Accuracy (trueness and precision) of measurement methods and results -- Part 1: General principles and definitions

The purpose is to outline the general principles to be understood when assessing accuracy (trueness and precision) of measurement methods and results, and in applications, and to establish practical estimations of the various measures by experiment. Is concerned exclusively with measurement methods which yield measurements on a continuous scale and give a single value as the test result. May be applied to a very wide range of materials, including liquids, powders and solid objects, manufactured or naturally occurring, provided that due consideration is given to any heterogeneity of the material.

Exactitude (justesse et fidélité) des résultats et méthodes de mesure -- Partie 1: Principes généraux et définitions

Le but de l'ISO 5725 est :a) de donner les grandes lignes des principes généraux à comprendre lors de l'estimation de l'exactitude (justesse et fidélité) des méthodes et des résultats de mesure, et dans des applications, et d'établir des estimations pratiques des différentes mesures par l'expérience (ISO 5725-1) ;b) de fournir une méthode de base pour l'estimation des deux mesures extrêmes de la fidélité des méthodes de mesure par l'expérience (ISO 5725-2) ;c) de fournir une procédure pour l'obtention des mesures intermédiaires de fidélité donnant les circonstances dans lesquelles elles s'appliquent, et des méthodes pour les estimer (ISO 5725-3) ;d) de fournir des méthodes de base pour la détermination de la justesse d'une méthode de mesure (ISO 5725-4) ;e) de fournir des alternatives aux méthodes de base données dans l'ISO 5725-2 et l'ISO 5725-4, pour la détermination de la justesse et de la fidélité des méthodes de mesure pour utilisation dans certaines circonstances (ISO 5725-5).

Točnost (pravilnost in natančnost) merilnih metod in rezultatov – 1. del : Splošna načela in definicije

General Information

Status
Published
Publication Date
31-May-2003
Technical Committee
Current Stage
6060 - National Implementation/Publication (Adopted Project)
Start Date
01-Jun-2003
Due Date
01-Jun-2003
Completion Date
01-Jun-2003

RELATIONS

Buy Standard

Standard
ISO 5725-1:1994 - Accuracy (trueness and precision) of measurement methods and results
English language
17 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview
Standard
SIST ISO 5725-1:2003
English language
17 pages
sale 10% off
Preview
sale 10% off
Preview

e-Library read for
1 day
Standard
ISO 5725-1:1994 - Exactitude (justesse et fidélité) des résultats et méthodes de mesure
French language
18 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview
Standard
ISO 5725-1:1994 - Exactitude (justesse et fidélité) des résultats et méthodes de mesure
French language
18 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview

Standards Content (sample)

INTERNATIONAL
IS0
STANDARD
5725-l
First edition
1994-I 2-15
Accuracy (trueness and precision) of
measurement methods and results -
Part 1:
General principles and definitions
Exactitude (justesse et fidblit6) des r&ultats et mgthodes de mesure -
Partie 1: Principes g&-Graux et d6finitions
Reference number
IS0 5725-l :I 994(E)
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
IS0 5725-l :1994(E)
Contents
Page

1 Scope ..............................................................................................

..................................................................... 1
2 Normative references

3 Definitions .................................................................................

4 Practical implications of the definitions for accuracy experiments
41 . Standard measurement method ............................................
.............................................................. 4
42 . Accuracy experiment

4.3 Identical test items .................................................................

............................................................ 5
44 . Short intervals of time

45 . Participating laboratories ........................................................

........................................................... 5
4.6 Observation conditions

Statistical model ........................................................................

51 l Basic model ............................................................................

..... 7
52 . Relationship between the basic model and the precision

53 . Alternative models ..................................................................

Experimental design considerations when estimating accuracy 7
...................................... 7
61 . Planning of an accuracy experiment
............................................ 8
62 . Standard measurement method
.......... 8
63 . Selection of laboratories for the accuracy experiment
6.4 Selection of materials to be used for an accuracy experiment

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

7 Utilization of accuracy data
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
7.1 Publication of trueness and precision values
. . . . . . . 12
7.2 Practical applications of trueness and precision values
Annexes
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A Symbols and abbreviations used in IS0 5725
0 IS0 1994

All rights reserved. Unless otherwise specified, no part of this publication may be reproduced

or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying and

microfilm, without permission in writing from the publisher.
International Organization for Standardization
Case Postale 56 l CH-1211 Geneve 20 l Switzerland
Printed in Switzerland
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
0 IS0
IS0 5725-1:1994(E)
..................... 15
B Charts of uncertainties for precision measures

C Bibliography ............................................................................ 17

---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
0 IS0
IS0 5725-l : 1994lE)
Foreword
IS0 (the international Organization for Standardization) is a worldwide
federation of national standards bodies (IS0 member bodies). The work
of preparing International Standards is normally carried out through IS0
technical committees. Each member body interested in a subject for
which a technical committee has been established has the right to be
represented on that committee. International organizations, governmental
and non-governmental, in liaison with ISO, also take part in the work. IS0
collaborates closely with the International Electrotechnical Commission
(IEC) on all matters of electrotechnical standardization.
Draft International Standards adopted by the technical committees are
circulated to the member bodies for voting. Publication as an International
Standard requires approval by at least 75 % of the member bodies casting
a vote.
International Standard IS0 5725-l was prepared by Technical Committee
lSO/TC 69, Applications of statistical methods, Subcommittee SC 6,
Measurement methods and results.
IS0 5725 consists of the following parts, under the general title Accuracy
(trueness and precision) of measurement methods and results:
- Part 1: General principles and definitions
- Part 2: Basic method for the determination of repeatability and re-
producibility of a standard measurement method
- Part 3: Intermediate measures of the precision of a standard
measurement method
- Part 4: Basic methods for the determination of the trueness of a
standard measurement method
- Part 5: Alternative methods for the determination of the precision
of a standard measurement method
- Part 6: Use in practice of accuracy values
Parts 1 to 6 of IS0 5725 together cancel and replace IS0 5725:1986,
which has been extended to cover trueness (in addition to precision) and
intermediate precision conditions (in addition to repeatability and repro-
ducibility conditions).
Annexes A and B form an integral part of this part of IS0 5725. Annex C
is for information only.
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
0 IS0 IS0 5725=1:1994(E)
Introduction
0.1 IS0 5725 uses two terms “trueness” and “precision” to describe
the accuracy of a measurement method. “Trueness” refers to the close-
ness of agreement between the arithmetic mean of a large number of test
results and the true or accepted reference value. “Precision” refers to the
closeness of agreement between test results.
0.2 The need to consider “precision” arises because tests performed
on presumably identical materials in presumably identical circumstances
do not, in general, yield identical results. This is attributed to unavoidable
random errors inherent in every measurement procedure; the factors that
influence the outcome of a measurement cannot all be completely
controlled. In the practical interpretation of measurement data, this vari-
ability has to be taken into account. For instance, the difference between
a test result and some specified value may be within the scope of un-
avoidable random errors, in which case a real deviation from such a
specified value has not been established. Similarly, comparing test results
from two batches of material will not indicate a fundamental quality dif-
ference if the difference between them can be attributed to the inherent
variation in the measurement procedure.
0.3 Many different factors (apart from variations between supposedly
identical specimens) may contribute to the variability of results from a
measurement method, including:
a) the operator;
the equipment used;
c) the calibration of the equipment;
the environment (temperature, humidity, air pollution, etc.);
the time elapsed between measurements.
The variability between measurements performed by different operators
and/or with different equipment will usually be greater than the variability
between measurements carried out within a short interval of time by a
single operator using the same equipment.
0.4 The general term for variability between repeated measurements is
precision. Two conditions of precision, termed repeatability and reproduc-
ibility conditions, have been found necessary and, for many practical
cases, useful for describing the variability of a measurement method. Un-
der repeatability conditions, factors a) to e) listed above are considered
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
0 IS0
IS0 5725=1:1994(E
constants and do no contribute to the variability, while under reproduc-
ibility conditions the\
vary and do contribute to the variability of the test
results. Thus repeatability and reproducibility are the two extremes of
precision, the first describing the minimum and the second the maximum
variability in results. Other intermediate conditions between these two
extreme conditions of precision are also conceivable, when one or more
of factors a) to e) are allowed to vary, and are used in certain specified
circumstances. Precision is normally expressed in terms of standard devi-
ations.
0.5 The “trueness” of a measurement method is of interest when it is
possible to conceive of a true value for the property being measured. Al-
though, for some measurement methods, the true value cannot be known
exactly, it may be possible to have an accepted reference value for the
property being measured; for example, if suitable reference materials are
available, or if the accepted reference value can be established by refer-
ence to another measurement method or by preparation of a known
sample. The trueness of the measurement method can be investigated
by comparing the accepted reference value with the level of the results
given by the measurement method. Trueness is normally expressed in
terms of bias. Bias can arise, for example, in chemical analysis if the
measurement method fails to extract all of an element, or if the presence
of one element interferes with the determination of another.
0.6 The general term accuracy is used in IS0 5725 to refer to both
trueness and precision.
The term accuracy was at one time used to cover only the one component
now named trueness, but it became clear that to many persons it should
imply the total displacement of a result from a reference value, due to
random as well as systematic effects.
The term bias has been in use for statistical matters for a very long time,
but because it caused certain philosophical objections among members
of some professions (such as medical and legal practitioners), the positive
aspect has been emphasized by the invention of the term trueness.
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
IS0 5725=1:1994(E)
INTERNATIONAL STANDARD Q ISO
Accuracy (trueness and precision) of measurement
methods and results -
Part 1:
General principles and definitions
I.2 This part of IS0 5725 is concerned exclusively
1 Scope
with measurement methods which yield measure-
ments on a continuous scale and give a single value
as the test result, although this single value may be
1.1 The purpose of IS0 5725 is as follows:
the outcome of a calculation from a set of observa-
tions.
a) to outline the general principles to be understood
when assessing accuracy (trueness and precision)
It defines values which describe, in quantitative
of measurement methods and results, and in ap-
terms, the ability of a measurement method to give
plications, and to establish practical estimations
a correct result (trueness) or to replicate a given result
measures by experiment
of the various
(precision). Thus there is an implication that exactly
(IS0 5725-I)
the same thing is being measured, in exactly the
same way, and that the measurement process is un-
b) to provide a basic method for estimating the two
der control.
extreme measures of the precision of measure-
This part of IS0 5725 may be applied to a very wide
ment methods by experiment (IS0 5725-2);
range of materials, including liquids, powders and
solid objects, manufactured or naturally occurring,
c) to provide a procedure for obtaining intermediate
provided that due consideration is given to any
measures of precision, giving the circumstances
heterogeneity of the material.
in which they apply and methods for estimating
them (IS0 5725-3);
d) to provide basic methods for the determination
2 Normative references
of the trueness of a measurement method
(IS0 5725-4);
The following standards contain provisions which,
through reference in this text, constitute provisions
e) to provide some alternatives to the basic meth-
of this part of IS0 5725. At the time of publication, the
ods, given in IS0 5725-2 and IS0 5725-4, for de-
editions indicated were valid. All standards are subject
termining the precisior and trueness of
to revision, and parties to agreements based on this
measurement methods fo * use under certain cir-
part of IS0 5725 are encouraged to investigate the
cumstances (IS0 5725-5);
possibility of applying the most recent editions of the
standards indicated below. Members of IEC and IS0

f) to present some practica I applications of these maintain registers of currently valid International

measures of trueness and precision (IS0 5725-6). Standards.
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
0 IS0
IS0 5725-l :I 994(E)

IS0 3534-l :I 993, Statistics - Vocabulary and sym- 3.5 accepted reference value: A value that serves

Part I: Probability and general statistical as an agreed-upon reference for comparison, and

bols -
which is derived as:
terms.
a theoretical or e stablished value,
IS0 5725-2: 1994, Accuracy (trueness and precision) a)
scientific principles;
of measurement methods and results - Part 2: Basic
method for the determination of repeatability and re-
an assigned or certified value, based on exper-
producibility of a standard measurement method.
imental work of some national or international or-
ganization;
IS0 5725-3: 1994, Accuracy (trueness and precision)
of measurement methods and results - Part 3:
c) a consensus or certified value, based on collabor-
Intermediate measures of the precision of a standard
ative experimental work under the auspices of a
measurement method.
scientific or engineering group;
IS0 5725-4: 1994, Accuracy (trueness and precision)
d) when a), b) and c) are not available, the expec-
of measurement methods and results - Part 4: Basic
tation of the (measurable) quantity, i.e. the mean
methods for the determination of the trueness of a
of a specified population of measurements.
standard measurement method.
[ISO 3534-I]
36 . accuracy: The closeness of agreement between
3 Definitions
a tes t result and the accepted reference value.
For the purposes of IS0 5725, the following defi-
NOTE 2 The term accuracy, when applied to a set of test
nitions apply. results, involves a combination of random components and
a common systematic error or bias component.
Some definitions are taken from IS0 3534-l.
[ISO 3534-I]
The symbols used in IS0 5725 are given in annex A.
3.7 trueness: The closeness of agreement between
value: The value of a characteristic
3.1 observed
the average value obtained from a large series of test
result of a single observation.
obtained as the
results and an accepted reference value.
[ISO 3534-I]
NOTES
3 The measure of trueness is usually expressed in terms
3.2 test result: The value of a characteristic ob-
of bias.
tained by carrying out a specified test method.
4 Trueness has been referred to
as “accuracy of the
The test method should specify that one or a
NOTE 1
mean”. This usage is not recommen
ded.
number of individual observations be made, and their aver-
age or another appropriate function (such as the median or
[ISO 3534-I]
the standard deviation) be reported as the test result. It may
also require standard corrections to be applied, such as
correction of gas volumes to standard temperature and
3.8 bias: The difference between the expectation
pressure. Thus a test result can be a result calculated from
of the test results and an accepted reference value.
several observed values. In the simple case, the test result
is the observed value itself.
NOTE 5 Bias is the total systematic error as contrasted
to random error. There may be one or more systematic error
[ISO 3534-I]
components contributing to the bias. A larger systematic
difference from the accepted reference value is reflected
by a larger bias value.
3.3 level of the test in a precision experiment:
The general average of the test results from all lab-
[ISO 3534-l-J
oratories for one particular material or specimen
tested.
3.9 laboratory bias: The difference between the

34 . cell in a precision experiment: The test expectation of the test results from a particular lab-

at a single level obtained by one laboratory. oratory and an accepted reference value.

