Ergonomics of the thermal environment — Determination of metabolic rate

The metabolic rate, as a conversion of chemical into mechanical and thermal energy, measures the energetic cost of muscular load and gives a numerical index of activity. Metabolic rate is an important determinant of the comfort or the strain resulting from exposure to a thermal environment. In particular, in hot climates, the high levels of metabolic heat production associated with muscular work aggravate heat stress, as large amounts of heat need to be dissipated, mostly by sweat evaporation. ISO 8996:2004 specifies different methods for the determination of metabolic rate in the context of ergonomics of the climatic working environment. It can also be used for other applications -- for example, the assessment of working practices, the energetic cost of specific jobs or sport activities, the total cost of an activity, etc.

Ergonomie de l'environnement thermique — Détermination du métabolisme énergétique

Le métabolisme énergétique, transformation d'énergie chimique potentielle en énergie thermique et en énergie mécanique, mesure le coût énergétique de la charge musculaire et constitue un indice quantitatif de l'activité. Le métabolisme énergétique représente un facteur important pour déterminer le confort ou la contrainte résultant de l'exposition à un environnement thermique. Dans les climats chauds notamment, les niveaux élevés de production de chaleur métabolique, associés au travail musculaire, aggravent la contrainte thermique dans la mesure où de grandes quantités de chaleur doivent être dissipées, principalement par évaporation de la sueur. L'ISO 8996:2004 spécifie différentes méthodes visant à déterminer le métabolisme énergétique dans le domaine de l'ergonomie de l'environnement de travail climatique. Elle peut cependant être également utilisée en vue d'autres applications -- par exemple: l'évaluation des pratiques de travail, le coût énergétique de travaux ou d'activités sportives spécifiques, le coût global de l'activité, etc.

General Information

Status
Withdrawn
Publication Date
21-Sep-2004
Withdrawal Date
21-Sep-2004
Current Stage
9599 - Withdrawal of International Standard
Start Date
13-Dec-2021
Completion Date
13-Dec-2021
Ref Project

RELATIONS

Buy Standard

Standard
ISO 8996:2004 - Ergonomics of the thermal environment -- Determination of metabolic rate
English language
24 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview
Standard
ISO 8996:2004 - Ergonomie de l'environnement thermique -- Détermination du métabolisme énergétique
French language
25 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview

Standards Content (sample)

INTERNATIONAL ISO
STANDARD 8996
Second edition
2004-10-01
Ergonomics of the thermal
environment — Determination of
metabolic rate
Ergonomie de l'environnement thermique — Détermination du
métabolisme énergétique
Reference number
ISO 8996:2004(E)
ISO 2004
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO 8996:2004(E)
PDF disclaimer

This PDF file may contain embedded typefaces. In accordance with Adobe's licensing policy, this file may be printed or viewed but

shall not be edited unless the typefaces which are embedded are licensed to and installed on the computer performing the editing. In

downloading this file, parties accept therein the responsibility of not infringing Adobe's licensing policy. The ISO Central Secretariat

accepts no liability in this area.
Adobe is a trademark of Adobe Systems Incorporated.

Details of the software products used to create this PDF file can be found in the General Info relative to the file; the PDF-creation

parameters were optimized for printing. Every care has been taken to ensure that the file is suitable for use by ISO member bodies. In

the unlikely event that a problem relating to it is found, please inform the Central Secretariat at the address given below.

© ISO 2004

All rights reserved. Unless otherwise specified, no part of this publication may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means,

electronic or mechanical, including photocopying and microfilm, without permission in writing from either ISO at the address below or

ISO's member body in the country of the requester.
ISO copyright office
Case postale 56 • CH-1211 Geneva 20
Tel. + 41 22 749 01 11
Fax + 41 22 749 09 47
E-mail copyright@iso.org
Web www.iso.org
Published in Switzerland
ii © ISO 2004 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO 8996:2004(E)
Contents Page

Foreword............................................................................................................................................................ iv

1 Scope...................................................................................................................................................... 1

2 Normative references ........................................................................................................................... 1

3 Principle and accuracy......................................................................................................................... 1

4 Level 1, screening ................................................................................................................................. 3

4.1 Table for the estimation of metabolic rate by occupation................................................................ 3

4.2 Classification of metabolic rate by categories ..................................................................................3

5 Level 2, observation.............................................................................................................................. 3

5.1 Estimation of metabolic rate by task requirements .......................................................................... 3

5.2 Metabolic rate for typical activities ..................................................................................................... 4

5.3 Metabolic rate for a work cycle............................................................................................................ 4

5.4 Influence of the length of rest periods and work periods................................................................. 5

5.5 Obtaining values by interpolation ....................................................................................................... 6

5.6 Requirements for the application of metabolic-rate tables .............................................................. 6

6 Level 3, analysis.................................................................................................................................... 6

6.1 Estimation of metabolic rate using heart rate.................................................................................... 6

6.2 Relationship between heart rate and metabolic rate......................................................................... 7

7 Level 4, expertise .................................................................................................................................. 8

7.1 Determination of metabolic rate by measurement of oxygen consumption rate........................... 8

7.2 The doubly labelled water method for long-term measurements.................................................. 14

7.3 Direct calorimetry — Principle........................................................................................................... 14

Annex A (informative) Evaluation of the metabolic rate at level 1, screening ........................................... 15

Annex B (informative) Evaluation of the metabolic rate at level 2, observation........................................ 17

Annex C (informative) Evaluation of the metabolic rate at level 3, analysis .............................................. 20

Annex D (informative) Evaluation of the metabolic rate at level 4, expertise — Examples of the

calculation of metabolic rate based on measured data .................................................................. 21

© ISO 2004 – All rights reserved iii
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO 8996:2004(E)
Foreword

ISO (the International Organization for Standardization) is a worldwide federation of national standards bodies

(ISO member bodies). The work of preparing International Standards is normally carried out through ISO

technical committees. Each member body interested in a subject for which a technical committee has been

established has the right to be represented on that committee. International organizations, governmental and

non-governmental, in liaison with ISO, also take part in the work. ISO collaborates closely with the

International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) on all matters of electrotechnical standardization.

International Standards are drafted in accordance with the rules given in the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 2.

The main task of technical committees is to prepare International Standards. Draft International Standards

adopted by the technical committees are circulated to the member bodies for voting. Publication as an

International Standard requires approval by at least 75 % of the member bodies casting a vote.

Attention is drawn to the possibility that some of the elements of this document may be the subject of patent

rights. ISO shall not be held responsible for identifying any or all such patent rights.

