Geometrical Product Specifications (GPS) — Surface texture: Profile method; Surfaces having stratified functional properties — Part 3: Height characterization using the material probability curve

Spécification géométrique des produits (GPS) — État de surface: Méthode du profil; surfaces ayant des propriétés fonctionnelles différentes suivant les niveaux — Partie 3: Caractérisation des hauteurs par la courbe de probabilité de matière

La présente partie de l'ISO 13565 établit le procédé d'évaluation permettant de déterminer les paramètres issus des régions linéaires de la courbe de probabilité de matière, qui constitue la représentation gaussienne de la courbe du taux de longueur portante. Ces paramètres sont destinés à faciliter l'évaluation du comportement tribologique, par exemple de surfaces de glissement lubrifiées, et à maîtriser le procédé de fabrication.

Specifikacija geometrijskih veličin izdelka - Tekstura površine: profilna metoda - Površine s slojevitimi funkcionalnimi lastnostmi - 3. del: Določevanje višine na osnovi krivulje verjetnosti

General Information

Status
Withdrawn
Publication Date
02-Dec-1998
Withdrawal Date
02-Dec-1998
Current Stage
9599 - Withdrawal of International Standard
Start Date
20-Dec-2021
Completion Date
20-Dec-2021

RELATIONS

Buy Standard

Standard
ISO 13565-3:1998 - Geometrical Product Specifications (GPS) -- Surface texture: Profile method; Surfaces having stratified functional properties
English language
20 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview
Standard
ISO 13565-3:2001
English language
26 pages
sale 10% off
Preview
sale 10% off
Preview
e-Library read for
1 day
Standard
ISO 13565-3:1998 - Spécification géométrique des produits (GPS) -- État de surface: Méthode du profil; surfaces ayant des propriétés fonctionnelles différentes suivant les niveaux
French language
20 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview

Standards Content (sample)

INTERNATIONAL ISO
STANDARD 13565-3
First edition
1998-11-15
Geometrical Product Specifications (GPS) —
Surface texture: Profile method; Surfaces
having stratified functional properties —
Part 3:
Height characterization using the material
probability curve
Spécification géométrique des produits (GPS) — État de surface: Méthode
du profil; surfaces ayant des propriétés fonctionnelles différentes suivant
les niveaux —
Partie 3: Cartactérisation des hauteurs par la courbe de probabilité
de matière
Reference number
ISO 13565-3:1998(E)
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO 13565-3:1998(E)
Contents Page

1 Scope ........................................................................................................................................................................1

2 Normative references ..............................................................................................................................................1

3 Definitions ................................................................................................................................................................1

4 Procedure .................................................................................................................................................................2

5 Measurement process requirements .....................................................................................................................3

6 Drawing indications.................................................................................................................................................3

Annex A (normative) Procedures for determining the limits of the linear regions ..............................................4

Annex B (informative) Background information ......................................................................................................9

Annex C (informative) Determination of UPL and LVL via second derivatives...................................................13

Annex D (informative) Normalization of the bounded material probability curve ..............................................16

Annex E (informative) Relation to the GPS matrix model .....................................................................................18

Annex F (informative) Bibliography.........................................................................................................................20

© ISO 1998

All rights reserved. Unless otherwise specified, no part of this publication may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic

or mechanical, including photocopying and microfilm, without permission in writing from the publisher.

International Organization for Standardization
Case postale 56 • CH-1211 Genève 20 • Switzerland
Internet iso@iso.ch
Printed in Switzerland
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
© ISO
ISO 13565-3:1998(E)
Foreword

ISO (the International Organization for Standardization) is a worldwide federation of national standards bodies

(ISO member bodies). The work of preparing International Standards is normally carried out through ISO technical

committees. Each member body interested in a subject for which a technical committee has been established has

the right to be represented on that committee. International organizations, governmental and non-governmental, in

liaison with ISO, also take part in the work. ISO collaborates closely with the International Electrotechnical

Commission (IEC) on all matters of electrotechnical standardization.

Draft International Standards adopted by the technical committees are circulated to the member bodies for voting.

Publication as an International Standard requires approval by at least 75 % of the member bodies casting a vote.

International Standard ISO 13565-3 was prepared by Technical Committee ISO/TC 213, Dimensional and

geometrical product specifications and verification.

ISO 13565 consists of the following parts under the general title Geometrical product specifications (GPS) —

Surface texture: Profile method; Surfaces having stratified functional properties:

 Part 1: Filtering and general measurement conditions
 Part 2: Height characterization using the linear material ratio curve
 Part 3: Height characterization using the material probability curve

Annex A forms an integral part of this part of ISO 13565. Annexes B to F are for information only.

iii
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO
ISO 13565-3:1998(E)
Introduction

This part of ISO 13565 is a geometrical product specification (GPS) standard and is to be regarded as a general

GPS standard (see ISO/TR 14638). It influences the chain link 2 of the chains of standards on roughness profile

and primary profile.

For more detailed information on the relation of this standard to the GPS matrix model see annex E.

This part of ISO 13565 provides a numerical characterization of surfaces consisting of two vertical random

components, namely, a relatively coarse "valley" texture and a finer "plateau" texture. This type of surface is used

for lubricated, sliding contact, for example in cylinder liners and fuel injectors. The calculations necessary to

determine the parameters Rpq, Rvq, and Rmq (Ppq, Pvq, and Pmq) used to characterize these two components

separately involves the generation of the material probability curve, the determination of its linear regions, and the

linear regressions through these regions.
The parameters are undefined for surfaces not consisting of two such components.
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
INTERNATIONAL STANDARD © ISO ISO 13565-3:1998(E)
Geometrical Product Specifications (GPS) — Surface texture:
Profile method; Surfaces having stratified functional properties —
Part 3:
Height characterization using the material probability curve
1 Scope

This part of ISO 13565 establishes the evaluation process for determining parameters from the linear regions of the

material probability curve, which is the Gaussian representation of the material ratio curve. The parameters are

intended to aid in assessing tribological behaviour, for example of lubricated, sliding surfaces, and to control the

manufacturing process.
2 Normative references

The following standards contain provisions which, through reference in this text, constitute provisions of this part of

ISO 13565. At the time of publication, the editions indicated were valid. All Standards are subject to revision, and

parties to agreements based on this part of ISO 13565 are encouraged to investigate the possibility of applying the

most recent editions of the standards indicated below. Members of IEC and ISO maintain registers of currently valid

International Standards.
ISO 1302:1992, Technical drawings — Methods of indicating surface texture.