---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
Q IS0 IS0 5725=1:1994(E)
by the same operator using the same equipment
3.10 bias of the measurement method: The dif-
within short intervals of time.
ference between the expectation of test results ob-
tained from all laboratories using that method and an
[ISO 3534-I-J
accepted reference value.
NOTE 6 One example of this in operation would be
3.15 repeatability standard deviation: The stan-
where a method purporting to measure the sulfur content
dard deviation of test results obtained under repeat-
of a compound consistently fails to extract all the sulfur,
ability conditions.
giving a negative bias to the measurement method. The
bias of the measurement method is measured by the dis-
NOTES
placement of the average of results from a large number
of different laboratories all using the same method. The bias
12 It is a measure of dispersion of t .he distribution of test
of a measurement method may be different at different
results under repeatability conditions.
levels.
13 Similarly “repeatability variance” and “repeatability co-
‘he dif ference
3.11 laboratory component of bias: T
efficient of variation” could be defined and used as meas-
bias of the
between the laboratory bias and the
ures of the dispersion of test results under repeatability
measurement method.
conditions.
NOTES
[ISO 3534-I]
7 The laboratory component of bias is specific to a given
laboratory and the conditions of measurement within the
3.16 repeatability limit: The value less than or
Ia,boratory, and also it may be different at different levels of
equal to which the absolute difference between two
the test.
test results obtained under repeatability conditions
may be expected to be with a probability of 95 %.
8 The laboratory component of bias is relative to the
overall average result, not the true or reference value.
NOTE 14 The symbol used is r.
The closeness of agreement be-
3.12 precision:
[ISO 3534-I]
tween independent test results obtained under stipu-
lated conditions.
3.17 reproducibility: Precision under reproducibility
NOTES
conditions.
9 Precision depends only on the distribution of random
[ISO 3534-I]
errors and does not relate to the true value or the specified
value.
3.18 reproducibility conditions: Conditions where
10 The measure of precision is usually expressed in terms
test results are obtained with the same method on
of imprecision and computed as a standard deviation of the
identical test items in different laboratories with dif-
test results. Less precision is reflected by a larger standard
deviation. ferent operators using different equipment.
11 “Independent test results” means results obtained in
[ISO 3534-l]
a manner not influenced by any previous result on the same
or similar test object. Quantitative measures of precision
depend critically on the stipulated conditions. Repeatability
3.19 reproducibility standard deviation: The stan-
and reproducibility conditions are particular sets of extreme
dard deviation of test results obtained under repro-
conditions.
ducibility conditions.
[ISO 3534-l]
NOTES
15 It is a measure of the dispersion of the distribution of
3.13 repeatability: Precision under repeatability
test results under reproducibility conditions.
conditions.
16 Similarly “reproducibility variance” and “reproducibility
[ISO 3534-I]
coefficient of variation ” could be defined and used as
measures of the dispersion of test results under reproduc-
3.14 repeatability conditions: Conditions where
ibility conditions.
independent test results are obtained with the same
method on identical test items in the same laboratory [ISO 3534-l]
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
IS0 5725-l : 1994(E)
3.20 reproducibility limit: The value less than or
4 Practical implications of the definitions
equal to which the absolute difference between two
for accuracy experiments
test results obtained under reproducibility conditions
may be expected to be with a probability of 95 %.
4.1 Standard measurement method
NOTE 17 The symbol used is R.
4.1.1 In order that the measurements are made in
the same way, the measurement method shall have
[ISO 3534-I]
been standardized. All measurements shall be carried
out according to that standard method. This means
that there has to be a written document that lays
3.21 outlier: A member of a set of values which is
down in full detail how the measurement shall be
inconsistent with the other members of that set.
carried out, preferably including a description as to
how the measurement specimen should be obtained
IS0 5725-2 specifies the statistical tests and
NOTE 18
and prepared.
the significance level to be used to identify outliers in
trueness and precision experiments.
4.1.2 The existence of a documented measurement
method implies the existence of an organization re-
sponsible for the establishment of the measurement
3.22 collaborative assessment experiment: An
method under study.
interlaboratory experiment in which the performance
of each laboratory is assessed using the same stan-
NOTE 22 The standard measurement method is dis-
dard measurement method on identical material. cussed more fully in 6.2.
NOTES
4.2 Accuracy experiment
19 The definitions given in 3.16 and 3.20 apply to results
that vary on a continuous scale. If the test result is discrete
or rounded off, the repeatability limit and the reproducibility
4.2.1 The accuracy (trueness and precision) meas-
limit as defined above are each the minimum value equal to
ures should be determined from a series of test re-
or below which the absolute difference between two single
sults reported by the participating laboratories,
test results is expected to lie with a probability of not less
organized under a panel of experts established spe-
than 95 %.
cifically for that purpose.
20 The definitions given in 3.8 to 3.11, 3.15, 3.16, 3.19 and
Such an interlaboratory experiment is called an “ac-
3.20 refer to theoretical values which in reality remain un-
curacy experiment”. The accuracy experiment may
known. The values for reproducibility and repeatability stan-

dard deviations and bias actually determined by experiment also be called a “precision” or “trueness exper-

(as described in IS0 5725-2 and IS0 5725-4) are, in stat-
iment” according to its limited purpose. If the purpose
istical terms, estimates of these values, and as such are
is to determine trueness, then a precision experiment
subject to errors. Consequently, for example, the probability
shall either have been completed previously or shall
levels associated with the limits r and R will not be exactly
occur simultaneously.
95 %. They will approximate to 95 % when many labora-
tories have taken part in the precision experiment, but may
The estimates of accuracy derived from such an ex-
be considerably different from 95 % when fewer than 30
periment should always be quoted as being valid only
laboratories have participated. This is unavoidable but does
for tests carried out according to the standard
not seriously detract from their practical utility as they are
measurement method.
primarily designed to serve as tools for judging whether the
difference between results could be ascribed to random
uncertainties inherent in the measurement method or not.
4.2.2 An accuracy experiment can often be consid-
Differences larger than the repeatability limit r or the repro-

ducibility limit R are suspect. ered to be a practical test of the adequacy of the

standard measurement method. One of the main
21 The symbols r and R are already in general use for
purposes of standardization is to eliminate differences
other purposes; in IS0 3534-l r is recommended for the
between users (laboratories) as far as possible, and
correlation coefficient and R (or w) for the range of a single
the data provided by an accuracy experiment will re-
series of observations. However, there should be no con-
veal how effectively this purpose has been achieved.
fusion if the full wordings repeatability limit r and reproduc-
Pronounced differences in the within-laboratory vari-
ibility limit R are used whenever there is a possibility of
ances (see clause 7) or between the laboratory
misunderstanding, particularly when they are quoted in
standards. means may indicate that the standard measurement
---------------------- Page: 10 ----------------------
IS0 5725~1:1994( E)
0 IS0
measured, and presumably that order will be ran-
method is not yet sufficiently detailed and can poss-
domized so that all the “identical” items are not
ibly be improved. If so, this should be reported to the
measured together. This might mean that the time
standardizing body with a request for further investi-
interval between repeated measurements may appear
gation.
to defeat the object of a short interval of time unless
the measurements are of such a nature that the
4.3 Identical test items
whole series of measurements could all be completed
within a short interval of time. Common sense must
4.3.1 In an accuracy experiment, samples of a spe-
prevail.
cific material or specimens of a specific product are
sent from a central point to a number of laboratories
4.5 Participating laboratories
in different places, different countries, or even in dif-
ferent continents. The definition of repeatability con-

ditions (3.14) stating that the measurements in these 4.5.1 A basic assumption underlying this part of

laboratories shall be performed on identical test items IS0 5725 is that, for a standard measurement

refers to the moment when these measurements are method, repeatability will be, at least approximately,

actually carried out. To achieve this, two different
the same for all laboratories applying the standard
conditions have to be satisfied:
procedure, so that it is permissible to establish one
common average repeatability standard deviation
a) the samples have to be identical when dispatched
which will be applicable to any laboratory. However,
to the laboratories;
any laboratory can, by carrying out a series of
measurements under repeatability conditions, arrive
b) they have to remain identical during transport and
at an estimate of its own repeatability standard devi-
during the different time intervals that may elapse
ation for the measurement method .and check it
before the measurements are actually performed.
against the common standard value. Such a pro-
cedure is dealt with in IS0 5725-6.
In organizing accuracy experiments, both conditions
shall be carefully observed.
4.5.2 The quantities defined in 3.8 to 3.20 in theory
apply to all laboratories which are likely to perform the
NOTE 23 The selection of material is discussed more
measurement method. In practice, they are deter-
fully in 6.4.
mined from a sample of this population of labora-
tories. Further details of the selection of this sample
4.4 Short intervals of time
are given in 6.3. Provided the instructions given there
regarding the number of laboratories to be included
4.4.1 According to the definition of repeatability
and the number of measurements that they carry out
conditions (3.14), measurements for the determi-
are followed, then the resulting estimates of trueness
nation of repeatability have to be made under con-
and precision should suffice. If, however, at some fu-
stant operating conditions; i.e. during the time
ture date it should become evident that the labora-
covered by the measurements, factors such as those
tories participating were not, or are no longer, truly
listed in 0.3 should be constant. In particular, the
representative of all those using the standard
equipment should not be recalibrated between the
measurement method, then the measurement shall
measurements unless this is an essential part of
be repeated.
every single measurement. In practice, tests under
repeatability conditions should be conducted in as
4.6 Observation conditions
short a time as possible in order to minimize changes
in those factors, such as environmental, which cannot
always be guaranteed constant.
4.6.1 The factors which contribute to the variability
of the observed values obtained within a laboratory

4.4.2 There is also a second consideration which are listed in 0.3. They may be given as time, operator

may affect the interval elapsing between measure- and equipment when observations at different times

ments, and that is that the test results are assumed include the effects due to the change of environ-

to be independent. If it is feared that previous results mental conditions and the recalibration of equipment

may influence subsequent test results (and so reduce between observations. Under repeatability conditions,

the estimate of repeatability variance), it may be
observations are carried out with all these factors
necessary to provide separate specimens coded in
constant, and under reproducibility conditions obser-
such a way that an operator will not know which are
vations are carried out at different laboratories; i.e. not

supposedly identical. Instructions would be given as only with all the other factors varying but also with

to the order in which those specimens are to be additional effects due to the difference between lab-

---------------------- Page: 11 ----------------------
0 IS0
IS0 5725-l : 1994(E)
when comparing test results with a value specified in
oratories in management and maintenance of the
a contract or a standard where the contract or speci-
laboratory, stability checking of the observations, etc.
fication refers to the true
...