ISO 8996 was prepared by Technical Committee ISO/TC 159, Ergonomics, Subcommittee SC 5, Ergonomics

of the physical environment.

This second edition cancels and replaces the first edition (ISO 8996:1990), which has been technically revised.

iv © ISO 2004 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
INTERNATIONAL STANDARD ISO 8996:2004(E)
Ergonomics of the thermal environment — Determination of
metabolic rate
1 Scope

The metabolic rate, as a conversion of chemical into mechanical and thermal energy, measures the energetic

cost of muscular load and gives a numerical index of activity. Metabolic rate is an important determinant of the

comfort or the strain resulting from exposure to a thermal environment. In particular, in hot climates, the high

levels of metabolic heat production associated with muscular work aggravate heat stress, as large amounts of

heat need to be dissipated, mostly by sweat evaporation.

This International Standard specifies different methods for the determination of metabolic rate in the context of

ergonomics of the climatic working environment. It can also be used for other applications — for example, the

assessment of working practices, the energetic cost of specific jobs or sport activities, the total cost of an

activity, etc.

The estimations, tables and other data included in this International Standard concern an “average” individual:

 a man 30 years old weighing 70 kg and 1,75 m tall (body surface area 1,8 m );

 a woman 30 years old weighing 60 kg and 1,70 m tall (body surface area 1,6 m ).

Users should make appropriate corrections when they are dealing with special populations including children,

aged persons, people with physical disabilities, etc.
2 Normative references

The following referenced documents are indispensable for the application of this document. For dated

references, only the edition cited applies. For undated references, the latest edition of the referenced

document (including any amendments) applies.

ISO 9886, Ergonomics — Evaluation of thermal strain by physiological measurements

ISO 15265, Ergonomics of the thermal environment — Risk assessment strategy for the prevention of stress

or discomfort in thermal working conditions
3 Principle and accuracy

The mechanical efficiency of muscular work — called the “useful work”, W — is low. In most types of industrial

work, it is so small (a few percent) that it is assumed to be nil. This means that the total energy consumption

while working is assumed equal to the heat production. For the purposes of this International Standard, the

metabolic rate is assumed to be equal to the rate of heat production.

Table 1 lists the different approaches presented in this International Standard for determining the metabolic

rate.

These approaches are structured following the philosophy exposed in ISO 15265 regarding the assessment of

exposure. Four levels are considered here:
© ISO 2004 – All rights reserved 1
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
ISO 8996:2004(E)

Level 1, screening: Two methods simple and easy to use are presented to quickly characterize the mean

workload for a given occupation or for a given activity:
 method 1A is a classification according to occupation;
 method 1B is a classification according to the kind of activity.

Both methods provide only a rough estimate and there is considerable scope for error. This limits their

accuracy considerably. At this level, an inspection of the work place is not necessary.

Level 2, observation: Two methods are presented for people with full knowledge of the working conditions

but without necessarily a training in ergonomics, to characterize, on average, a working situation at a specific

time:

 in method 2A, the metabolic rate is determined by adding to the baseline metabolic rate the metabolic

rate for body posture, the metabolic rate for the type of work and the metabolic rate for body motion

related to work speed (using group assessment tables);

 in method 2B, the metabolic rate is determined by means of the tabulated values for various activities.

A procedure is described to record the activities with time and compute the time-weighted average metabolic

rate, using the data from the two methods above.

The possibility for errors is high. A time and motion study is necessary to determine the metabolic rate in work

situations that involve a cycle of different activities.

Level 3, analysis: One method is addressed to people trained in occupational health and ergonomics of the

thermal environment. The metabolic rate is determined from heart rate recordings over a representative period.

This method for the indirect determination of metabolic rate is based on the relationship between oxygen

uptake and heart rate under defined conditions.

Level 4, expertise: Three methods are presented. They require very specific measurements made by

experts:

 in Method 4A, the oxygen consumption is measured over short periods (10 min to 20 min) (a detailed time

and motion study is necessary to show the representativity of the measurement period);

 method 4B is the so-called doubly labelled water method aiming at characterizing the average metabolic

rate over much longer periods (1 to 2 weeks);
 method 4C is a direct calorimetry method.
The main factors affecting the accuracy of the estimations are the following:
 individual variability;
 differences in the work equipment;
 differences in work speed;
 differences in work technique and skill;
 gender differences and anthropometric characteristics;
 cultural differences;

 when using the tables, differences between observers and their level of training;

2 © ISO 2004 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
ISO 8996:2004(E)

 when using level 3, the accuracy of the relationship between heart rate and oxygen uptake, as other

stress factors also influence the heart rate;

 at level 4, the measurement accuracy (determination of gas volume and oxygen fraction).

The accuracy of the results, but also the costs of the study, increase from level 1 to level 4. Measurement at

level 4 gives the most accurate values. As far as possible, the most accurate method should be used.

Table 1 — Levels for the determination of the metabolic rate
Level Method Accuracy Inspection of the work place
Not necessary, but information
1A: Classification according to
needed on technical equipment,
occupation Rough information
work organization
Screening
Very great risk of error
1B: Classification according to
activity
2A: Group assessment tables Time and motion study necessary
High error risk
Observation
Accuracy: ± 20 %
2B: Tables for specific activities
Medium error risk
3 Heart rate measurement under Study required to determine a
Analysis defined conditions representative period
Accuracy: ± 10 %
4A: Measurement of oxygen
Time and motion study necessary
consumption
Errors within the limits of the
accuracy of the measurement
Inspection of work place not
or of the time and motion
4B: Doubly labelled water method necessary, but leisure activities
Expertise
study
must be evaluated.
Accuracy: ± 5 %
Inspection of work place not
4C: Direct calorimetry
necessary
4 Level 1, screening
4.1 Table for the estimation of metabolic rate by occupation

Table A.1 in Annex A shows the metabolic rate for different occupations. The values are mean values for the

whole working time, but without considering longer rest pauses, for example lunchtime. Significant variation

may arise due to differences in technology, work elements, work organization, etc.

4.2 Classification of metabolic rate by categories

The metabolic rate can be estimated approximately using the classification given in Annex A. Table A.2

defines five classes of metabolic rate: resting, low, moderate, high, very high. For each class, an average and

a range of metabolic rate values are given as well as a number of examples. These activities are supposed to

include short rest pauses. The examples given in Table A.2 illustrate the classification.

5 Level 2, observation
5.1 Estimation of metabolic rate by task requirements
Here, the metabolic rate is estimated from the following observations:

 the body segment involved in the work: both hands, one arm, two arms, the entire body;

© ISO 2004 – All rights reserved 3
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
ISO 8996:2004(E)

 the workload for that body segment: light, medium, heavy, as judged subjectively by the observer;

 the body posture: sitting, kneeling, crouching, standing, standing stooped;
 the work speed.

