Information technology — Open Distributed Processing — Use of UML for ODP system specifications

ISO/IEC 19793:2015 defines use of the unified modelling language (UML 2.4.1 superstructure specification, ISO/IEC 19505-2, for expressing system specifications in terms of the viewpoint specifications defined by the reference model of open distributed processing (RM-ODP, Rec. ITU-T X.901 to X.904 | ISO/IEC 10746 Parts 1 to 4) and the Enterprise Language (Rec. ITU-T X.911 | ISO/IEC 15414). It covers: a) the expression of a system specification in terms of RM-ODP viewpoint specifications using defined UML concepts and extensions (e.g., structuring rules, technology mappings, etc.); b) relationships between the resultant RM-ODP viewpoint specifications. ISO/IEC 19793:2015 is intended for the following audiences: ? ODP modellers who want to use the UML notation for expressing their ODP specifications in a graphical and standard way; ? UML modellers who want to use the RM-ODP concepts and mechanisms to structure their UML system specifications; ? modelling tool suppliers, who wish to develop UML-based tools that are capable of expressing RM‑ODP viewpoint specifications.

Technologies de l'information — Traitement réparti ouvert — Utilisation de l'UML pour les spécifications de système ODP

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Published
Publication Date
17-Mar-2015
Current Stage
9093 - International Standard confirmed
Start Date
11-Jun-2020
Completion Date
11-Jun-2020
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INTERNATIONAL ISO/IEC
STANDARD 19793
Second edition
2015-04-01
Information technology — Open
Distributed Processing — Use of UML for
ODP system specifications
Technologies de l'information — Traitement réparti ouvert — Utilisation
de l'UML pour les spécifications de système ODP
Reference number
ISO/IEC 19793:2015(E)
ISO/IEC 2015
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO/IEC 19793:2015(E)
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ii © ISO/IEC 2015 – All rights reserved
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CONTENTS
Page

0.1 RM-ODP ............................................................................................................................................. v

0.2 UML .................................................................................................................................................... v

0.3 Overview and motivation .................................................................................................................... vi

1 Scope .............................................................................................................................................................. 1

2 Normative references...................................................................................................................................... 1

2.1 Identical Recommendations | International Standards ........................................................................ 1

2.2 Additional References ......................................................................................................................... 1

3 Definitions ...................................................................................................................................................... 2

3.1 Definitions from ODP standards ......................................................................................................... 2

3.2 Definitions from the Enterprise Language .......................................................................................... 2

3.3 Definitions from the Unified Modeling Language .............................................................................. 2

4 Abbreviations ................................................................................................................................................. 3

5 Conventions .................................................................................................................................................... 3

6 Overview of modelling and system specification approach ........................................................................... 4

6.1 Introduction ......................................................................................................................................... 4

6.2 Overview of ODP concepts (extracted from RM-ODP Part 1) ........................................................... 4

6.3 Overview of UML concepts ................................................................................................................ 8

6.4 Universes of discourse, ODP specifications and UML models ........................................................... 10

6.5 Modelling concepts and UML profiles for ODP viewpoint languages and correspondences ............. 11

6.6 General principles for expressing and structuring ODP system specifications using UML ................ 11

6.7 Correspondences between viewpoint specifications ........................................................................... 12

7 Enterprise specification .................................................................................................................................. 13

7.1 Modelling concepts ............................................................................................................................. 13

7.2 UML profile ........................................................................................................................................ 19

7.3 Enterprise specification structure (in UML terms) .............................................................................. 28

7.4 Viewpoint correspondences for the enterprise language ..................................................................... 29

8 Information specification ................................................................................................................................ 30

8.1 Modelling concepts ............................................................................................................................. 30

8.2 UML profile ........................................................................................................................................ 32

8.3 Information specification structure (in UML terms) ........................................................................... 34

8.4 Viewpoint correspondences for the information language .................................................................. 35

9 Computational specification ........................................................................................................................... 36

9.1 Modelling concepts ............................................................................................................................. 36

9.2 UML profile ........................................................................................................................................ 41

9.3 Computational specification structure (in UML terms)....................................................................... 47

9.4 Viewpoint correspondences for the computational language .............................................................. 47

10 Engineering specification ............................................................................................................................... 48

10.1 Modelling concepts ............................................................................................................................. 48

10.2 UML profile ........................................................................................................................................ 56

10.3 Engineering specification structure (in UML terms) ........................................................................... 62