ISO 3274:1996, Geometrical Product Specifications (GPS) — Surface texture: Profile method — Nominal

characteristics of contact (stylus) instruments.

ISO 4287:1997, Geometrical Product Specifications (GPS) — Surface texture: Profile method — Terms, definitions

and surface texture parameters.

ISO 13565-1:1996, Geometrical Product Specifications (GPS) — Surface texture: Profile method; Surfaces having

stratified functional properties — Part 1: Filtering and general measurement conditions.

ISO 13565-2:1996, Geometrical Product Specifications (GPS) — Surface Texture: Profile method; Surfaces having

stratified functional properties — Part 2: Height characterization using the linear material ratio curve.

3 Definitions

For the purposes of this part of ISO 13565, the definitions given in ISO 3274, ISO 4287, ISO 13565-2 and the

following apply.
3.1
material probability curve

a representation of the material ratio curve in which the profile material length ratio is expressed as Gaussian

probability in standard deviation values, plotted linearly on the horizontal axis

NOTE — This scale is expressed linearly in standard deviations according to the Gaussian distribution. In this scale the

material ratio curve of a Gaussian distribution becomes a straight line. For stratified surfaces composed of two Gaussian

distributions, the material probability curve will exhibit two linear regions (see 1 and 2 in figure 1).

---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
© ISO
ISO 13565-3:1998(E)
Key
1 Plateau region
2 Valley region
3 Debris or outlying peaks in the data (profile)
4 Deep scratches or outlying valleys in the data (profile)

5 Unstable region (curvature) introduced at the plateau to valley transition point based on the combination of two distributions

Figure 1 — Material probability curve
3.2
Rpq (Ppq) parameter
slope of a linear regression performed through the plateau region
See figure 2.

NOTE — Rpq (Ppq) can thus be interpreted as the Rq (Pq)-value (in micrometres) of the random process that generated the

plateau component of the profile.
3.3
Rvq (Pvq) parameter
slope of a linear regression performed through the valley region
See figure 2.

NOTE — Rvq (Pvq) can thus be interpreted as the Rq (Pq)-value (in micrometres) of the random process that generated the

valley component of the profile.
3.4
( )
Rmq Pmq parameter
relative material ratio at the plateau to valley intersection
See figure 2.
4 Procedure

The roughness profile used for determining the parameters Rpq, Rvq and Rmq shall be calculated in accordance with

ISO 13565-1. This roughness profile is different from that in ISO 4287. The profile for determining the parameters

Ppq, Pvq and Pmq shall be the primary profile.

Three non-linear effects can be present in the material probability curve as shown in figure 1 for measured surface

data from a two-process surface. These effects shall be eliminated by limiting the fitted portions of the material

probability curve, using only the statistically sound, Gaussian portions of the material probability curve excluding a

number of influences.
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
© ISO
ISO 13565-3:1998(E)
In figure 1 the non-linear effects originate from:
 debris or outlying peaks in the data (profile) (labelled 3);
 deep scratches or outlying valleys in the data (profile) (labelled 4); and

 unstable region (curvature) introduced at the plateau to valley transition point based on the combination of two

distributions (labelled 5).

These exclusions are intended keep the parameters more stable for repeated measurements of a given surface.

Figure 2 shows a profile with its corresponding material probability curve and its plateau and valley regions and the

parts of the surface that defines the two regions. The profile has a peak that is outlying and the figure shows how it

does not influence the parameters. Figure 2 also shows how the bottom parts of the deepest groves, which will vary

significantly depending on where the measurements are made on a surface, are disregarded when determining the

parameters.

Figure 2 — Roughness profile with its corresponding material probability curve and the regions used

in the definitions of the parameters Rpq, Rvq, and Rmq
5 Measurement process requirements

The following criteria are designed to ensure that the profile represents a proper two-process surface and that the

measuring process is adequate for calculating a stable material probability curve resulting in reliable parameter

values. These criteria shall be met in order for the parameters Rpq, Rvq, and Rmq (Ppq, Pvq, and Pmq) to be defined:

 The instrument shall be capable of measuring a value of Rq from an optical flat that is less than 30 % of the

nominal value of Rpq (Ppq).

 The vertical resolution of the material probability curve shall be such that at least 40 classes fall within the linear

plateau and linear valley regions respectively.

 The digital data density of the material probability curve shall be such that at least 100 profile ordinates fall

within the linear plateau and linear valley regions respectively.
 The ratio Rvq: Rpq (Pvq: Ppq) shall be at least 5.
 The conic section regressions result in a hyperbolic solution (see annex A).

If the profile does not satisfy the above criteria, a suitable warning message shall give the reason for the failure.

6 Drawing indications

The parameters specified in this part of ISO 13565 shall be indicated on drawings in accordance with ISO 1302.

---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
© ISO
ISO 13565-3:1998(E)
Annex A
(normative)
Procedures for determining the limits of the linear regions

Clauses A.1 through A.3 specify the procedures for determining the upper plateau limit, UPL, and the lower valley

limit, LVL. Clauses A.4 through A.6 specify the procedures for determining the lower plateau limit, LPL, and the

upper valley limit, UVL . Clause A.7 specifies the procedure for determining the calculation of parameters.

A.1 Initial conic fit

A conic section is initially fitted through the material probability curve since it is a very good approximation of the

expected form of the material probability curve of surfaces consisting of two vertical random components. This initial

conic fit provides a framework for subsequent operations on the material probability curve.