Table B.1 in Annex B gives the mean value and the range of metabolic rates for a standard person, seated, as

a function of the body segment involved and the workload. Table B.2 gives the corrections to be added when

the posture is different from seated.
5.2 Metabolic rate for typical activities

Table B.3 in Annex B provides values of metabolic rate for typical activities. These values are based on

measurements performed in the past in many different laboratories.
5.3 Metabolic rate for a work cycle

To determine the overall metabolic rate for a work cycle, it is necessary to carry out a time and motion study

that includes a detailed description of the work. This involves classifying each activity and taking account of

factors such as the duration of each activity, the distances walked, the heights climbed, the weights

manipulated, the number of actions carried out, etc.

The time-weighted average metabolic rate for a work cycle can be determined from the metabolic rate of the

respective activity and the respective duration using the equation:
M = Mt (1)
i=1
where
M is the average metabolic rate for the work cycle, in watts per square metre;
M is the metabolic rate for activity i, in watts per square metre;
t is the duration of activity i, in minutes;

T is the duration, in minutes, of the work cycle considered, and is equal to the sum of the partial

durations t .

The recording of occupational activities and the duration of the activities for a working day or for a particular

period may be simplified by using the diary described in Table B.4 and Table B.5. Activities are recorded when

they are changed, using a classification code derived from the tables for the estimation of metabolic rate by

task components. The number of components to be considered will vary depending upon the complexity of the

activity.
The procedure is as follows:
a) Fill in the name and other details of the person under study.
b) Observe the work of the person under study (at least 2 h to 3 h).

c) Determine each individual task component and the corresponding metabolic rate estimated from

Table B.1, B.2 or B.3.
d) Always fill in the diary when the task component is changed.
e) Calculate the total length of time spent on each task component.
4 © ISO 2004 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO 8996:2004(E)

f) Multiply the length of time spent on each task component by the corresponding metabolic rate.

g) Add the values.
h) Divide the sum by the total length of the observation period.
Forms for the evaluation are given in Tables B.4 and B.5.
5.4 Influence of the length of rest periods and work periods

The tables in Annex B cannot be used for the evaluation of the average metabolic rate for working conditions

with an intermittent sequence of short periods of activity and long rest periods. In this case, the technique

described in 5.3. would lead to an underestimation of the metabolic rate, known as the Simonson effect. The

limit of validity of combinations of work and rest periods is shown by the curve in Figure 1. Example 1

concerns a cycle of 8 min of rest and 1 min of work. In this case, the technique described in 5.3 would lead to

an underestimation of the metabolic rate and the tables in Annex B cannot be used. For work-rest cycles such

as in Example 2, the tables can be used with the indicated accuracy.
Figure 1 only applies if there is no physical workload during the rest periods.

An increase in the metabolic rate due to this effect depends on the type of work and the muscle groups used.

Further information on this problem is not given here, because of its complexity and because of its low

relevancy at this level of evaluation.
Key
X length of work period, min
Y length of rest pause, min
1 Example 1
2 Example 2

Figure 1 — Curve showing limit of validity of combinations of work and rest periods

when estimating metabolic rate
© ISO 2004 – All rights reserved 5
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
ISO 8996:2004(E)
5.5 Obtaining values by interpolation

It is possible to obtain metabolic-rate values by interpolation. When working speeds differ from those given in

the tables in Annex B, conversion is only possible within a range of ± 25 % of the indicated speed, however.

5.6 Requirements for the application of metabolic-rate tables

To allow comparison of values from different sources, values reported in the tables in Annexes A and B have

been standardized with respect to the standard person working in a comfortable thermal environment.

The metabolic rate for a given person performing a given task may vary within certain limits around the mean

values given in the tables, due to the influence of the factors mentioned in Clause 3.

However, it can be estimated that:

 for the same work and under the same working conditions, the metabolic rate can vary from person to

person by about ± 5 %;

 for a person trained in the activity, the variation is about 5 % under Iaboratory conditions;

 under field conditions, i.e. when the activity to be measured is not exactly the same from test to test, a

variation of up to 20 % can be expected.

Considering this risk of error, it is normally not justified, at this level of evaluation, to take into consideration

differences in height or gender.

The consideration of the weight of the subject might be warranted only for activities involving movements of

the whole body, such as walking, climbing, lifting weights.
−2 −2

In hot conditions, a maximum increase of 5 W⋅m to 10 W⋅m may be expected due to increased heart rate

and sweating. Such a correction is not justified.

On the other hand, in cold conditions, an increase of up to 200 W⋅m may be observed when shivering

occurs. The wearing of heavy clothing will also increase metabolic rate, by increasing the weight of the subject

and decreasing the subject's ease of movement.
6 Level 3, analysis
6.1 Estimation of metabolic rate using heart rate
The heart rate at a given time may be regarded as the sum of several components:
HR = HR + ∆HR + ∆HR + ∆HR + ∆HR + ∆HR (2)
0 M S T N E
where

HR is the heart rate, in beats per minute, at rest in a prone position under neutral thermal conditions;

∆HR is the increase in heart rate, in beats per minute, due to dynamic muscular load, under neutral

thermal conditions;

∆HR is the increase in heart rate, in beats per minute, due to static muscular work (this component

depends on the relationship between the force used and the maximum voluntary force of the

working muscle group);
6 © ISO 2004 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 10 ----------------------
ISO 8996:2004(E)

∆HR is the increase in heart rate, in beats per minute, due to heat stress (the thermal component is

discussed in ISO 9886);
∆HR is the increase in heart rate, in beats per minute, due to mental load;

∆HR is the change in heart rate, in beats per minute, due to other factors, for example respiratory

effects, circadian rhythms, dehydration.

In the case of dynamic work using major muscle groups, with only a small amount of static muscular load and

in the absence of thermal strain and mental loads, the metabolic rate may be estimated by measuring the

heart rate while working. Under such conditions, a linear relationship exists between the metabolic rate and

the heart rate. If the above-mentioned restrictions are taken into account, this method can be more accurate

than the level 1 and level 2 methods of estimation (see Table 1) and is less complex than the measurement of

oxygen consumption, which provides the most accurate results.

The heart rate may be recorded continuously, for example by the use of telemetric equipment, or, with a

further reduction in accuracy, measured manually by counting the arterial pulse rate (see ISO 9886).

The mean heart rate HR may be computed over fixed time intervals, for example 1 min, over different working

cycles or over the whole shift time.

