Measurement of radioactivity in the environment — Soil — Part 1: General guidelines and definitions

This document specifies the general requirements to carry out radionuclides tests, including sampling of soil including rock from bedrock and ore as well as of construction materials and products, pottery, etc. using NORM or those from technological processes involving Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (TENORM) e.g. the mining and processing of mineral sands or phosphate fertilizer production and use. For simplification, the term "soil" used in this document covers the set of elements mentioned above. This document is addressed to people responsible for determining the radioactivity present in soils for the purpose of radiation protection. This concerns soils from gardens and farmland, urban or industrial sites, as well as soil not affected by human activities. This document is applicable to all laboratories regardless of the number of personnel or the extent of the scope of testing activities. When a laboratory does not undertake one or more of the activities covered by this document, such as planning, sampling or testing, the requirements of those clauses do not apply. This document is to be used in conjunction with other parts of ISO 18589 that outline the setting up of programmes and sampling techniques, methods of general processing of samples in the laboratory and also methods for measuring the radioactivity in soil. Its purpose is the following: — define the main terms relating to soils, sampling, radioactivity and its measurement; — describe the origins of the radioactivity in soils; — define the main objectives of the study of radioactivity in soil samples; — present the principles of studies of soil radioactivity; — identify the analytical and procedural requirements when measuring radioactivity in soil. This document is applicable if radionuclide measurements for the purpose of radiation protection are to be made in the following cases: — initial characterization of radioactivity in the environment; — routine surveillance of the impact of nuclear installations or of the evolution of the general territory; — investigations of accident and incident situations; — planning and surveillance of remedial action; — decommissioning of installations or clearance of materials.

Mesurage de la radioactivité dans l'environnement — Sol — Partie 1: Lignes directrices générales et définitions

Le présent document spécifie les exigences générales qui s'appliquent à la réalisation des essais pour des radionucléides, incluant l'échantillonnage du sol, comprenant les roches provenant du socle rocheux et le minerai, ainsi que de matériaux et produits de construction, de poteries, etc. utilisant des MRN ou résultant de procédés technologiques impliquant des matières radioactives naturelles améliorées technologiquement (MRNAT), par exemple l'exploitation minière et le traitement des sables minéraux ou la production et l'utilisation d'engrais phosphatés. Pour plus de commodité, le terme «sol» utilisé dans le présent document couvre l'ensemble des éléments susmentionnés. Le présent document s'adresse aux personnes chargées de déterminer la radioactivité présente dans les sols dans le cadre de la radioprotection. Cela concerne les sols de jardins ou de terres agricoles, les sols de sites urbains ou industriels, ainsi que les sols qui ne font pas l'objet d'activités humaines. Le présent document est applicable à tous les laboratoires, quel que soit l'effectif du personnel ou l'étendue des activités d'essai. Lorsqu'un laboratoire ne réalise pas une ou plusieurs des activités couvertes par le présent document, comme la planification, l'échantillonnage ou les essais, les exigences correspondantes ne s'appliquent pas. Le présent document est destiné à être utilisé conjointement à d'autres parties de l'ISO 18589 qui traitent de l'établissement des programmes et des techniques d'échantillonnage, de méthodes de traitement général des échantillons en laboratoire, ainsi que des méthodes de mesure de la radioactivité contenue dans le sol. Il a pour objet de: — définir les principaux termes relatifs aux sols, à l'échantillonnage, à la radioactivité et à son mesurage; — présenter les origines de la radioactivité contenue dans les sols; — décrire quelques-uns des principaux objectifs poursuivis par les études de la radioactivité dans les prélèvements de sol; — présenter les principes des études sur la radioactivité des sols; — identifier les exigences en matière d'analyse et de mode opératoire lors du mesurage de la radioactivité contenue dans le sol. Le présent document est applicable lorsque des mesurages de radionucléides doivent être effectués dans le cadre de la radioprotection dans les cas suivants: — caractérisation initiale de la radioactivité dans l'environnement; — surveillance de routine de l'impact des installations nucléaires ou de l'évolution du territoire dans son ensemble; — recherches de situations d'accident ou d'incident; — planification et surveillance des actions de remédiation; — déclassement d'installations ou mise au rebut des matériaux.

General Information

Status
Published
Publication Date
17-Nov-2019
Current Stage
6060 - International Standard published
Start Date
18-Nov-2019
Completion Date
18-Nov-2019
Ref Project

RELATIONS

Buy Standard

Standard
ISO 18589-1:2019 - Measurement of radioactivity in the environment -- Soil
English language
14 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview
Standard
ISO 18589-1:2019 - Mesurage de la radioactivité dans l'environnement -- Sol
French language
16 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview

Standards Content (sample)

INTERNATIONAL ISO
STANDARD 18589-1
Second edition
2019-11
Measurement of radioactivity in the
environment — Soil —
Part 1:
General guidelines and definitions
Mesurage de la radioactivité dans l'environnement — Sol —
Partie 1: Lignes directrices générales et définitions
Reference number
ISO 18589-1:2019(E)
ISO 2019
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO 18589-1:2019(E)
COPYRIGHT PROTECTED DOCUMENT
© ISO 2019

All rights reserved. Unless otherwise specified, or required in the context of its implementation, no part of this publication may

be reproduced or utilized otherwise in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, or posting

on the internet or an intranet, without prior written permission. Permission can be requested from either ISO at the address

below or ISO’s member body in the country of the requester.
ISO copyright office
CP 401 • Ch. de Blandonnet 8
CH-1214 Vernier, Geneva
Phone: +41 22 749 01 11
Fax: +41 22 749 09 47
Email: copyright@iso.org
Website: www.iso.org
Published in Switzerland
ii © ISO 2019 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO 18589-1:2019(E)
Contents Page

Foreword ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................iv

Introduction ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................v

1 Scope ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 1

2 Normative references ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3 Terms and definitions ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 2

3.1 General terms ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 2

3.2 Terms relating to soils ...................................................................................................................................................................... 2

3.3 Terms relating to sampling ........................................................................................................................................................... 3

4 Symbols .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 5

5 Origins of the radioactivity in soils ................................................................................................................................................... 5

5.1 Natural radioactivity .......................................................................................................................................................................... 5

5.2 Other sources of radioactivity in soils ................................................................................................................................ 6

6 Objectives of the study of soil radioactivity .............................................................................................................................. 6

6.1 General ........................................................................................................................................................................................................... 6

6.2 Characterization of radioactivity in the environment ........................................................................................... 6

