Safety aspects -- Guidelines for child safety

This Guide provides a framework for addressing potential sources of unintentional physical harm (hazards) to children from products, processes or services that they use or with which they may come into contact, even if they are not specifically intended for children. The framework aims at minimizing risk of injury to children. It is primarily intended for those involved in the preparation and revision of standards. However, it has important information that can be useful to, amongst others, designers, architects, manufacturers, service providers, communicators and policy makers. For children with special needs, additional requirements may be appropriate. This Guide does not claim to address those additional requirements in full. ISO/IEC Guide 71 addresses the neds of persons with disabilities. A product may include goods, structures, buildings, installations or a combination of these. No specific guidance is given in this Guide for the prevention or reduction of psychological or moral harm or of intentional injuries.

Aspects liés à la sécurité -- Principes directeurs pour la sécurité des enfants

Le Guide ISO/CEI 50 fournit un cadre de traitement des sources potentielles de danger physique non intentionnel (phénomènes dangereux) pour les enfants eu égard aux produits, procédés ou services qu'ils utilisent ou avec lesquels ils peuvent entrer en contact, même si ceux-ci ne sont pas destinés spécifiquement aux enfants. Ce cadre vise à minimiser le risque de blessure pour les enfants. Ce Guide est destiné principalement aux personnes concernées par l'élaboration et la révision de normes. Il contient des informations importantes qui peuvent être utiles, notamment aux concepteurs, architectes, fabricants, prestataires de services, spécialistes de la communication, ainsi qu'aux personnes chargées de définir les politiques en matière de sécurité. Pour les enfants ayant des besoins particuliers, des exigences supplémentaires peuvent se révéler appropriées. Le présent Guide ne prétend pas traiter ces exigences supplémentaires dans leur totalité. Le Guide ISO/CEI 71 répond aux besoins des personnes ayant des incapacités. Un produit peut inclure des biens, des structures, des bâtiments, installations, ou une combinaison de ces éléments. Ce Guide ne contient aucun principe directeur pour la prévention ou la réduction des dangers d'ordre psychologique ou moral, ou des blessures infligées intentionnellement.

General Information

Status
Replaced
Publication Date
29-May-2002
Withdrawal Date
29-May-2002
Current Stage
6060 - International Standard published
Start Date
18-Mar-2002
Completion Date
30-May-2002
Ref Project

RELATIONS

Buy Standard

Guide
ISO/IEC Guide 50:2002 - Safety aspects -- Guidelines for child safety
English language
29 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview
Guide
ISO/IEC Guide 50:2002 - Aspects liés a la sécurité -- Principes directeurs pour la sécurité des enfants
French language
33 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview

Standards Content (sample)

GUIDE 50
Safety aspects — Guidelines for
child safety
Second edition 2002
ISO/IEC 2002
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO/IEC GUIDE 50:2002(E)
PDF disclaimer

This PDF file may contain embedded typefaces. In accordance with Adobe's licensing policy, this file may be printed or viewed but shall not

be edited unless the typefaces which are embedded are licensed to and installed on the computer performing the editing. In downloading this

file, parties accept therein the responsibility of not infringing Adobe's licensing policy. The ISO Central Secretariat accepts no liability in this

area.
Adobe is a trademark of Adobe Systems Incorporated.

Details of the software products used to create this PDF file can be found in the General Info relative to the file; the PDF-creation parameters

were optimized for printing. Every care has been taken to ensure that the file is suitable for use by ISO member bodies. In the unlikely event

that a problem relating to it is found, please inform the Central Secretariat at the address given below.

© ISO/IEC 2002

All rights reserved. Unless otherwise specified, no part of this publication may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic

or mechanical, including photocopying and microfilm, without permission in writing from either ISO at the address below or ISO's member body

in the country of the requester.
ISO copyright office
Case postale 56 • CH-1211 Geneva 20
Tel. + 41 22 749 01 11
Fax + 41 22 749 09 47
E-mail copyright@iso.ch
Web www.iso.ch
Printed in Switzerland
ii © ISO/IEC 2002 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO/IEC GUIDE 50:2002(E)
Contents Page

Foreword.....................................................................................................................................................................iv

0 Introduction....................................................................................................................................................v

0.1 Relevance of child safety..............................................................................................................................v

0.2 Role of standards ..........................................................................................................................................v

0.3 Structure of the Guide...................................................................................................................................v

1 Scope..............................................................................................................................................................1

2 Normative reference......................................................................................................................................1

3 Terms and definitions ...................................................................................................................................1

4 General approach to child safety.................................................................................................................2

4.1 General............................................................................................................................................................2

4.2 Risk assessment............................................................................................................................................2

4.3 Preventing and reducing injury....................................................................................................................2

4.4 Child development and behaviour...............................................................................................................3

4.5 Physical and social environment.................................................................................................................6

5 Hazards relevant for children .......................................................................................................................6

5.1 General............................................................................................................................................................6

5.2 Mechanical hazards.......................................................................................................................................7

5.3 Thermal hazards..........................................................................................................................................16

5.4 Chemical hazards........................................................................................................................................19

5.5 Electric shock hazards................................................................................................................................20

5.6 Radiation hazards........................................................................................................................................20

5.7 Biological hazards.......................................................................................................................................21

5.8 Explosion hazards.......................................................................................................................................21

5.9 Inadequate protective function ..................................................................................................................22

5.10 Inadequate information...............................................................................................................................23

Annex A (informative) Examples of preventive measures for hazards ...............................................................24

Annex B (informative) Checklist for assessing a standard ..................................................................................28

Bibliography..............................................................................................................................................................29

© ISO/IEC 2002 – All rights reserved iii
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO/IEC GUIDE 50:2002(E)
Foreword

ISO (the International Organization for Standardization) and IEC (the International Electrotechnical Commission)

form the specialized system for worldwide standardization. National bodies that are members of ISO or IEC

participate in the development of International Standards through technical committees established by the

respective organization to deal with particular fields of technical activity. ISO and IEC technical committees

collaborate in fields of mutual interest. Other international organizations, governmental and non-governmental, in

liaison with ISO and IEC, also take part in the work.

Guides are drafted in accordance with the rules given in the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 3.