10.4 Viewpoint correspondences for the engineering language .................................................................. 62

11 Technology specification ................................................................................................................................ 63

11.1 Modelling concepts ............................................................................................................................. 63

11.2 UML profile ........................................................................................................................................ 63

11.3 Technology specification structure (in UML terms) ........................................................................... 64

11.4 Viewpoint correspondences for the technology language ................................................................... 65

12 Correspondences specification ....................................................................................................................... 65

12.1 Modelling concepts ............................................................................................................................. 65

12.2 UML profile ........................................................................................................................................ 66

13 Modelling conformance in ODP system specifications .................................................................................. 67

13.1 Modelling conformance concepts ....................................................................................................... 67

Rec. ITU-T X.906 (10/2014) iii
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Page

13.2 UML profile ........................................................................................................................................ 67

14 Conformance and compliance to this Recommendation | International Standard .......................................... 68

14.1 Conformance ....................................................................................................................................... 68

14.2 Compliance ......................................................................................................................................... 68

Annex A – An example of ODP specifications using UML ...................................................................................... 69

A.1 The Templeman Library system.......................................................................................................... 69

A.2 Enterprise specification in UML ......................................................................................................... 70

A.3 Information specification in UML ...................................................................................................... 83

A.4 Computational specification in UML .................................................................................................. 91

A.5 Engineering specification in UML ...................................................................................................... 96

A.6 Technology specification in UML ...................................................................................................... 107

Annex B – An example of the representation of deontic concepts ............................................................................ 111

B.1 The scenario ........................................................................................................................................ 111

B.2 Expressing the deontic constraints ...................................................................................................... 112

INDEX .................................................................................................................................................................. 117

iv Rec. ITU-T X.906 (10/2014)
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ISO/IEC 19793:2015(E)
Foreword

ISO (the International Organization for Standardization) and IEC (the International Electrotechnical

Commission) form the specialized system for worldwide standardization. National bodies that are members of

ISO or IEC participate in the development of International Standards through technical committees

established by the respective organization to deal with particular fields of technical activity. ISO and IEC

technical committees collaborate in fields of mutual interest. Other international organizations, governmental

and non-governmental, in liaison with ISO and IEC, also take part in the work. In the field of information

technology, ISO and IEC have established a joint technical committee, ISO/IEC JTC 1.

International Standards are drafted in accordance with the rules given in the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 2.

The main task of the joint technical committee is to prepare International Standards. Draft International

Standards adopted by the joint technical committee are circulated to national bodies for voting. Publication as

an International Standard requires approval by at least 75 % of the national bodies casting a vote.

Attention is drawn to the possibility that some of the elements of this document may be the subject of patent

rights. ISO and IEC shall not be held responsible for identifying any or all such patent rights.

ISO/IEC 8825-7 was prepared by Joint Technical Committee ISO/IEC JTC 1, Information technology,

Subcommittee SC 7, Software and systems engineering, in collaboration with ITU-T. The identical text is

published as ITU-T X.906 (10/2014).
v Rec. ITU-T X.906 (10/2014)
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Introduction

The rapid growth of distributed processing has led to the adoption of the reference model of open distributed processing

(RM-ODP), which provides a coordinating framework for the standardization of open distributed processing (ODP). It

creates an architecture within which support of distribution, interworking and portability can be integrated. This

architecture provides a framework for the specification of ODP systems.

The reference model of open distributed processing is based on precise concepts derived from current distributed

processing developments and, as far as possible, on the use of formal description techniques for specification of the

architecture. It does not recommend any notation.

The Unified Modeling Language™ (UML ) was developed by the Object Management Group™ (OMG™). It provides

a notation for modelling in support of information system design and is widely used throughout the IT industry as the

language and notation of choice.

This Recommendation | International Standard refines and extends the definition of how ODP systems are specified by

defining the use of the unified modelling language for the expression of ODP system specifications.

0.1 RM-ODP
The RM-ODP consists of:

– Part 1 [Rec. ITU-T X.901 | ISO/IEC 10746-1]: Overview, which contains a motivational overview of ODP,

giving scoping, justification and explanation of key concepts, and an outline of the ODP architecture. It

contains explanatory material on how the RM-ODP is to be interpreted and applied by its users, who may

include standards writers and architects of ODP systems. It also contains a categorization of required areas

of standardization expressed in terms of the reference points for conformance identified in Rec. ITU-T

X.903 | ISO/IEC 10746-3. This part is informative.

