Generic smart grid requirements - Part 1: Specific application of the use case methodology for defining generic smart grid requirements according to the IEC systems approach

IEC SRD 62913-2:2022 (E) describes a common approach for IEC technical committees to define generic smart grid requirements for further standardization work. It uses as input the use case methodology defined as part of the IEC 62559 series, and provides a more detailed methodology for describing use cases and extracting requirements from these use cases. This will achieve a consistent and homogeneous description of generic requirements for the different areas which make up the smart grid environment
This second edition cancels and replaces the first edition published in 2019. This edition constitutes a technical revision. This edition includes the following significant technical changes with respect to the previous edition:
• it consolidates requirements identification and management and their associated naming rules;
• it leverages IEC SRD 63200:2021, Definition of extended SGAM Smart Energy Grid Reference Architecture Model;
• it highlights links between use case methodology and other tools and methodologies (i.e. TOGAF/ArchiMate as used in IEC 61968-1:2020).

General Information

Status
Published
Publication Date
28-Aug-2022
Current Stage
PPUB - Publication issued
Completion Date
29-Aug-2022
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IEC SRD 62913-1
Edition 2.0 2022-08
SYSTEMS
REFERENCE DELIVERABLE
colour
inside
Generic smart grid requirements –
Part 1: Specific application of the use case methodology for defining generic
smart grid requirements according to the IEC systems approach
IEC SRD 62913-1:2022-08(en)
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
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IEC SRD 62913-1
Edition 2.0 2022-08
SYSTEMS
REFERENCE DELIVERABLE
colour
inside
Generic smart grid requirements –
Part 1: Specific application of the use case methodology for defining generic
smart grid requirements according to the IEC systems approach
INTERNATIONAL
ELECTROTECHNICAL
COMMISSION
ICS 29.020; 29.240 ISBN 978-2-8322-4434-0

Warning! Make sure that you obtained this publication from an authorized distributor.

® Registered trademark of the International Electrotechnical Commission
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
– 2 – IEC SRD 62913-1:2022 © IEC 2022
CONTENTS

FOREWORD ........................................................................................................................... 5

INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................................... 7

1 Scope .............................................................................................................................. 8

2 Normative references ...................................................................................................... 8

3 Terms, definitions and abbreviated terms ........................................................................ 8

3.1 Terms and definitions .............................................................................................. 8

3.2 Abbreviated terms ................................................................................................. 12

4 Systems approach ......................................................................................................... 13

4.1 A systems perspective .......................................................................................... 13

4.2 Applying the IEC systems approach to smart energy ............................................. 13

4.3 Main areas of work................................................................................................ 15

4.4 Breaking down the scope ...................................................................................... 16

4.5 Link with some existing conceptual models ........................................................... 16

5 Specific application of use case methodology for defining generic smart grid

requirements ................................................................................................................. 17

5.1 General ................................................................................................................. 17

5.2 Why the use case methodology is particularly adapted to smart grid ..................... 17

5.2.1 General ......................................................................................................... 17

5.2.2 Linking the use case methodology with existing frameworks .......................... 18

5.2.3 Notion of role ................................................................................................. 21

5.3 Applying the use case methodology to define generic smart grid

requirements ......................................................................................................... 22

5.3.1 A customer-centric and business-processes-driven approach ........................ 22

5.3.2 Generic smart grid requirements .................................................................... 26

5.4 Approach used to elaborate a consolidated smart grid role model ......................... 30

6 UML profile for modelling smart grid use cases .............................................................. 31

6.1 A formal approach of use cases modelling ............................................................ 31

6.1.1 General ......................................................................................................... 31

6.1.2 Key principles ................................................................................................ 31

6.2 UML-driven top-down approach methodology ........................................................ 32

6.2.1 Formalism and objectives .............................................................................. 32

6.2.2 Modelling language........................................................................................ 32

6.2.3 Scope and information type classification: diagrams and main elements ........ 33

6.2.4 Key benefits .................................................................................................. 34

6.2.5 Types of diagrams and views ......................................................................... 36

6.3 IEC use cases UML profile concepts ..................................................................... 38

7 UML modelling diagrams ............................................................................................... 40

Annex A (informative) Existing Actors Lists .......................................................................... 44

Annex B (informative) Content of the use case mapped on IEC 62559-2 template ............... 45

B.1 Description of the use case ................................................................................... 45

B.1.1 Name of use case .......................................................................................... 45

B.1.2 Version management ..................................................................................... 45