Fit a conic section
2 2
z = Ax + Bxz + Cz + Dx + E
where
z is the profile height;
x is the material probability expressed in standard deviations;
through the entire curve (see figure A.1).
Figure A.1 — Conic section based on the entire material probability curve
A.2 Estimation of plateau to valley transition

Determine the asymptotes of the conic section (lines designated "a" in figure A.1). Bisect the asymptotes with a line

(line designated "b" in figure A.1). The intersection of this line with the conic section serves as an initial estimate of

the plateau to valley transition (see A in figure A.2).

NOTE — Graphically the bisector line may appear to be at a improper angle (see figure A.1). This is because of the different

scaling of the two axis on figure A.1. See also clause A.4 and annex D for the normalized material probability curve, where the

bisector line appears consistent.
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
© ISO
ISO 13565-3:1998(E)
A.3 Determination of UPL and LVL

The second derivative is computed at each point of the material probability curve starting at the transition point "c"

and working upward through the plateau region and downward through the valley region.

The second derivative at each point is computed using a "window" of 0,05 standard deviations (– 0,025 × s around

the point at which the derivative is to be recorded). See B in figure A.2.

NOTE — The number of points within the window will vary as it is passed through the curve.

For the valley region and the plateau region individually:

 find 25 % of the number of points to one side of the point "c"; call this value i;

 working out from point "c", the standard deviation, s , is computed for the second derivative values using

points on one side;

 the value of the second derivative at the next point (D ) is divided by the standard deviation, s :

i + 1 i
i+1
T =
 if T < 6, increment i by 1, recompute s and T;

 if T > 6, data point i is the limit of that region (UPL for the plateau region and LVL for the valley region,

respectively). See also C in figure A.2.

Figure A.2 — Bisection of the asymptotes is the initial transition point between the two regions

of the material probability curve and the corresponding second derivatives
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
© ISO
ISO 13565-3:1998(E)
A.4 Normalization of the bounded region

The Z-axis of the material probability curve is normalized such that the bounded region (region between UPL and

LVL) is "square" (see annex D). This insures consistent bisection of the conic section asymptotes (see figure A.3).

A.5 Second conic section fit

The conic section is now regressed through the region within UPL and LVL. The asymptotes are constructed (see

figure A.3).
NOTE — For k , see annex D.

Figure A.3 — Conic section determined within the upper plateau limit, UPL, and the lower valley limit,

LVL — Normalized material probability curve
A.6 Determination of LPL and UVL

To determine the lower plateau limit, LPL , and the upper valley limit, UVL , the asymptotes are bisected three times

(b: first time; P2 and V2: second time; P3 and V3: third time). The intersection of these lines (P3 and V3) with the

conic section of the material probability curve determines the LPL and UVL (see figure A.4).

---------------------- Page: 10 ----------------------
© ISO
ISO 13565-3:1998(E)
NOTE — For k , see annex D.

Figure A.4 — Determination of the lower plateau limit, LPL, and the upper valley limit, UVL — Normalized

material probability curve
A.7 Calculation of parameters

A linear regression is then performed within each region of the original, non-normalized material probability curve

(see figure A.5).

Rpq (Ppq) is the slope of a linear regression (z = A s + B ) performed through the plateau region. Rpq (Ppq) can thus

p p

be interpreted as the Rq-value (in micrometres) of the random process that generated the plateau component of the

profile.

Rvq (Pvq) is the slope of a linear regression (z = A s + B ) performed through the valley

...

SLOVENSKI STANDARD
SIST ISO 13565-3:2001
01-julij-2001

6SHFLILNDFLMDJHRPHWULMVNLKYHOLþLQL]GHOND7HNVWXUDSRYUãLQHSURILOQDPHWRGD

3RYUãLQHVVORMHYLWLPLIXQNFLRQDOQLPLODVWQRVWPLGHO'RORþHYDQMHYLãLQHQD
RVQRYLNULYXOMHYHUMHWQRVWL

Geometrical Product Specifications (GPS) -- Surface texture: Profile method; Surfaces

having stratified functional properties -- Part 3: Height characterization using the material

probability curve

Spécification géométrique des produits (GPS) -- État de surface: Méthode du profil;

surfaces ayant des propriétés fonctionnelles différentes suivant les niveaux -- Partie 3:

Caractérisation des hauteurs par la courbe de probabilité de matière
Ta slovenski standard je istoveten z: ISO 13565-3:1998
ICS:
17.040.20 Lastnosti površin Properties of surfaces
SIST ISO 13565-3:2001 en

2003-01.Slovenski inštitut za standardizacijo. Razmnoževanje celote ali delov tega standarda ni dovoljeno.

---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
SIST ISO 13565-3:2001
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
SIST ISO 13565-3:2001
INTERNATIONAL ISO
STANDARD 13565-3
First edition
1998-11-15
Geometrical Product Specifications (GPS) —
Surface texture: Profile method; Surfaces
having stratified functional properties —
Part 3:
Height characterization using the material
probability curve
Spécification géométrique des produits (GPS) — État de surface: Méthode
du profil; surfaces ayant des propriétés fonctionnelles différentes suivant
les niveaux —
Partie 3: Cartactérisation des hauteurs par la courbe de probabilité
de matière
Reference number
ISO 13565-3:1998(E)
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
SIST ISO 13565-3:2001
ISO 13565-3:1998(E)
Contents Page

1 Scope ........................................................................................................................................................................1

2 Normative references ..............................................................................................................................................1

3 Definitions ................................................................................................................................................................1

4 Procedure .................................................................................................................................................................2

5 Measurement process requirements .....................................................................................................................3

6 Drawing indications.................................................................................................................................................3

Annex A (normative) Procedures for determining the limits of the linear regions ..............................................4

Annex B (informative) Background information ......................................................................................................9

Annex C (informative) Determination of UPL and LVL via second derivatives...................................................13

Annex D (informative) Normalization of the bounded material probability curve ..............................................16

Annex E (informative) Relation to the GPS matrix model .....................................................................................18

Annex F (informative) Bibliography.........................................................................................................................20

© ISO 1998

All rights reserved. Unless otherwise specified, no part of this publication may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic

or mechanical, including photocopying and microfilm, without permission in writing from the publisher.