Draft Guides adopted by the responsible Committee or Group are circulated to national bodies for voting.

Publication as a Guide requires approval by at least 75 % of the national bodies casting a vote.

Attention is drawn to the possibility that some of the elements of this Guide may be the subject of patent rights. ISO

and IEC shall not be held responsible for identifying any or all such patent rights.

ISO/IEC Guide 50 was prepared by the Joint ISO/IEC Technical Advisory Group (JTAG) for Child Safety.

It should be used in conjunction with ISO/IEC Guide 51, Safety aspects — Guidelines for their inclusion in

standards.

This second edition cancels and replaces the first edition (ISO/IEC Guide 50:1987), which has been technically

revised.
Annexes A and B of this Guide are for information only.
iv © ISO/IEC 2002 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
ISO/IEC GUIDE 50:2002(E)
0 Introduction
0.1 Relevance of child safety

Child safety should be a major concern for society because childhood and adolescent injuries are a major cause of

death and disability in many countries. Children are born into an adult world, without experience or appreciation of

risk but with a natural desire to explore. Consequently, the potential for injury is particularly great during childhood.

Since supervision to the degree that always prevents or controls potentially harmful interactions is neither possible

nor practical; additional injury prevention strategies are necessary.

Intervention strategies aimed at protecting children must recognize that children are not little adults. Children's

susceptibility to injury and the nature of their injuries differ from those of adults. Such intervention strategies must

also recognize the fundamental concept that children do not misuse products or surroundings. Rather, children

interact with them in ways that reflect normal child behaviour, which will vary according to the child's age and level

of development. Therefore, intervention strategies intended to protect children might differ from those intended to

protect adults.

The challenge is to develop products, structures, installations and services (collectively referred to as products) in a

way in which the potential for injury to children may be minimized. Preventing injuries is everyone's responsibility.

Prevention of injuries can be addressed through design and technology, legislation and education.

0.2 Role of standards

Standards can play a key role in injury prevention and control because they have the unique potential

 to draw on technical expertise for design and manufacture,
 to implement solutions through legislation, and

 to educate through provisions for instructions, warnings, illustrations, symbols, etc.

If standards are to fulfil their role in childhood injury prevention and control, standards-writers must consider how

children might interact with the products their standards are addressing, regardless of whether or not those

products are aimed specifically at children.

NOTE The word “standard” in this Guide is intended to include other ISO/IEC publications, for example Technical

Specifications and Guides.
0.3 Structure of the Guide
This Guide consists of three main parts and two annexes as follows.

a) General approach to child safety, including the principles for a systematic way to address hazards (4.1 and

4.2).

b) Specific developmental characteristics of children that place them at particular risk of injury (4.3).

c) Hazards to which children might be exposed during their use of, or interaction with, a product, along with

specific suggestions for addressing those hazards (clause 5). These hazards are also listed in

ISO/IEC Guide 51 but, here, the focus is on the specific risk to children associated with those hazards.

© ISO/IEC 2002 – All rights reserved v
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
ISO/IEC GUIDE 50:2002(E)

Annex A provides an overview of hazards, potential injuries and approaches to solutions. However, it is essential

that it be read in conjunction with the main body of this Guide as it only gives a few examples of solutions.

Annex B is intended as a checklist for standards-makers to assess their taking into account child safety.

vi © ISO/IEC 2002 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
ISO/IEC GUIDE 50:2002(E)
Safety aspects — Guidelines for child safety
1 Scope

This Guide provides a framework for addressing potential sources of unintentional physical harm (hazards) to

children from products, processes or services that they use or with which they may come into contact, even if they

are not specifically intended for children. The framework aims at minimizing risk of injury to children.

It is primarily intended for those involved in the preparation and revision of standards. However, it has important

information that can be useful to, amongst others, designers, architects, manufacturers, service providers,

communicators and policy makers.

For children with special needs, additional requirements may be appropriate. This Guide does not claim to address

those additional requirements in full. ISO/IEC Guide 71 addresses the needs of persons with disabilities.

A product may include goods, structures, buildings, installations or a combination of these.

No specific guidance is given in this Guide for the prevention or reduction of psychological or moral harm or of

intentional injuries.
2 Normative reference

The following normative document contains provisions which, through reference in this text, constitute provisions of

this Guide. For dated references, subsequent amendments to, or revisions of, any of these publications do not

apply. However, parties to agreement based on this Guide are encouraged to investigate the possibility of applying

the most recent edition of the normative document indicated below. For undated references, the latest edition of the

normative document referred to applies. Members of ISO and IEC maintain registers of currently valid International

Standards.

ISO/IEC Guide 51:1999, Safety aspects — Guidelines for their inclusion in standards

3 Terms and definitions
For the purposes of this Guide, the following terms and definitions apply.
3.1
risk

combination of the probability of occurrence of harm and the severity of that harm

[ISO/IEC Guide 51:1999, definition 3.2]
3.2
harm

physical injury or damage to the health of people or damage to property or the environment

[ISO/IEC Guide 51:1999, definition 3.3]
NOTE In this Guide the word “injury” encompasses damage to health.
© ISO/IEC 2002 – All rights reserved 1
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
ISO/IEC GUIDE 50:2002(E)
3.3
hazard
potential source of harm
[ISO/IEC Guide 51:1999, definition 3.5]
3.4
child
person aged from birth to 14 years
4 General approach to child safety
4.1 General

The safety concepts that distinguish child safety from safety in general are explained in this clause. These

concepts are additional to the contents of ISO/IEC Guide 51.
4.2 Risk assessment

Risk assessment is an important step in any injury prevention strategy. The general approach is outlined in

ISO/IEC Guide 51. The main questions to ask in a risk assessment process are the following.

a) What can happen?
b) How probable is it?
c) How severe is the resulting injury?

When addressing child safety, the answers to these questions must take into account the following special factors

for children:
a) their likelihood of being injured;
b) their interactions with persons and products;
c) their development and behaviour;
d) their lack of knowledge and experience;
e) social/environmental factors.
4.3 Preventing and reducing injury

Injury or disease can result from the transfer of energy (mechanical, thermal, electrical), or exposure to agents

(biological, radiation) greater than the body's capacity to withstand. They can be prevented or reduced by

intervening in the chain of events leading to or following their occurrence.
Strategies can address the following:

 preventing the harmful event from occurring or reducing exposure to hazard (primary prevention);

 reducing the severity of injuries (secondary prevention);

 reducing the long-term effects of the injury through rescue, treatment or rehabilitation (tertiary prevention).