6.3 Routine surveillance of the impact of nuclear installations or of the evolution of

the general territory ........................................................................................................................................................................... 7

6.4 Investigations of accident and incident situations ................................................................................................... 7

6.5 Planning and surveillance of remedial action .............................................................................................................. 7

6.6 Decommissioning of installations or clearance of materials .......................................................................... 7

7 Principles and requirements of the study of soil radioactivity ........................................................................... 8

7.1 General ........................................................................................................................................................................................................... 8

7.2 Planning process — Sampling strategy and plan ...................................................................................................... 9

7.3 Sampling process .................................................................................................................................................................................. 9

7.4 Laboratory process ..........................................................................................................................................................................10

7.4.1 Preparation of samples ...........................................................................................................................................10

7.4.2 Radioactivity measurements ..............................................................................................................................10

7.5 General procedural requirements .......................................................................................................................................11

7.6 Documentation ....................................................................................................................................................................................12

Bibliography .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................13

© ISO 2019 – All rights reserved iii
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO 18589-1:2019(E)
Foreword

ISO (the International Organization for Standardization) is a worldwide federation of national standards

bodies (ISO member bodies). The work of preparing International Standards is normally carried out

through ISO technical committees. Each member body interested in a subject for which a technical

committee has been established has the right to be represented on that committee. International

organizations, governmental and non-governmental, in liaison with ISO, also take part in the work.

ISO collaborates closely with the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) on all matters of

electrotechnical standardization.

The procedures used to develop this document and those intended for its further maintenance are

described in the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 1. In particular, the different approval criteria needed for the

different types of ISO documents should be noted. This document was drafted in accordance with the

editorial rules of the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 2 (see www .iso .org/ directives).

Attention is drawn to the possibility that some of the elements of this document may be the subject of

patent rights. ISO shall not be held responsible for identifying any or all such patent rights. Details of

any patent rights identified during the development of the document will be in the Introduction and/or

on the ISO list of patent declarations received (see www .iso .org/ patents).

Any trade name used in this document is information given for the convenience of users and does not

constitute an endorsement.

For an explanation of the voluntary nature of standards, the meaning of ISO specific terms and

expressions related to conformity assessment, as well as information about ISO's adherence to the

World Trade Organization (WTO) principles in the Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT) see www .iso .org/

iso/ foreword .html.

This document was prepared by Technical Committee ISO/TC 85, Nuclear energy, nuclear technologies

and radiological protection, Subcommittee SC 2, Radiological protection.

This second edition cancels and replaces the first edition (ISO 18589-1:2005), which has been

technically revised.
The main change compared to the previous edition is as follows:

— The introduction has been reviewed accordingly to the generic introduction adopted for the

standards published on the radioactivity measurement in the environment.
A list of all parts in the ISO 18589 series can be found on the ISO website.

Any feedback or questions on this document should be directed to the user’s national standards body. A

complete listing of these bodies can be found at www .iso .org/ members .html
iv © ISO 2019 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
ISO 18589-1:2019(E)
Introduction

Everyone is exposed to natural radiation. The natural sources of radiation are cosmic rays and

naturally occurring radioactive substances which exist in the earth and flora and fauna, including the

human body. Human activities involving the use of radiation and radioactive substances add to the

radiation exposure from this natural exposure. Some of those activities, such as the mining and use

of ores containing naturally-occurring radioactive materials (NORM) and the production of energy

by burning coal that contains such substances, simply enhance the exposure from natural radiation

sources. Nuclear power plants and other nuclear installations use radioactive materials and produce

radioactive effluent and waste during operation and decommissioning. The use of radioactive materials

in industry, agriculture and research is expanding around the globe.

All these human activities give rise to radiation exposures that are only a small fraction of the global

average level of natural exposure. The medical use of radiation is the largest and a growing man-made

source of radiation exposure in developed countries. It includes diagnostic radiology, radiotherapy,

nuclear medicine and interventional radiology.

Radiation exposure also occurs as a result of occupational activities. It is incurred by workers in

industry, medicine and research using radiation or radioactive substances, as well as by passengers

and crew during air travel. The average level of occupational exposures is generally below the global

average level of natural radiation exposure (see Reference [1]).

As uses of radiation increase, so do the potential health risk and the public's concerns. Thus, all these

exposures are regularly assessed in order to:

— improve the understanding of global levels and temporal trends of public and worker exposure;

— evaluate the components of exposure so as to provide a measure of their relative importance;

— identify emerging issues that may warrant more attention and study. While doses to workers are

mostly directly measured, doses to the public are usually assessed by indirect methods using the

results of radioactivity measurements of waste, effluent and/or environmental samples.

To ensure that the data obtained from radioactivity monitoring programs support their intended use, it

is essential that the stakeholders (for example nuclear site operators, regulatory and local authorities)

agree on appropriate methods and procedures for obtaining representative samples and for handling,

storing, preparing and measuring the test samples. An assessment of the overall measurement

uncertainty also needs to be carried out systematically. As reliable, comparable and ‘fit for purpose’

data are an essential requirement for any public health decision based on radioactivity measurements,

international standards of tested and validated radionuclide test methods are an important tool for

the production of such measurement results. The application of standards serves also to guarantee

comparability of the test results over time and between different testing laboratories. Laboratories

apply them to demonstrate their technical competences and to complete proficiency tests successfully

during interlaboratory comparisons, two prerequisites for obtaining national accreditation.

Today, over a hundred International Standards are available to testing laboratories for measuring

radionuclides in different matrices.

Generic standards help testing laboratories to manage the measurement process by setting out the

general requirements and methods to calibrate equipment and validate techniques. These standards

underpin specific standards which describe the test methods to be performed by staff, for example, for

different types of sample. The specific standards cover test methods for:
40 3 14

— naturally-occurring radionuclides (including K, H, C and those originating from the thorium

226 228 234 238 210

and uranium decay series, in particular Ra, Ra, U, U and Pb) which can be found in

materials from natural sources or can be released from technological processes involving naturally

occurring radioactive materials (e.g. the mining and processing of mineral sands or phosphate

fertilizer production and use);
© ISO 2019 – All rights reserved v
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
ISO 18589-1:2019(E)

— human-made radionuclides, such as transuranium elements (americium, plutonium, neptunium,

3 14 90

and curium), H, C, Sr and gamma-ray emitting radionuclides found in waste, liquid and gaseous

effluent, in environmental matrices (water, air, soil and biota), in food and in animal feed as a result

of authorized releases into the environment, fallout from the explosion in the atmosphere of nuclear

devices and fallout from accidents, such as those that occurred in Chernobyl and Fukushima.