International Organization for Standardization
Case postale 56 • CH-1211 Genève 20 • Switzerland
Internet iso@iso.ch
Printed in Switzerland
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
SIST ISO 13565-3:2001
© ISO
ISO 13565-3:1998(E)
Foreword

ISO (the International Organization for Standardization) is a worldwide federation of national standards bodies

(ISO member bodies). The work of preparing International Standards is normally carried out through ISO technical

committees. Each member body interested in a subject for which a technical committee has been established has

the right to be represented on that committee. International organizations, governmental and non-governmental, in

liaison with ISO, also take part in the work. ISO collaborates closely with the International Electrotechnical

Commission (IEC) on all matters of electrotechnical standardization.

Draft International Standards adopted by the technical committees are circulated to the member bodies for voting.

Publication as an International Standard requires approval by at least 75 % of the member bodies casting a vote.

International Standard ISO 13565-3 was prepared by Technical Committee ISO/TC 213, Dimensional and

geometrical product specifications and verification.

ISO 13565 consists of the following parts under the general title Geometrical product specifications (GPS) —

Surface texture: Profile method; Surfaces having stratified functional properties:

 Part 1: Filtering and general measurement conditions
 Part 2: Height characterization using the linear material ratio curve
 Part 3: Height characterization using the material probability curve

Annex A forms an integral part of this part of ISO 13565. Annexes B to F are for information only.

iii
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
SIST ISO 13565-3:2001
ISO
ISO 13565-3:1998(E)
Introduction

This part of ISO 13565 is a geometrical product specification (GPS) standard and is to be regarded as a general

GPS standard (see ISO/TR 14638). It influences the chain link 2 of the chains of standards on roughness profile

and primary profile.

For more detailed information on the relation of this standard to the GPS matrix model see annex E.

This part of ISO 13565 provides a numerical characterization of surfaces consisting of two vertical random

components, namely, a relatively coarse "valley" texture and a finer "plateau" texture. This type of surface is used

for lubricated, sliding contact, for example in cylinder liners and fuel injectors. The calculations necessary to

determine the parameters Rpq, Rvq, and Rmq (Ppq, Pvq, and Pmq) used to characterize these two components

separately involves the generation of the material probability curve, the determination of its linear regions, and the

linear regressions through these regions.
The parameters are undefined for surfaces not consisting of two such components.
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
SIST ISO 13565-3:2001
INTERNATIONAL STANDARD © ISO ISO 13565-3:1998(E)
Geometrical Product Specifications (GPS) — Surface texture:
Profile method; Surfaces having stratified functional properties —
Part 3:
Height characterization using the material probability curve
1 Scope

This part of ISO 13565 establishes the evaluation process for determining parameters from the linear regions of the

material probability curve, which is the Gaussian representation of the material ratio curve. The parameters are

intended to aid in assessing tribological behaviour, for example of lubricated, sliding surfaces, and to control the

manufacturing process.
2 Normative references

The following standards contain provisions which, through reference in this text, constitute provisions of this part of

ISO 13565. At the time of publication, the editions indicated were valid. All Standards are subject to revision, and

parties to agreements based on this part of ISO 13565 are encouraged to investigate the possibility of applying the

most recent editions of the standards indicated below. Members of IEC and ISO maintain registers of currently valid

International Standards.
ISO 1302:1992, Technical drawings — Methods of indicating surface texture.

ISO 3274:1996, Geometrical Product Specifications (GPS) — Surface texture: Profile method — Nominal

characteristics of contact (stylus) instruments.

ISO 4287:1997, Geometrical Product Specifications (GPS) — Surface texture: Profile method — Terms, definitions

and surface texture parameters.

ISO 13565-1:1996, Geometrical Product Specifications (GPS) — Surface texture: Profile method; Surfaces having

stratified functional properties — Part 1: Filtering and general measurement conditions.

ISO 13565-2:1996, Geometrical Product Specifications (GPS) — Surface Texture: Profile method; Surfaces having

stratified functional properties — Part 2: Height characterization using the linear material ratio curve.

3 Definitions

For the purposes of this part of ISO 13565, the definitions given in ISO 3274, ISO 4287, ISO 13565-2 and the

following apply.
3.1
material probability curve

a representation of the material ratio curve in which the profile material length ratio is expressed as Gaussian

probability in standard deviation values, plotted linearly on the horizontal axis

NOTE — This scale is expressed linearly in standard deviations according to the Gaussian distribution. In this scale the

material ratio curve of a Gaussian distribution becomes a straight line. For stratified surfaces composed of two Gaussian

distributions, the material probability curve will exhibit two linear regions (see 1 and 2 in figure 1).

---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
SIST ISO 13565-3:2001
© ISO
ISO 13565-3:1998(E)
Key
1 Plateau region
2 Valley region
3 Debris or outlying peaks in the data (profile)
4 Deep scratches or outlying valleys in the data (profile)

5 Unstable region (curvature) introduced at the plateau to valley transition point based on the combination of two distributions

Figure 1 — Material probability curve
3.2
Rpq (Ppq) parameter
slope of a linear regression performed through the plateau region
See figure 2.

NOTE — Rpq (Ppq) can thus be interpreted as the Rq (Pq)-value (in micrometres) of the random process that generated the

plateau component of the profile.
3.3
Rvq (Pvq) parameter
slope of a linear regression performed through the valley region
See figure 2.

NOTE — Rvq (Pvq) can thus be interpreted as the Rq (Pq)-value (in micrometres) of the random process that generated the

valley component of the profile.
3.4
( )
Rmq Pmq parameter
relative material ratio at the plateau to valley intersection
See figure 2.
4 Procedure

The roughness profile used for determining the parameters Rpq, Rvq and Rmq shall be calculated in accordance with

ISO 13565-1. This roughness profile is different from that in ISO 4287. The profile for determining the parameters

Ppq, Pvq and Pmq shall be the primary profile.