2 © ISO/IEC 2002 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO/IEC GUIDE 50:2002(E)

In addition, strategies can be passive or active. Passive strategies work without the individual having to take any

action to be protected. Active strategies require the individual to take some action. Designing safe products

generally results in primary prevention; incorporating passive protective strategies generally ensures a greater

likelihood of success.

Various sources can be used to identify the potential for injury associated with a product. These include, but are not

limited to
 injury statistics,
 detailed information available from injury surveillance systems,
 research studies,
 investigations of case reports, and
 complaint data.

CAUTION — The absence of reported injury does not necessarily mean that there is no hazard.

As injuries to children are closely related to their developmental stage and their exposure to hazards at various

ages, it is important to sort child injury data by age group to identify the patterns that emerge. For example, in some

countries, burns from oven doors, scalds, poisoning by medicines and household chemicals and drowning have

peak rates in children under 5 years of age; injuries associated with falls from playground equipment peak at 5 to

9 years; and injuries associated with falls and impacts related to sports peak at 10 to 14 years.

The identification of appropriate countermeasures results from processes of research and evaluation, particularly

based on the methods of epidemiology, engineering and biomechanics as well as by the feedback cycle of gradual

improvements to design. When choosing preventive measures, it should be recognized that tolerable levels of

safety/risk for adults might not be sufficient to protect children. When introducing measures designed to protect

adults it is essential to consider any potential effects that might increase risks to children (e.g. passenger side air

bags in cars).
4.4 Child development and behaviour
4.4.1 General

Children are not small adults. Inherent characteristics of children, including their stage of development, together

with their exposure to hazards, put them at risk of injury in ways different from adults. Developmental stage broadly

encompasses children's size, shape, physiology, physical and cognitive ability, emotional development and

behaviour. These characteristics change quickly as children develop. Consequently, parents and carers often over-

or under-estimate children's abilities at different stages of development, thus resulting in exposure to hazards. This

situation is compounded by the fact that much of the environment that surrounds children is designed for adults.

All the childhood characteristics described below need to be considered in determining potential hazards

associated with products. It should be kept in mind that these characteristics may act in combination, increasing the

child’s risk of injury. For example,
 exploratory behaviour might lead a child to climb a ladder,

 limited cognitive skills might prevent the child from recognizing that the ladder might be too high or unstable,

and
 limited motor control might result in the child losing grip and falling.

The way children use and interact with these products must be considered as normal childhood behaviour. With

regard to children, the term “misuse” is misleading in this respect, and may lead to inappropriate decision-making

regarding hazards for children. Survey evidence shows that children regularly use products that were not designed

© ISO/IEC 2002 – All rights reserved 3
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
ISO/IEC GUIDE 50:2002(E)

for them, such as microwave ovens. When a child interacts with a product, it is difficult to make a distinction

between play, active learning or intended use. For safety reasons it might not be constructive to attempt to

distinguish between such interactions.

While safety considerations should provide an appropriate balance between the risk of injury and freedom for

children to explore a stimulating environment and to learn, the goal is to reduce the risk of injury by design until

such time as the child has developed an ability to assess risk and take appropriate action.

4.4.2 Children's body size and anthropometric data

Certain characteristics of children's body size and weight distribution make them vulnerable to injury. Their overall

mass is smaller, thereby reducing their capacity to absorb injury-causing energy. The following are examples where

body size and weight distribution, as compared to adults, are factors in injury.

a) In the case of thermal injuries, a relatively small area of contact can affect a large proportion of their body

surface. The large surface area in relation to the small body mass can result in a greater proportion of body

fluids being lost from the burnt area.

b) Young children have a large head compared with their body size. Their high centre of gravity increases the

likelihood of falls, for example from furniture or structures on which children may be seated, climbing or

standing. Children often fall directly onto the head without breaking their fall with their arms.

c) Another effect on the high centre of gravity is that it also increases the risk of falling into pools, buckets, toilets,

etc., into which children are bending or reaching, thereby increasing their risk of drowning.

d) The relatively large size of the head means that it requires a much larger space to pass through than the rest

of the body. Entrapment can occur when the body passes, feet first, through a gap through which the head

cannot pass.

e) Children might be able to insert their fingers, hands or other parts of their body into small openings to access

rotating parts, electrical wiring or other hazards.

f) The relatively large mass of the head increases the likelihood and severity of a whiplash injury.

Children’s size in relation to their surroundings makes it necessary to examine their anthropometry, including

overall heights as well as body part lengths, widths and circumferences. Anthropometric data should be consulted

in order to establish the normal distribution and safety margins.
4.4.3 Motor development

Motor development refers to the maturation process of gross and fine movements. The process includes changes

from primary involuntary reflex actions to deliberate, goal-directed actions. Milestone achievements in the process

include acquiring the strength and skill to support the head, crouch, sit up, rollover, crawl, stand, climb, rock, walk,

run, and the ability to manipulate objects with hands and fingers. Until balance, control and strength have

sufficiently developed, children are at risk of falling and getting into unsafe positions from which they cannot

escape. The following are examples.

a) When lying, infants can move to the edge of a surface and roll off, but be unable to lift themselves back onto

the surface. As a result, they can become wedged in or between products and suffer positioned or

compression asphyxia.

b) Standing infants and toddlers can become entangled in cords, ribbons, or window dressings within their reach.

When they sit or slump, the cords can tighten around the neck, resulting in strangulation.

c) Climbing infants can get clothing caught in furniture items or protrusions. If they cannot extricate themselves,

they can hang.
d) Children fall from heights because they lose their balance or grip.
4 © ISO/IEC 2002 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 10 ----------------------
ISO/IEC GUIDE 50:2002(E)

Understanding what motor skills a child can/cannot accomplish can be an important tool in the design of safer

products and also in the design of interventions. For example, access to lift (elevator) platforms can be designed to

be out of reach for crawlers, and child-resistance measures can take advantage of the lack of well-developed motor

skill.
4.4.4 Physiological development

In addition to body size and motor functions, there are many other physiological functions that develop in children.