In the presence of considerable thermal load, static muscular work, dynamic work with small muscle groups

and/or mental loads, the slope and form of the heart rate to metabolic rate relationship can change drastically.

The procedure used to correct the heart rate measurements for thermal effects is described in ISO 9886.

6.2 Relationship between heart rate and metabolic rate

The relationship between heart rate and metabolic rate can be measured by recording the heart rate at

different stages of defined muscular load during an experiment in a neutral climatic environment. Heart rate

and corresponding oxygen consumption or physical work performed is measured during dynamic muscular

work at different load stages. As the type of work (cycle ergometer, step test, treadmill) and the sequence and

duration of the load stages have an influence on both parameters, it is necessary to use a standardized

procedure.
In general, linearity holds true for the range extending

 from a lower limit of 120 beats per minute (bpm), because the mental component can then be neglected;

 up to 20 beats below the maximum heart rate of the subject, because the heart rate tends to level off

above this value.

Within this range, the relationship between heart rate and metabolic rate can be written as:

HR = HR + RM × (M − M ) (3)
0 0
where
M is the metabolic rate, in watts per square metre;
M is the metabolic rate at rest, in watts per square metre;
RM is the increase in heart rate per unit of metabolic rate;
HR is the heart rate at rest, under neutral thermal conditions.

This relationship is used to derive the metabolic rate from the measured heart rate.

When this expression is derived from HR and M measurements during an experiment, the precision can be

estimated at about 10 %.
© ISO 2004 – All rights reserved 7
---------------------- Page: 11 ----------------------
ISO 8996:2004(E)

With a further loss of accuracy, the expression can be derived from estimations of:

 the heart rate at rest under neutral thermal conditions HR ;
 the metabolic rate at rest M (= 55 watts per square metre);

 the maximum working capacity MWC, estimated using the following formulae as a function of age (A, in

years) and weight (P, in kg):
0,666 −2
Men: MWC = (41,7 − 0,22A)P W⋅m (4)
0,666 −2
Women: MWC = (35,0 − 0,22A)P W⋅m (5)
 the maximum heart rate HR , estimated by the following formula:
max
HR = 205 − 0,62A (6)
max
 RM = (HR − HR )/(MWC − M) (7)
max 0 0

Table C.1 in Annex C provides directly estimations of the HR-M relationship for ages ranging from 20 years to

60 years and weights ranging from 50 kg to 90 kg. The precision, in that case, is further reduced.

7 Level 4, expertise
7.1 Determination of metabolic rate by measurement of oxygen consumption rate
7.1.1 Partial and integral methods
The metabolic rate can be determined by two main methods:
 the partial method, to be used for light and moderately heavy work;
 the integral method, to be used for heavy work of short duration.
The use of these two methods is justified as follows:

 In the case of light and moderate work, the oxygen uptake reaches a steady state equal to the oxygen

requirement after a short period of work.

 In the case of heavy work, the oxygen requirement is above the long-term limit of aerobic power and, in

the case of very heavy work, above the maximum aerobic power. During heavy work, the oxygen uptake

cannot satisfy the oxygen requirement. The oxygen deficit is balanced after work has ceased. Thus, the

measurement includes the work period and the subsequent rest period. The integral method shall be

used for an oxygen consumption rate of more than 60 litres of oxygen per hour (60 l O /h), equivalent to

1 litre of oxygen per minute.
Figure 2 shows the procedure to be followed when using the partial method.

Since the steady state is only reached after 3 min to 5 min, the collection of expired air starts after about 5 min

(preliminary period), without interrupting the work. The work continues for 5 min to 10 min (main period). Air

collection can be either complete (for example with a Douglas bag) or by regular sampling (for example with a

gas-meter). It is stopped when work ceases.
8 © ISO 2004 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 12 ----------------------
ISO 8996:2004(E)
Key
X time, min
Y oxygen uptake, l⋅min
1 O requirement 6 main period
2 increase in metabolic rate due to work 7 work period
3 baseline metabolic rate 8 O deficit
4 measurement period 9 O debt repayment
5 preliminary period
Figure 2 — Measurement of metabolic rate using the partial method

With the integral method (see Figure 3), expired-air collection is started immediately at the beginning of the

work period and the work is continued for a certain time, usually for not more than 2 min to 3 min (main

period). At the end of the work period, the subject is asked to sit down and air collection is continued until the

resting value is reached. During this recovery period, the oxygen debt incurred during the work is repaid.

Since the measurement includes the working (main period) and sitting (recovery period) activity, the metabolic

rate needed for sitting has to be subtracted from the measured value in order to obtain the metabolic rate

related to the work alone.

It is necessary to record the course of the work (time and motion study) and the frequency of repeated

activities for further evaluation of the results and for comparison of the metabolic rate with data in the literature.

Examples of the calculation of metabolic rate are given in Annex D.
© ISO 2004 – All rights reserved 9
---------------------- Page: 13 ----------------------
ISO 8996:2004(E)
Key
X time, min
Y oxygen uptake, l⋅min
1 O requirement 6 recovery period
2 maximum aerobic power 7 measurement period
3 increase in metabolic rate due to work 8 O deficit
4 work period 9 O debt repayment
5 main period 10 baseline metabolic rate
Figure 3 — Measurement of metabolic rate using the integral method
7.1.2 Determination of metabolic rate from oxygen consumption rate

Since the human body can only store very small amounts of oxygen, it must be continuously taken up from the

atmosph
...

NORME ISO
INTERNATIONALE 8996
Deuxième édition
2004-10-01
Ergonomie de l'environnement
thermique — Détermination du
métabolisme énergétique
Ergonomics of the thermal environment — Determination of metabolic
rate
Numéro de référence
ISO 8996:2004(F)
ISO 2004
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO 8996:2004(F)
PDF – Exonération de responsabilité

Le présent fichier PDF peut contenir des polices de caractères intégrées. Conformément aux conditions de licence d'Adobe, ce fichier

peut être imprimé ou visualisé, mais ne doit pas être modifié à moins que l'ordinateur employé à cet effet ne bénéficie d'une licence

autorisant l'utilisation de ces polices et que celles-ci y soient installées. Lors du téléchargement de ce fichier, les parties concernées

acceptent de fait la responsabilité de ne pas enfreindre les conditions de licence d'Adobe. Le Secrétariat central de l'ISO décline toute

responsabilité en la matière.
Adobe est une marque déposée d'Adobe Systems Incorporated.