2003-01.Slovenski inštitut za standardizacijo. Razmnoževanje celote ali delov tega standarda ni dovoljeno.Accuracy (trueness and precision) of measurement methods and results -- Part 1: General principles and definitionsExactitude (justesse et fidélité) des résultats et méthodes de mesure -- Partie 1: Principes généraux et définitions17.020Meroslovje in merjenje na splošnoMetrology and measurement in general03.120.30Application of statistical methodsICS:SIST ISO 5725-1:2003enTa slovenski standard je istoveten z:ISO 5725-1:199401-junij-2003SIST ISO 5725-1:2003SLOVENSKI

STANDARD

INTERNATIONAL STANDARD IS0 5725-l First edition 1994-I 2-15 Accuracy (trueness and precision) of measurement methods and results - Part 1: General principles and definitions Exactitude (justesse et fidblit6) des r&ultats et mgthodes de mesure - Partie 1: Principes g&-Graux et d6finitions Reference number IS0 5725-l :I 994(E)

IS0 5725-l :1994(E) Contents 1 2 3 4 41 . 42 . 4.3 44 . 45 . 4.6 5 51 l 52 . 53 . 6 61 . 62 . 63 . Page Scope .............................................................................................. 1 Normative references ..................................................................... 1 Definitions ................................................................................. 2 Practical implications of the definitions for accuracy experiments 4 Standard measurement method ............................................ 4 Accuracy experiment .............................................................. 4 Identical test items ................................................................. 5 Short intervals of time ............................................................ 5 Participating laboratories ........................................................ 5 Observation conditions ........................................................... 5 Statistical model ........................................................................ 6 Basic model ............................................................................ 6 Relationship between the basic model and the precision ..... 7 Alternative models .................................................................. 7 Experimental design considerations when estimating accuracy 7 Planning of an accuracy experiment ...................................... 7 Standard measurement method ............................................ 8 Selection of laboratories for the accuracy experiment .......... 8 6.4 Selection of materials to be used for an accuracy experiment 10 7 Utilization of accuracy data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 7.1 Publication of trueness and precision values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 7.2 Practical applications of trueness and precision values . . . . . . . 12 Annexes A Symbols and abbreviations used in IS0 5725 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 0 IS0 1994 All rights reserved. Unless otherwise specified, no part of this publication may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying and microfilm, without permission in writing from the publisher. International Organization for Standardization Case Postale 56 l CH-1211 Geneve 20 l Switzerland Printed in Switzerland ii

0 IS0 IS0 5725-1:1994(E) B Charts of uncertainties for precision measures ..................... 15 C Bibliography ............................................................................ 17

IS0 5725-l : 1994lE) 0 IS0 Foreword IS0 (the international Organization for Standardization) is a worldwide federation of national standards bodies (IS0 member bodies). The work of preparing International Standards is normally carried out through IS0 technical committees. Each member body interested in a subject for which a technical committee has been established has the right to be represented on that committee. International organizations, governmental and non-governmental, in liaison with ISO, also take part in the work. IS0 collaborates closely with the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) on all matters of electrotechnical standardization. Draft International Standards adopted by the technical committees are circulated to the member bodies for voting. Publication as an International Standard requires approval by at least 75 % of the member bodies casting a vote. International Standard IS0 5725-l was prepared by Technical Committee lSO/TC 69, Applications of statistical methods, Subcommittee SC 6, Measurement methods and results. IS0 5725 consists of the following parts, under the general title Accuracy (trueness and precision) of measurement methods and results: - Part 1: General principles and definitions - Part 2: Basic method for the determination of repeatability and re- producibility of a standard measurement method - Part 3: Intermediate measures measurement method of the precision of a standard - Part 4: Basic methods for the determination of the trueness of a standard measurement method - Part 5: Alternative methods for the determination of the precision of a standard measurement method - Part 6: Use in practice of accuracy values Parts 1 to 6 of IS0 5725 together cancel and replace IS0 5725:1986, which has been extended to cover trueness (in addition to precision) and intermediate precision conditions (in addition to repeatability and repro- ducibility conditions). Annexes A and B form an integral part of this part of IS0 5725. Annex C is for information only.

0 IS0 IS0 5725=1:1994(E) Introduction 0.1 IS0 5725 uses two terms “trueness” and “precision” to describe the accuracy of a measurement method. “Trueness” refers to the close- ness of agreement between the arithmetic mean of a large number of test results and the true or accepted reference value. “Precision” refers to the closeness of agreement between test results. 0.2 The need to consider “precision” arises because tests performed on presumably identical materials in presumably identical circumstances do not, in general, yield identical results. This is attributed to unavoidable random errors inherent in every measurement procedure; the factors that influence the outcome of a measurement cannot all be completely controlled. In the practical interpretation of measurement data, this vari- ability has to be taken into account. For instance, the difference between a test result and some specified value may be within the scope of un- avoidable random errors, in which case a real deviation from such a specified value has not been established. Similarly, comparing test results from two batches of material will not indicate a fundamental quality dif- ference if the difference between them can be attributed to the inherent variation in the measurement procedure. 0.3 Many different factors (apart from variations between supposedly identical specimens) may contribute to the variability of results from a measurement method, including: a) the operator; b) c) d e) the equipment used; the calibration of the equipment; the environment (temperature, humidity, air pollution, etc.); the time elapsed between measurements. The variability between measurements performed by different operators and/or with different equipment will usually be greater than the variability between measurements carried out within a short interval of time by a single operator using the same equipment. 0.4 The general term for variability between repeated measurements is precision. Two conditions of precision, termed repeatability and reproduc- ibility conditions, have been found necessary and, for many practical cases, useful for describing the variability of a measurement method. Un- der repeatability conditions, factors a) to e) listed above are considered

IS0 5725=1:1994(E constants and do no ibility conditions the\ contribute to the variability, while under reproduc- vary and do contribute to the variability of the test results. Thus repeatability and reproducibility are the two extremes of precision, the first describing the minimum and the second the maximum variability in results. Other intermediate conditions between these two extreme conditions of precision are also conceivable, when one or more of factors a) to e) are allowed to vary, and are used in certain specified circumstances. Precision is normally expressed in terms of standard devi- ations. 0 IS0 0.5 The “trueness” of a measurement method is of interest when it is possible to conceive of a true value for the property being measured. Al- though, for some measurement methods, the true value cannot be known exactly, it may be possible to have an accepted reference value for the property being measured; for example, if suitable reference materials are available, or if the accepted reference value can be established by refer- ence to another measurement method or by preparation of a known sample. The trueness of the measurement method can be investigated by comparing the accepted reference value with the level of the results given by the measurement method. Trueness is normally expressed in terms of bias. Bias can arise, for example, in chemical analysis if the measurement method fails to extract all of an element, or if the presence of one element interferes with the determination of another. 0.6 The general term accuracy is used in IS0 5725 to refer to both trueness and precision. The term accuracy was at one time used to cover only the one component now named trueness, but it became clear that to many persons it should imply the total displacement of a result from a reference value, due to random as well as systematic effects. The term bias has been in use for statistical matters for a very long time, but because it caused certain philosophical objections among members of some professions (such as medical and legal practitioners), the positive aspect has been emphasized by the invention of the term trueness. vi

INTERNATIONAL STANDARD Q ISO IS0 5725=1:1994(E) Accuracy (trueness and precision) of measurement methods and results - Part 1: General principles and definitions 1 Scope 1.1 The purpose of IS0 5725 is as follows: a) to outline the general principles to be understood when assessing accuracy (trueness and precision) of measurement methods and results, and in ap- plications, and to establish practical estimations of the various measures by experiment (IS0 5725-I) I b) to provide a basic method for estimating the two extreme measures of the precision of measure- ment methods by experiment (IS0 5725-2); c) to provide a procedure for obtaining intermediate measures of precision, giving the circumstances in which they apply and methods for estimating them (IS0 5725-3); d) to provide basic methods for the determination of the trueness of a measurement method (IS0 5725-4); e) to provide some alternatives to the basic meth- ods, given in IS0 5725-2 and IS0 5725-4, for de- termining the precisior measurement methods fo cumstances (IS0 5725-5); and trueness of * use under certain cir- f) to present some practica I applications of these measures of trueness and precision (IS0 5725-6). I.2 This part of IS0 5725 is concerned exclusively with measurement methods which yield measure- ments on a continuous scale and give a single value as the test result, although this single value may be the outcome of a calculation from a set of observa- tions. It defines values which describe, in quantitative terms, the ability of a measurement method to give a correct result (trueness) or to replicate a given result (precision). Thus there is an implication that exactly the same thing is being measured, in exactly the same way, and that the measurement process is un- der control. This part of IS0 5725 may be applied to a very wide range of materials, including liquids, powders and solid objects, manufactured or naturally occurring, provided that due consideration is given to any heterogeneity of the material. 2 Normative references The following standards contain provisions which, through reference in this text, constitute provisions of this part of IS0 5725. At the time of publication, the editions indicated were valid. All standards are subject to revision, and parties to agreements based on this part of IS0 5725 are encouraged to investigate the possibility of applying the most recent editions of the standards indicated below. Members of IEC and IS0 maintain registers of currently valid International Standards.

IS0 5725-l :I 994(E) 0 IS0 IS0 3534-l :I 993, Statistics - Vocabulary and sym- bols - Part I: Probability and general statistical terms. 3.5 accepted reference value: A value that serves as an agreed-upon reference for comparison, and which is derived as: IS0 5725-2: 1994, Accuracy (trueness and precision) of measurement methods and results - Part 2: Basic method for the determination of repeatability and re- producibility of a standard measurement method. a) a theoretical or e scientific principles; stablished value, on b) an assigned or certified value, based on exper- imental work of some national or international or- IS0 5725-3: 1994, Accuracy (trueness and precision) of measurement methods and results - Part 3: Intermediate measures of the precision of a standard measurement method. ganization; c) a consensus or certified value, based on collabor- ative experimental work under the auspices of a scientific or engineering group; IS0 5725-4: 1994, Accuracy (trueness and precision) of measurement methods and results - Part 4: Basic methods for the determination of the trueness of a standard measurement method. d) when a), b) and c) are not available, the expec- tation of the (measurable) quantity, i.e. the mean of a specified population of measurements. [ISO 3534-I] 36 . a tes accuracy: The closeness of agreement between t result and the accepted reference value. 3 Definitions For the purposes of IS0 5725, the following defi- nitions apply. NOTE 2 The term accuracy, when applied to a set of test results, involves a combination of random components and a common systematic error or bias component. Some definitions are taken from IS0 3534-l. [ISO 3534-I] The symbols used in IS0 5725 are given in annex A. 3.7 trueness: The closeness of agreement between the average value obtained from a large series of test results and an accepted reference value. 3.1 observed value: The value of a characteristic obtained as the result of a single observation. [ISO 3534-I] NOTES 3.2 test result: The value of a characteristic ob- tained by carrying out a specified test method. 3 The measure of trueness is usually expressed in terms of bias. 4 Trueness has been referred to as “accuracy of the mean”. This usage is not recommen ded. NOTE 1 The test method should specify that one or a number of individual observations be made, and their aver- age or another appropriate function (such as the median or the standard deviation) be reported as the test result. It may also require standard corrections to be applied, such as correction of gas volumes to standard temperature and pressure. Thus a test result can be a result calculated from several observed values. In the simple case, the test result is the observed value itself. [ISO 3534-I] 3.8 bias: The difference between the expectation of the test results and an accepted reference value. NOTE 5 Bias is the total systematic error as contrasted to random error. There may be one or more systematic error components contributing to the bias. A larger systematic difference from the accepted reference value is reflected by a larger bias value. [ISO 3534-I] 3.3 level of the test in a precision experiment: The general average of the test results from all lab- oratories for one particular material or specimen tested. [ISO 3534-l-J 3.9 laboratory bias: The difference between the expectation of the test results from a particular lab- oratory and an accepted reference value. 34 . cell in a precision experiment: The test at a single level obtained by one laboratory. 2