These include sensory functions, biomechanical properties, reaction time, metabolism and organ development. The

following are examples where incomplete physiological development can be a factor in injuries:

 children are vulnerable to poisoning, since medications, chemicals and plants can be toxic to children in

smaller amounts than to adults;
 the nature of their skin makes children more vulnerable to thermal injury;

 children's bones are not fully developed, resulting in different responses to mechanical forces.

4.4.5 Cognitive development

Children's stages of cognitive development determine their ability (inability) to assess risk and make informed

decisions. Cognitive functions that are not fully developed result in the lack of ability of young children to assess the

situation in which they find themselves and save themselves from hazards. In the first year or two of life children

appear to have no sense of danger. Thus, whereas normally allowance can be made for hazards that are obvious

to the user and are necessary for the function of the product, these hazards might not be so obvious for children. At

some stage in early childhood, prior experience and parental/carer teaching begin to influence the child's

behaviour. Coping with limited risks is therefore a natural part of children's learning.

Certain behavioural characteristics associated with early childhood also render children at risk of injury. These

include the following:

 putting things into their mouths (mouthing), particularly in the first three years of life, exposing them to

ingestion and aspiration risks;

 putting things in other body openings, exposing them to impaction and laceration risks;

 natural inquisitiveness and exploring behaviour;

 a relatively small head width, combined with a relatively large head height and length enable children to enter

spaces head-first in one orientation, but they are unable to understand how to position their head to exit the

space;

 starting to develop individuality at around 2 years, resulting in saying “no” and refusing help, for example when

eating;
 assertion of their independence at about 3 to 4 years;
 attraction to taste, smell, design, and colours (e.g. medications).

Since young children explore by mouth, products that are for use by, or likely to be used around, children should

not have small easily removable parts. Objects not meant to be put into the mouth, such as erasers or small toys,

should not be made to resemble food.

Child behaviour often mimics that of adults and older children. This behaviour can become dangerous when

children do not understand the implications of their actions. For example, they may administer medications to their

younger siblings, operate locking mechanisms and switch on appliances.
© ISO/IEC 2002 – All rights reserved 5
---------------------- Page: 11 ----------------------
ISO/IEC GUIDE 50:2002(E)

Children cannot necessarily be expected to recognize the difference between a real object and an imitation or

model, either of which might be harmful. The use of images for products, which may be associated with toys, such

as cartoon characters for hairdryers, lanterns and cigarette lighters, can be misleading and potentially injurious for

children.

Reading and communication skills take years to acquire. Warnings and information, including the use of simple

methods such as pictograms (symbols), might have no meaning to children.
4.5 Physical and social environment
4.5.1 General

In addition to taking into account child development, it is necessary to consider both the physical and social

environment in which a child might use or come into contact with a product. Product safety might be affected by the

natural and built environments, climate, language, customs, attitudes and beliefs, knowledge and users’

experience.
4.5.2 Physical environment

Specific physical environmental factors related to intended and unintended location of use (such as indoor/outdoor,

private/public space, supervised/unsupervised area) and factors such as the effects of weather and terrain must be

considered. Interaction with other activities and people, potential for unsupervised activity and the potential for a

child to ever be exposed to a particular setting are also relevant. Settings not intended for children, but to which

they become exposed or have access (such as the parental workplace and the traffic system), pose greater

challenges. Where hazards cannot be controlled, barriers to exposure must be employed.

4.5.3 Social environment

Psychological considerations that might affect intended versus unintended use might also relate to the global

geographic location in which the product can potentially be used. The opportunity for global trade requires careful

attention to the subtle translations of language and the prevailing customs and attitudes based on cultural/ethnic

differences, so that these interpretations of product use do not inadvertently become hazards.

The relationship between parents/carers and children can be expected to vary with geographic, cultural/ethnic and

socio-economic differences. Cultural variations of discipline, supervision and safety awareness should be

recognized. Although supervision is an important aspect of child safety, it can never replace inherent safety, even

when the child is within visual or auditory range of the parent or carer.

As children approach adolescence, peer pressure and risk-taking behaviour can affect the use or consumption of

the product. Recreational activities might be associated with higher risk behaviour relating to presumed increased

protection from “safety” equipment, aggressive behaviour inherent in the competitive nature of sports, and the

greater risk of injury related to attention-seeking behaviour.
5 Hazards relevant for children
5.1 General

In view of the facts presented in the preceding clause, the risks associated with products can be high for children.

Product-related hazards and their potential to injure children are discussed below. Examples based on reported

injury patterns are provided to help users of this Guide to understand the hazards. It is impo

...

GUIDE 50
Aspects liés à la sécurité —
Principes directeurs pour la
sécurité des enfants
Deuxième édition 2002
ISO/CEI 2002
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
GUIDE ISO/CEI 50:2002(F)
PDF – Exonération de responsabilité

Le présent fichier PDF peut contenir des polices de caractères intégrées. Conformément aux conditions de licence d'Adobe, ce fichier peut

être imprimé ou visualisé, mais ne doit pas être modifié à moins que l'ordinateur employé à cet effet ne bénéficie d'une licence autorisant

l'utilisation de ces polices et que celles-ci y soient installées. Lors du téléchargement de ce fichier, les parties concernées acceptent de fait la

responsabilité de ne pas enfreindre les conditions de licence d'Adobe. Le Secrétariat central de l'ISO décline toute responsabilité en la

matière.
Adobe est une marque déposée d'Adobe Systems Incorporated.