The fraction of the background dose rate to man from environmental radiation, mainly gamma

radiation, is very variable and depends on factors such as the radioactivity of the local rock and soil, the

nature of building materials and the construction of buildings in which people live and work.

A reliable determination of the activity concentration of gamma-ray emitting radionuclides in various

matrices is necessary to assess the potential human exposure, to verify compliance with radiation

protection and environmental protection regulations or to provide guidance on reducing health risks.

Gamma-ray emitting radionuclides are also used as tracers in biology, medicine, physics, chemistry, and

engineering. Accurate measurement of the activities of the radionuclides is also needed for homeland

security and in connection with the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT).

This document is to be used in the context of a quality assurance management system (ISO/IEC 17025).

ISO 18589 is published in several parts for use jointly or separately according to needs. These parts

are complementary and are addressed to those responsible for determining the radioactivity present

in soil, bedrocks and ore (NORM or TENORM). The first two parts are general in nature describe the

setting up of programmes and sampling techniques, methods of general processing of samples in the

laboratory (ISO 18589-1), the sampling strategy and the soil sampling technique, soil sample handling

and preparation (ISO 18589-2). ISO 18589-3, ISO 18589-4 and ISO 18589-5 deal with nuclide-specific

test methods to quantify the activity concentration of gamma emitters radionuclides (ISO 18589-3 and

ISO 20042), plutonium isotopes (ISO 18589-4) and Sr (ISO 18589-5) of soil samples. ISO 18589-6

deals with non-specific measurements to quantify rapidly gross alpha or gross beta activities and

ISO 18589-7 describes in situ measurement of gamma-emitting radionuclides.

The test methods described in ISO 18589-3 to ISO 18589-6 can also be used to measure the radionuclides

[2][3[[4][5]

in sludge, sediment, construction material and products following proper sampling procedure

[22][23]

This document is one of a set of International Standards on measurement of radioactivity in the

environment.
vi © ISO 2019 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
INTERNATIONAL STANDARD ISO 18589-1:2019(E)
Measurement of radioactivity in the environment — Soil —
Part 1:
General guidelines and definitions
1 Scope

This document specifies the general requirements to carry out radionuclides tests, including sampling

of soil including rock from bedrock and ore as well as of construction materials and products, pottery,

etc. using NORM or those from technological processes involving Technologically Enhanced Naturally

Occurring Radioactive Materials (TENORM) e.g. the mining and processing of mineral sands or

phosphate fertilizer production and use.

For simplification, the term “soil” used in this document covers the set of elements mentioned above.

This document is addressed to people responsible for determining the radioactivity present in soils for

the purpose of radiation protection. This concerns soils from gardens and farmland, urban or industrial

sites, as well as soil not affected by human activities.

This document is applicable to all laboratories regardless of the number of personnel or the extent of the

scope of testing activities. When a laboratory does not undertake one or more of the activities covered

by this document, such as planning, sampling or testing, the requirements of those clauses do not apply.

This document is to be used in conjunction with other parts of ISO 18589 that outline the setting up of

programmes and sampling techniques, methods of general processing of samples in the laboratory and

also methods for measuring the radioactivity in soil. Its purpose is the following:

— define the main terms relating to soils, sampling, radioactivity and its measurement;

— describe the origins of the radioactivity in soils;
— define the main objectives of the study of radioactivity in soil samples;
— present the principles of studies of soil radioactivity;

— identify the analytical and procedural requirements when measuring radioactivity in soil.

This document is applicable if radionuclide measurements for the purpose of radiation protection are

to be made in the following cases:
— initial characterization of radioactivity in the environment;

— routine surveillance of the impact of nuclear installations or of the evolution of the general territory;

— investigations of accident and incident situations;
— planning and surveillance of remedial action;
— decommissioning of installations or clearance of materials.
2 Normative references

The following documents are referred to in the text in such a way that some or all of their content

constitutes requirements of this document. For dated references, only the edition cited applies. For

undated references, the latest edition of the referenced document (including any amendments) applies.

© ISO 2019 – All rights reserved 1
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
ISO 18589-1:2019(E)
ISO 11074, Soil quality — Vocabulary

ISO 11929 (all parts), Determination of the characteristic limits (decision threshold, detection limit and

limits of the coverage interval) for measurements of ionizing radiation — Fundamentals and application

ISO/IEC 17025, General requirements for the competence of testing and calibration laboratories

ISO 18589-2, Measurement of radioactivity in the environment — Soil — Part 2: Guidance for the selection

of the sampling strategy, sampling and pre-treatment of samples

ISO/IEC Guide 98-3, Uncertainty of measurement — Part 3: Guide to the expression of uncertainty in

me a s ur ement (GUM: 1995)
3 Terms and definitions

For the purposes of this document, the terms and definitions given in ISO 11074 and the following apply.

ISO and IEC maintain terminological databases for use in standardization at the following addresses:

— ISO Online browsing platform: available at https:// www .iso .org/ obp
— IEC Electropedia: available at http:// www .electropedia .org/
3.1 General terms
3.1.1
routine surveillance

surveillance carried out periodically and designed to observe the potential changes of the soil’s

radioactive characteristics
3.1.2
analysis for characterization

set of observations that contribute, at a given time, to the characterization of the radioactive properties

of a soil sample with a view to use them later as reference data

Note 1 to entry: The test report may include other data characterizing the site studied.

3.1.3
vertical distribution of the radioactivity

determination of the radioactivity in the layers of the earth’s crust sampled at different depths which

describe the vertical profile of the distribution by a radionuclide or a group of radionuclides

3.2 Terms relating to soils
3.2.1
soil

upper layer of the Earth’s crust transformed by weathering and physical/chemical and biological

processes and composed of mineral particles, organic matter, water, air, and living organisms organized

in generic soil horizons

Note 1 to entry: In a broader civil engineering sense, soil includes topsoil and sub-soil; deposits such as clays,

silts, sands, gravels, cobbles, boulders, and organic matter and deposits such as peat; materials of human origin

such as wastes; ground gas and moisture; and living organisms.