Q IS0 IS0 5725=1:1994(E) 3.10 bias of the measurement method: The dif- ference between the expectation of test results ob- tained from all laboratories using that method and an accepted reference value. NOTE 6 One example of this in operation would be where a method purporting to measure the sulfur content of a compound consistently fails to extract all the sulfur, giving a negative bias to the measurement method. The bias of the measurement method is measured by the dis- placement of the average of results from a large number of different laboratories all using the same method. The bias of a measurement method may be different at different levels. 3.11 laboratory component of bias: T between the laboratory bias and the measurement method. ‘he dif bias ference of the NOTES 7 The laboratory component of bias is specific to a given laboratory and the conditions of measurement within the Ia,boratory, and also it may be different at different levels of the test. 8 The laboratory component of bias is relative to the overall average result, not the true or reference value. 3.12 precision: The closeness of agreement be- tween independent test results obtained under stipu- lated conditions. NOTES 9 Precision depends only on the distribution of random errors and does not relate to the true value or the specified value. 10 The measure of precision is usually expressed in terms of imprecision and computed as a standard deviation of the test results. Less precision is reflected by a larger standard deviation. 11 “Independent test results” means results obtained in a manner not influenced by any previous result on the same or similar test object. Quantitative measures of precision depend critically on the stipulated conditions. Repeatability and reproducibility conditions are particular sets of extreme conditions. [ISO 3534-l] 3.13 repeatability: Precision under repeatability conditions. [ISO 3534-I] 3.14 repeatability conditions: Conditions where independent test results are obtained with the same method on identical test items in the same laboratory by the same operator using the same equipment within short intervals of time. [ISO 3534-I-J 3.15 repeatability standard deviation: The stan- dard deviation of test results obtained under repeat- ability conditions. NOTES 12 It is a measure of dispersion of t results under repeatability conditions. .he distribution of test 13 Similarly “repeatability variance” and “repeatability co- efficient of variation” could be defined and used as meas- ures of the dispersion of test results under repeatability conditions. [ISO 3534-I] 3.16 repeatability limit: The value less than or equal to which the absolute difference between two test results obtained under repeatability conditions may be expected to be with a probability of 95 %. NOTE 14 The symbol used is r. [ISO 3534-I] 3.17 reproducibility: Precision under reproducibility conditions. [ISO 3534-I] 3.18 reproducibility conditions: Conditions where test results are obtained with the same method on identical test items in different laboratories with dif- ferent operators using different equipment. [ISO 3534-l] 3.19 reproducibility standard deviation: The stan- dard deviation of test results obtained under repro- ducibility conditions. NOTES 15 It is a measure of the dispersion of the distribution of test results under reproducibility conditions. 16 Similarly “reproducibility variance” and “reproducibility coefficient of variation ” could be defined and used as measures of the dispersion of test results under reproduc- ibility conditions. [ISO 3534-l]

IS0 5725-l : 1994(E) 3.20 reproducibility limit: The value less than or equal to which the absolute difference between two test results obtained under reproducibility conditions may be expected to be with a probability of 95 %. NOTE 17 The symbol used is R. [ISO 3534-I] 3.21 outlier: A member of a set of values which is inconsistent with the other members of that set. NOTE 18 IS0 5725-2 specifies the statistical tests and the significance level to be used to identify outliers in trueness and precision experiments. 3.22 collaborative assessment experiment: An interlaboratory experiment in which the performance of each laboratory is assessed using the same stan- dard measurement method on identical material. NOTES 19 The definitions given in 3.16 and 3.20 apply to results that vary on a continuous scale. If the test result is discrete or rounded off, the repeatability limit and the reproducibility limit as defined above are each the minimum value equal to or below which the absolute difference between two single test results is expected to lie with a probability of not less than 95 %. 20 The definitions given in 3.8 to 3.11, 3.15, 3.16, 3.19 and 3.20 refer to theoretical values which in reality remain un- known. The values for reproducibility and repeatability stan- dard deviations and bias actually determined by experiment (as described in IS0 5725-2 and IS0 5725-4) are, in stat- istical terms, estimates of these values, and as such are subject to errors. Consequently, for example, the probability levels associated with the limits r and R will not be exactly 95 %. They will approximate to 95 % when many labora- tories have taken part in the precision experiment, but may be considerably different from 95 % when fewer than 30 laboratories have participated. This is unavoidable but does not seriously detract from their practical utility as they are primarily designed to serve as tools for judging whether the difference between results could be ascribed to random uncertainties inherent in the measurement method or not. Differences larger than the repeatability limit r or the repro- ducibility limit R are suspect. 21 The symbols r and R are already in general use for other purposes; in IS0 3534-l r is recommended for the correlation coefficient and R (or w) for the range of a single series of observations. However, there should be no con- fusion if the full wordings repeatability limit r and reproduc- ibility limit R are used whenever there is a possibility of misunderstanding, particularly when they are quoted in standards. 4 Practical implications of the definitions for accuracy experiments 4.1 Standard measurement method 4.1.1 In order that the measurements are made in the same way, the measurement method shall have been standardized. All measurements shall be carried out according to that standard method. This means that there has to be a written document that lays down in full detail how the measurement shall be carried out, preferably including a description as to how the measurement specimen should be obtained and prepared. 4.1.2 The existence of a documented measurement method implies the existence of an organization re- sponsible for the establishment of the measurement method under study. NOTE 22 The standard measurement method is dis- cussed more fully in 6.2. 4.2 Accuracy experiment 4.2.1 The accuracy (trueness and precision) meas- ures should be determined from a series of test re- sults reported by the participating laboratories, organized under a panel of experts established spe- cifically for that purpose. Such an interlaboratory experiment is called an “ac- curacy experiment”. The accuracy experiment may also be called a “precision” or “trueness exper- iment” according to its limited purpose. If the purpose is to determine trueness, then a precision experiment shall either have been completed previously or shall occur simultaneously. The estimates of accuracy derived from such an ex- periment should always be quoted as being valid only for tests carried out according to the standard measurement method. 4.2.2 An accuracy experiment can often be consid- ered to be a practical test of the adequacy of the standard measurement method. One of the main purposes of standardization is to eliminate differences between users (laboratories) as far as possible, and the data provided by an accuracy experiment will re- veal how effectively this purpose has been achieved. Pronounced differences in the within-laboratory vari- ances (see clause 7) or between the laboratory means may indicate that the standard measurement 4

0 IS0 IS0 5725~1:1994( E) method is not yet sufficiently detailed and can poss- ibly be improved. If so, this should be reported to the standardizing body with a request for further investi- gation. 4.3 Identical test items 4.3.1 In an accuracy experiment, samples of a spe- cific material or specimens of a specific product are sent from a central point to a number of laboratories in different places, different countries, or even in dif- ferent continents. The definition of repeatability con- ditions (3.14) stating that the measurements in these laboratories shall be performed on identical test items refers to the moment when these measurements are actually carried out. To achieve this, two different conditions have to be satisfied: a) the samples have to be identical when dispatched to the laboratories; b) they have to remain identical during transport and during the different time intervals that may elapse before the measurements are actually performed. In organizing accuracy experiments, both conditions shall be carefully observed. NOTE 23 The selection of material is discussed more fully in 6.4. 4.4 Short intervals of time 4.4.1 According to the definition of repeatability conditions (3.14), measurements for the determi- nation of repeatability have to be made under con- stant operating conditions; i.e. during the time covered by the measurements, factors such as those listed in 0.3 should be constant. In particular, the equipment should not be recalibrated between the measurements unless this is an essential part of every single measurement. In practice, tests under repeatability conditions should be conducted in as short a time as possible in order to minimize changes in those factors, such as environmental, which cannot always be guaranteed constant. 4.4.2 There is also a second consideration which may affect the interval elapsing between measure- ments, and that is that the test results are assumed to be independent. If it is feared that previous results may influence subsequent test results (and so reduce the estimate of repeatability variance), it may be necessary to provide separate specimens coded in such a way that an operator will not know which are supposedly identical. Instructions would be given as to the order in which those specimens are to be measured, and presumably that order will be ran- domized so that all the “identical” items are not measured together. This might mean that the time interval between repeated measurements may appear to defeat the object of a short interval of time unless the measurements are of such a nature that the whole series of measurements could all be completed within a short interval of time. Common sense must prevail. 4.5 Participating laboratories 4.5.1 A basic assumption underlying this part of IS0 5725 is that, for a standard measurement method, repeatability will be, at least approximately, the same for all laboratories applying the standard procedure, so that it is permissible to establish one common average repeatability standard deviation which will be applicable to any laboratory. However, any laboratory can, by carrying out a series of measurements under repeatability conditions, arrive at an estimate of its own repeatability standard devi- ation for the measurement method .and check it against the common standard value. Such a pro- cedure is dealt with in IS0 5725-6. 4.5.2 The quantities defined in 3.8 to 3.20 in theory apply to all laboratories which are likely to perform the measurement method. In practice, they are deter- mined from a sample of this population of labora- tories. Further details of the selection of this sample are given in 6.3. Provided the instructions given there regarding the number of laboratories to be included and the number of measurements that they carry out are followed, then the resulting estimates of trueness and precision should suffice. If, however, at some fu- ture date it should become evident that the labora- tories participating were not, or are no longer, truly representative of all those using the standard measurement method, then the measurement shall be repeated. 4.6 Observation conditions 4.6.1 The factors which contribute to the variability of the observed values obtained within a laboratory are listed in 0.3. They may be given as time, operator and equipment when observations at different times include the effects due to the change of environ- mental conditions and the recalibration of equipment between observations. Under repeatability conditions, observations are carried out with all these factors constant, and under reproducibility conditions obser- vations are carried out at different laboratories; i.e. not only with all the other factors varying but also with additional effects due to the difference between lab- 5

IS0 5725-l : 1994(E) 0 IS0 oratories in management and maintenance of the laboratory, stability checking of the observations, etc. 4.6.2 It may be useful on occasion to consider intermediate precision conditions, in which observa- tions are carried out in the same laboratory but one or more of the factors time, operator or equipment are allowed to vary. In establishing the precision of a measurement method, it is very important to define the appropriate observation conditions, i.e. whether the above three factors should be constant or not. Furthermore, the size of the variability arising from a factor will depend on the measurement method. For example, in chemical analysis, the factors “operator” and “time” may dominate; likewise with microanaly- sis the factors “equipment” and “environment”, and with physical testing “equipment” and “calibration” may dominate. 5 Statistical mod

...

NORME
ISO
INTERNATIONALE
5725-1
Première édition
1994-12-15
Exactitude (justesse et fidélité) des
résultats et méthodes de mesure -
Partie 1:
Principes généraux et définitions
Accuracy (trueness and precision) of measurement methods and
results -
Part 1: General principles and definitions
Numéro de référence
ISO 5725-1:1994(F)
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO 5725-l :1994(F)
Sommaire
Page

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

1 Domaine d’application

2 Références normatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

3 Définitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4 Conséquences pratiques des définitions pour les expériences

d’exactitude . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

4.1 Méthode de mesure normalisée . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4.2 Expérience d’exactitude . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

4.3 Individus d’essai identiques

4.4 Courts intervalles de temps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

4.5 Laboratoires participants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

4.6 Conditions d’observation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

5 Modèle statistique

5.1 Modèle de base . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

5.2 Relation entre le modèle de base et la fidélité . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

5.3 Modèles alternatifs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

6 Considérations sur la planification de l’expérience lors de l’estimation

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

de l’exactitude 8

6.1 Organisation d’une expérience d’exactitude . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

6.2 Méthode de mesure normalisée . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6.3 Sélection des laboratoires pour l’expérience d’exactitude . . . . . 8
6.4 Sélection des matériaux à utiliser pour une expérience
d’exactitude

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

7 Utilisation des données d’exactitude . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

7.1 Publication des valeurs de justesse et de fidélité
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
7.2 Applications pratiques des valeurs de justesse et de fidélité
0 60 1994

Droits de reproduction réservés. Sauf prescription différente, aucune partie de cette publi-

cation ne peut être reproduite ni utilisée sous quelque forme que ce soit et par aucun pro-

cédé, électronique ou mécanique, y compris la photocopie et les microfilms, sans l’accord