Les détails relatifs aux produits logiciels utilisés pour la création du présent fichier PDF sont disponibles dans la rubrique General Info du

fichier; les paramètres de création PDF ont été optimisés pour l'impression. Toutes les mesures ont été prises pour garantir l'exploitation de

ce fichier par les comités membres de l'ISO. Dans le cas peu probable où surviendrait un problème d'utilisation, veuillez en informer le

Secrétariat central à l'adresse donnée ci-dessous.
© ISO/CEI 2002

Droits de reproduction réservés. Sauf prescription différente, aucune partie de cette publication ne peut être reproduite ni utilisée sous quelque

forme que ce soit et par aucun procédé, électronique ou mécanique, y compris la photocopie et les microfilms, sans l'accord écrit de l’ISO à

l’adresse ci-après ou du comité membre de l’ISO dans le pays du demandeur.
ISO copyright office
Case postale 56 • CH-1211 Geneva 20
Tel. + 41 22 749 01 11
Fax. + 41 22 749 09 47
E-mail copyright@iso.ch
Web www.iso.ch
Imprimé en Suisse
ii © ISO/CEI 2002 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
GUIDE ISO/CEI 50:2002(F)
Sommaire Page

Avant-propos .............................................................................................................................................................iv

0 Introduction....................................................................................................................................................v

0.1 Importance de la sécurité des enfants ........................................................................................................v

0.2 Rôle des normes............................................................................................................................................v

0.3 Structure du Guide ........................................................................................................................................v

1 Domaine d'application ..................................................................................................................................1

2 Référence normative .....................................................................................................................................1

3 Termes et définitions.....................................................................................................................................1

4 Approche générale de la sécurité des enfants...........................................................................................2

4.1 Généralités .....................................................................................................................................................2

4.2 Estimation du risque .....................................................................................................................................2

4.3 Prévention et réduction des blessures .......................................................................................................2

4.4 Développement et comportement de l’enfant ............................................................................................3

4.5 Environnement physique et environnement social ...................................................................................6

5 Dangers spécifiques aux enfants ................................................................................................................7

5.1 Généralités .....................................................................................................................................................7

5.2 Dangers d’ordre mécanique .........................................................................................................................7

5.3 Dangers d’ordre thermique.........................................................................................................................17

5.4 Dangers d’ordre chimique ..........................................................................................................................21

5.5 Dangers d’ordre électrique.........................................................................................................................22

5.6 Dangers dus aux radiations .......................................................................................................................22

5.7 Dangers d’ordre biologique........................................................................................................................23

5.8 Dangers d’explosion ...................................................................................................................................24

5.9 Dangers découlant d’une fonction de protection insuffisante ...............................................................25

5.10 Dangers découlant d’une information inappropriée................................................................................26

Annexe A (informative) Exemples de mesures de prévention associées aux risques......................................27

Annexe B (informative) Liste de contrôle pour l'évaluation d'une norme...........................................................32

Bibliographie.............................................................................................................................................................33

© ISO/CEI 2002 – Tous droits réservés iii
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
GUIDE ISO/CEI 50:2002(F)
Avant-propos

L'ISO (Organisation internationale de normalisation) est une fédération mondiale d'organismes nationaux de

normalisation (comités membres de l'ISO). L'élaboration des Normes internationales est en général confiée aux

comités techniques de l'ISO. Chaque comité membre intéressé par une étude a le droit de faire partie du comité

technique créé à cet effet. Les organisations internationales, gouvernementales et non gouvernementales, en

liaison avec l'ISO participent également aux travaux. L'ISO collabore étroitement avec la Commission

électrotechnique internationale (CEI) en ce qui concerne la normalisation électrotechnique.

Les Guides sont rédigés conformément aux règles données dans les Directives ISO/CEI, Partie 3.

Les projets de Guides adoptés par le comité ou le groupe responsable sont soumis aux comités membres pour

vote. Leur publication comme Guides requiert l'approbation de 75 % au moins des comités membres votants.

L'attention est appelée sur le fait que certains des éléments du présent Guide peuvent faire l'objet de droits de

propriété intellectuelle ou de droits analogues. L'ISO ne saurait être tenue pour responsable de ne pas avoir

identifié de tels droits de propriété et averti de leur existence.

Le Guide ISO/CEI 50 a été élaboré par le Groupe consultatif conjoint ISO/CEI (JTAG) pour la sécurité des enfants.

Il convient de l’utiliser conjointement avec le Guide ISO/CEI 51, Aspects liés à la sécurité — Principes directeurs

pour les inclure dans les normes.

Cette deuxième édition annule et remplace la première édition (Guide ISO/CEI 50:1987), dont elle constitue une

révision technique.

Les annexes A et B du présent Guide sont données uniquement à titre d’information.

iv © ISO/CEI 2002 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
GUIDE ISO/CEI 50:2002(F)
0 Introduction
0.1 Importance de la sécurité des enfants

Il convient que la sécurité des enfants soit le souci premier de la société dans la mesure où, à l’âge de l’enfance et

de l’adolescence, les blessures sont une cause principale de décès et d’invalidité dans de nombreux pays. Les

enfants naissent dans un monde d’adultes, sans expérience ou évaluation du risque mais avec un désir naturel

d’exploration. Il en résulte que le risque de blessure est particulièrement grand au cours de l’enfance. Étant donnée

qu'une surveillance pour empêcher ou contrôler en permanence des interactions potentiellement dangereuses

n’est ni possible ni réaliste, des stratégies complémentaires de prévention des blessures se révèlent nécessaires.

Les stratégies d’intervention visant à la protection des enfants doivent reconnaître que les enfants ne sont pas de

petits adultes. La vulnérabilité des enfants aux blessures et la nature de leurs blessures diffèrent de celles des

adultes. Ces stratégies de prévention doivent également reconnaître le concept fondamental qui veut que des

enfants ne font pas une mauvaise utilisation des produits ou du milieu environnant. Au contraire, les enfants

interagissent avec ces derniers d’une manière qui reflète leur comportement normal, variant en fonction de leur

âge et de leur niveau de développement. Par conséquent, les stratégies d’intervention destinées à protéger les

enfants peuvent différer de celles destinées à protéger les adultes.

La difficulté consiste à développer des produits, structures, installations et services (collectivement désignés sous

le vocable produits), de manière à pouvoir minimiser le risque de blessure encouru par les enfants. Le traitement

de la prévention des blessures peut se faire au travers de la conception et du choix de la technologie, ainsi que de

la législation et de l’éducation.
0.2 Rôle des normes

Les normes peuvent jouer un rôle fondamental dans la prévention et le contrôle des blessures dans la mesure où

elles ont un potentiel unique

 d’élaboration d’une expertise technique en matière de conception et de fabrication,

 de mise en pratique des solutions par le biais de la législation en vigueur, et

 d’éducation par le biais de dispositions d’instructions, de mises en garde, d’illustrations, de symboles, etc.