B.1.3 Scope and objectives of use case .................................................................. 45

B.1.4 Narrative of use case ..................................................................................... 45

B.1.5 Key performance indicators (KPI) .................................................................. 46

B.1.6 Use case conditions....................................................................................... 46

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IEC SRD 62913-1:2022 © IEC 2022 – 3 –

B.1.7 Further information to the use case for classification / mapping ..................... 46

B.1.8 General remarks ............................................................................................ 46

B.2 Diagrams of use case ........................................................................................... 46

B.3 Technical details ................................................................................................... 47

B.3.1 Actors ............................................................................................................ 47

B.3.2 References .................................................................................................... 47

B.4 Step by step analysis of use case ......................................................................... 47

B.4.1 Overview of scenarios ................................................................................... 47

B.4.2 Steps of scenarios ......................................................................................... 48

B.5 Information exchanged .......................................................................................... 48

B.6 Requirements (optional) ........................................................................................ 48

B.7 Common terms and definitions .............................................................................. 48

B.8 Custom information (optional) ............................................................................... 49

B.9 IEC 62559-2 UML Modelling ................................................................................. 49

Annex C (informative) Example of telecommunications related non-functional

requirements ......................................................................................................................... 51

Annex D (informative) Existing Smart Grid Conceptual Models ............................................ 52

Bibliography .......................................................................................................................... 54

Figure 1 – The GridWise Architecture Council's model (NIST, 2012) ..................................... 18

Figure 2 – Simplification of the GWAC model (CEN-CENELEC-ETSI, 2014) ......................... 19

Figure 3 – Smart grid plane domains and hierarchical zones ................................................. 19

Figure 4 – The Smart Grid Architecture Model (CEN-CENELEC-ETSI, 2014) ........................ 20

Figure 5 – Interactions between the use case methodology and the Smart Grid

Architecture Model (based on CEN-CENELEC-ETSI, 2014) .................................................. 21

Figure 6 – Defining smart grid requirements methodology ..................................................... 23

Figure 7 – Point of view of a domain role .............................................................................. 24

Figure 8 – The first two levels of detail used to capture generic smart grid

requirements ......................................................................................................................... 25

Figure 9 – The three levels of detail used to capture generic smart grid requirements ........... 26

Figure 10 – Generic smart grid functional requirements and non-functional

requirements captured in use cases ...................................................................................... 28

Figure 11 – Example of representation of a domain's role model ........................................... 30

Figure 12 – Example of representation of relations between roles ......................................... 31

Figure 13 – Four-layer model architecture ............................................................................. 33

Figure 14 – UML use case profile for the IEC SRD 62913 series aligned with the

IEC 62559 series .................................................................................................................. 36

Figure 15 – Use case overview diagram ................................................................................ 37

Figure 16 – Domain overview diagram .................................................................................. 37

Figure 17 – BUC-SUC relations diagram ............................................................................... 38

Figure 18 – Mapping between use case concepts and architecture concepts ........................ 40

Figure 19 – Domain overview concepts UML model .............................................................. 41

Figure 20 – Use case overview concepts UML model ............................................................ 41

Figure 21 – Scenario overview concepts UML model ............................................................ 42

Figure 22 – Activity overview concepts UML model ............................................................... 43

Figure 23 – Requirement overview concepts UML model ...................................................... 43

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– 4 – IEC SRD 62913-1:2022 © IEC 2022

Figure C.1 – Use case mapping to IEC 62559-2 .................................................................... 49

Figure C.2 – Use case mapping to IEC 62559-2 – Scenario and activities ............................. 50

Figure D.1 – NIST/SGIP Smart Grid Conceptual Model ......................................................... 52

Figure D.2 – M490 domains .................................................................................................. 53

Table 1 – Differences between business use cases and system use cases ........................... 12

Table 2 – Links between SGAM and IEC SRD 62913 series domains.................................... 17

Table 3 – Use cases concepts .............................................................................................. 39

Table C.1 – Example of telecommunications related non-functional requirements ................. 51

Table D.1 – NIST/SGIP domains ........................................................................................... 52

Table D.2 – SGAM domains .................................................................................................. 53

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IEC SRD 62913-1:2022 © IEC 2022 – 5 –
INTERNATIONAL ELECTROTECHNICAL COMMISSION
____________
GENERIC SMART GRID REQUIREMENTS –
Part 1: Specific application of the use case methodology for defining
generic smart grid requirements according to the IEC systems approach
FOREWORD

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IEC SRD 62913-1, which is a Systems Reference Deliverable, has been prepared by
IEC systems committee Smart Energy.