Note 2 to entry: Mineral materials include earth, sands, clay, slates, stones, etc. that can also be used as

construction materials and included in construction products.
[SOURCE: ISO 11074:2015, 2.1.11]
2 © ISO 2019 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO 18589-1:2019(E)
3.2.2
herbaceous cover

lower stratum of vegetation made up essentially of various herbaceous species found for example in

meadows, lawns or fallow fields
3.2.3
soil horizon

basic layer of soil, which is more or less parallel to the surface and is homogeneous in appearance for

most morphological characteristics (colour, texture, structure, etc.)

Note 1 to entry: The succession of soil horizons makes up a soil profile and allows, on the basis of certain

analytical criteria, the morphogenetic nature of the soil to be defined.
3.3 Terms relating to sampling
3.3.1
sample

portion of material selected from a larger quantity of material, collected and taken away for testing

[SOURCE: ISO 11074:2015, 4.1.17, modified — The word "soil" was removed and the last part of the

definition was added.]
3.3.2
sampling
defined procedure whereby a part of the soil is taken for testing

Note 1 to entry: In certain cases, the sample might not be representative but is determined by availability.

Note 2 to entry: Sampling procedures describe all the processes necessary to provide the laboratory with

the samples required to reach the objectives of the study of the soil radioactivity. This includes the selection,

sampling plan, withdrawal and preparation of the samples from the soil.
3.3.3
sampling strategy

set of technical principles that aim to resolve, depending on the objectives and site considered, the two

main issues which are the sampling density and the spatial distribution of the sampling areas

Note 1 to entry: The sampling strategy provides the set of technical options that are required in the sampling plan.

3.3.4
sampling area
area from which the different samples are collected
Note 1 to entry: A site can be divided into several sampling areas.
3.3.5
sampling plan

precise protocol that, depending on the application of the principles of the strategy adopted, defines

the spatial and temporal dimensions of sampling, the frequency, the sample number, the quantities

sampled, etc., and the human resources to be used for the sampling operation
3.3.6
random sampling
sampling at random in space and time from the sampling area
3.3.7
systematic sampling
sampling by some systematic method in space and time from the sampling area
3.3.8
random systematic sampling

sampling at random from each sampling unit from a set of systematically defined sampling units

© ISO 2019 – All rights reserved 3
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
ISO 18589-1:2019(E)
3.3.9
sampling unit
section of the sampling area whose limits can be physical or hypothetical

Note 1 to entry: Sampling units are obtained by dividing the sampling area into grid box units according to the

sampling pattern.
3.3.10
sampling pattern
system of sampling locations based on the results of statistical procedures

Note 1 to entry: This leads to a set of predetermined sampling points designed to monitor one or more specified

sites. The sampling area is divided into several sampling units or basic grid box units, which are usually square

or rectangular (but circular or linear grid boxes are not excluded depending upon the characteristics of the

pollution source).
3.3.11
increment

individual portion of material collected by a single operation of a sampling device

[SOURCE: ISO 11074:2015, 4.1.8]
Note 1 to entry: Increments can be grouped to form a composite sample.
3.3.12
sub-sample

sample in which the material of interest is randomly distributed in parts of equal or unequal size

3.3.13
single sample

representative quantity of the material, presumed to be homogeneous, taken from a sampling unit, kept

and treated separately from the other samples
3.3.14
composite sample

two or more increments mixed together in appropriate proportions, either discretely or continuously

(blended composite sample), from which the average value representative of a desired characteristic

can be obtained

[SOURCE: ISO 11074:2015, 4.3.3 modified — the word "subsamples" was removed, "average result"

replaced by "average value representative".]
3.3.15
sorted sample

single sample or composite sample taken from the same sampling unit, obtained after the elimination

of coarse elements that are larger than 2 cm and before drying
3.3.16
laboratory sample
sorted sample intended for laboratory inspection or testing

Note 1 to entry: When the laboratory sample is further prepared (reduced) by subdividing, mixing, grinding

or combinations of these operations, the result is the test sample. When no preparation is required, the initial

laboratory sample is considered as the test sample. Depending on the number of analyses to be performed, test

portions are isolated from the test sample for analysis

Note 2 to entry: The laboratory sample is the final sample from the point of view of the sample collection step, but

it is the initial sample from the point of view of the test step.
[SOURCE: ISO 11074:2015, 4.3.7, modified — Notes have been modified.]
4 © ISO 2019 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 10 ----------------------
ISO 18589-1:2019(E)
3.3.17
test sample
sample treated prepared for testing

Note 1 to entry: The test sample is prepared from the laboratory sample. It is a fine dry homogeneous soil in a

powder state. It is prepared in accordance with ISO 18589-2 depending of the test method used.

3.3.18
test portion
part of the test sample prepared for specific testing
4 Symbols
Table 1 — Definitions and symbols
Common
Quantity Unit Definition
notation
becquerel
Activity A number of decays per second of a radionuclide
becquerel per
Activity concentra-
kilogram
A radionuclide activity per unit dry mass of material
tion
Bq·kg
becquerel per
radionuclide activity per unit area used to characterize
Activity per unit
square metre
A the activity at the soil surface, at a depth or integrated
area
−2 activity over a soil column
Bq·m
number of α decays per second of a mixture of radionu-
becquerel
clides determined by non-nuclide-specific measurement
Gross α activity A′(α)
techniques whose efficiency is calibrated using a specific
239 241
radionuclide such as Pu, Am, …
number of β decays per second of a mixture of radionu-
becquerel
clides determined by non-nuclide-specific measurement
Gross β activity A′(β)
techniques whose efficiency is calibrated using a specific
36 40 90 90
radionuclide such as Cl, K, Sr+ Y, …
5 Origins of the radioactivity in soils
5.1 Natural radioactivity

Soils are naturally radioactive, primarily because of their mineral content. The main natural

40 238

radionuclides are potassium 40 ( K) and the radioactive nuclides of the uranium 238 ( U) and

232

thorium 232 ( Th) decay series. The natural radioactivity may vary considerably from one type of

soil to another. Table 2 gives the order of magnitude of the activity concentrations of these elements in

[24]
soils of some large regions of the world .
© ISO 2019 – All rights reserved 5
---------------------- Page: 11 ----------------------
ISO 18589-1:2019(E)
[24]
Table 2 — Activity concentrations of natural radionuclides in soils
Activity concentration
Bq·kg
Region/Country
40 238 232
K U Th
Mean Range Mean Range Mean Range
North America (USA) 370 100 to 700 35 4 to 140 35 4 to 130
South America (Argentina) 650 540 to 750 — — — —
East Asia (China R.P.) 440 9 to 1 800 33 2 to 690 41 1 to 360
West Asia (Armenia) 360 310 to 420 46 20 to 78 30 29 to 60
North Europe (Lithuania) 600 350 to 850 16 3 t
...