– Part 2 [Rec. ITU-T X.902 | ISO/IEC 10746-2]: Foundations, which contains the definition of the concepts

and analytical framework for normalised description of (arbitrary) distributed processing systems. It

introduces the principles of conformance to ODP standards and the way in which they are applied. This is

only to a level of detail sufficient to support Rec. ITU-T X.903 | ISO/IEC 10746-3 and to establish

requirements for new specification techniques. This part is normative.

– Part 3 [Rec. ITU-T X.903 | ISO/IEC 10746-3]: Architecture, which contains the specification of the

required characteristics that qualify distributed processing as open. These are the constraints to which ODP

standards shall conform. It uses the descriptive techniques from Rec. ITU-T X.902 | ISO/IEC 10746-2.

This part is normative.

– Part 4 [Rec. ITU-T X.904 | ISO/IEC 10746-4]: Architectural semantics, which contains a formalization of

the ODP modelling concepts defined in Rec. ITU-T X.902 | ISO/IEC 10746-2 clauses 8 and 9. The

formalization is achieved by interpreting each concept in terms of the constructs of one or more of the

different standardized formal description techniques. This part is normative.

In the same series as the RM-ODP are a number of other standards and recommendations, and, of these, the chief that

concerns this Recommendation | International Standard is:

– The Enterprise Language [Rec. ITU-T X.911 | ISO/IEC 15414], which refines and extends the enterprise

language defined in Rec. ITU-T X.903 | ISO/IEC 10746-3 to enable full enterprise viewpoint specification

of an ODP system.
0.2 UML

The Unified Modelling Language (UML) is a visual language for specifying and documenting the artefacts of systems. It

is a general-purpose modelling language that can be used with all major object and component methods and that can be

applied to all application domains (e.g., in health, finance, telecommunications, or aerospace) and implementation

platforms (e.g., J2EE, CORBA , .NET).

The version of UML currently adopted as an International Standard (ISO/IEC 19505) is UML 2.4.1. UML version 2 has

been structured modularly, with the ability to select only those parts of the language that are of direct interest. It is

extensible, so it can be easily tailored to meet the specific user requirements. The UML specification defines thirteen

types of diagram, divided in two categories that represent, respectively, the static structure of the objects in a system

(structure diagrams) and the dynamic behaviour of the objects in a system (behaviour diagrams). In addition, UML

incorporates extension mechanisms that allow the definition of new dialects of UML (managed using UML profiles) to

customize the language for particular platforms and domains.
Rec. ITU-T X.906 (10/2014) vi
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The UML specification is defined using a metamodelling approach (i.e., a metamodel is used to specify the model that

comprises UML). That metamodel has been constructed so that the resulting family of UML languages is fully aligned

with the rest of the OMG specifications (e.g., MOF™, OCL, XMI ) and to allow the exchange of models between tools.

0.3 Overview and motivation

Part 3 of the reference model, Rec. ITU-T X.903 | ISO/IEC 10746-3 defines a framework for the specification of ODP

systems comprising

a) five viewpoints, called enterprise, information, computational, engineering and technology, which provide

a basis for the specification of ODP systems;

b) a viewpoint language for each viewpoint, defining concepts and rules for specifying ODP systems from

the corresponding viewpoint.
This Recommendation | International Standard defines:

– use of the viewpoints prescribed by the RM-ODP to structure UML system specifications;

– rules for expressing RM-ODP viewpoint languages and specifications with UML and UML extensions

(e.g., UML profiles).

It allows UML tools to be used to process viewpoint specifications, facilitating the software design process. Currently

there is growing interest in the use of UML for system modelling. However, there is no widely agreed approach to the

structuring of such specifications. This adds to the cost of adopting the use of UML for system specification, hampers

communication between system developers and makes it difficult to relate or merge system specifications where there is

a need to integrate IT systems.

The RM-ODP defines essential concepts necessary to specify open distributed processing systems from five prescribed

viewpoints and provides a framework for the structuring of specifications for distributed systems. However, the RM-ODP

prescribes neither a notation, nor a model development method.

This Recommendation | International Standard provides the necessary framework for ODP system specification using

UML. It defines both a UML based notation for the expression of such specifications, and an approach for structuring of

them using the notation, thus providing the basis for model development methods.

By defining how UML and UML extensions should be used to express RM-ODP viewpoint specifications, the standard

enables the ODP viewpoints and ODP architecture to provide the needed framework for system specification using UML.