This second edition cancels and replaces the first edition published in 2019. This edition

constitutes a technical revision.

This edition includes the following significant technical changes with respect to the previous

edition:

• it consolidates requirements identification and management and their associated naming

rules;
• it leverages IEC SRD 63200:2021, Definition of extended SGAM Smart Energy Grid
Reference Architecture Model;

• it highlights links between use case methodology and other tools and methodologies (i.e.

TOGAF/ArchiMate as used in IEC 61968-1:2020).
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
– 6 – IEC SRD 62913-1:2022 © IEC 2022

The text of this Systems Reference Deliverable is based on the following documents:

Draft Report on voting
SyCSmartEnergy /169/DTS SyCSmartEnergy /204/RVDTS

Full information on the voting for its approval can be found in the report on voting indicated in

the above table.

The language used for the development of this Systems Reference Deliverable is English.

This document was drafted in accordance with ISO/IEC Directives, Part 2, and developed in

accordance with ISO/IEC Directives, Part 1 and ISO/IEC Directives, IEC Supplement, available

at www.iec.ch/members_experts/refdocs. The main document types developed by IEC are

described in greater detail at www.iec.ch/standardsdev/publications.

A list of all parts in the IEC SRD 62913 series, published under the general title Generic smart

grid requirements, can be found on the IEC website.

The committee has decided that the contents of this document will remain unchanged until the

stability date indicated on the IEC website under webstore.iec.ch in the data related to the

specific document. At this date, the document will be
• reconfirmed,
• withdrawn,
• replaced by a revised edition, or
• amended.

IMPORTANT – The 'colour inside' logo on the cover page of this publication indicates that it

contains colours which are considered to be useful for the correct understanding of its

contents. Users should therefore print this document using a colour printer.
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
IEC SRD 62913-1:2022 © IEC 2022 – 7 –
INTRODUCTION

IEC SRD 62913 generic smart grid requirements are needed to fulfil the SG3 decision 2 made

by the SMB at its February 2010 meeting (SMB/4204/DL, Decision 137/10) requesting the need

to describe all the functional and system requirements for all smart grid applications.

The IEC Smart Grid Standardization Roadmap states that "the standardization process should

offer a formal path between the application as 'requested' by smart grid (stakeholders) and the

standards themselves, i.e. a 'top-down' process", whilst at the same time recognizing that for

various reasons in many cases this path has not been the one implemented. This has in turn

led to inconsistencies in standards.

The purpose of the IEC systems approach is to ensure and improve the interoperability between

smart energy systems and components. This approach is based on the business needs

expressed by the market. The main purpose of capturing and sharing generic smart grid

requirements is the constitution of a basis for coming standardization work, with standards

ensuring and facilitating the deployment of smart grid applications.

A working group has been set up within IEC SyC Smart Energy in order to capture the smart

grid requirements derived from the market needs, using a standardized approach based on use

cases as described in the IEC 62559 series. This work is building on existing use cases, namely

within the IEC when they exist, and is carried out collaboratively with the experts of the relevant

technical committees.

The IEC SRD 62913 series will deliver an applicable methodology to draft use cases

(IEC SRD 62913-1), clarifying 'who does what' with regards to smart energy use cases, and it

will also initiate the process of listing, organizing and making available the use cases which

carry the smart energy requirements which should be addressed by the IEC core technical

standards (IEC SRD 62913-2 series). The IEC systems approach will require adapted tools and

processes to facilitate its implementation, and until they are available to the IEC National

Committees and experts, the IEC SRD 62913-2 series should be understood as the first

stepping stone towards this systems approach implementation. IEC SRD 62913-3 will be a roles

database, based on a harmonized naming methodology, to ensure consistency when drafting

smart energy use cases. This will provide a consistent and ready-to-use framework for all

standardization stakeholders.

Use cases in the top-down approach of IEC SyC Smart Energy (C/1845/RV) are tools to identify

smart grid requirements used to assess situations in standards (gaps or overlaps) and in that

way contribute to interoperability. These requirements can also be used further as input for

interoperability profiles for the testing phase.

These requirements should then feed into the work carried out by IEC SyC Smart Energy with

other technical committees in order to ensure the technical standards are developed taking into

account the needs and priorities of the smart grid market.