NORME ISO
INTERNATIONALE 18589-1
Deuxième édition
2019-11
Mesurage de la radioactivité dans
l'environnement — Sol —
Partie 1:
Lignes directrices générales et
définitions
Measurement of radioactivity in the environment — Soil —
Part 1: General guidelines and definitions
Numéro de référence
ISO 18589-1:2019(F)
ISO 2019
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO 18589-1:2019(F)
DOCUMENT PROTÉGÉ PAR COPYRIGHT
© ISO 2019

Tous droits réservés. Sauf prescription différente ou nécessité dans le contexte de sa mise en œuvre, aucune partie de cette

publication ne peut être reproduite ni utilisée sous quelque forme que ce soit et par aucun procédé, électronique ou mécanique,

y compris la photocopie, ou la diffusion sur l’internet ou sur un intranet, sans autorisation écrite préalable. Une autorisation peut

être demandée à l’ISO à l’adresse ci-après ou au comité membre de l’ISO dans le pays du demandeur.

ISO copyright office
Case postale 401 • Ch. de Blandonnet 8
CH-1214 Vernier, Genève
Tél.: +41 22 749 01 11
Fax: +41 22 749 09 47
E-mail: copyright@iso.org
Web: www.iso.org
Publié en Suisse
ii © ISO 2019 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO 18589-1:2019(F)
Sommaire Page

Avant-propos ..............................................................................................................................................................................................................................iv

Introduction ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................v

1 Domaine d’application ................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

2 Références normatives ................................................................................................................................................................................... 2

3 Termes et définitions ....................................................................................................................................................................................... 2

3.1 Termes généraux ................................................................................................................................................................................... 2

3.2 Termes relatifs aux sols ................................................................................................................................................................... 3

3.3 Termes relatifs à l’échantillonnage ........................................................................................................................................ 3

4 Symboles ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 5

5 Origines de la radioactivité des sols ................................................................................................................................................. 6

5.1 Radioactivité naturelle ..................................................................................................................................................................... 6

5.2 Autres sources de radioactivité des sols ........................................................................................................................... 6

6 Objectifs des études de la radioactivité des sols ................................................................................................................. 7

6.1 Généralités .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 7

6.2 Caractérisation de la radioactivité de l’environnement ...................................................................................... 7

6.3 Surveillance de routine de l’impact des installations nucléaires ou de l’évolution

du territoire dans son ensemble .............................................................................................................................................. 7

6.4 Recherches de situations d’accident ou d’incident .................................................................................................. 7

6.5 Planification et surveillance des actions de remédiation ................................................................................... 8

6.6 Déclassement d’installations ou mise au rebut des matériaux ..................................................................... 8

7 Principe et exigences des études sur la radioactivité des sols ............................................................................. 8

7.1 Généralités .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 8

7.2 Processus de planification — Stratégie et plan d’échantillonnage ............................................................ 9

7.3 Processus d’échantillonnage ....................................................................................................................................................10

7.4 Processus de laboratoire .............................................................................................................................................................10

7.4.1 Préparation des échantillons .............................................................................................................................10

7.4.2 Mesurages de la radioactivité ............................................................................................................................11

7.5 Exigences générales concernant le mode opératoire .........................................................................................12

7.6 Documentation ....................................................................................................................................................................................13

Bibliographie ...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................14

© ISO 2019 – Tous droits réservés iii
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO 18589-1:2019(F)
Avant-propos

L’ISO (Organisation internationale de normalisation) est une fédération mondiale d’organismes

nationaux de normalisation (comités membres de l’ISO). L’élaboration des Normes internationales est

en général confiée aux comités techniques de l’ISO. Chaque comité membre intéressé par une étude

a le droit de faire partie du comité technique créé à cet effet. Les organisations internationales,

gouvernementales et non gouvernementales, en liaison avec l’ISO participent également aux travaux.

L’ISO collabore étroitement avec la Commission électrotechnique internationale (IEC) en ce qui

concerne la normalisation électrotechnique.

Les procédures utilisées pour élaborer le présent document et celles destinées à sa mise à jour sont

décrites dans les Directives ISO/IEC, Partie 1. Il convient, en particulier de prendre note des différents

critères d’approbation requis pour les différents types de documents ISO. Le présent document a été

rédigé conformément aux règles de rédaction données dans les Directives ISO/IEC, Partie 2 (voir www

.iso .org/ directives).

L’attention est attirée sur le fait que certains des éléments du présent document peuvent faire l’objet de

droits de propriété intellectuelle ou de droits analogues. L’ISO ne saurait être tenue pour responsable

de ne pas avoir identifié de tels droits de propriété et averti de leur existence. Les détails concernant

les références aux droits de propriété intellectuelle ou autres droits analogues identifiés lors de

l’élaboration du document sont indiqués dans l’Introduction et/ou dans la liste des déclarations de

brevets reçues par l’ISO (voir www .iso .org/ brevets).

Les appellations commerciales éventuellement mentionnées dans le présent document sont données

pour information, par souci de commodité, à l’intention des utilisateurs et ne sauraient constituer un

engagement.

Pour une explication de la nature volontaire des normes, la signification des termes et expressions

spécifiques de l’ISO liés à l’évaluation de la conformité, ou pour toute information au sujet de l’adhésion

de l’ISO aux principes de l’Organisation mondiale du commerce (OMC) concernant les obstacles

techniques au commerce (OTC), voir le lien suivant: www .iso .org/ iso/ fr/ avant -propos.

Le présent document a été élaboré par le comité technique ISO/TC 85, Énergie nucléaire, technologies

nucléaires, et radioprotection, sous-comité SC 2, Radioprotection.

Cette deuxième édition annule et remplace la première édition (ISO 18589-1:2005), qui a fait l’objet

d’une révision technique.

Les principales modifications par rapport à l’édition précédente sont les suivantes:

— révision de l’introduction conformément à l’introduction générale adoptée pour les normes publiées

traitant du mesurage de la radioactivité dans l’environnement.

Une liste de toutes les parties de la série ISO 18589 se trouve sur le site web de l’ISO.