Les détails relatifs aux produits logiciels utilisés pour la création du présent fichier PDF sont disponibles dans la rubrique General Info

du fichier; les paramètres de création PDF ont été optimisés pour l'impression. Toutes les mesures ont été prises pour garantir

l'exploitation de ce fichier par les comités membres de l'ISO. Dans le cas peu probable où surviendrait un problème d'utilisation,

veuillez en informer le Secrétariat central à l'adresse donnée ci-dessous.
© ISO 2004

Droits de reproduction réservés. Sauf prescription différente, aucune partie de cette publication ne peut être reproduite ni utilisée sous

quelque forme que ce soit et par aucun procédé, électronique ou mécanique, y compris la photocopie et les microfilms, sans l'accord écrit

de l'ISO à l'adresse ci-après ou du comité membre de l'ISO dans le pays du demandeur.

ISO copyright office
Case postale 56 • CH-1211 Geneva 20
Tel. + 41 22 749 01 11
Fax. + 41 22 749 09 47
E-mail copyright@iso.org
Web www.iso.org
Publié en Suisse
ii © ISO 2004 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO 8996:2004(F)
Sommaire Page

Avant-propos..................................................................................................................................................... iv

1 Domaine d'application.......................................................................................................................... 1

2 Références normatives......................................................................................................................... 1

3 Principes et précision........................................................................................................................... 1

4 Niveau 1, typologies ............................................................................................................................. 3

4.1 Tableau d'estimation du métabolisme énergétique par professions .............................................. 3

4.2 Classification du métabolisme énergétique par catégories............................................................. 3

5 Niveau 2, observation........................................................................................................................... 4

5.1 Estimation du métabolisme énergétique à partir des composantes de l'activité .......................... 4

5.2 Métabolisme énergétique pour des activités type............................................................................. 4

5.3 Métabolisme énergétique d'un cycle de travail ................................................................................. 4

5.4 Influence de la durée des périodes de repos et des périodes de travail ........................................ 5

5.5 Interpolation des valeurs...................................................................................................................... 6

5.6 Exigences concernant l'application des tableaux d'évaluation du métabolisme

énergétique............................................................................................................................................ 6

6 Niveau 3, analyse .................................................................................................................................. 7

6.1 Estimation du métabolisme énergétique à partir de la fréquence cardiaque................................. 7

6.2 Relation entre fréquence cardiaque et métabolisme énergétique................................................... 8

7 Niveau 4, expertise................................................................................................................................ 9

7.1 Détermination du métabolisme énergétique à partir du mesurage de la consommation

d'oxygène............................................................................................................................................... 9

7.2 Méthode de l'eau doublement marquée pour les mesurages à long terme.................................. 15

7.3 Méthode calorimétrique directe — Principe..................................................................................... 15

Annexe A (informative) Évaluation du métabolisme énergétique au niveau 1, typologies ...................... 16

Annexe B (informative) Évaluation du métabolisme énergétique au niveau 2, observation.................... 18

Annexe C (informative) Évaluation du métabolisme énergétique au niveau 3, analyse ........................... 21

Annexe D (informative) Évaluation du métabolisme énergétique au niveau 4, expertise —

Exemples de calcul du métabolisme énergétique basé sur des données mesurées.................. 22

© ISO 2004 – Tous droits réservés iii
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO 8996:2004(F)
Avant-propos

L'ISO (Organisation internationale de normalisation) est une fédération mondiale d'organismes nationaux de

normalisation (comités membres de l'ISO). L'élaboration des Normes internationales est en général confiée

aux comités techniques de l'ISO. Chaque comité membre intéressé par une étude a le droit de faire partie du

comité technique créé à cet effet. Les organisations internationales, gouvernementales et non

gouvernementales, en liaison avec l'ISO participent également aux travaux. L'ISO collabore étroitement avec

la Commission électrotechnique internationale (CEI) en ce qui concerne la normalisation électrotechnique.

Les Normes internationales sont rédigées conformément aux règles données dans les Directives ISO/CEI,

Partie 2.

La tâche principale des comités techniques est d'élaborer les Normes internationales. Les projets de Normes

internationales adoptés par les comités techniques sont soumis aux comités membres pour vote. Leur

publication comme Normes internationales requiert l'approbation de 75 % au moins des comités membres

votants.

L'attention est appelée sur le fait que certains des éléments du présent document peuvent faire l'objet de

droits de propriété intellectuelle ou de droits analogues. L'ISO ne saurait être tenue pour responsable de ne

pas avoir identifié de tels droits de propriété et averti de leur existence.

L'ISO 8996 a été élaborée par le comité technique ISO/TC 159, Ergonomie, sous-comité SC 5, Ergonomie de

l'environnement physique.

Cette deuxième édition annule et remplace la première édition (ISO 8996:1990), qui a fait l'objet d'une

révision technique.
iv © ISO 2004 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
NORME INTERNATIONALE ISO 8996:2004(F)
Ergonomie de l'environnement thermique — Détermination du
métabolisme énergétique
1 Domaine d'application

Le métabolisme énergétique, transformation d'énergie chimique potentielle en énergie thermique et en

énergie mécanique, mesure le coût énergétique de la charge musculaire et constitue un indice quantitatif de

l'activité. Le métabolisme énergétique représente un facteur important pour déterminer le confort ou la

contrainte résultant de l'exposition à un environnement thermique. Dans les climats chauds notamment, les

niveaux élevés de production de chaleur métabolique, associés au travail musculaire, aggravent la contrainte

thermique dans la mesure où de grandes quantités de chaleur doivent être dissipées, principalement par

évaporation de la sueur.

La présente Norme internationale spécifie différentes méthodes visant à déterminer le métabolisme

énergétique dans le domaine de l'ergonomie de l'environnement de travail climatique. Elle peut cependant

être également utilisée en vue d'autres applications — par exemple: l'évaluation des pratiques de travail, le

coût énergétique de travaux ou d'activités sportives spécifiques, le coût global de l'activité, etc.

Les estimations, les tableaux et d'autres données figurant dans la présente Norme internationale concernent

un individu «moyen»:

 un homme âgé de 30 ans, pesant 70 kg et mesurant 1,75 m (surface corporelle: 1,8 m );

 une femme âgée de 30 ans, pesant 60 kg et mesurant 1,70 m (surface corporelle: 1,6 m ).

Il convient que les utilisateurs apportent les corrections appropriées lorsqu'ils considèrent une population

particulière comportant des enfants, des personnes âgées, des personnes handicapées, etc.

2 Références normatives

Les documents de référence suivants sont indispensables pour l'application du présent document. Pour les

références datées, seule l'édition citée s'applique. Pour les références non datées, la dernière édition du

document de référence s'applique (y compris les éventuels amendements).