This document corresponds to the specific application of the use case methodology for defining

generic smart grid requirements according to the IEC systems approach.
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
– 8 – IEC SRD 62913-1:2022 © IEC 2022
GENERIC SMART GRID REQUIREMENTS –
Part 1: Specific application of the use case methodology for defining
generic smart grid requirements according to the IEC systems approach
1 Scope

This part of IEC SRD 62913 describes a common approach for IEC technical committees to

define generic smart grid requirements for further standardization work. It uses as input the use

case methodology defined as part of the IEC 62559 series, and provides a more detailed

methodology for describing use cases and extracting requirements from these use cases. This

will achieve a consistent and homogeneous description of generic requirements for the different

areas which make up the smart grid environment.
2 Normative references
There are no normative references in this document.
3 Terms, definitions and abbreviated terms
3.1 Terms and definitions
For the purposes of this document, the following terms and definitions apply.

ISO and IEC maintain terminological databases for use in standardization at the following

addresses:
• IEC Electropedia: available at http://www.electropedia.org/
• ISO Online browsing platform: available at http://www.iso.org/obp
3.1.1
activity
part of a scenario that can be executed by one or more roles

Note 1 to entry: The details of an activity are described through actions. However, if it is necessary, intermediate

levels can be created where activities describe an activity.
3.1.2
actor
entity that communicates and interacts

Note 1 to entry: These actors can include people, software applications, systems, databases, and even the power

system itself.

Note 2 to entry: In IEC SRD 62913 this term includes the concepts of business role and system role involved in use

cases.
[SOURCE: IEC 62559-2:2015, 3.2]
3.1.3
business case

explanation or set of reasons describing how a business decision will improve a business,

product, etc. and how it will affect costs and profits and attract investments

Note 1 to entry: Equivalent to strategic goals and principles which drive business processes.

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IEC SRD 62913-1:2022 © IEC 2022 – 9 –
3.1.4
business process

chain of logical connected, repetitive activities that utilizes the enterprise's resources to refine

an object (physical or mental) for the purpose of achieving specified and measurable

results/products for internal or external customers

Note 1 to entry: In the context of IEC SRD 62913, the business processes describe the sequenced interactions

between several roles of a system.

Note 2 to entry: Business processes can be described or modelled as business use cases.

[SOURCE: Ericsson Quality Institute (1993): Business Process Management, Gothenburg,

Sweden]
3.1.5
business role
role describing a finite set of responsibilities that is assumed by a party

Note 1 to entry: Organizations, organizational entities and physical persons are examples of business roles.

3.1.6
cluster
group of items organized by criteria
3.1.7
consumer
end user of electricity
Note 1 to entry: Consumers never generate or store the use of electricity.
3.1.8
demand response

action resulting from management of the electricity demand in response to supply conditions

[SOURCE: IEC 60050-617:2018, 617-04-16]
3.1.9
domain
group of related subjects of standardization

[SOURCE: IEC 60050-901:2013, 901-01-03, modified – The term "field of standardization" has

been replaced by "domain".]
3.1.10
functional requirement
requirement that describes what the system must do

Note 1 to entry: They are actions in response to events, or actions performed autonomously. They represent

operations and features provided.
[SOURCE: IEC 62559-2:2015, 7.2.6.2]
3.1.11
level of maturity

one of a set of structured levels that describe how well a process, or use case, is implemented

through an organization and relates to its degree of formality, optimization and reliability

Note 1 to entry: Proposed levels of maturity:
---------------------- Page: 11 ----------------------
– 10 – IEC SRD 62913-1:2022 © IEC 2022

– Level "Already implemented": the process is implemented in and between several organizations, it is well defined,

reliable, sustainable and few uncertainties remain in its framework (regulatory, business or technological).

– Level "Adjustments in progress": the process is implemented in a few organizations, it is well defined but subject

to remaining major uncertainties in its framework (regulatory, business or technological).

– Level "Explorative": the process is tested in very few organizations, it is not completely defined and subject to

numerous major uncertainties in its framework (regulatory, business or technological).

3.1.12
non-functional requirement
NFR

requirement that describes what qualities the system must contain from an execution and

performance perspective

Note 1 to entry: These are also known as "constraints", "behaviour", "criteria", "performance targets", etc. They set

limits or controls on how well the system performs the functional requirements.

Note 2 to entry: Non-functional requirements include: reliability, security, usability, upgradeability, expandability,

scalability, compatibility, safety, performance, and conformance.
[SOURCE: IEC 62559-2:2015, 7.2.6.2]
3.1.13
prosumer

end user of electricity who may also generate, store and manage the use of electricity

Note 1 to entry: Traditionally, three prosumer types ar
...

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