Il convient que l’utilisateur adresse tout retour d’information ou toute question concernant le présent

document à l’organisme national de normalisation de son pays. Une liste exhaustive desdits organismes

se trouve à l’adresse www .iso .org/ fr/ members .html.
iv © ISO 2019 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
ISO 18589-1:2019(F)
Introduction

Tout individu est exposé à des rayonnements naturels. Les sources naturelles de rayonnement sont les

rayons cosmiques et les substances radioactives naturellement présentes dans la terre, la faune et la

flore, incluant le corps humain. Les activités anthropiques impliquant l’utilisation de rayonnements

et de substances radioactives s’ajoutent à l’exposition aux rayonnements résultant de cette exposition

naturelle. Certaines de ces activités, dont l’exploitation minière et l’utilisation de minerais contenant des

matières radioactives naturelles (MRN) ainsi que la production d’énergie par combustion de charbon

contenant ces substances, ne font qu’augmenter l’exposition des sources naturelles de rayonnement. Les

centrales électriques nucléaires et autres installations nucléaires emploient des matières radioactives et

génèrent des effluents et des déchets radioactifs dans le cadre de leur exploitation et leur déclassement.

L’utilisation de matières radioactives dans les secteurs de l’industrie, de l’agriculture et de la recherche

connaît un essor mondial.

Toutes ces activités anthropiques provoquent des expositions aux rayonnements qui ne représentent

qu’une petite fraction du niveau moyen mondial d’exposition naturelle. Dans les pays développés,

l’utilisation des rayonnements à des fins médicales représente la plus importante source anthropique

d’exposition aux rayonnements et qui de plus ne cesse d’augmenter. Ces applications médicales englobent

la radiologie diagnostique, la radiothérapie, la médecine nucléaire et la radiologie interventionnelle.

L’exposition aux rayonnements découle également d’activités professionnelles. Elle est subie par les

employés des secteurs de l’industrie, de la médecine et de la recherche qui utilisent des rayonnements

ou des substances radioactives, ainsi que par les passagers et le personnel navigant pendant les voyages

aériens. Le niveau moyen des expositions professionnelles est généralement inférieur au niveau moyen

mondial des expositions naturelles aux rayonnements (voir Référence [1]).

Du fait de l’utilisation croissante des rayonnements, le risque pour la santé et les préoccupations du

public augmentent. Par conséquent, toutes ces expositions sont régulièrement évaluées afin:

— de mieux connaître les niveaux mondiaux et les tendances temporelles de l’exposition du public et

des salariés;

— d’évaluer les composantes de l’exposition et de chiffrer leur importance relative;

— d’identifier de nouvelles problématiques qui peuvent mériter une plus grande attention et

une surveillance. Alors que les doses reçues par les travailleurs sont le plus souvent mesurées

directement, celles reçues par le public sont habituellement évaluées par des méthodes indirectes

qui consistent à exploiter les résultats des mesurages de la radioactivité de déchets, effluents et/ou

échantillons environnementaux.

Afin de garantir que les données obtenues dans le cadre de programmes de surveillance de la

radioactivité permettent de répondre à l’objectif de l’évaluation, il est primordial que les parties

prenantes (par exemple, les exploitants de site nucléaire, les organismes de réglementation et les

autorités locales) conviennent des méthodes et modes opératoires appropriés pour obtenir des

échantillons représentatifs ainsi que pour la manipulation, le stockage, la préparation et le mesurage

des échantillons pour essai. Il est également nécessaire de procéder systématiquement à une évaluation

de l’incertitude globale de mesure. Pour toute décision en matière de santé publique s’appuyant sur

des mesures de la radioactivité, il est capital que les données soient fiables, comparables et adéquates

par rapport à l’objectif de l’évaluation; c’est pourquoi les Normes internationales spécifiant des

méthodes d’essai des radionucléides qui ont été vérifiées par des essais et validées sont un outil

important dans l’obtention de tels résultats de mesure. L’application de normes permet également de

garantir la comparabilité des résultats d’essai dans le temps et entre différents laboratoires d’essai.

Les laboratoires les appliquent pour démontrer leurs compétences techniques et pour passer les essais

d’aptitude lors d’études interlaboratoires, deux conditions préalables à l’obtention d’une accréditation

nationale.

À l’heure actuelle, plus d’une centaine de Normes internationales sont à la disposition des laboratoires

d’essai pour leur permettre de mesurer les radionucléides dans différentes matrices.

© ISO 2019 – Tous droits réservés v
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
ISO 18589-1:2019(F)

Les normes générales aident les laboratoires d’essai à maîtriser le processus de mesure en définissant

les exigences et méthodes générales d’étalonnage des appareils et de validation des techniques. Ces

normes viennent à l’appui de normes spécifiques qui décrivent les méthodes d’essai à mettre en œuvre

par le personnel, par exemple pour différents types d’échantillons. Les normes spécifiques couvrent les

méthodes d’essai relatives aux:
40 3 14

— radionucléides naturels (comprenant le K, le H, le C et les radionucléides des familles radioactives

226 228 234 238 210

du thorium et de l’uranium, notamment le Ra, le Ra, le U, le U et le Pb) qui peuvent être

retrouvés dans des matériaux issus de sources naturelles ou qui peuvent être émis par des procédés

technologiques impliquant des matières radioactives naturelles (par exemple, l’exploitation minière

et le traitement des sables minéraux ou la production et l’utilisation d’engrais phosphatés);

— radionucléides anthropiques, tels que les éléments transuraniens (américium, plutonium, neptunium,

3 14 90

curium), le H, le C, le Sr et les radionucléides émetteurs gamma retrouvés dans les déchets, les

effluents liquides et gazeux, dans les matrices environnementales (telles que l’eau, l’air, le sol, le

biote), dans l’alimentation et dans les aliments pour animaux à la suite de rejets autorisés dans

l’environnement, d’une contamination par des retombées radioactives engendrées par l’explosion

dans l’atmosphère de dispositifs nucléaires et d’une contamination par des retombées radioactives

résultant d’accidents tels que ceux qui se sont produits à Tchernobyl et à Fukushima.

La fraction du débit de dose d’exposition au rayonnement bruit de fond, due aux rayonnements

environnementaux, principalement aux rayonnements gamma, qu’une personne reçoit est très variable

et dépend de plusieurs facteurs tels que la radioactivité de la roche locale et du sol local, la nature des

matériaux de construction et la construction des bâtiments dans lesquels les personnes vivent ou

travaillent.