Three non-linear effects can be present in the material probability curve as shown in figure 1 for measured surface

data from a two-process surface. These effects shall be eliminated by limiting the fitted portions of the material

probability curve, using only the statistically sound, Gaussian portions of the material probability curve excluding a

number of influences.
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
SIST ISO 13565-3:2001
© ISO
ISO 13565-3:1998(E)
In figure 1 the non-linear effects originate from:
 debris or outlying peaks in the data (profile) (labelled 3);
 deep scratches or outlying valleys in the data (profile) (labelled 4); and

 unstable region (curvature) introduced at the plateau to valley transition point based on the combination of two

distributions (labelled 5).

These exclusions are intended keep the parameters more stable for repeated measurements of a given surface.

Figure 2 shows a profile with its corresponding material probability curve and its plateau and valley regions and the

parts of the surface that defines the two regions. The profile has a peak that is outlying and the figure shows how it

does not influence the parameters. Figure 2 also shows how the bottom parts of the deepest groves, which will vary

significantly depending on where the measurements are made on a surface, are disregarded when determining the

parameters.

Figure 2 — Roughness profile with its corresponding material probability curve and the regions used

in the definitions of the parameters Rpq, Rvq, and Rmq
5 Measurement process requirements

The following criteria are designed to ensure that the profile represents a proper two-process surface and that the

measuring process is adequate for calculating a stable material probability curve resulting in reliable parameter

values. These criteria shall be met in order for the parameters Rpq, Rvq, and Rmq (Ppq, Pvq, and Pmq) to be defined:

 The instrument shall be capable of measuring a value of Rq from an optical flat that is less than 30 % of the

nominal value of Rpq (Ppq).

 The vertical resolution of the material probability curve shall be such that at least 40 classes fall within the linear

plateau and linear valley regions respectively.

 The digital data density of the material probability curve shall be such that at least 100 profile ordinates fall

within the linear plateau and linear valley regions respectively.
 The ratio Rvq: Rpq (Pvq: Ppq) shall be at least 5.
 The conic section regressions result in a hyperbolic solution (see annex A).

If the profile does not satisfy the above criteria, a suitable warning message shall give the reason for the failure.

6 Drawing indications

The parameters specified in this part of ISO 13565 shall be indicated on drawings in accordance with ISO 1302.

---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
SIST ISO 13565-3:2001
© ISO
ISO 13565-3:1998(E)
Annex A
(normative)
Procedures for determining the limits of the linear regions

Clauses A.1 through A.3 specify the procedures for determining the upper plateau limit, UPL, and the lower valley

limit, LVL. Clauses A.4 through A.6 specify the procedures for determining the lower plateau limit, LPL, and the

upper valley limit, UVL . Clause A.7 specifies the procedure for determining the calculation of parameters.

A.1 Initial conic fit

A conic section is initially fitted through the material probability curve since it is a very good approximation of the

expected form of the material probability curve of surfaces consisting of two vertical random components. This initial

conic fit provides a framework for subsequent operations on the material probability curve.

Fit a conic section
2 2
z = Ax + Bxz + Cz + Dx + E
where
z is the profile height;
x is the material probability expressed in standard deviations;
through the entire curve (see figure A.1).
Figure A.1 — Conic section based on the entire material probability curve
A.2 Estimation of plateau to valley transition

Determine the asymptotes of the conic section (lines designated "a" in figure A.1). Bisect the asymptotes with a line

(line designated "b" in figure A.1). The intersection of this line with the conic section serves as an initial estimate of

the plateau to valley transition (see A in figure A.2).

NOTE — Graphically the bisector line may appear to be at a improper angle (see figure A.1). This is because of the different

scaling of the two axis on figure A.1. See also clause A.4 and annex D for the normalized material probability curve, where the

bisector line appears consistent.
---------------------- Page: 10 ----------------------
SIST ISO 13565-3:2001
© ISO
ISO 13565-3:1998(E)
A.3 Determination of UPL and LVL

The second derivative is computed at each point of the material probability curve starting at the transition point "c"

and working upward through the plateau region and downward through the valley region.

The second derivative at each point is computed using a "window" of 0,05 standard deviations (– 0,025 × s around

the point at which the derivative is to be recorded). See B in figure A.2.

NOTE — The number of points within the window will vary as it is passed through the curve.

For the valley region and the plateau region individually:

 find 25 % of the number of points to one side of the point "c"; call this value i;

 working out from point "c", the standard deviation, s , is computed for the second derivative values using

points on one side;

 the value of the second derivative at the next point (D ) is divided by the standard deviation, s :

i + 1 i
i+1
T =
 if T < 6, increment i by 1, recompute s and T;

 if T > 6, data point i is the limit of that region (UPL for the plateau region and LVL for the valley region,

respectively). See also C in figure A.2.

Figure A.2 — Bisection of the asymptotes is the initial transition point between the two regions

of the material probability curve and the corresponding second derivatives
---------------------- Page: 11 ----------------------
SIST ISO 13565-3:2001
© ISO
ISO 13565-3:1998(E)
A.4 Normalization of the bounded region

The Z-axis of the material probability curve is normalized such that the bounded region (region between UPL and

LVL) is "square" (see annex D). This insures consistent bisection of the conic section asymptotes (see figure A.3).

A.5 Second conic section fit

The conic section is now regressed through the region within UPL and LVL. The asymptotes are constructed (see

figure A.3).
NOTE — For k , see annex D.

Figure A.3 — Conic section determined within the upper plateau limit, UPL, and the lower valley limit,

LVL — Normalized material probability curve
A.6 Determination of LPL and UVL

To determine the lower plateau limit, LPL , and the upper valley limit, UVL , the asymptotes are bisected three times

(b: first time; P2 and V2: second time; P3 and V3: third time). The intersection of these lines (P3 and V3) with the

conic section of the material probability curve determines the LPL and UVL (see figure A.4).

---------------------- Page: 12 ----------------------
SIST ISO 13565-3:2001
© ISO
ISO 13565-3:1998(E)
NOTE — For k
...