écrit de l’éditeur.
Organisation internationale de normalisation
Case Postale 56 l CH-121 1 Genève 20 l Suisse
Imprimé en Suisse
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
Page blanche
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
0 ISO
ISO 5725-l :1994(F)
Avant-propos
L’ISO (Organisation internationale de normalisation) est une fédération
mondiale d’organismes nationaux de normalisation (comités membres de
I’ISO). L’élaboration des Normes internationales est en général confiée aux
comités techniques de I’ISO. Chaque comité membre intéressé par une
étude a le droit de faire partie du comité technique créé à cet effet. Les
organisations internationales, gouvernementales et non gouvernemen-
tales, en liaison avec I’ISO participent également aux travaux. L’ISO colla-
bore étroitement avec la Commission électrotechnique internationale (CEI)
en ce qui concerne la normalisation électrotechnique.
Les projets de Normes internationales adoptés par les comités techniques
sont soumis aux comités membres pour vote. Leur publication comme
Normes internationales requiert l’approbation de 75 % au moins des co-
mités membres votants.
La Norme internationale ISO 5725-l a été élaborée par le comité techni-
que lSO/TC 69, Application des méthodes statistiques, sous-comité
SC 6, Méthodes et résultats de mesure.
L’ISO 5725 comprend les parties suivantes, présentées sous le titre gé-
néral Exactitude (justesse et fidélité) des résultats et méthodes de
mesure:
- Partie 7: Principes généraux et définitions
- Partie 2: Méthode de base pour la dé termina tion de la répétabilité
et de la reproductibilité d’une méthode de mesure normalisée
- Partie 3: Mesures intermédiaires de la fidélité d’une méthode de
mesure normalisée
- Partie 4: Méthodes de base pour la de termina tion de la justesse
d’une méthode de mesure normalisée
- Partie 5: Méthodes alternatives pour la détermination de la fidélité
d’une méthode de mesure normalisée
- Partie 6: Utilisation dans la pratique des valeurs d’exactitude
L’ISO 5725, parties 1 à 6, annule et remplace I’ISO 5725:1986, qui a été
étendue pour traiter de la justesse (en supplément de la fidélité) et des
conditions intermédiaires de fidélité (en supplément des conditions de
répétabilité et des conditions de reproductibilité).
Les annexes A et B font partie intégrante de la présente partie de I’ISO
5725. L’annexe C est donnée uniquement à titre d’information.
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
0 ISO
ISO 5725~1:,1994( F)
Introduction
0.1
L’ISO 5725 utilise deux termes «justesse» et «fidélité)) pour décrire
l’exactitude d’une méthode de mesure. La «justesse» se réfère à I’étroi-
tesse de l’accord entre la moyenne arithmétique d’un grand nombre de
résultats d’essai et la valeur de référence vraie ou acceptée. La ((fidélité»
se réfère à l’étroitesse de l’accord entre les résultats d’essai.
0.2 La nécessité de considérer la «fidélité» se pose car les essais exé-
cutés sur des matériaux présumés identiques dans des circonstances
présumées identiques ne donnent pas, en général, des résultats identi-
ques. Ceci est attribué à des erreurs aléatoires inévitables, inhérentes à
toute procédure de mesure; les facteurs qui influencent le résultat d’une
mesure ne peuvent pas tous être complètement contrôlés. Dans I’inter-
prétation pratique des données de mesure, cette variabilité doit être prise
en compte. Par exemple, la différence entre un résultat d’essai et une
valeur spécifiée peut se trouver à l’intérieur d’erreurs aléatoires inévita-
bles, auquel cas on n’a pas établi de déviation réelle par rapport à cette
valeur spécifiée. De même, la comparaison des résultats d’essai de deux
lots de matière n’indiquera pas une différence de qualité fondamentale si
la différence entre eux peut être attribuée à une variation inhérente à la
procédure de mesure.
0.3 De nombreux facteurs différents (mises à part des variations entre
des spécimens présumés identiques) peuvent contribuer à la’ variabilité
des résultats d’une méthode de mesure, parmi lesquels:
a) l’opérateur;
l’équipement utilisé;
c) l’étalonnage de l’équipement;
d) l’environnement (température, humidité, pollution de l’air, etc.);
e) le temps écoulé entre les mesures.
La variabilité entre des mesures exécutées par différents opérateurs
et/ou avec différents équipements sera généralement plus grande que la
variabilité entre des mesures exécutées dans un court intervalle de temps
par un seul opérateur utilisant le même équipement.
0.4 Le terme général pour la variabilité entre des mesures répétées est
fidélité. Deux conditions de fidélité, appelées répétabilité et reproductibilité
ont été jugées nécessaires et, dans de nombreux cas pratiques, utiles
pour la description de la variabilité d’une méthode de mesure.
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
0 ISO
ISO .5725-l : 1994(F)
Sous des conditions de répétabilité, les facteurs a) à e) cités ci-dessus sont
considérés comme constants et ne contribuent pas à la variabilité, tandis
que sous des conditions de reproductibilité, ils varient et contribuent à la
variabilité des résultats d’essai. La répétabilité et la reproductibilité sont
donc les deux extrêmes de la fidélité, la première donnant le minimum et
la seconde le maximum de la variabilité dans les résultats. Des conditions
intermédiaires se situant entre ces deux conditions extrêmes de la fidélité
sont également concevables, lorsqu’un ou plusieurs des facteurs a) à e)
peuvent varier, et sont utilisées dans certaines circonstances spécifiées.
La fidélité est normalement exprimée en termes d’écarts-types.
0.5 La ((justesse)) d’une méthode de mesure présente de l’intérêt lors-
qu’il est possible de concevoir une valeur vraie pour la propriété mesurée.
Bien que pour certaines méthodes de mesure, la valeur vraie ne soit pas
connue exactement, il est possible d’avoir une valeur de référence ac-
ceptée pour la propriété mesurée: par exemple, si des matériaux de réfé-
rence appropriés sont disponibles, ou si la valeur de référence acceptée
peut être établie par rapport à une autre méthode de mesure ou par la
préparation d’un échantillon connu. La justesse d’une méthode de mesure
peut être alors recherchée en comparant la valeur de référence acceptée
avec le niveau des résultats donnés par la méthode de mesure. La jus-
tesse est normalement exprimée en terme de biais. On peut rencontrer
un biais, par exemple en analyse chimique, si la méthode de mesure ne
peut tout extraire d’un élément, ou si la présence d’un élément interfère
avec la détermination d’un autre.
0.6 Le terme général exactitude est utilisé dans I’ISO 5725 en référence
à la fois à la justesse et à la fidélité.
Le terme exactitude fut, à une période, utilisé pour couvrir uniquement la
composante maintenant appelée justesse, mais, pour de nombreuses
personnes, il devint clair que ce terme devrait comprendre le déplacement
total d’un résultat par rapport à la valeur de référence, dû aux effets tant
aléatoires que systématiques.
Le terme biais a été très longtemps utilisé pour les problèmes statistiques,
mais cela ayant causé certaines objections philosophiques parmi des
membres de certaines professions (tels que praticiens en médecine et
législation), l’aspect positif a été accentué par l’invention du terme jus-
tesse.
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
NORME INTERNATIONALE 0 60 ISO 57254 :1994(F)
Exactitude (justesse et fidélité) des résultats, et
méthodes de mesure -
. .
Partie 1:
Principes généraux et définitions
f) de présenter des applications pratiques de ces
1 Domaine d’application
mesures de la justesse et de la fidélité
(ISO 5725-6).
13 Le but de NS0 5725 est:
1.2 La présente partie de I’ISO 5725 porte exclu-
sivement sur des méthodes de mesure produisant
des mesures sur une échelle continue et donnant une
de donner’ les grandes lignes’ des principes géné-
seule valeur comme résultat d’essai, bien que cette
raux à comprendre lors de l’estimation de I’exac-
valeur unique puisse être le résultat d’un calcul sur
titude (justesse et fidélité) des méthodes et des
un ensemble d’observations.
résultats de mesure, et dans des applications, et
d’établir des estimations pratiques des différentes
Elle définit des valeurs qui décrivent, en termes
mesures par l’expérience (ISO 5725-l );
quantitatifs, l’aptitude d’une méthode de mesure à
donner un résultat correct (justesse) ou à répéter un
résultat donné (fidélité). Cela implique donc que la
de fournir une méthode de base pour l’estimation
même chose est mesurée exactement de la même
des deux mesures extrêmes de la fidélité des
façon et que le processus de mesure est maîtrisé.
mesure l’expérience
méthodes de
Par
(ISO 5725-2)
La présente partie de NS0 5725 peut être appliquée
à une très grande variété de matériaux, y compris des
liquides, des poudres et des objets solides, fabriqués
de fournir une procédure pour l’obtention des
ou naturels, pourvu qu’on ait pris les précautions né-
mesures intermédiaires de fidélité donnant les
cessaires vis-à-vis de toute hétérogénéité du maté-
circonstances dans lesquelles elles s’appliquent,
riau.
et des méthodes pour les estimer (ISO 5725-3);
2 Références normatives
de fournir des méthodes de base pour la déter-
mination de la justesse d’une méthode de mesure
Les normes suivantes contiennent des dispositions
(ISO 5725-4)
qui, par suite de la référence qui en est faite, consti-
tuent des dispositions valables pour la présente partie
de fournir des alternatives aux méthodes de base
de I’ISO 5725. Au moment de la publication, les édi-
données dans I’ISO 5725-2 et I’ISO 5725-4, pour
tions indiquées étaient en vigueur. Toute norme est
la détermination de la justesse et de la fidélité des
sujette à révision et les parties prenantes des accords
méthodes de mesure pour utilisation dans certai-
fondés sur la présente partie de NS0 5725 sont invi-
nes circonstances (ISO 5725-5);
tées à rechercher la possibilité d’appliquer les éditions
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
0 ISO
ISO 5725-l : 1994(F)

les plus récentes des normes indiquées ci-après. Les 3.3 niveau de l’essai dans une expérience de fi-

membres de la CEI et de I’ISO possèdent le registre délité: La moyenne générale des résultats d’essai de

des Normes internationales en vigueur à un moment tous les laboratoires pour un matériau ou spécimen

particulier essayé.
donné.
ISO 3534-l :1993, Statistique - Vocabulaire et sym-
3.4 classe [cellule] dans une expérience de fidé-
boles - Partie 1: Probabilité et termes statistiques
lité: Les résultats d’essai à un niveau unique, obtenus
généraux.
par un laboratoire.
ISO 5725.2:1994, Exactitude (justesse et fidélité) des
résultats et méthodes de mesure - Partie 2: Mé-
3.5 valeur de référence acceptée: Valeur qui sert
thode de base pour la détermination de la répétabilité
de référence, agréée pour une comparaison, et qui
et de la reproductibilité d’une méthode de mesure
résulte:
normalisée.
d’une valeur théorique
a) ou établie, fondée sur des
ISO 5725-3: 1994, Exactitude (‘justesse et fidélité) des
principes scientifiques;
résultats et méthodes de mesure - Partie 3: Mesu-
res intermédiaires de la fidélité d’une méthode de
mesure normalisée. b) d’une valeur assignée ou certifiée, fondée sur les
travaux expérimentaux d’une organisation natio-
ISO 5725-4: 1994, Exactitude (justesse et fidélité) des nale ou internationale;
résultats et méthodes de mesure - Partie 4: Mé-
thodes de base pour la détermination de la justesse
c) d’une valeur de consensus ou certifiée, fondée
d’une méthode de mesure normalisée.
sur un travail expérimental en collaboration et
placé sous les auspices d’un groupe scientifique
ou technique;
d) dans les cas où a), b) et c) ne sont pas applicables,
de l’espérance de la quantité (mesurable), c’est-
3 Définitions
à-dire la moyenne d’une population spécifiée de
mesures.
Pour les besoins de I’ISO 5725, les définitions sui-
vantes s’appliquent.
[ISO 3534-11
Certaines definitions sont tirées de NS0 3534-l.
3.6 exactitude: Étroitesse de l’accord entre le ré-
Les symboles utilisés dans I’ISO 5725 sont donnes
sultat d’essai et la valeur de référence acceptée.
en annexe A.
NOTE 2 Le terme «exactitude», applique à un ensemble
3.1 valeur observée: Valeur d’un caractère obtenue
de résultats d’essai, implique une combinaison de compo-
comme résultat d’une observation unique.
santes aléatoires et d’une erreur systématique commune
ou d’une composante de biais.
[ISO 3534-11
[ISO 3534-11
3.2 résultat d’essai: Valeur d’un caractere obtenue
par l’application d’une méthode d’essai spécifiée.
3.7 justesse: Étroitesse de l’accord entre la valeur
NOTE 1 II convient que la méthode d’essai spécifie qu’un
moyenne obtenue à partir d’une large série de résul-
nombre donne d’observations individuelles soient faites, et
tats d’essais et une valeur de référence acceptée.
que leur moyenne, ou une autre fonction appropriée (telle
que la médiane ou l’écart-type), soit reportée comme résul-
NOTES
tat d’essai. Elle peut aussi spécifier que des corrections
normalisées soient appliquées, telles que la correction de
3 La mesure de la justesse est généralement exprimée
volumes de gaz à une température et une pression norma-
en termes de biais.
lisées. Un résultat d’essai peut donc être calcule à partir de

plusieurs valeurs observées. Dans le cas simple le résultat 4 La justesse a été également appelée ((exactitude de la

d’essai est la valeur observée elle-même. moyenne». Cet usage n’est pas recommande.