Une détermination fiable de l’activité massique des radionucléides émetteurs gamma dans différentes

matrices est nécessaire pour évaluer le niveau potentiel d’exposition des êtres humains, vérifier

la conformité à la législation en matière d’environnement et de radioprotection ou donner des

recommandations visant à limiter les risques sur la santé. Les radionucléides émetteurs gamma

sont également utilisés en tant que traceurs en biologie, médecine, physique, chimie et ingénierie. Un

mesurage précis de l’activité des radionucléides est également nécessaire pour la sécurité intérieure et

dans le cadre du traité de non-prolifération (T.N.P.).

Le présent document doit être utilisé dans le cadre d’un système de management de l’assurance qualité

(ISO/IEC 17025).

L’ISO 18589 est publiée en plusieurs parties, à utiliser ensemble ou séparément selon les besoins. Elles

sont complémentaires entre elles et s’adressent aux personnes chargées de déterminer la radioactivité

présente dans les sols, les socles rocheux et le minerai (MRN ou MRNAT). Les deux premières parties

sont générales et décrivent la définition des programmes et des techniques d’échantillonnage, des

méthodes de traitement général d’échantillons dans le laboratoire (ISO 18589-1), ainsi que la stratégie

d’échantillonnage et la technique d’échantillonnage des échantillons de sol, la manipulation et la

préparation des échantillons de sol (ISO 18589-2). L’ISO 18589-3, l’ISO 18589-4 et l’ISO 18589-5 traitent

de méthodes d’essai propres à un nucléide pour quantifier l’activité massique des radionucléides

émetteurs gamma (ISO 18589-3 et ISO 20042), des isotopes de plutonium (ISO 18589-4) et du Sr

(ISO 18589-5) des échantillons de sol. L’ISO 18589-6 traite des mesurages non spécifiques pour

quantifier rapidement des activités alpha globale ou bêta globale et l’ISO 18589-7 décrit un mesurage in

situ de radionucléides émetteurs gamma.

Les méthodes d’essai décrites dans l'ISO 18589-3 à l'ISO 18589-6 peuvent également être utilisées pour

mesurer les radionucléides dans une boue, dans un sédiment, dans un matériau de construction et dans

[2][3][4][5][22][23]

des produits de construction en suivant un mode opératoire d’échantillonnage approprié .

Le présent document fait partie d’un ensemble de Normes internationales traitant du mesurage de la

radioactivité dans l’environnement.
vi © ISO 2019 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
NORME INTERNATIONALE ISO 18589-1:2019(F)
Mesurage de la radioactivité dans l'environnement — Sol —
Partie 1:
Lignes directrices générales et définitions
1 Domaine d’application

Le présent document spécifie les exigences générales qui s’appliquent à la réalisation des essais pour

des radionucléides, incluant l’échantillonnage du sol, comprenant les roches provenant du socle rocheux

et le minerai, ainsi que de matériaux et produits de construction, de poteries, etc. utilisant des MRN

ou résultant de procédés technologiques impliquant des matières radioactives naturelles améliorées

technologiquement (MRNAT), par exemple l’exploitation minière et le traitement des sables minéraux

ou la production et l’utilisation d’engrais phosphatés.

Pour plus de commodité, le terme «sol» utilisé dans le présent document couvre l’ensemble des éléments

susmentionnés.

Le présent document s’adresse aux personnes chargées de déterminer la radioactivité présente dans

les sols dans le cadre de la radioprotection. Cela concerne les sols de jardins ou de terres agricoles, les

sols de sites urbains ou industriels, ainsi que les sols qui ne font pas l’objet d’activités humaines.

Le présent document est applicable à tous les laboratoires, quel que soit l’effectif du personnel ou

l’étendue des activités d’essai. Lorsqu’un laboratoire ne réalise pas une ou plusieurs des activités

couvertes par le présent document, comme la planification, l’échantillonnage ou les essais, les exigences

correspondantes ne s’appliquent pas.

Le présent document est destiné à être utilisé conjointement à d’autres parties de l’ISO 18589 qui

traitent de l’établissement des programmes et des techniques d’échantillonnage, de méthodes de

traitement général des échantillons en laboratoire, ainsi que des méthodes de mesure de la radioactivité

contenue dans le sol. Il a pour objet de:

— définir les principaux termes relatifs aux sols, à l’échantillonnage, à la radioactivité et à son mesurage;

— présenter les origines de la radioactivité contenue dans les sols;

— décrire quelques-uns des principaux objectifs poursuivis par les études de la radioactivité dans les

prélèvements de sol;
— présenter les principes des études sur la radioactivité des sols;

— identifier les exigences en matière d’analyse et de mode opératoire lors du mesurage de la

radioactivité contenue dans le sol.

Le présent document est applicable lorsque des mesurages de radionucléides doivent être effectués

dans le cadre de la radioprotection dans les cas suivants:
— caractérisation initiale de la radioactivité dans l’environnement;

— surveillance de routine de l’impact des installations nucléaires ou de l’évolution du territoire dans

son ensemble;
— recherches de situations d’accident ou d’incident;
— planification et surveillance des actions de remédiation;
— déclassement d’installations ou mise au rebut des matériaux.
© ISO 2019 – Tous droits réservés 1
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
ISO 18589-1:2019(F)
2 Références normatives

Les documents suivants sont cités dans le texte de sorte qu’ils constituent, pour tout ou partie de leur

contenu, des exigences du présent document. Pour les références datées, seule l’édition citée s’applique.

Pour les références non datées, la dernière édition du document de référence s’applique (y compris les

éventuels amendements).
ISO 11074, Qualité du sol — Vocabulaire

ISO 11929 (toutes les parties), Détermination des limites caractéristiques (seuil de décision, limite de

détection et extrémités de l’intervalle élargi) pour mesurages de rayonnements ionisants — Principes

fondamentaux et applications

ISO/IEC 17025, Exigences générales concernant la compétence des laboratoires d'étalonnages et d'essais

ISO 18589-2, Mesurage de la radioactivité dans l'environnement — Sol — Partie 2: Lignes directrices pour

la sélection de la stratégie d'échantillonnage, l'échantillonnage et le prétraitement des échantillons

Guide ISO/IEC 98-3, Incertitude de mesure — Partie 3: Guide pour l’expression de l’incertitude de mesure

(GUM: 1995)
3 Termes et définitions

Pour les besoins du présent document, les termes et définitions suivants s’appliquent.