Si les normes sont destinées à remplir leur rôle dans la prévention et le contrôle des blessures subies par les

enfants, les rédacteurs de normes doivent tenir compte de la possibilité d’interaction des enfants avec les produits

auxquels leurs normes s’adressent, que ces produits soient ou non destinés spécifiquement aux enfants.

NOTE Dans le présent Guide, le terme «norme» inclut d’autres publications de l’ISO ou de la CEI, telles que les

Spécifications techniques et les Guides.
0.3 Structure du Guide
Le présent Guide comprend trois parties principales et deux annexes, comme suit.

a) Une approche générale de la sécurité des enfants, y compris les principes d’un traitement systématique des

phénomènes dangereux (4.1 et 4.2).

b) Les caractéristiques de développement spécifiques des enfants qui les exposent à un risque particulier de

blessure (4.3).
© ISO/CEI 2002 – Tous droits réservés v
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
GUIDE ISO/CEI 50:2002(F)

c) Les phénomènes dangereux auxquels les enfants peuvent être exposés lors de l’utilisation ou de l’interaction

avec un produit, ainsi que les suggestions spécifiques de traitement de ces phénomènes dangereux (article 5).

Ces phénomènes dangereux sont également énumérés dans le Guide ISO/CEI 51 mais, ici, l’objectif repose

sur le risque spécifique encouru par les enfants, associé à ces phénomènes dangereux.

L’annexe A offre une vision globale des différents dangers liés, des blessures potentielles et des approches de

solutions. Cependant, il est essentiel de la lire conjointement avec le texte principal car seuls quelques exemples

de solutions y sont donnés.

L’annexe B, quant à elle, est conçue comme une liste de contrôle permettant aux rédacteurs de normes d’évaluer

leur prise en compte de l’aspect «sécurité des enfants».
vi © ISO/CEI 2002 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
GUIDE ISO/CEI 50:2002(F)
Aspects liés à la sécurité — Principes directeurs pour la sécurité
des enfants
1 Domaine d'application

Le présent Guide fournit un cadre de traitement des sources potentielles de danger physique non intentionnel

(phénomènes dangereux) pour les enfants eu égard aux produits, procédés ou services qu’ils utilisent ou avec

lesquels ils peuvent entrer en contact, même si ceux-ci ne sont pas destinés spécifiquement aux enfants. Ce cadre

vise à minimiser le risque de blessure pour les enfants.

Ce Guide est destiné principalement aux personnes concernées par l’élaboration et la révision de normes. Il

contient des informations importantes qui peuvent être utiles, notamment aux concepteurs, architectes, fabricants,

prestataires de services, spécialistes de la communication, ainsi qu’aux personnes chargées de définir les

politiques en matière de sécurité.

Pour les enfants ayant des besoins particuliers, des exigences supplémentaires peuvent se révéler appropriées. Le

présent Guide ne prétend pas traiter ces exigences supplémentaires dans leur totalité. Le Guide ISO/CEI 71 répond

aux besoins des personnes ayant des incapacités.

Un produit peut inclure des biens, des structures, des bâtiments, installations, ou une combinaison de ces

éléments.

Le présent Guide ne contient aucun principe directeur pour la prévention ou la réduction des dangers d’ordre

psychologique ou moral, ou des blessures infligées intentionnellement.
2 Référence normative

Le document normatif suivant contient des dispositions qui, par suite de la référence qui y est faite, constituent des

dispositions valables pour le présent Guide. Pour les références datées, les amendements ultérieurs ou les

révisions de ces publications ne s’appliquent pas. Toutefois, les parties prenantes aux accords fondés sur le

présent Guide sont invitées à rechercher la possibilité d’appliquer l’édition la plus récente du document normatif

indiqué ci-après. Pour les références non datées, la dernière édition du document normatif en référence s’applique.

Les membres de l’ISO et de la CEI possèdent le registre des Normes internationales en vigueur.

ISO/CEI Guide 51:1999, Aspects liés à la sécurité — Principes directeurs pour les inclure dans les normes

3 Termes et définitions

Pour les besoins du présent Guide, les termes et définitions suivants s’appliquent.

3.1
risque
combinaison de la probabilité d’un dommage et de sa gravité
[Guide ISO/CEI 51:1999, définition 3.2]
© ISO/CEI 2002 – Tous droits réservés 1
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
GUIDE ISO/CEI 50:2002(F)
3.2
dommage

blessure physique ou atteinte à la santé des personnes, ou atteinte aux biens ou à l’environnement

[Guide ISO/CEI 51:1999, définition 3.3]

NOTE Dans le présent Guide, la notion de «blessure» englobe les atteintes à la santé.

3.3
phénomène dangereux
danger
source potentielle de dommage
[Guide ISO/CEI 51:1999, définition 3.5]
3.4
enfant
personne, de la naissance jusqu’à l’âge de 14 ans
4 Approche générale de la sécurité des enfants
4.1 Généralités

Les concepts de sécurité qui distinguent la sécurité des enfants de la sécurité en général sont explicités dans le

présent article. Ces concepts viennent s’ajouter au contenu du Guide ISO/CEI 51.
4.2 Estimation du risque

L’estimation du risque est une étape importante de toute stratégie de prévention des blessures. L’approche

générale est esquissée dans le Guide ISO/CEI 51. Les principales questions à formuler dans un processus

d’estimation du risque sont les suivantes.
a) Que peut-il arriver?
b) Quelle est la probabilité du risque?
c) Quelle est la gravité de la blessure qui en résulte?

Lorsque l’on traite de la sécurité des enfants, les réponses à ces questions doivent prendre en compte les facteurs

suivants propres aux enfants:
a) la probabilité de se blesser;
b) leurs interactions avec les personnes et les produits;
c) leur développement et leur comportement;
d) leur manque de connaissance et d’expérience;
e) les facteurs sociaux/environnementaux.
4.3 Prévention et réduction des blessures

Les blessures et les maladies peuvent résulter du transfert d’énergie (mécanique, thermique, électrique), ou d’une

exposition à des agents (biologiques, radiations) supérieure à la capacité de résistance du corps. Ces blessures

peuvent être évitées ou réduites en intervenant dans la chaîne des événements qui en constituent la source ou qui

leur sont consécutifs.
2 © ISO/CEI 2002 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
GUIDE ISO/CEI 50:2002(F)
Les stratégies peuvent aborder les aspects suivants:

 la prévention de l’événement dangereux ou la réduction de l’exposition au phénomène dangereux (prévention

primaire);
 la réduction de la gravité des blessures (prévention secondaire);

 la réduction des effets à long terme de la blessure par le biais d’un sauvetage, d’un traitement ou d’une

rééducation (prévention tertiaire).