[ISO 3534-11 [ISO 3534-l]
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
63 ISO
ISO 5725-1:1994(F)
10 La mesure de fidélité est exprimée en termes d’infidé-
3.8 biais: Différence entre l’espérance mathéma-
lité et est calculée à partir de l’écart-type des résultats
tique des résultats d’essai et une valeur de référence
d’essais. Une fidélité moindre est reflétée par un plus grand
acceptée.
écart-type.
NOTE 5 Le biais est l’erreur systématique totale par op-
11 Le terme «résultats d’essai indépendants» signifie des
position à l’erreur aléatoire. II peut y avoir une ou plusieurs
résultats obtenus d’une façon non influencée par un résultat
composantes d’erreur systématique qui contribuent au
précédent sur le même matériau d’essai ou similaire. Les
biais. Une différence systématique plus importante par rap-
mesures quantitatives de la fidélité dépendent de façon cri-
port a la valeur de référence acceptée est reflétée par une
tique des conditions stipulées. Les conditions de répétabilité
plus grande valeur du biais.
et de reproductibilité sont des ensembles particuliers de
conditions extrêmes.
[ISO 3534-l]
[ISO 3534-1-J
3.9 biais du laboratoire: Différence entre I’espé-
rance mathématique des résultats d’essai d’un labo-
3.13 répétabilité: Fidélité sous des conditions de
ratoire particulier et une valeur de référence acceptée.
répétabilité.
3.10 biais de la méthode de mesure: Différence [ISO 3534-1-J
entre l’espérance mathématique des résultats d’essai
obtenus à partir de tous les laboratoires utilisant cette
méthode et une valeur de référence acceptée.
3.14 conditions de répétabilité: Conditions où les
résultats d’essai indépendants sont obtenus par la
NOTE 6 Un exemple de ceci serait le suivant: une mé-
même méthode sur des individus d’essai identiques
thode devant mesurer la teneur en soufre d’un composé ne
dans le même laboratoire, par le même opérateur,
reussit pas normalement à extraire tout le soufre, condui-
utilisant le même équipement et pendant un court in-
sant a un biais négatif de la méthode de mesure. Le biais
de la méthode de mesure est mesure par le déplacement tewalle de temps.
de la moyenne des résultats d’un grand nombre de labora-
toires différents utilisant tous la même méthode. Le biais
[ISO 3534-l]
de la méthode de mesure peut être différent pour différents
niveaux.
3.15 écart-type de répbtabilité: Écart-type des ré-

3.11 composante laboratojre du biais: Différence sultats d’essai obtenus sous des conditions de

entre le biais du laboratoire et le biais de la méthode répétabilité.
de mesure.
NOTES
NOTES
C’est une mesure de la dispersion de la loi de distribu-
tion des résultats d’essai sous des. conditions de
7 La composante laboratoire du biais est spécifique à un
répétabilité.
laboratoire donne et aux conditions de mesure dans ce la-
boratoire, et peut également être différente à différents ni-
13 On peut définir de façon similaire la wariance de
veaux de l’essai.
répétabilité» et le «coefficient de variation de la
répétabilité» et les utiliser comme mesures de la dispersion
8 La composante laboratoire du biais est relative au résul-
des résultats d’essai sous des conditions de répétabilité.
tat de la moyenne générale et non à la valeur vraie ou de
référence.
[ISO 3534-l]
3.12 fidélité: Étroitesse d’accord entre des résultats
d’essai indépendants obtenus sous des conditions
3.16 limite de répétabilité: Valeur au-dessous de
stipulées.
laquelle est située, avec une probabilité de 95 %, la
valeur absolue de la différence entre deux résultats
NOTES
d’essai, obtenus sous des conditions de répétabilité.
9 La fidélité dépend uniquement de la distribution des er-

reurs aléatoires et n’a aucune relation avec la valeur vraie NOTE 14 Le symbole utilise est r.

ou spécifiée.
[ISO 3534-l]
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
0 ISO
ISO 5725-l :1994(F)
limite de reproductibilité, comme définies ci-dessus, sont
3.17 reproductibilité: Fidélité sous des conditions
chacune la valeur minimale égale a, ou au-dessous de la-
de reproductibilité.
quelle est située, avec une probabilité d’au moins 95 %, la
différence absolue entre deux résultats d’essai individuels.
[ISO 3534-l]
20 Les définitions en 3.8 a 3.11, 3.15, 3.16, 3.19 et 3.20

3.18 conditions de reproductibilité: Conditions où se réferent à des valeurs théoriques qui, en réalité, restent

inconnues. Les valeurs des écarts-types de reproductibilité
les résultats d’essai sont obtenus par la même mé-
et répétabilité, et des biais, déterminés réellement par I’ex-
thode sur des individus d’essais identiques dans dif-
périence (comme décrit dans I’ISO 5725-2 et I’ISO 5725-4),
férents laboratoires, avec différents opérateurs et
sont, en termes statistiques, des estimations de ces valeurs
utilisant des équipements différents.
et, en tant que telles, sujettes à des erreurs. En consé-
quence, par exemple, les niveaux de probabilité associes
[ISO 3534-11
aux limites r et R ne sont pas exactement 95 %. Ils seront
approximativement 95 % lorsque de nombreux laboratoires
auront pris part à l’expérience de fidélité mais pourront être
3.19 écart-type de reproductibilité: Écart-type des
considérablement différents de 95 % lorsque moins de 30
résultats d’essai obtenus sous des conditions de re-
laboratoires auront participe. Cela est inevitable mais ne doit
productibilité.
pas sérieusement porter atteinte à leur valeur pratique,
puisqu’ils sont principalement désignés pour être utilisés
NOTES
comme outils pour décider, si oui ou non, la différence entre
des résultats peut être attribuée à des incertitudes aléatoi-
15 C’est une mesure de dispersion de la loi de distribution
res inhérentes à la méthode de mesure. Des différences
résultats d’essai sous des conditions de c .eproductibilité.
des
plus grandes que la limite de répétabilité r ou la limite de
reproductibilité R sont suspectes.
16 On peut définir de façon similaire la wariance de re-
productibilité)) et le «coefficient de variation de reproduc-
21 Les symboles r et R sont déjà utilises pour d’autres
tibilité)) et les utiliser comme mesure de la dispersion des
buts; dans I’ISO 3534-1, r représente le coefficient de cor-
résultats d’essai sous des conditions de reproductibilité.
relation et R (ou W) l’étendue d’une série unique d’obser-
vations. Cependant, il ne devrait pas y avoir de confusion
uso 3534-l]
si les expressions complètes limite de répétabilité r et limite
de reproductibilité R sont utilisées chaque fois qu’il y a
possibilité de malentendu, particuliérement lorsqu’elles sont
3.20 limite de reproductibilité: Valeur au-dessous
citées dans des normes.
de laquelle est située, avec une probabilité de 95 %,
la valeur absolue de la différence entre deux résultats
d’essai obtenus sous des conditions de reproductibi-
l I
4 Conséquences pratiques des
Me .
définitions pour les expériences
NOTE 17 Le symbole utilise est R.
d’exactitude
[ISO 3534-l]
4.1 Méthode de mesure normalisée
3.21 valeur aberrante: ilement d’un ensemble de
valeurs qui est incohérent avec les autres cléments
4.1.1 Afin que les mesures soient faites de la même
de cet ensemble.
façon, il est nécessaire que la méthode de mesure ait
été normalisée. Toutes les mesures devront alors
NOTE 18 L’ISO 5725-2 spécifie les tests statistiques et
avoir été effectuées selon la norme correspondante.
le niveau de signification à utiliser pour identifier les valeurs
Cela signifie qu’il doit exister un document écrit dé-
aberrantes dans les expériences de justesse et de fidélité.
crivant en détail comment la mesure doit être effec-
tuée, comportant de préférence une description de la
3.22 expérience d’évaluation collective: Expé-
façon dont il convient d’obtenir et de préparer le spé-
rience interlaboratoires dans laquelle la performance
cimen de mesure.
de chaque laboratoire est évaluée en utilisant la
même méthode de mesure normalisée sur materiau
4.1.2 L’existence d’une méthode de mesure docu-
identique.
mentée implique l’existence d’une organisation res-
ponsable de l’établissement de la méthode de
NOTES
mesure étudiée.
19 Les definitions en 3.16 et 3.20 s’appliquent à des ré-
sultats variables sur une échelle continue. Si le résultat
NOTE 22 La méthode de mesure normalisée est discu-

d’essai est discret ou arrondi, la limite de répetabilité et la tee de façon plus compléte en 6.2.

---------------------- Page: 10 ----------------------
0 ISO ISO 5725=1:1994(F)
vant s’écouler avant que les mesures ne soient
4.2 Expérience d’exactitude
réellement effectuées.
4.2.1 II convient de déterminer les mesures de
Dans l’organisation des expériences d’exactitude, ces
l’exactitude (justesse et fidélité) à partir d’une série
deux conditions doivent être soigneusement respec-
de résultats d’essai, reportés par les laboratoires par-
tée.s.
ticipants organisés sous la direction d’une commis-
sion d’experts établie spécifiquement dans ce but.
NOTE 23 La sélection de matériau est discutée de façon
plus compléte en 6.4.
Cette expérience interlaboratoires est appelée (cexpé-
rience d’exactitude)). L’expérience d’exactitude peut
4.4 Courts intervalles de temps
également être appelée ((expérience de fidélité ou de
justesse» selon son but limité. Si le but est de déter-
4.4.1 Selon la définition des conditions de
miner la justesse, alors une expérience de fidélité
répétabilité (3.14), les mesures pour la détermination
doit, soit avoir été faite précédemment, soit être me-
de la répétabilité doivent être effectuées sous des
née simultanément.
conditions opératoires constantes, c’est-à-dire, pen-
dant la période de temps couverte par les mesures,
II est recommandé que les estimations de I’exacti-
il est recommandé que des facteurs tels que ceux ci-
tude, obtenues à partir d’une telle expérience, soient

toujours données comme valables uniquement pour tés en 0.3, soient constants. En particulier, il convient

des essais exécutés selon la méthode de mesure de ne pas réétalonner l’équipement entre les mesu-

normalisée. res, à moins que ce ne soit une partie essentielle de
chaque mesure individuelle. En pratique, il convient
de conduire des essais sous des conditions de
4.2.2 Une expérience d’exactitude peut souvent être
répétabilité dans un temps aussi court que possible,
considérée comme un essai pratique de l’adéquation
afin de minimiser les variations de ces facteurs, tels
de la méthode de mesure normalisée. Un des buts
que l’environnement que l’on ne peut pas toujours
principaux de la normalisation est d’éliminer, autant
garantir constant.
que possible, les différences entre utilisateurs (labo-
ratoires), et les données obtenues par une expérience
4.4.2 II existe également une deuxième considé-
d’exactitude révèleront l’efficacité avec laquelle ce but
ration qui peut affecter I’ntervalle s’écoulant entre les
aura été atteint. Des différences prononcées dans les
mesures, et il s’agit du fait que les résultats d’essai
variantes intralaboratoires (voir article 7) ou entre les
sont supposés être indépendants. S’il faut craindre
moyens dont disposent les laboratoires peuvent indi-
que des résultats d’essai p’récédents puissent influ-
quer que la méthode de mesure normalisée n’est pas
encer des résultats d’essai suivants (et ainsi réduire
encore suffisamment détaillée et peut être proba-
l’estimation de la variante de répétabilité), il peut être
blement améliorée. S’il en est ainsi, il convient de
nécessaire de fournir des spécimens séparés, codés
faire un rapport à l’organisme de normalisation avec
de telle façon qu’un opérateur ne saura pas lesquels
une demande d’approfondissement de l’étude.
sont présumés’identiques. II convient de donner des
instructions quant à l’ordre dans lequel les spécimens
4.3 Individus d’essai identiques
doivent être mesurés, et cet ordre sera présumé alé-
atoire de façon que tous les individus ((identiques) ne
4.3.1 Dans une expérience d’exactitude, des échan-
soient pas mesurés ensemble. Cela peut signifier que
tillons d’un matériau spécifique ou d’un produit spé-
l’intervalle de
...

NORME
ISO
INTERNATIONALE
5725-1
Première édition
1994-12-15
Exactitude (justesse et fidélité) des
résultats et méthodes de mesure -
Partie 1:
Principes généraux et définitions
Accuracy (trueness and precision) of measurement methods and
results -
Part 1: General principles and definitions
Numéro de référence
ISO 5725-1:1994(F)
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO 5725-l :1994(F)
Sommaire
Page

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

1 Domaine d’application

2 Références normatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

3 Définitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4 Conséquences pratiques des définitions pour les expériences

d’exactitude . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

4.1 Méthode de mesure normalisée . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4.2 Expérience d’exactitude . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

4.3 Individus d’essai identiques

4.4 Courts intervalles de temps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

4.5 Laboratoires participants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

4.6 Conditions d’observation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

5 Modèle statistique

5.1 Modèle de base . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

5.2 Relation entre le modèle de base et la fidélité . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

5.3 Modèles alternatifs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

6 Considérations sur la planification de l’expérience lors de l’estimation

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

de l’exactitude 8

6.1 Organisation d’une expérience d’exactitude . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

6.2 Méthode de mesure normalisée . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6.3 Sélection des laboratoires pour l’expérience d’exactitude . . . . . 8
6.4 Sélection des matériaux à utiliser pour une expérience
d’exactitude

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

7 Utilisation des données d’exactitude . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

7.1 Publication des valeurs de justesse et de fidélité
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
7.2 Applications pratiques des valeurs de justesse et de fidélité
0 60 1994

Droits de reproduction réservés. Sauf prescription différente, aucune partie de cette publi-

cation ne peut être reproduite ni utilisée sous quelque forme que ce soit et par aucun pro-

cédé, électronique ou mécanique, y compris la photocopie et les microfilms, sans l’accord