ISO 9886, Ergonomie — Évaluation de l'astreinte thermique par mesures physiologiques

ISO 15265, Ergonomie des ambiances thermiques — Stratégie d'évaluation du risque pour la prévention de

contraintes ou d'inconfort dans des conditions de travail thermiques
3 Principes et précision

Le rendement mécanique du travail musculaire — appelé «travail utile», W — est faible. Dans la plupart des

activités industrielles, il est si faible (quelques pour-cents) qu'il est supposé nul. Cela signifie que la

consommation totale d'énergie au travail est supposée égale à la production de chaleur. Pour les besoins de

la présente Norme internationale, le métabolisme énergétique est considéré comme étant égal à la production

de chaleur métabolique.
© ISO 2004 – Tous droits réservés 1
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
ISO 8996:2004(F)

Le Tableau 1 indique les différentes méthodes décrites dans la présente Norme internationale pour

déterminer le métabolisme énergétique.

Ces méthodes sont structurées selon la philosophie décrite dans l'ISO 15265 concernant l'évaluation de

l'exposition. Les quatre niveaux suivants sont considérés:

Niveau 1, typologies: deux méthodes simples et faciles à utiliser pour déterminer rapidement la charge de

travail moyenne pour une profession ou une activité donnée:
 la méthode 1A est une classification en fonction de la profession;
 la méthode 1B est une classification en fonction du type d'activité.

Les deux méthodes donnent une estimation grossière sujette à une erreur importante. Cela limite

considérablement leur précision. À ce niveau, un examen du poste de travail n'est pas nécessaire.

Niveau 2, observation: deux méthodes destinées à des personnes ayant une parfaite connaissance des

conditions de travail mais n'ayant pas nécessairement reçu une formation en ergonomie, pour caractériser en

moyenne une situation de travail à un moment donné:

 la méthode 2A permet de déterminer le métabolisme énergétique en ajoutant au métabolisme de base le

métabolisme lié à la posture, le métabolisme lié au type d'activité et le métabolisme lié au déplacement

du corps en fonction de la vitesse de travail (en utilisant les tableaux d'estimation par les composantes);

 la méthode 2B permet de déterminer le métabolisme énergétique au moyen de valeurs classifiées pour

différentes activités.

Un mode opératoire décrit la manière d'enregistrer les activités au cours du temps et de calculer le

métabolisme moyen pondéré en fonction du temps, à partir des données issues des deux méthodes

susmentionnées.

La possibilité d'erreurs est élevée. Une analyse des temps et des mouvements est nécessaire pour

déterminer le métabolisme pour des conditions de travail qui comportent une succession d'activités différentes.

Niveau 3, analyse: une méthode destinée aux personnes formées à l'hygiène du travail et à l'ergonomie de

l'environnement thermique. Le métabolisme énergétique est déterminé à partir de mesures de la fréquence

cardiaque sur une période représentative. Cette méthode, qui permet une détermination indirecte du

métabolisme, est fondée sur la relation entre la consommation d'oxygène et la fréquence cardiaque dans des

conditions définies.

Niveau 4, expertise: trois méthodes sont présentées. Elles nécessitent des mesurages très spécifiques

réalisés par des experts:

 avec la méthode 4A, la consommation d'oxygène est mesurée sur de courtes périodes (10 min à 20 min).

Une analyse détaillée des temps et des mouvements est nécessaire pour indiquer la représentativité de

la période de mesure;

 la méthode 4B est la méthode dite méthode de l'eau doublement marquée, destinée à déterminer le

métabolisme moyen sur des périodes beaucoup plus longues (1 à 2 semaines);
 la méthode 4C est la méthode calorimétrique directe.

La précision des estimations est principalement limitée par les facteurs suivants:

 la variabilité des individus;
 les différences au niveau des outils de travail;
 les différences au niveau des vitesses de travail;
2 © ISO 2004 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
ISO 8996:2004(F)
 les différences en matière de méthodes de travail et de compétences;
 les différences entre les sexes et les caractéristiques anthropométriques;
 les différences culturelles;

 en cas d'utilisation de tableaux, les différences existant entre les observateurs et leur niveau de

formation;

 lors de l'utilisation du niveau 3, la validité de la relation entre la consommation d'oxygène et la fréquence

cardiaque, puisque d'autres facteurs de contrainte influencent la fréquence cardiaque;

 au niveau 4, la précision des mesures (détermination du volume gazeux et de la teneur en oxygène).

La précision des résultats, mais également le coût de l'étude, augmentent du niveau 1 au niveau 4. Un

mesurage de niveau 4 donne les valeurs les plus précises. Il convient d'utiliser autant que possible le

mesurage le plus précis.
Tableau 1 — Niveaux de détermination du métabolisme énergétique
Niveau Méthode Précision Étude du poste de travail
1A: Classification en fonction de Pas nécessaire, mais
Information grossière
la profession
information requise sur
Risque d'erreur très
l'équipement technique et
Typologies
1B: Classification en fonction de
important
l'organisation du travail
l'activité
2A: Tableaux d'estimation par les
Risque d'erreur élevé
2 composantes
Étude des temps et des
Observation Précision : ± 20 % mouvements nécessaire
2B: Tableaux par activités
spécifiques
Mesurage de la fréquence Étude requise pour
Risque d'erreur modéré
cardiaque dans des conditions déterminer une période
Analyse Précision : ± 10 %
définies représentative
4A: Mesurage de la Inspection du lieu de travail
consommation d'oxygène nécessaire
Erreurs dans les limites
Inspection du lieu de travail
de précision de la mesure
4B: Méthode de l'eau doublement
pas nécessaire, mais
ou de l'étude des temps
Expertise
marquée estimation des activités de
Précision : ± 5 %
loisirs requise
4C: Calorimétrie directe Pas nécessaire
4 Niveau 1, typologies
4.1 Tableau d'estimation du métabolisme énergétique par professions

Le Tableau A.1 de l'Annexe A donne le métabolisme énergétique pour plusieurs professions. Les valeurs sont

des valeurs moyennes pour toute la durée de travail, mais elles ne tiennent pas compte de longues périodes

de repos telles que la durée du déjeuner. Un écart important peut résulter des différences en matière de

technologie, d'outils de travail, de processus de travail, etc.
4.2 Classification du métabolisme énergétique par catégories

Le métabolisme peut être estimé approximativement au moyen de la classification donnée à l'Annexe A. Le

Tableau A.2 définit cinq classes de métabolisme: repos, métabolisme faible, moyen, élevé et très élevé. Pour

chaque classe sont indiqués une valeur moyenne et une plage de valeurs du métabolisme ainsi qu'un certain

© ISO 2004 – Tous droits réservés 3
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
ISO 8996:2004(F)

nombre d'exemples. Ces activités sont supposées comporter de courtes périodes de repos. Les exemples

donnés dans le Tableau A.2 illustrent cette classification.
5 Niveau 2, observation
5.1 Estimation du métabolisme énergétique à partir des composantes de l'activité

Dans ce cas, le métabolisme est déterminé sur la base des observations suivantes:

 la partie du corps impliquée dans le travail: les deux mains, un bras, deux bras, le corps entier;

 la charge de travail pour cette partie du corps: légère, modérée, intense, telle que jugée subjectivement

par l'observateur;
 la posture du sujet: assis, agenouillé, accroupi, debout, debout penché;
 la vitesse de travail.