NORME ISO
INTERNATIONALE 13565-3
Première édition
1998-11-15
Spécification géométrique des produits
(GPS) — État de surface: Méthode du
profil; surfaces ayant des propriétés
fonctionnelles différentes suivant
les niveaux —
Partie 3:
Caractérisation des hauteurs par la courbe
de probabilité de matière
Geometrical Product Specifications (GPS) — Surface texture: Profile
method; Surfaces having stratified functional properties —
Part 3: Height characterization using the material probability curve
Numéro de référence
ISO 13565-3:1998(F)
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO 13565-3:1998(F)
Sommaire Page

1 Domaine d’application ............................................................................................................................................1

2 Références normatives ...........................................................................................................................................1

3 Définitions ................................................................................................................................................................2

4 Procédure .................................................................................................................................................................3

5 Exigences relatives au procédé de mesure ..........................................................................................................4

6 Indication sur les dessins.......................................................................................................................................4

Annexe A (normative) Procédures de détermination des limites des régions linéaires......................................5

Annexe B (informative) Information de base..........................................................................................................10

Annexe C (informative) Détermination de UPL et de LVL par l'intermédiaire des dérivées secondes.............14

Annexe D (informative) Normalisation de la courbe de probabilité de matière délimitée..................................17

Annexe E (informative) Relation avec la matrice GPS...........................................................................................19

Annexe F (informative) Bibliographie......................................................................................................................20

© ISO 1998

Droits de reproduction réservés. Sauf prescription différente, aucune partie de cette publication ne peut être reproduite ni utilisée sous quelque

forme que ce soit et par aucun procédé, électronique ou mécanique, y compris la photocopie et les microfilms, sans l'accord écrit de l'éditeur.

Organisation internationale de normalisation
Case postale 56 • CH-1211 Genève 20 • Suisse
Internet iso@iso.ch
Imprimé en Suisse
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
© ISO
ISO 13565-3:1998(F)
Avant-propos

L'ISO (Organisation internationale de normalisation) est une fédération mondiale d'organismes nationaux de

normalisation (comités membres de l'ISO). L'élaboration des Normes internationales est en général confiée aux

comités techniques de l'ISO. Chaque comité membre intéressé par une étude a le droit de faire partie du comité

technique créé à cet effet. Les organisations internationales, gouvernementales et non gouvernementales, en

liaison avec l'ISO, participent également aux travaux. L'ISO collabore étroitement avec la Commission

électrotechnique internationale (CEI) en ce qui concerne la normalisation électrotechnique.

Les projets de Normes internationales adoptés par les comités techniques sont soumis aux comités membres pour

vote. Leur publication comme Normes internationales requiert l'approbation de 75 % au moins des comités

membres votants.

La Norme internationale ISO 13565-3 a été élaborée par le comité technique ISO/TC 213, Spécifications et

vérification dimensionnelles et géométriques des produits.

L’ISO 13565 comprend les parties suivantes, présentées sous le titre général Spécification géométrique des

produits (GPS) — État de surface: Méthode du profil; surfaces ayant des propriétés fonctionnelles différentes

suivant les niveaux:
 Partie 1: Filtrage et conditions générales de mesurage

 Partie 2: Caractérisation des hauteurs par la courbe de taux de longueur portante

 Partie 3: Caractérisation des hauteurs par la courbe de probabilité de matière

L'annexe A fait partie intégrante de la présente partie de l'ISO 13565. Les annexes B à F sont données uniquement

à titre d'information.
iii
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
© ISO
ISO 13565-3:1998(F)
Introduction

La présente partie de l'ISO 13565 qui traite de la spécification géométrique des produits (GPS) est considérée

comme une norme GPS générale (voir l'ISO/TR 14638). Elle influence le maillon 2 des chaînes de normes relatives

au profil de rugosité et au profil primaire.

Pour de plus amples informations sur la relation de la présente partie de l'ISO 13565 avec les autres normes et la

matrice GPS, voir l'annexe E.

La présente partie de l'ISO 13565 fournit une caractérisation numérique de surfaces constituées de deux

composantes aléatoires verticales, à savoir un état de surface relativement grossier en «creux» et un état de

surface plus fin en «plateau». Ce type de surface est utilisé pour assurer un contact glissant, lubrifié, comme par

exemple, dans les chemises de cylindres et dans les injecteurs de carburant. Les calculs nécessaires pour

déterminer les paramètres Rpq, Rvq et Rmq (Ppq, Pvq et Pmq), utilisés pour caractériser séparément ces deux

composantes, impliquent de tracer la courbe de probabilité de matière, de déterminer ses régions linéaires et de

faire des régressions linéaires sur ces régions.

Ces paramètres ne sont pas définis pour les surfaces qui ne sont pas constituées de deux composantes de ce type.

---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
NORME INTERNATIONALE © ISO ISO 13565-3:1998(F)
Spécification géométrique des produits (GPS) — État de surface:
Méthode du profil; surfaces ayant des propriétés fonctionnelles
différentes suivant les niveaux —
Partie 3:
Caractérisation des hauteurs par la courbe de probabilité de matière
1 Domaine d’application

La présente partie de l'ISO 13565 établit le procédé d’évaluation permettant de déterminer les paramètres issus des

régions linéaires de la courbe de probabilité de matière, qui constitue la représentation gaussienne de la courbe du

taux de longueur portante. Ces paramètres sont destinés à faciliter l’évaluation du comportement tribologique, par

exemple de surfaces de glissement lubrifiées, et à maîtriser le procédé de fabrication.

2 Références normatives

Les normes suivantes contiennent des dispositions qui, par suite de la référence qui en est faite, constituent des

dispositions valables pour la présente partie de l’ISO 13565. Au moment de la publication, les éditions indiquées

étaient en vigueur. Toute norme est sujette à révision et les parties prenantes des accords fondés sur la présente

partie de l’ISO 13565 sont invitées à rechercher la possibilité d'appliquer les éditions les plus récentes des normes

indiquées ci-après. Les membres de la CEI et de l'ISO possèdent le registre des Normes internationales en vigueur

à un moment donné.
ISO 1302:1992, Dessins techniques — Indication des états de surface.