écrit de l’éditeur.
Organisation internationale de normalisation
Case Postale 56 l CH-121 1 Genève 20 l Suisse
Imprimé en Suisse
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
Page blanche
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
0 ISO
ISO 5725-l :1994(F)
Avant-propos
L’ISO (Organisation internationale de normalisation) est une fédération
mondiale d’organismes nationaux de normalisation (comités membres de
I’ISO). L’élaboration des Normes internationales est en général confiée aux
comités techniques de I’ISO. Chaque comité membre intéressé par une
étude a le droit de faire partie du comité technique créé à cet effet. Les
organisations internationales, gouvernementales et non gouvernemen-
tales, en liaison avec I’ISO participent également aux travaux. L’ISO colla-
bore étroitement avec la Commission électrotechnique internationale (CEI)
en ce qui concerne la normalisation électrotechnique.
Les projets de Normes internationales adoptés par les comités techniques
sont soumis aux comités membres pour vote. Leur publication comme
Normes internationales requiert l’approbation de 75 % au moins des co-
mités membres votants.
La Norme internationale ISO 5725-l a été élaborée par le comité techni-
que lSO/TC 69, Application des méthodes statistiques, sous-comité
SC 6, Méthodes et résultats de mesure.
L’ISO 5725 comprend les parties suivantes, présentées sous le titre gé-
néral Exactitude (justesse et fidélité) des résultats et méthodes de
mesure:
- Partie 7: Principes généraux et définitions
- Partie 2: Méthode de base pour la dé termina tion de la répétabilité
et de la reproductibilité d’une méthode de mesure normalisée
- Partie 3: Mesures intermédiaires de la fidélité d’une méthode de
mesure normalisée
- Partie 4: Méthodes de base pour la de termina tion de la justesse
d’une méthode de mesure normalisée
- Partie 5: Méthodes alternatives pour la détermination de la fidélité
d’une méthode de mesure normalisée
- Partie 6: Utilisation dans la pratique des valeurs d’exactitude
L’ISO 5725, parties 1 à 6, annule et remplace I’ISO 5725:1986, qui a été
étendue pour traiter de la justesse (en supplément de la fidélité) et des
conditions intermédiaires de fidélité (en supplément des conditions de
répétabilité et des conditions de reproductibilité).
Les annexes A et B font partie intégrante de la présente partie de I’ISO
5725. L’annexe C est donnée uniquement à titre d’information.
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
0 ISO
ISO 5725~1:,1994( F)
Introduction
0.1
L’ISO 5725 utilise deux termes «justesse» et «fidélité)) pour décrire
l’exactitude d’une méthode de mesure. La «justesse» se réfère à I’étroi-
tesse de l’accord entre la moyenne arithmétique d’un grand nombre de
résultats d’essai et la valeur de référence vraie ou acceptée. La ((fidélité»
se réfère à l’étroitesse de l’accord entre les résultats d’essai.
0.2 La nécessité de considérer la «fidélité» se pose car les essais exé-
cutés sur des matériaux présumés identiques dans des circonstances
présumées identiques ne donnent pas, en général, des résultats identi-
ques. Ceci est attribué à des erreurs aléatoires inévitables, inhérentes à
toute procédure de mesure; les facteurs qui influencent le résultat d’une
mesure ne peuvent pas tous être complètement contrôlés. Dans I’inter-
prétation pratique des données de mesure, cette variabilité doit être prise
en compte. Par exemple, la différence entre un résultat d’essai et une
valeur spécifiée peut se trouver à l’intérieur d’erreurs aléatoires inévita-
bles, auquel cas on n’a pas établi de déviation réelle par rapport à cette
valeur spécifiée. De même, la comparaison des résultats d’essai de deux
lots de matière n’indiquera pas une différence de qualité fondamentale si
la différence entre eux peut être attribuée à une variation inhérente à la
procédure de mesure.
0.3 De nombreux facteurs différents (mises à part des variations entre
des spécimens présumés identiques) peuvent contribuer à la’ variabilité
des résultats d’une méthode de mesure, parmi lesquels:
a) l’opérateur;
l’équipement utilisé;
c) l’étalonnage de l’équipement;
d) l’environnement (température, humidité, pollution de l’air, etc.);
e) le temps écoulé entre les mesures.
La variabilité entre des mesures exécutées par différents opérateurs
et/ou avec différents équipements sera généralement plus grande que la
variabilité entre des mesures exécutées dans un court intervalle de temps
par un seul opérateur utilisant le même équipement.
0.4 Le terme général pour la variabilité entre des mesures répétées est
fidélité. Deux conditions de fidélité, appelées répétabilité et reproductibilité
ont été jugées nécessaires et, dans de nombreux cas pratiques, utiles
pour la description de la variabilité d’une méthode de mesure.
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
0 ISO
ISO .5725-l : 1994(F)
Sous des conditions de répétabilité, les facteurs a) à e) cités ci-dessus sont
considérés comme constants et ne contribuent pas à la variabilité, tandis
que sous des conditions de reproductibilité, ils varient et contribuent à la
variabilité des résultats d’essai. La répétabilité et la reproductibilité sont
donc les deux extrêmes de la fidélité, la première donnant le minimum et
la seconde le maximum de la variabilité dans les résultats. Des conditions
intermédiaires se situant entre ces deux conditions extrêmes de la fidélité
sont également concevables, lorsqu’un ou plusieurs des facteurs a) à e)
peuvent varier, et sont utilisées dans certaines circonstances spécifiées.
La fidélité est normalement exprimée en termes d’écarts-types.
0.5 La ((justesse)) d’une méthode de mesure présente de l’intérêt lors-
qu’il est possible de concevoir une valeur vraie pour la propriété mesurée.
Bien que pour certaines méthodes de mesure, la valeur vraie ne soit pas
connue exactement, il est possible d’avoir une valeur de référence ac-
ceptée pour la propriété mesurée: par exemple, si des matériaux de réfé-
rence appropriés sont disponibles, ou si la valeur de référence acceptée
peut être établie par rapport à une autre méthode de mesure ou par la
préparation d’un échantillon connu. La justesse d’une méthode de mesure
peut être alors recherchée en comparant la valeur de référence acceptée
avec le niveau des résultats donnés par la méthode de mesure. La jus-
tesse est normalement exprimée en terme de biais. On peut rencontrer
un biais, par exemple en analyse chimique, si la méthode de mesure ne
peut tout extraire d’un élément, ou si la présence d’un élément interfère
avec la détermination d’un autre.
0.6 Le terme général exactitude est utilisé dans I’ISO 5725 en référence
à la fois à la justesse et à la fidélité.
Le terme exactitude fut, à une période, utilisé pour couvrir uniquement la
composante maintenant appelée justesse, mais, pour de nombreuses
personnes, il devint clair que ce terme devrait comprendre le déplacement
total d’un résultat par rapport à la valeur de référence, dû aux effets tant
aléatoires que systématiques.
Le terme biais a été très longtemps utilisé pour les problèmes statistiques,
mais cela ayant causé certaines objections philosophiques parmi des
membres de certaines professions (tels que praticiens en médecine et
législation), l’aspect positif a été accentué par l’invention du terme jus-
tesse.
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
NORME INTERNATIONALE 0 60 ISO 57254 :1994(F)
Exactitude (justesse et fidélité) des résultats, et
méthodes de mesure -
. .
Partie 1:
Principes généraux et définitions
f) de présenter des applications pratiques de ces
1 Domaine d’application
mesures de la justesse et de la fidélité
(ISO 5725-6).
13 Le but de NS0 5725 est:
1.2 La présente partie de I’ISO 5725 porte exclu-
sivement sur des méthodes de mesure produisant
des mesures sur une échelle continue et donnant une
de donner’ les grandes lignes’ des principes géné-
seule valeur comme résultat d’essai, bien que cette
raux à comprendre lors de l’estimation de I’exac-
valeur unique puisse être le résultat d’un calcul sur
titude (justesse et fidélité) des méthodes et des
un ensemble d’observations.
résultats de mesure, et dans des applications, et
d’établir des estimations pratiques des différentes
Elle définit des valeurs qui décrivent, en termes
mesures par l’expérience (ISO 5725-l );
quantitatifs, l’aptitude d’une méthode de mesure à
donner un résultat correct (justesse) ou à répéter un
résultat donné (fidélité). Cela implique donc que la
de fournir une méthode de base pour l’estimation
même chose est mesurée exactement de la même
des deux mesures extrêmes de la fidélité des
façon et que le processus de mesure est maîtrisé.
mesure l’expérience
méthodes de
Par
(ISO 5725-2)
La présente partie de NS0 5725 peut être appliquée
à une très grande variété de matériaux, y compris des
liquides, des poudres et des objets solides, fabriqués
de fournir une procédure pour l’obtention des
ou naturels, pourvu qu’on ait pris les précautions né-
mesures intermédiaires de fidélité donnant les
cessaires vis-à-vis de toute hétérogénéité du maté-
circonstances dans lesquelles elles s’appliquent,
riau.
et des méthodes pour les estimer (ISO 5725-3);
2 Références normatives
de fournir des méthodes de base pour la déter-
mination de la justesse d’une méthode de mesure
Les normes suivantes contiennent des dispositions
(ISO 5725-4)
qui, par suite de la référence qui en est faite, consti-
tuent des dispositions valables pour la présente partie
de fournir des alternatives aux méthodes de base
de I’ISO 5725. Au moment de la publication, les édi-
données dans I’ISO 5725-2 et I’ISO 5725-4, pour
tions indiquées étaient en vigueur. Toute norme est
la détermination de la justesse et de la fidélité des
sujette à révision et les parties prenantes des accords
méthodes de mesure pour utilisation dans certai-
fondés sur la présente partie de NS0 5725 sont invi-
nes circonstances (ISO 5725-5);
tées à rechercher la possibilité d’appliquer les éditions
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
0 ISO
ISO 5725-l : 1994(F)

les plus récentes des normes indiquées ci-après. Les 3.3 niveau de l’essai dans une expérience de fi-

membres de la CEI et de I’ISO possèdent le registre délité: La moyenne générale des résultats d’essai de

des Normes internationales en vigueur à un moment tous les laboratoires pour un matériau ou spécimen

particulier essayé.
donné.
ISO 3534-l :1993, Statistique - Vocabulaire et sym-
3.4 classe [cellule] dans une expérience de fidé-
boles - Partie 1: Probabilité et termes statistiques
lité: Les résultats d’essai à un niveau unique, obtenus
généraux.
par un laboratoire.
ISO 5725.2:1994, Exactitude (justesse et fidélité) des
résultats et méthodes de mesure - Partie 2: Mé-
3.5 valeur de référence acceptée: Valeur qui sert
thode de base pour la détermination de la répétabilité
de référence, agréée pour une comparaison, et qui
et de la reproductibilité d’une méthode de mesure
résulte:
normalisée.
d’une valeur théorique
a) ou établie, fondée sur des
ISO 5725-3: 1994, Exactitude (‘justesse et fidélité) des
principes scientifiques;
résultats et méthodes de mesure - Partie 3: Mesu-
res intermédiaires de la fidélité d’une méthode de
mesure normalisée. b) d’une valeur assignée ou certifiée, fondée sur les
travaux expérimentaux d’une organisation natio-
ISO 5725-4: 1994, Exactitude (justesse et fidélité) des nale ou internationale;
résultats et méthodes de mesure - Partie 4: Mé-
thodes de base pour la détermination de la justesse
c) d’une valeur de consensus ou certifiée, fondée
d’une méthode de mesure normalisée.
sur un travail expérimental en collaboration et
placé sous les auspices d’un groupe scientifique
ou technique;
d) dans les cas où a), b) et c) ne sont pas applicables,
de l’espérance de la quantité (mesurable), c’est-
3 Définitions
à-dire la moyenne d’une population spécifiée de
mesures.
Pour les besoins de I’ISO 5725, les définitions sui-
vantes s’appliquent.
[ISO 3534-11
Certaines definitions sont tirées de NS0 3534-l.
3.6 exactitude: Étroitesse de l’accord entre le ré-
Les symboles utilisés dans I’ISO 5725 sont donnes
sultat d’essai et la valeur de référence acceptée.
en annexe A.
NOTE 2 Le terme «exactitude», applique à un ensemble
3.1 valeur observée: Valeur d’un caractère obtenue
de résultats d’essai, implique une combinaison de compo-
comme résultat d’une observation unique.
santes aléatoires et d’une erreur systématique commune
ou d’une composante de biais.
[ISO 3534-11
[ISO 3534-11
3.2 résultat d’essai: Valeur d’un caractere obtenue
par l’application d’une méthode d’essai spécifiée.
3.7 justesse: Étroitesse de l’accord entre la valeur
NOTE 1 II convient que la méthode d’essai spécifie qu’un
moyenne obtenue à partir d’une large série de résul-
nombre donne d’observations individuelles soient faites, et
tats d’essais et une valeur de référence acceptée.
que leur moyenne, ou une autre fonction appropriée (telle
que la médiane ou l’écart-type), soit reportée comme résul-
NOTES
tat d’essai. Elle peut aussi spécifier que des corrections
normalisées soient appliquées, telles que la correction de
3 La mesure de la justesse est généralement exprimée
volumes de gaz à une température et une pression norma-
en termes de biais.
lisées. Un résultat d’essai peut donc être calcule à partir de

plusieurs valeurs observées. Dans le cas simple le résultat 4 La justesse a été également appelée ((exactitude de la

d’essai est la valeur observée elle-même. moyenne». Cet usage n’est pas recommande.