L’ISO et l’IEC tiennent à jour des bases de données terminologiques destinées à être utilisées en

normalisation, consultables aux adresses suivantes:

— ISO Online browsing platform: disponible à l’adresse https:// www .iso .org/ obp;

— IEC Electropedia: disponible à l’adresse http:// www .electropedia .org/ .
3.1 Termes généraux
3.1.1
surveillance de routine

surveillance effectuée périodiquement et destinée à observer l’évolution des caractéristiques

radioactives du sol
3.1.2
analyse de caractérisation

ensemble d’observations contribuant à caractériser, à un moment donné, les propriétés radioactives

d’un échantillon de sol en vue de l’utiliser comme référentiel

Note 1 à l'article: Le rapport d’essai peut inclure d’autres caractéristiques du site étudié.

3.1.3
distribution verticale de la radioactivité

détermination de la radioactivité dans des couches de l’écorce terrestre prélevées à différentes

profondeurs de façon à tracer le profil vertical de la distribution par un radionucléide ou un groupe de

radionucléides
2 © ISO 2019 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO 18589-1:2019(F)
3.2 Termes relatifs aux sols
3.2.1
sol

couche supérieure de la croûte terrestre transformée par des processus climatiques, physico-chimiques

et biologiques et composée de particules minérales, de matière organique, d’eau, d’air et d’organismes

vivants, organisée en horizons de sols génériques

Note 1 à l'article: Dans une acception plus large relevant du génie civil, le terme «sol» inclut l’horizon superficiel

et le sous-sol; les dépôts tels que les argiles, limons, sables, graviers, gravillons, pierres, ainsi que la matière

organique et les dépôts tels que la tourbe; les matériaux d’origine anthropique tels que les déchets; les gaz et

l’humidité du sol; et les organismes vivants.

Note 2 à l'article: Les matières minérales comprennent la terre, le sable, l’argile, les ardoises, les pierres, etc. qui

peuvent être utilisés comme matériaux de construction et intégrés dans des produits de construction.

[SOURCE: ISO 11074:2015, 2.1.11]
3.2.2
couvert herbacé

strate basse de la végétation constituée essentiellement d’espèces herbacées de nature variée, présente

par exemple dans les prairies, les pelouses ou les jachères
3.2.3
horizon de sol

couche élémentaire d’un sol, plus ou moins parallèle à la surface, d’apparence homogène pour la plupart

des caractères morphologiques (couleur, texture, structure, etc.)

Note 1 à l'article: La succession des horizons de sol constitue le profil et permet de définir, avec l’appoint éventuel

de quelques critères analytiques, le type morphogénétique de sol.
3.3 Termes relatifs à l’échantillonnage
3.3.1
échantillon

partie de matériau choisie dans une quantité de matériau plus grande, prélevée dans le but de réaliser

des essais

[SOURCE: ISO 11074:2015, 4.1.17, modifiée — «du sol» a été supprimé et la dernière partie de la

définition a été ajoutée.]
3.3.2
échantillonnage

mode opératoire défini consistant à prélever une partie du sol dans le but de réaliser des essais

Note 1 à l'article: Dans certains cas, l’échantillon peut ne pas être représentatif, mais être prélevé pour des

raisons de disponibilité.

Note 2 à l'article: Les modes opératoires d’échantillonnage décrivent tous les processus nécessaires pour fournir

au laboratoire les échantillons nécessaires pour atteindre les objectifs de l’étude de la radioactivité des sols.

Cela comprend la sélection, le plan d’échantillonnage, le prélèvement et la préparation des échantillons prélevés

dans le sol.
3.3.3
stratégie d’échantillonnage

ensemble d’options techniques visant à résoudre, en fonction des objectifs et du site considérés, les

deux principales questions que sont la densité d’échantillonnage et la répartition spatiale des zones

d’échantillonnage

Note 1 à l'article: La stratégie d’échantillonnage fournit l’ensemble des options techniques qui sont requises dans

le plan d’échantillonnage.
© ISO 2019 – Tous droits réservés 3
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
ISO 18589-1:2019(F)
3.3.4
zone d’échantillonnage
zone dans laquelle sont effectués les différents prélèvements d’échantillons

Note 1 à l'article: Un site peut être divisé en plusieurs zones d’échantillonnage.

3.3.5
plan d’échantillonnage

protocole précis qui, d’après l’application des principes de la stratégie adoptée, définit les dimensions

spatiales et temporelles de l’échantillonnage, la fréquence, le nombre d’échantillons, les quantités

prélevées, etc., ainsi que les ressources humaines nécessaires à l’opération d’échantillonnage

3.3.6
échantillonnage aléatoire

échantillonnage dans la zone d’échantillonnage, effectué de manière aléatoire dans l’espace et dans

le temps
3.3.7
échantillonnage systématique

échantillonnage dans la zone d’échantillonnage, effectué de manière systématique dans l’espace et dans

le temps
3.3.8
échantillonnage systématique aléatoire

échantillonnage effectué de manière aléatoire dans chaque unité d’échantillonnage à partir d’une série

d’unités d’échantillonnage systématiquement définies
3.3.9
unité d’échantillonnage

portion de la zone d’échantillonnage dont les limites peuvent être physiques ou hypothétiques

Note 1 à l'article: Ces unités d’échantillonnage sont obtenues en divisant la zone d’échantillonnage en mailles

unitaires en fonction de la grille d’échantillonnage.
3.3.10
grille d’échantillonnage

système de localisation des échantillonnages fondé sur les résultats des modes opératoires statistiques

Note 1 à l'article: On obtient ainsi une série de points d’échantillonnage prédéterminés servant à surveiller

un ou plusieurs sites spécifiés. La zone d’échantillonnage est divisée en plusieurs unités d’échantillonnage ou

mailles élémentaires, le plus souvent carrées ou rectangulaires (en fonction des caractéristiques de la source de

pollution, les grilles circulaires ou linéaires ne sont pas à exclure).
3.3.11
prélèvement élémentaire

quantité individuelle de matériau prélevée en une seule opération à l’aide d’un dispositif de prélèvement

[SOURCE: ISO 11074:2015, 4.1.8]

Note 1 à l'article: Les prélèvements élémentaires peuvent être regroupés pour former un échantillon composite.

3.3.12
sous-échantillon

échantillon dans lequel le matériau d’intérêt fait l’objet d’une distribution aléatoire en parties de taille

égale ou inégale
3.3.13
échantillon unitaire
quantité représentative du matériau, supposée homogène, prélevée d’une
...

Questions, Comments and Discussion

Ask us and Technical Secretary will try to provide an answer. You can facilitate discussion about the standard in here.