ISO 3274:1996, Spécification géométrique des produits (GPS) — État de surface: Méthode du profil —

Caractéristiques nominales des appareils à contact (palpeur).

ISO 4287:1997, Spécification géométrique des produits (GPS) — État de surface: Méthode du profil — Termes,

définitions et paramètres d'état de surface.

ISO 13565-1:1996, Spécification géométrique des produits (GPS) — État de surface: Méthode du profil; surfaces

ayant des propriétés fonctionnelles différentes suivant les niveaux — Partie 1: Filtrage et conditions générales de

mesurage.

ISO 13565-2:1996, Spécification géométrique des produits (GPS) — État de surface: Méthode du profil; surfaces

ayant des propriétés fonctionnelles différentes suivant les niveaux — Partie 2: Caractérisation des hauteurs par la

courbe de taux de longueur portante.
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
© ISO
ISO 13565-3:1998(F)
3 Définitions

Pour les besoins de la présente partie de l’ISO 13565, les définitions données dans l'ISO 3274, l'ISO 4287 et

l’ISO 13565-2, ainsi que les définitions suivantes, s'appliquent.
3.1
courbe de probabilité de matière

représentation de la courbe du taux de longueur portante, où le taux de longueur portante du profil est exprimé

comme probabilité gaussienne sous forme d'écarts-types, tracés linéairement sur l’axe horizontal

NOTE — Cette échelle est exprimée linéairement en écarts-types, suivant une distribution normale. Dans cette échelle, la

courbe du taux de longueur portante d’une distribution normale devient une droite. Pour les surfaces ayant des propriétés

différentes suivant les niveaux, composées de deux distributions normales, la courbe de probabilité de matière présente deux

régions linéaires (voir 1 et 2 sur la figure 1).
Légende
1 Région en plateau
2 Région en creux
3 Les débris ou pics isolés dans le profil
4 Les rayures profondes ou creux isolés dans le profil

5 La région instable (courbure) au point de transition entre le plateau et le creux, résultant de la combinaison de deux

distributions
Figure 1 — Courbe de probabilité de matière
3.2
paramètre Rpq (Ppq)
pente de la régression linéaire effectuée sur la région en plateau
Voir figure 2.

NOTE — Rpq (Ppq) peut donc être considéré comme la valeur de Rq (Pq) (en micromètres) du processus aléatoire qui a

engendré la composante en plateau du profil.
3.3
paramètre Rvq (Pvq)
pente de la régression linéaire effectuée sur la région en creux
Voir figure 2.

NOTE — Rvq (Pvq) peut donc être considéré comme la valeur de Rq (Pq) (en micromètres) du processus aléatoire qui a

engendré la composante en creux du profil.
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
© ISO
ISO 13565-3:1998(F)
3.4
paramètre Rmq (Pmq)
taux de portée au niveau de l’intersection entre plateau et creux
Voir figure 2.
4 Procédure

Le profil de rugosité, utilisé pour déterminer les paramètres Rpq, Rvq et Rmq, doit être déterminé conformément à

l'ISO 13565-1. Ce profil de rugosité est différent de celui de l'ISO 4287. Le profil permettant de déterminer les

paramètres Ppq, Pvq et Pmq doit être le profil primaire.

Trois effets non linéaires peuvent être présents dans la courbe de probabilité de matière, comme représenté à la

figure 1, pour des données issues d’une surface obtenue avec deux procédés. Ces effets doivent être supprimés en

limitant les portions ajustées de la courbe de probabilité de matière aux portions gaussiennes statistiquement sûres,

à l'exclusion d'un certain nombre d'influences.
Sur la figure 1, les origines des effets non linéaires sont:
 Les débris ou pics isolés dans le profil (identifiés 3),
 Les rayures profondes ou creux isolés dans le profil (identifiés 4), et

 La région instable (courbure) au point de transition entre le plateau et le creux, résultant de la combinaison de

deux distributions (identifiée 5).

Le but de l’élimination de ces influences est d’assurer une plus grande stabilité des paramètres lors de mesures

répétées d’une surface donnée. La figure 2 illustre un profil avec sa courbe de probabilité de matière, ainsi que les

régions en plateau et en creux de cette courbe et les parties de la surface qui définissent les deux régions. Le profil

présente un pic qui dépasse nettement et la figure montre qu'il n’exerce aucune influence sur les paramètres. La

figure 2 montre également que les parties inférieures des rainures les plus profondes, qui varient de manière

significative selon l’endroit de la surface où les mesures sont effectuées, ne sont pas prises en compte lors de la

détermination des paramètres.

Figure 2 — Profil de rugosité avec sa courbe de probabilité de matière et les régions utilisées pour la

détermination des paramètres Rpq, Rvq et Rmq
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
© ISO
ISO 13565-3:1998(F)
5 Exigences relatives au procédé de mesure

Les critères suivants sont destinés à s’assurer que le profil représente bien une surface obtenue suivant deux

procédés et que le procédé de mesure est approprié pour déterminer une courbe stable de probabilité de matière,

permettant ainsi d’obtenir des valeurs de paramètres fiables. Ces critères doivent être respectés pour définir les

paramètres Rpq, Rvq et Rmq (Ppq, Pvq et Pmq):

 L’instrument doit être capable de mesurer, sur un verre plan, une valeur de Rq qui soit inférieure à 30 % de la

valeur nominale de Rpq (Ppq).

 La résolution verticale de la courbe de probabilité de matière doit être telle qu’au moins 40 classes

appartiennent respectivement aux régions linéaires en plateau et en creux.

 La densité des données numériques de la courbe de probabilité de matière doit être telle qu’au moins 100

ordonnées du profil appartiennent respectivement aux régions linéaires en plateau et en creux.

 Le rapport Rvq: Rpq (Pvq: Ppq) doit être au moins égal à 5.

 Les régressions des sections coniques aboutissent à une solution hyperbolique (voir annexe A).