This Recommendation | International Standard contains the following annexes:
– Annex A: An example of ODP specifications using UML;
– Annex B: An example of the representation of deontic concepts.
These annexes are not normative.
vii Rec. ITU-T X.906 (10/2014)
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ISO/IEC 19793:2015 (E)
INTERNATIONAL STANDARD
ITU-T RECOMMENDATION
Information technology – Open distributed processing –
Use of UML for ODP system specifications
1 Scope

This Recommendation | International Standard defines use of the unified modelling language (UML 2.4.1 superstructure

specification, ISO/IEC 19505-2, for expressing system specifications in terms of the viewpoint specifications defined

by the reference model of open distributed processing (RM-ODP, Rec. ITU-T X.901 to X.904 | ISO/IEC 10746 Parts

1 to 4) and the Enterprise Language (Rec. ITU-T X.911 | ISO/IEC 15414). It covers:

a) the expression of a system specification in terms of RM-ODP viewpoint specifications using defined

UML concepts and extensions (e.g., structuring rules, technology mappings, etc.);

b) relationships between the resultant RM-ODP viewpoint specifications.

This Recommendation | International Standard is intended for the following audiences:

– ODP modellers who want to use the UML notation for expressing their ODP specifications in a graphical

and standard way;

– UML modellers who want to use the RM-ODP concepts and mechanisms to structure their UML system

specifications;

– modelling tool suppliers, who wish to develop UML-based tools that are capable of expressing RM-ODP

viewpoint specifications.
2 Normative references

The following Recommendations and International Standards contain provisions which, through reference in this text,

constitute provisions of this Recommendation | International Standard. At the time of publication, the editions indicated

were valid. All Recommendations and Standards are subject to revision, and parties to agreements based on this

Recommendation | International Standard are encouraged to investigate the possibility of applying the most recent

edition of the Recommendations and Standards listed below. Members of IEC and ISO maintain registers of currently

valid International Standards. The Telecommunication Standardization Bureau of the ITU maintains a list of currently

valid ITU-T Recommendations.
2.1 Identical Recommendations | International Standards

– Recommendation ITU-T X.901 (1997) | ISO/IEC 10746-1:1998, Information technology – Open

Distributed Processing – Reference Model: Overview.

– Recommendation ITU-T X.902 (2009) | ISO/IEC 10746-2:2010, Information technology – Open

Distributed Processing – Reference Model: Foundations.

– Recommendation ITU-T X.903 (2009) | ISO/IEC 10746-3:2010, Information technology – Open

Distributed Processing – Reference Model: Architecture.

– Recommendation ITU-T X.904 (1997) | ISO/IEC 10746-4:1998, Information technology – Open

Distributed Processing – Reference Model: Architectural semantics.

– Recommendation ITU-T X.911 (2012) | ISO/IEC 15414:2013, Information technology – Open

distributed processing – Reference model – Enterprise language.

– Recommendation ITU-T X.725 | ISO/IEC 10165-7, Information Technology – Open Systems

Interconnection – Structure of Management Information – Part 7: General Relationship Model

2.2 Additional References

– Recommendation ITU-T X.950 (1997), Information technology – Open distributed processing – Trading

function: Specification.

– Recommendation ITU-T X.960 (1999), Information Technology – Open Distributed Processing – Type

Repository Function.
Rec. ITU-T X.906 (10/2014) 1
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ISO/IEC 19793:2015 (E)

– ISO/IEC 19505-2:2012, Information Technology – OMG Unified Modeling Language – Superstructure.

3 Definitions

For the purposes of this Recommendation | International Standard, the following definitions apply.

3.1 Definitions from ODP standards
3.1.1 Modelling concept definitions

This Recommendation | International Standard makes use of the following terms as defined in Rec. ITU-T X.902 |

ISO/IEC 10746-2:

abstraction; action; activity; architecture; atomicity; behaviour (of an object); binding; class; client

object; communication; composition; component object [2-5.1]; composite object; configuration (of

objects); conformance point; consumer object; contract; creation; data; decomposition; deletion;

distributed processing; distribution transparency; domain; entity; environment; environment

contract; epoch; error; establishing behaviour; failure; fault; group; identifier; information;

initiating object; instance; instantiation (of an template); internal action; interaction; interchange

reference point; interface; interface signature; interworking reference point; introduction; invariant;

location in space; location in time; name; naming context; naming domain; notification; object;

obligation; ODP standards; ODP system; open distributed processing; perceptual reference point;

permission; persistence; producer object; programmatic reference point; prohibition; proposition; quality

of service; reference point; refinement; role; server object; spawn action; stability; state (of an object);

subdomain; subtype; supertype; system; template; term; terminating behaviour; trading; type (of

an ); viewpoint (on a system).
3.1.2 Viewpoint language definitions

This Recommendation | International Standard makes use of the following terms as defined in Rec. ITU-T X.903 |