Les stratégies peuvent en outre être passives ou actives. Les stratégies passives ne nécessitent aucune action de

la part de l’individu en vue de sa protection. Les stratégies actives nécessitent une certaine action de l’individu. La

conception de produits sûrs entraîne généralement une prévention primaire; l’intégration de stratégies de

protection passives garantit généralement une plus grande probabilité de réussite.

Différentes sources peuvent être utilisées pour identifier le potentiel de blessure associé à un produit. Ces sources

incluent, sans toutefois s’y limiter
 les statistiques disponibles sur les traumatismes;

 les informations détaillées fournies par les systèmes de surveillance des traumatismes;

 les études de recherche;
 les analyses des rapports de cas;
 les données relatives aux plaintes signalées.

ATTENTION — L’absence de rapports sur les traumatismes ne signifie pas nécessairement qu’il y a

absence de phénomène dangereux.

Dans la mesure où les blessures subies par les enfants sont étroitement liées à leur stade de développement et à

leur exposition aux dangers à des âges différents, il est important de trier les données relatives aux blessures

subies par les enfants par groupe d’âge afin d’identifier les types émergents. Par exemple, dans certains pays, les

brûlures dues aux portes de fours, les brûlures occasionnées par l’eau bouillante, l’empoisonnement par des

médicaments et des produits chimiques ménagers, ainsi que la noyade, présentent des taux maximaux chez les

enfants de moins de 5 ans; les blessures dues aux chutes du haut d’une installation pour aire de jeu présentent un

taux maximal chez les enfants de 5 à 9 ans; enfin, les blessures résultant de chutes et les chocs associés à la

pratique des sports présentent un taux maximal chez les enfants de 10 à 14 ans.

L’identification de contre-mesures appropriées est le résultat de processus de recherche et d’évaluation,

particulièrement sur la base des méthodes d’épidémiologie, d’ingénierie et de biomécanique ainsi que par le cycle

de rétroaction des améliorations graduelles de la conception. Lors du choix des mesures de prévention, il convient

de reconnaître que les niveaux tolérables de sécurité/risque pour les adultes peuvent ne pas être suffisants pour la

protection des enfants. En introduisant des mesures destinées à protéger les adultes il est essentiel de prendre en

considération tout effet potentiel qui pourrait accroître les risques pour les enfants, par exemple les sacs gonflables

latéraux (airbags) pour les passagers des voitures.
4.4 Développement et comportement de l’enfant
4.4.1 Généralités

Les enfants ne sont pas de petits adultes. Les caractéristiques intrinsèques aux enfants, y compris leur stade de

développement ainsi que leur exposition aux phénomènes dangereux, leur font courir un risque de blessure

différent des risques auxquels sont exposés les adultes. Le stade de développement englobe dans une large

mesure la taille et la constitution de l’enfant, sa physiologie, sa capacité physique et cognitive, son développement

affectif et son comportement. Ces caractéristiques varient rapidement à mesure du développement de l’enfant. Par

conséquent, les parents et les agents de puériculture surestiment ou sous-estiment souvent les capacités des

enfants à différents stades de développement, ce qui entraîne une exposition aux phénomènes dangereux. Cette

situation est aggravée par le fait qu’une grande partie de l’environnement des enfants est conçue pour les adultes.

© ISO/CEI 2002 – Tous droits réservés 3
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
GUIDE ISO/CEI 50:2002(F)

Pour la détermination des dangers potentiels associés aux produits, toutes les caractéristiques de l’enfance

décrites ci-après doivent être prises en considération. Il convient de garder à l’esprit le fait que ces caractéristiques

peuvent se combiner entre elles, accroissant par-là le risque, pour l’enfant, de se blesser. Par exemple,

 un comportement exploratoire peut amener un enfant à grimper sur une échelle;

 une habileté cognitive limitée peut empêcher l’enfant de s’apercevoir de la hauteur excessive de l’échelle ou

de son instabilité;
 un contrôle moteur insuffisant peut faire lâcher prise et entraîner la chute.

La façon dont les enfants utilisent et interagissent avec les produits doit être considérée comme un comportement

normal d’enfant. Eu égard aux enfants, le terme «mauvaise utilisation» porte à confusion en la matière, et peut

entraîner une prise de décision inappropriée par rapport aux risques encourus par les enfants. Les études

montrent clairement que les enfants utilisent régulièrement des produits qui ne leur étaient pas destinés, tels que

les fours à micro-ondes. Lorsqu’un enfant interagit avec un produit, il est difficile de faire une distinction entre le

jeu, l’apprentissage actif ou l’utilisation prévue. Tenter de faire une différence entre ces interactions peut ne pas

être constructif pour des raisons de sécurité.

Tandis qu’il convient que les considérations de sécurité garantissent un équilibre approprié entre le risque de

blessure et la liberté pour les enfants d’explorer un environnement stimulant et d’apprendre, l’objectif, par le biais

de la conception, est de réduire le risque de blessure jusqu’à ce que l’enfant soit en mesure de développer son

aptitude à évaluer le risque et à agir de manière appropriée.
4.4.2 Dimensions corporelles des enfants et données anthropométriques

Certaines caractéristiques des enfants, touchant la taille et la distribution de la masse corporelle, les rendent

vulnérables aux blessures. Leur masse globale est inférieure, réduisant de ce fait leur capacité d’absorption de

l’énergie, source de blessures. Ci-après sont cités quelques exemples où la taille et la masse corporelle, par

comparaison à celles des adultes, sont des facteurs de blessure.