Le Tableau B.1 de l'Annexe B donne la valeur moyenne et une plage de valeurs des métabolismes pour un

sujet standard, assis, en fonction de la partie du corps impliquée et de la charge de travail. Le Tableau B.2

fournit les corrections à apporter lorsque la posture est différente de la position assise.

5.2 Métabolisme énergétique pour des activités types

Le Tableau B.3 de l'Annexe B fournit les valeurs du métabolisme pour des activités types. Ces valeurs sont

fondées sur des mesurages réalisés dans le passé par de nombreux laboratoires distincts.

5.3 Métabolisme énergétique d'un cycle de travail

Pour déterminer le métabolisme total d'un cycle de travail, il est nécessaire d'effectuer une étude des temps et

des mouvements comprenant une description détaillée du travail. Cela implique de classer chaque activité en

tenant compte de facteurs tels que la durée de chaque activité, les distances parcourues, les dénivelés

associés au déplacement, les charges manipulées, le nombre d'actions effectuées.

Le métabolisme moyen pondéré en fonction du temps pour un cycle de travail peut être déterminé à partir du

métabolisme et de la durée des activités concernées, selon l'équation suivante:
M = Mt (1)
∑ ii
i=1
M est le métabolisme moyen pour le cycle de travail, en watts par mètre carré;
M est le métabolisme de l'activité i, en watts par mètre carré;
t est la durée de l'activité i, en minutes;

T est la durée, en minutes, du cycle de travail considéré, et elle est égale à la somme des durées

partielles t .

L'enregistrement des activités professionnelles et de la durée des activités pour une journée de travail ou pour

une période particulière peut être simplifié en utilisant le tableau de bord décrit dans les Tableaux B.4 et B.5.

Les activités sont enregistrées au moment où elles changent, en utilisant un code de classification issu des

4 © ISO 2004 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO 8996:2004(F)

tableaux d'estimation du métabolisme par composantes de l'activité. Le nombre de composantes à prendre en

considération dépend de la complexité de l'activité.
Le mode opératoire est le suivant.
a) Inscrire le nom et d'autres détails de la personne au travail.
b) Observer le travail de la personne au travail (pendant au moins 2 h à 3 h).

c) Déterminer chaque composante individuelle d'activité et le métabolisme correspondant estimé sur la

base des Tableaux B.1, B.2 ou B.3.

d) Toujours renseigner le tableau de bord au moment du changement de composante d'activité.

e) Calculer la durée totale pour chaque composante d'activité.

f) Multiplier la durée de chaque composante d'activité par le métabolisme correspondant.

g) Ajouter les valeurs.
h) Diviser la somme par la durée totale de la période d'observation.
Les Tableaux B.4 et B.5 fournissent des formulaires d'évaluation.
5.4 Influence de la durée des périodes de repos et des périodes de travail

Les tableaux de l'Annexe B ne peuvent pas être utilisés pour l'évaluation du métabolisme moyen dans des

conditions de travail impliquant une succession de courtes périodes d'activité et de longues périodes de repos.

Dans ce cas, la procédure exposée en 5.3 conduirait à sous-estimer le métabolisme, du fait de l'effet dit de

Simonson. La courbe de la Figure 1 présente la limite de validité des combinaisons de périodes de travail et

des périodes de repos. L'Exemple 1 concerne une alternance de 1 min de travail avec 8 min de repos. Dans

ce cas, la procédure exposée en 5.3 conduit à une sous-estimation, et les tableaux de l'Annexe B ne peuvent

pas être utilisés. Pour les cycles de travail-repos tels qu'illustrés dans l'Exemple 2, les tableaux peuvent être

utilisés avec la précision indiquée.

La Figure 1 ne s'applique qu'en l'absence de charge de travail physique pendant la période de repos.

L'augmentation du métabolisme due à cet effet dépend de la nature du travail et des groupes musculaires

utilisés. Il n'a pas été jugé utile de donner ici plus d'informations sur cette question, en raison de sa complexité

et de sa faible pertinence à ce niveau d'évaluation.
© ISO 2004 – Tous droits réservés 5
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
ISO 8996:2004(F)
Légende
X durée des périodes de travail, min
Y durée des périodes de repos, min
1 Exemple 1
2 Exemple 2

Figure 1 — Courbe présentant la limite de validité des combinaisons de périodes de travail

et de périodes de repos durant l'évaluation du métabolisme énergétique
5.5 Interpolation des valeurs

L'interpolation des valeurs de métabolisme est possible. Toutefois, lorsque les vitesses de travail diffèrent de

celles données dans les tableaux de l'Annexe B, une conversion n'est possible que dans la limite de ± 25 %

de la vitesse indiquée.
5.6 Exigences concernant l'application des tableaux d'évaluation du métabolisme
énergétique

Pour permettre une comparaison des valeurs provenant de différentes sources, les valeurs spécifiées dans

les tableaux des Annexes A et B ont été normalisées par rapport à un sujet standard travaillant dans un

environnement thermique confortable.

Le métabolisme d'une personne donnée réalisant une tâche spécifique peut varier dans certaines limites

autour des valeurs moyennes indiquées dans les tableaux en raison de l'influence des facteurs mentionnés à

l'Article 3.
On peut cependant considérer que

 pour le même travail et dans les mêmes conditions de travail, le métabolisme peut varier d'environ ± 5 %

d'une personne à une autre;

 pour une personne habituée à l'activité, la variation est d'environ 5 % dans des conditions de laboratoire;

 sur le terrain, c'est-à-dire lorsque l'activité à mesurer n'est pas exactement la même d'un essai à l'autre,

une variation pouvant aller jusqu'à 20 % peut être attendue.
6 © ISO 2004 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 10 ----------------------
ISO 8996:2004(F)

Étant donné ce risque d'erreur, il n'est généralement pas justifié, à ce stade de l'évaluation, de tenir compte

des différences de taille ou de sexe.