ISO/IEC 10746-3:

binder; capsule; channel; cluster; community; computational behaviour; computational binding object;

computational object; computational interface; computational viewpoint; dynamic schema; engineering

viewpoint; distributed binding; enterprise object; enterprise viewpoint; federation; information

object; information viewpoint; interceptor; invariant schema; node; nucleus; operation; protocol object;

static schema; stream; stub; technology viewpoint; language.
3.2 Definitions from the Enterprise Language

This Recommendation | International Standard makes use of the following terms as defined in Rec. ITU-T X.911 |

ISO/IEC 15414:

actor (with respect to an action); agent; artefact (with respect to an action); authorization; commitment;

community object; declaration; delegation; evaluation; field of application (of a specification); interface

role; objective (of an ); party; policy; prescription; principal; process; resource (with respect to an

action); scope (of a system); step; violation.
3.3 Definitions from the Unified Modeling Language

This Recommendation | International Standard makes use of the following terms as defined in ISO/IEC 19505-2:

abstract class; action; activity; activity diagram; aggregate; aggregation; association; association class;

association end; attribute; behaviour; behaviour diagram; binary association; binding; call; class;

classifier; classification; class diagram; client; collaboration; collaboration occurrence; comment;

communication diagram; component; component diagram; composite; composite structure diagram;

composition; concrete class; connector; constraint; container; context; delegation; dependency;

deployment diagram; derived element; diagram; distribution unit; dynamic classification; element; entry

action; enumeration; event; exception; execution occurrence; exit action; export; expression; extend;

extension; feature; final state; fire; generalizable element; generalization; guard condition;

implementation; implementation class; implementation inheritance; import; include; inheritance; initial

state; instance; interaction; interaction diagram; interaction overview diagram; interface; internal

transition; lifeline; link; link end; message; metaclass; metamodel; method; multiple classification;

2 Rec. ITU-T X.906 (10/2014)
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
ISO/IEC 19793:2015 (E)

multiplicity; n-ary association; name; namespace; node; object; object diagram; object flow state; object

lifeline; operation; package; parameter; parent; part; partition; pattern; persistent object; pin; port; post-

condition; pre-condition; primitive type; profile; property; pseudo-state; realization; receive [a message];

receiver; reception; refinement; relationship; role; scenario; send [a message]; sender; sequence diagram;

signal; signature; slot; state; state machine diagram; state machine; static classification; stereotype;

stimulus; structural feature; structure diagram; subactivity state; subclass; submachine state; substate;

subpackage; subsystem; subtype; superclass; supertype; supplier; tagged value; time event; time

expression; timing diagram; trace; transition; type; usage; use case; use case diagram; value; visibility.

4 Abbreviations

For the purposes of this Recommendation | International Standard, the following abbreviations apply.

BEO Basic Engineering Object
IXIT Implementation extra Information for Test
MOF Meta Object Facility
OCL Object Constraint Language
ODP Open Distributed Processing
OMG Object Management Group
QoS Quality of Service
RM-ODP Reference Model of Open Distributed Processing
UML Unified Modeling Language
UOD Universe Of Discourse
XMI XML Metadata Interchange

NOTE – UML, CORBA, XMI, MOF, OMG, Object Management Group, and Unified Modeling Language are either registered

trademarks or trademarks of Object Management Group, Inc. in the United States or other countries.

5 Conventions
In the text that follows, the following conventions apply.

Rec. ITU-T X.902 | ISO/IEC 10746-2 (RM-ODP Part 2: Foundations) and Rec. ITU-T X.903 | ISO/IEC 10746-3 (RM-

ODP Part 3: Architecture) are referred to as "Part 2" and "Part 3" of the RM-ODP, respectively.

Rec. ITU-T X.911 | ISO/IEC 15414 (RM-ODP Enterprise Language) is referred to as "the Enterprise Language".

The UML superstructure specificati
...

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