a) Dans le cas de lésions dues à la chaleur, une zone de contact relativement petite peut affecter une large

proportion de leur surface corporelle. L’importance de l’aire de la surface par rapport à la faible masse

corporelle peut entraîner la perte d’une plus grande proportion de liquides organiques de la zone de brûlure.

b) Par rapport à leur corps, les jeunes enfants ont une tête relativement grosse. De ce fait, leur centre de gravité

élevé augmente la probabilité de chutes, par exemple du haut de meubles ou de structures sur lesquels les

enfants peuvent grimper, s’asseoir ou se tenir debout. Souvent, les enfants tombent directement sur la tête

sans amortir leur chute avec leurs bras.

c) Un centre de gravité élevé a aussi pour effet d’augmenter le risque de chute dans des bassins, baquets,

cuvettes de W.-C., etc., au-dessus desquels les enfants se penchent ou qu’ils atteignent, augmentant ainsi le

risque de noyade.

d) La dimension relativement importante de la tête signifie qu’elle nécessite un espace bien plus important que le

reste du corps pour pouvoir passer dans un orifice. Lorsque le corps passe, pieds en avant, par un orifice par

lequel la tête ne peut pas passer, il y a coincement.

e) Les enfants sont capables d’insérer leurs doigts, mains et autres parties de leur corps dans de faibles

ouvertures pour accéder à des pièces tournantes, des câbles électriques ou autres dangers.

f) Par ailleurs, la masse relativement importante de la tête accroît encore la probabilité et la gravité de blessures

par «coup du lapin».

La taille des enfants par rapport à leur environnement rend nécessaire l’examen de leur anthropométrie, y compris

la hauteur totale ainsi que les longueurs, largeurs et circonférences des parties du corps. À cet égard, il convient

de consulter les données anthropométriques en vue d’établir la distribution normale et les marges de sécurité.

4.4.3 Développement moteur

Le développement moteur se réfère au processus de maturation des mouvements, grands et petits. Ce processus

comprend le passage d’actions primaires issues de réflexes involontaires à des actions délibérées, dirigées vers un

4 © ISO/CEI 2002 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 10 ----------------------
GUIDE ISO/CEI 50:2002(F)

objectif donné. Dans ce processus, l’acquisition de la force et de l’habileté à supporter le poids de la tête, à

s’accroupir, à s’asseoir, à faire des roulades, ramper, se tenir debout, grimper, marcher, se balancer, courir, ainsi que

de la dextérité à pouvoir manipuler des objets constituent autant d’événements déterminants. Jusqu’à ce que

l’équilibre, la maîtrise et la force se soient suffisamment développés, les enfants s’exposent aux chutes et au risque

de se trouver dans des positions périlleuses d’où ils ne peuvent s’extraire. À titre d’exemple, on peut citer ce qui suit.

a) Un bébé étendu peut se mouvoir jusque sur le bord d’une surface et en dégringoler mais ne plus être capable

de s’y hisser à nouveau seul. De ce fait, il peut se retrouver coincé et subir une asphyxie due à la position qu’il

occupe ou à une compression.

b) Un jeune enfant debout, ou qui commence à marcher, peut se retrouver empêtré dans des cordons, des

rubans, ou des rideaux situés à portée de ses mains. Lorsqu’il s’assoit ou s’écroule par terre, le cordon peut

se resserrer autour du cou et provoquer un étranglement.

c) Un enfant occupé à grimper peut voir ses vêtements pris dans des éléments de mobilier ou des saillies. S’il

n’est pas à même de s’extirper seul, il peut rester suspendu.

d) Des enfants tombent du haut d’objets parce qu’ils perdent leur équilibre ou lâchent prise.

Comprendre quelle est l’habileté motrice qu’un enfant est en mesure ou pas de posséder peut constituer un outil

important lors de la conception de produits plus sûrs, de même que pour concevoir le type d’intervention approprié.

Par exemple, l’accès à une plate-forme d’ascenseur peut être conçu de manière à mettre celle-ci hors d’atteinte de

jeunes enfants à quatre pattes; le manque d’habileté motrice des enfants peut être mis à profit pour développer

des mesures de résistance aux enfants.
4.4.4 Développement physiologique

En plus des dimensions corporelles et des fonctions motrices, de nombreuses autres fonctions physiologiques se

développent chez l’enfant. Celles-ci comprennent les fonctions sensorielles, les propriétés biomécaniques, temps

de réaction, métabolisme, développement des organes. Ci-après sont cités plusieurs exemples dans lesquels un

développement physiologique incomplet peut se révéler être un facteur d’accident:

 les enfants sont vulnérables à l’empoisonnement, dans la mesure où les médicaments, les produits chimiques

et les plantes peuvent être toxiques dans des quantités plus faibles que celles tolérées par les adultes;

 la nature de leur peau rend les enfants plus vulnérables aux lésions dues à la chaleur;

 l’ossature des enfants n’est pas entièrement développée, ce qui entraîne différentes réponses aux forces

mécaniques.
4.4.5 Développement cognitif et comportement

Les stades du développement cognitif chez l’enfant déterminent sa capacité (incapacité) à estimer le risque et à

prendre des décisions réfléchies. Des fonctions cognitives incomplètement développées entraînent un manque de

capacité des jeunes enfants à évaluer la situation dans laquelle ils se trouvent et à se soustraire aux risques

encourus. Au cours de la première ou des deux premières années de leur vie, les enfants semblent ne pas avoir le

sens du danger. Ainsi, alors qu’une certaine tolérance est normalement possible à l’égard des dangers qui

paraissent évidents à l’utilisateur, et qui sont nécessaires pour la fonction du produit, ces dangers peuvent ne pas

être si évidents pour les enfants. À un certain stade au cours de la petite enfance, l’expérience antérieure et

l’enseignement des parents/agents de puériculture commencent à influencer le comportement de l’enfant. La

confrontation à des risques limités est, par conséquent, une partie naturelle de l’apprentissage des enfants.

Certaines caractéristiques comportementales associées à la petite enfance exposent également les enfants à un

risque de blessure. Ces caractéristiques incluent

 l’engloutissement d’objets dans la bouche (port d’objets à la bouche), particulièrement au cours des trois

premiè
...

Questions, Comments and Discussion

Ask us and Technical Secretary will try to provide an answer. You can facilitate discussion about the standard in here.