[ISO 3534-11 [ISO 3534-l]
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
63 ISO
ISO 5725-1:1994(F)
10 La mesure de fidélité est exprimée en termes d’infidé-
3.8 biais: Différence entre l’espérance mathéma-
lité et est calculée à partir de l’écart-type des résultats
tique des résultats d’essai et une valeur de référence
d’essais. Une fidélité moindre est reflétée par un plus grand
acceptée.
écart-type.
NOTE 5 Le biais est l’erreur systématique totale par op-
11 Le terme «résultats d’essai indépendants» signifie des
position à l’erreur aléatoire. II peut y avoir une ou plusieurs
résultats obtenus d’une façon non influencée par un résultat
composantes d’erreur systématique qui contribuent au
précédent sur le même matériau d’essai ou similaire. Les
biais. Une différence systématique plus importante par rap-
mesures quantitatives de la fidélité dépendent de façon cri-
port a la valeur de référence acceptée est reflétée par une
tique des conditions stipulées. Les conditions de répétabilité
plus grande valeur du biais.
et de reproductibilité sont des ensembles particuliers de
conditions extrêmes.
[ISO 3534-l]
[ISO 3534-1-J
3.9 biais du laboratoire: Différence entre I’espé-
rance mathématique des résultats d’essai d’un labo-
3.13 répétabilité: Fidélité sous des conditions de
ratoire particulier et une valeur de référence acceptée.
répétabilité.
3.10 biais de la méthode de mesure: Différence [ISO 3534-1-J
entre l’espérance mathématique des résultats d’essai
obtenus à partir de tous les laboratoires utilisant cette
méthode et une valeur de référence acceptée.
3.14 conditions de répétabilité: Conditions où les
résultats d’essai indépendants sont obtenus par la
NOTE 6 Un exemple de ceci serait le suivant: une mé-
même méthode sur des individus d’essai identiques
thode devant mesurer la teneur en soufre d’un composé ne
dans le même laboratoire, par le même opérateur,
reussit pas normalement à extraire tout le soufre, condui-
utilisant le même équipement et pendant un court in-
sant a un biais négatif de la méthode de mesure. Le biais
de la méthode de mesure est mesure par le déplacement tewalle de temps.
de la moyenne des résultats d’un grand nombre de labora-
toires différents utilisant tous la même méthode. Le biais
[ISO 3534-l]
de la méthode de mesure peut être différent pour différents
niveaux.
3.15 écart-type de répbtabilité: Écart-type des ré-

3.11 composante laboratojre du biais: Différence sultats d’essai obtenus sous des conditions de

entre le biais du laboratoire et le biais de la méthode répétabilité.
de mesure.
NOTES
NOTES
C’est une mesure de la dispersion de la loi de distribu-
tion des résultats d’essai sous des. conditions de
7 La composante laboratoire du biais est spécifique à un
répétabilité.
laboratoire donne et aux conditions de mesure dans ce la-
boratoire, et peut également être différente à différents ni-
13 On peut définir de façon similaire la wariance de
veaux de l’essai.
répétabilité» et le «coefficient de variation de la
répétabilité» et les utiliser comme mesures de la dispersion
8 La composante laboratoire du biais est relative au résul-
des résultats d’essai sous des conditions de répétabilité.
tat de la moyenne générale et non à la valeur vraie ou de
référence.
[ISO 3534-l]
3.12 fidélité: Étroitesse d’accord entre des résultats
d’essai indépendants obtenus sous des conditions
3.16 limite de répétabilité: Valeur au-dessous de
stipulées.
laquelle est située, avec une probabilité de 95 %, la
valeur absolue de la différence entre deux résultats
NOTES
d’essai, obtenus sous des conditions de répétabilité.
9 La fidélité dépend uniquement de la distribution des er-

reurs aléatoires et n’a aucune relation avec la valeur vraie NOTE 14 Le symbole utilise est r.

ou spécifiée.
[ISO 3534-l]
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
0 ISO
ISO 5725-l :1994(F)
limite de reproductibilité, comme définies ci-dessus, sont
3.17 reproductibilité: Fidélité sous des conditions
chacune la valeur minimale égale a, ou au-dessous de la-
de reproductibilité.
quelle est située, avec une probabilité d’au moins 95 %, la
différence absolue entre deux résultats d’essai individuels.
[ISO 3534-l]
20 Les définitions en 3.8 a 3.11, 3.15, 3.16, 3.19 et 3.20

3.18 conditions de reproductibilité: Conditions où se réferent à des valeurs théoriques qui, en réalité, restent

inconnues. Les valeurs des écarts-types de reproductibilité
les résultats d’essai sont obtenus par la même mé-
et répétabilité, et des biais, déterminés réellement par I’ex-
thode sur des individus d’essais identiques dans dif-
périence (comme décrit dans I’ISO 5725-2 et I’ISO 5725-4),
férents laboratoires, avec différents opérateurs et
sont, en termes statistiques, des estimations de ces valeurs
utilisant des équipements différents.
et, en tant que telles, sujettes à des erreurs. En consé-
quence, par exemple, les niveaux de probabilité associes
[ISO 3534-11
aux limites r et R ne sont pas exactement 95 %. Ils seront
approximativement 95 % lorsque de nombreux laboratoires
auront pris part à l’expérience de fidélité mais pourront être
3.19 écart-type de reproductibilité: Écart-type des
considérablement différents de 95 % lorsque moins de 30
résultats d’essai obtenus sous des conditions de re-
laboratoires auront participe. Cela est inevitable mais ne doit
productibilité.
pas sérieusement porter atteinte à leur valeur pratique,
puisqu’ils sont principalement désignés pour être utilisés
NOTES
comme outils pour décider, si oui ou non, la différence entre
des résultats peut être attribuée à des incertitudes aléatoi-
15 C’est une mesure de dispersion de la loi de distribution
res inhérentes à la méthode de mesure. Des différences
résultats d’essai sous des conditions de c .eproductibilité.
des
plus grandes que la limite de répétabilité r ou la limite de
reproductibilité R sont suspectes.
16 On peut définir de façon similaire la wariance de re-
productibilité)) et le «coefficient de variation de reproduc-
21 Les symboles r et R sont déjà utilises pour d’autres
tibilité)) et les utiliser comme mesure de la dispersion des
buts; dans I’ISO 3534-1, r représente le coefficient de cor-
résultats d’essai sous des conditions de reproductibilité.
relation et R (ou W) l’étendue d’une série unique d’obser-
vations. Cependant, il ne devrait pas y avoir de confusion
uso 3534-l]
si les expressions complètes limite de répétabilité r et limite
de reproductibilité R sont utilisées chaque fois qu’il y a
possibilité de malentendu, particuliérement lorsqu’elles sont
3.20 limite de reproductibilité: Valeur au-dessous
citées dans des normes.
de laquelle est située, avec une probabilité de 95 %,
la valeur absolue de la différence entre deux résultats
d’essai obtenus sous des conditions de reproductibi-
l I
4 Conséquences pratiques des
Me .
définitions pour les expériences
NOTE 17 Le symbole utilise est R.
d’exactitude
[ISO 3534-l]
4.1 Méthode de mesure normalisée
3.21 valeur aberrante: ilement d’un ensemble de
valeurs qui est incohérent avec les autres cléments
4.1.1 Afin que les mesures soient faites de la même
de cet ensemble.
façon, il est nécessaire que la méthode de mesure ait
été normalisée. Toutes les mesures devront alors
NOTE 18 L’ISO 5725-2 spécifie les tests statistiques et
avoir été effectuées selon la norme correspondante.
le niveau de signification à utiliser pour identifier les valeurs
Cela signifie qu’il doit exister un document écrit dé-
aberrantes dans les expériences de justesse et de fidélité.
crivant en détail comment la mesure doit être effec-
tuée, comportant de préférence une description de la
3.22 expérience d’évaluation collective: Expé-
façon dont il convient d’obtenir et de préparer le spé-
rience interlaboratoires dans laquelle la performance
cimen de mesure.
de chaque laboratoire est évaluée en utilisant la
même méthode de mesure normalisée sur materiau
4.1.2 L’existence d’une méthode de mesure docu-
identique.
mentée implique l’existence d’une organisation res-
ponsable de l’établissement de la méthode de
NOTES
mesure étudiée.
19 Les definitions en 3.16 et 3.20 s’appliquent à des ré-
sultats variables sur une échelle continue. Si le résultat
NOTE 22 La méthode de mesure normalisée est discu-

d’essai est discret ou arrondi, la limite de répetabilité et la tee de façon plus compléte en 6.2.

---------------------- Page: 10 ----------------------
0 ISO ISO 5725=1:1994(F)
vant s’écouler avant que les mesures ne soient
4.2 Expérience d’exactitude
réellement effectuées.
4.2.1 II convient de déterminer les mesures de
Dans l’organisation des expériences d’exactitude, ces
l’exactitude (justesse et fidélité) à partir d’une série
deux conditions doivent être soigneusement respec-
de résultats d’essai, reportés par les laboratoires par-
tée.s.
ticipants organisés sous la direction d’une commis-
sion d’experts établie spécifiquement dans ce but.
NOTE 23 La sélection de matériau est discutée de façon
plus compléte en 6.4.
Cette expérience interlaboratoires est appelée (cexpé-
rience d’exactitude)). L’expérience d’exactitude peut
4.4 Courts intervalles de temps
également être appelée ((expérience de fidélité ou de
justesse» selon son but limité. Si le but est de déter-
4.4.1 Selon la définition des conditions de
miner la justesse, alors une expérience de fidélité
répétabilité (3.14), les mesures pour la détermination
doit, soit avoir été faite précédemment, soit être me-
de la répétabilité doivent être effectuées sous des
née simultanément.
conditions opératoires constantes, c’est-à-dire, pen-
dant la période de temps couverte par les mesures,
II est recommandé que les estimations de I’exacti-
il est recommandé que des facteurs tels que ceux ci-
tude, obtenues à partir d’une telle expérience, soient

toujours données comme valables uniquement pour tés en 0.3, soient constants. En particulier, il convient

des essais exécutés selon la méthode de mesure de ne pas réétalonner l’équipement entre les mesu-

normalisée. res, à moins que ce ne soit une partie essentielle de
chaque mesure individuelle. En pratique, il convient
de conduire des essais sous des conditions de
4.2.2 Une expérience d’exactitude peut souvent être
répétabilité dans un temps aussi court que possible,
considérée comme un essai pratique de l’adéquation
afin de minimiser les variations de ces facteurs, tels
de la méthode de mesure normalisée. Un des buts
que l’environnement que l’on ne peut pas toujours
principaux de la normalisation est d’éliminer, autant
garantir constant.
que possible, les différences entre utilisateurs (labo-
ratoires), et les données obtenues par une expérience
4.4.2 II existe également une deuxième considé-
d’exactitude révèleront l’efficacité avec laquelle ce but
ration qui peut affecter I’ntervalle s’écoulant entre les
aura été atteint. Des différences prononcées dans les
mesures, et il s’agit du fait que les résultats d’essai
variantes intralaboratoires (voir article 7) ou entre les
sont supposés être indépendants. S’il faut craindre
moyens dont disposent les laboratoires peuvent indi-
que des résultats d’essai p’récédents puissent influ-
quer que la méthode de mesure normalisée n’est pas
encer des résultats d’essai suivants (et ainsi réduire
encore suffisamment détaillée et peut être proba-
l’estimation de la variante de répétabilité), il peut être
blement améliorée. S’il en est ainsi, il convient de
nécessaire de fournir des spécimens séparés, codés
faire un rapport à l’organisme de normalisation avec
de telle façon qu’un opérateur ne saura pas lesquels
une demande d’approfondissement de l’étude.
sont présumés’identiques. II convient de donner des
instructions quant à l’ordre dans lequel les spécimens
4.3 Individus d’essai identiques
doivent être mesurés, et cet ordre sera présumé alé-
atoire de façon que tous les individus ((identiques) ne
4.3.1 Dans une expérience d’exactitude, des échan-
soient pas mesurés ensemble. Cela peut signifier que
tillons d’un matériau spécifique ou d’un produit spé-
l’intervalle de
...

Questions, Comments and Discussion

Ask us and Technical Secretary will try to provide an answer. You can facilitate discussion about the standard in here.