Si le profil ne remplit pas les critères ci-dessus, donner un message d’avertissement adéquat, expliquant la raison

de la défaillance.
6 Indication sur les dessins

Les paramètres de la présente partie de l'ISO 13565 doivent être spécifiés sur les dessins conformément à

l'ISO 1302.
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
© ISO
ISO 13565-3:1998(F)
Annexe A
(normative)
Procédures de détermination des limites des régions linéaires

Les articles A.1 à A.3 spécifient les procédures de détermination de la limite supérieure du plateau, UPL, et de la

limite inférieure du creux, LVL. Les articles A.4 à A.6 spécifient les procédures de détermination de la limite

inférieure du plateau, LPL, et de la limite supérieure du creux, UVL. L'article A.7 concerne le calcul des paramètres.

A.1 Ajustement conique initial

Une section conique est ajustée initialement sur l'ensemble de la courbe de probabilité de matière étant donné que

c'est une très bonne approximation de la forme espérée de la courbe de probabilité de matière des surfaces

constituées de deux composantes aléatoires verticales. Cet ajustement conique initial fournit un cadre pour les

opérations ultérieures sur la courbe de probabilité de matière.
Ajuster une section conique
2 2
z = Ax + Bxz + Cz + Dx + E
z est la hauteur du profil;
x est la probabilité de matière, exprimée en écarts-types;
sur l’ensemble de la courbe (voir figure A.1).

Figure A.1 — Section conique basée sur l’ensemble de la courbe de probabilité de matière

A.2 Estimation de la transition entre plateau et creux

Déterminer les asymptotes de la section conique (lignes désignées «a» sur la figure A.1). Tracer la bissectrice de

ces asymptotes (ligne désignée «b» sur la figure A.1). L’intersection entre cette ligne et la section conique sert

d’estimation initiale de la transition entre plateau et creux (voir A à la figure A.2).

NOTE — Graphiquement, la bissectrice peut sembler faire un angle incorrect (voir figure A.1). Cela est dû aux échelles

différentes sur les deux axes de la figure A.1. Voir aussi l'article A.4 et l'annexe D concernant la courbe de probabilité de

matière normalisée, où la bissectrice apparaît correcte.
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
© ISO
ISO 13565-3:1998(F)
A.3 Détermination de UPL et de LVL

La dérivée seconde est calculée en chaque point de la courbe de probabilité de matière, à partir du point de

transition «c» et en procédant dans la direction ascendante pour la région en plateau, puis dans la direction

descendante pour la région en creux.

La dérivée seconde en chaque point est calculée en utilisant une «fenêtre» de 0,05 écart-type (– 0,025 · s de part

et d'autre du point où la dérivée doit être calculée). Voir B sur la figure A.2.

NOTE — Le nombre de points dans la fenêtre varie au fur et à mesure qu’elle traverse la courbe.

Pour la région en creux et pour la région en plateau individuellement:
 prendre 25 % des points situés d'un côté du point «c»; appeler cette valeur i;

 à partir du point «c», calculer l'écart-type, s , des dérivées secondes en utilisant les points i d'un seul côté;

 diviser par l'écart-type, s , la valeur de la dérivée seconde au point suivant, (D ):

i i + 1
i+1
T =
 si T < 6, incrémenter i de 1 et recalculer s , et T;

 si T . 6, le point i représente la limite de la région considérée (UPL pour la région en plateau et LVL pour la

région en creux, respectivement). Voir C à la figure A.2.

Figure A.2 — La bissection des asymptotes est le point de transition initial entre les deux régions

de la courbe de probabilité de matière et les dérivées secondes correspondantes
---------------------- Page: 10 ----------------------
© ISO
ISO 13565-3:1998(F)
A.4 Normalisation de la région délimitée

L’axe Z de la courbe de probabilité de matière est normalisé de sorte que la région délimitée (région entre UPL et

LVL) soit de forme carrée. Cela permet d’assurer une bissection cohérente des asymptotes de la section conique

(voir figure A.3).
A.5 Second ajustement de la section conique

Une régression est effectuée sur la section conique entre UPL et LVL et les asymptotes sont tracées (voir

figure A.3).
NOTE — pour k , voir annexe D.

Figure A.3 — Section conique déterminée entre la limite supérieure du plateau, UPL, et la limite inférieure

du creux, LVL — Courbe de probabilité de matière normalisée
A.6 Détermination de LPL et de UVL

Pour déterminer la limite inférieure du plateau, LPL, et la limite supérieure du creux, UVL, trois bissectrices sont

successivement tracées entre les asymptotes (b: première fois; P2 et V2: deuxième fois; P3 et V3: troisième fois).

L’intersection de ces droites (P3 et V3) avec la section conique de la courbe de probabilité de matière permet de

déterminer LPL et UVL (voir figure A.4).
---------------------- Page: 11 ----------------------
© ISO
ISO 13565-3:1998(F)

Figure A.4 — Détermination de la limite inférieure du plateau, LPL, et de la limite supérieure du creux,

UVL — Courbe de probabilité de matière normalisée
A.7 Calcul des paramètres

Une régression linéaire est effectuée sur chaque région de la courbe de probabilité de matière initiale, non

normalisée (voir figure A.5).

Rpq (Ppq) est la pente de la régression linéaire (z = A s + B ) effectuée sur la région en plateau. Rpq (Ppq) peut donc

p p

être considéré comme la valeur de Rq (en micromètres) du processus aléatoire qui a permis d'engendrer la

composante en plateau du profil.

Rvq (Pvq) est la pente de la régression linéaire (z = A s + B ) effectuée sur la région en creux. Rvq (Pvq) peut donc

v v

être considéré comme la valeur de Rq (en micromètres) du processus aléatoire qui a permis d'engendrer la

composante en creux du profil.

Rmq (Pmq) est le rapport de portée au point d’intersection entre plateau et creux, à savoir:

BB−
Rmq=
AA−
---------------------- Page: 12 ----------------------
© ISO
ISO 13565-3:1998(F)
Rpq = 0,050 mm
Rvq = 0,869 mm
Rmq = 84,9 %
Figure A.
...

Questions, Comments and Discussion

Ask us and Technical Secretary will try to provide an answer. You can facilitate discussion about the standard in here.