La prise en compte du poids du sujet ne pourrait être garantie que pour des activités impliquant des

mouvements du corps entier, comme marcher, grimper, soulever des poids.
−2 −2

Dans des conditions chaudes, une augmentation maximale de 5 W⋅m à 10 W⋅m peut être attendue en

raison de l'augmentation de la fréquence cardiaque et de la sudation. Une telle correction n'est pas justifiée.

Par ailleurs, dans des conditions froides, une augmentation pouvant aller jusqu'à 200 W⋅m peut être

observée en présence de frissons. Le port de vêtements lourds augmentera également le métabolisme en

accroissant le poids du sujet et en réduisant sa liberté de mouvements.
6 Niveau 3, analyse
6.1 Estimation du métabolisme énergétique à partir de la fréquence cardiaque

La fréquence cardiaque à un moment donné peut être considérée comme étant la somme de plusieurs

composantes.
HR = HR + ∆HR + ∆HR + ∆HR + ∆HR + ∆HR (2)
0 M S T N E

HR est la fréquence cardiaque, en battements par minute, au repos, en position allongée sur le

ventre, dans des conditions thermiques neutres;

∆HR est l'augmentation de la fréquence cardiaque, en battements par minute, liée au travail

musculaire dynamique dans des conditions thermiques neutres;

∆HR est l'augmentation de la fréquence cardiaque, en battements par minute, liée au travail

musculaire statique (cette composante dépend de la relation entre la force exercée et la force

volontaire maximale du groupe musculaire utilisé);

∆HR est l'augmentation de la fréquence cardiaque, en battements par minute, due à la contrainte

thermique (la composante thermique est traitée dans l'ISO 9886);

∆HR est l'augmentation de la fréquence cardiaque, en battements par minute, due à la charge

mentale;

∆HR est le changement de la fréquence cardiaque, en battements par minute, dû à d'autres facteurs,

par exemple aux effets respiratoires, aux rythmes circadiens, à la déshydratation.

Dans le cas d'un travail dynamique mettant en jeu des groupes musculaires majeurs, avec un travail

musculaire statique faible et en l'absence d'astreinte thermique et de charge mentale, le métabolisme peut

être estimé en mesurant la fréquence cardiaque pendant le travail. Dans ces conditions, une relation linéaire

existe entre le métabolisme et la fréquence cardiaque. Sous réserve de la prise en compte des restrictions

mentionnées ci-dessus, cette méthode peut être plus précise que les méthodes d'estimation du niveau 1 et du

niveau 2 (voir le Tableau 1) et elle est moins compliquée que le mesurage de la consommation d'oxygène, qui

donne les résultats les plus précis.

La fréquence cardiaque peut être enregistrée de façon continue, par exemple par l'utilisation d'équipements

télémétriques ou, avec une diminution consécutive de la précision, mesurée manuellement en comptant les

pulsations artérielles (voir l'ISO 9886).

La fréquence cardiaque moyenne, HR, peut être calculée sur des intervalles de temps fixes, par exemple

1 min, pour différents cycles de travail ou sur toute la journée de travail.
© ISO 2004 – Tous droits réservés 7
---------------------- Page: 11 ----------------------
ISO 8996:2004(F)

En présence d'une charge thermique importante, d'un travail musculaire statique, d'un travail dynamique

mettant en jeu de petits groupes musculaires et/ou des charges mentales, la pente et la forme de la relation

fréquence cardiaque-métabolisme peuvent changer radicalement. Les modalités de correction des mesurages

de la fréquence cardiaque pour tenir compte de l'effet thermique sont décrites dans l'ISO 9886.

6.2 Relation entre fréquence cardiaque et métabolisme énergétique

La relation entre la fréquence cardiaque et le métabolisme peut être mesurée par l'enregistrement de la

fréquence cardiaque à différents paliers d'un effort musculaire, défini au cours d'une expérimentation réalisée

dans un environnement climatique neutre. Au cours d'un travail musculaire dynamique, la fréquence

cardiaque et la consommation d'oxygène, ou le travail physique effectué correspondant, sont mesurés à

différents paliers de l'effort. En raison de l'influence du type d'effort (bicyclette ergométrique, «step test», tapis

roulant), de l'ordre et de la durée des paliers d'effort sur les deux paramètres, il est nécessaire d'utiliser un

mode opératoire normalisé.
En général, la linéarité subsiste dans l'intervalle

 W 120 battements par minute (bpm), car la composante mentale peut alors être négligée;

 u 20 battements par minute en dessous de la fréquence cardiaque maximale du sujet, car au-delà de

cette valeur la fréquence cardiaque a tendance à plafonner.

Dans cet intervalle, la relation entre la fréquence cardiaque et le métabolisme peut être exprimée de la

manière suivante:
HR = HR + RM × (M − M ) (3)
0 0
M est le métabolisme, en watts par mètre carré;
M est le métabolisme au repos, en watts par mètre carré;
RM est l'augmentation de la fréquence cardiaque par unité de métabolisme;
HR est la fréquence cardiaque au repos, dans des conditions thermiques neutres.

Cette relation est utilisée pour calculer le métabolisme sur la base de la fréquence cardiaque mesurée.

Lorsque cette expression est déduite des mesurages de HR et de M au cours d'une expérimentation, la

précision peut être évaluée autour de 10 %.

Moyennant une perte de précision, l'expression peut être calculée à partir des estimations suivantes:

 de la fréquence cardiaque au repos, HR , dans des conditions thermiques neutres;

 du métabolisme au repos, M (= 55 watts par mètre carré);

 de la capacité de travail maximale, MWC, estimée à l'aide des formules suivantes en fonction de l'âge

(A, en années) et du poids (P, en kg) :
0,666 −2
Homme: MWC = (41,7 − 0,22A)P W⋅m (4)
0,666 −2
Femme: MWC = (35,0 − 0,22A)P W⋅m (5)
8 © ISO 2004 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 12 ----------------------
ISO 8996:2004(F)

 de la fréquence cardiaque maximale, HR , estimée à l'aide de la formule suivante:

max
HR = 205 − 0,62A (6)
max
 RM = (HR − HR )/(MWC − M) (7)
max 0 0

Le Tableau C.1 de l'Annexe C fournit des estimations directes de la relation HR-M pour des tranches d'âge de

20 ans à 60 ans et des poids compris entre 50 kg et 90 kg. Dans ce cas, la précision est encore réduite.

7 Niveau 4, expertise
7.1 Détermination du métabolisme énergétique à partir du mesur
...

Questions, Comments and Discussion

Ask us and Technical Secretary will try to provide an answer. You can facilitate discussion about the standard in here.