Toxicity testing of fire effluents -- Part 2: Guidelines for biological assays to determine the acute inhalation toxicity of fire effluents (basic principles, criteria and methodology)

This Technical Report provides basic background information on methods suitable to define the acute inhalation toxicity of fire effluents, as generated by fire models. Contains terms and definitions.

Essais de toxicité des effluents du feu -- Partie 2: Directives pour les essais biologiques permettant de déterminer la toxicité aiguë par inhalation des effluents du feu (principes de base, critères et méthodologie)

Preskušanje toksičnosti dima – 2. del: Navodila za biološko določevanje akutne toksičnosti dima pri vdihavanju

General Information

Status
Published
Publication Date
31-Aug-1999
Technical Committee
Current Stage
6060 - National Implementation/Publication (Adopted Project)
Start Date
01-Sep-1999
Due Date
01-Sep-1999
Completion Date
01-Sep-1999

Buy Standard

Technical report
ISO/TR 9122-2:1990 - Toxicity testing of fire effluents
English language
11 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview
Technical report
SIST ISO/TR 9122-2:1999
English language
11 pages
sale 10% off
Preview
sale 10% off
Preview

e-Library read for
1 day
Technical report
ISO/TR 9122-2:1990 - Essais de toxicité des effluents du feu
French language
11 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview
Technical report
ISO/TR 9122-2:1990 - Essais de toxicité des effluents du feu
French language
11 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview

Standards Content (sample)

TECHNICAL
TR 9122-2
REPORT
First edition
1990-10-15
Toxicity testing of fire effluents -
Part 2:
Guidelines for biological assays to determine the
acute inhalation toxicity of fire effluents (basic
principles, criteria and methodology)
Essais de toxic&? des ef#uents du feu -
Partie 2: Directives pour les essais biologiques permettant de determiner
la toxicit aigui? par inhalation des effluents du feu (principes de base,
wit&-es et m&thodologie)
Reference number
ISWTR 9122-2:1990(E)
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122-2:1990(E)
Contents
Page

1 Scope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..~.................................................... 1

2 Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..-.........-..-.......................................................... 1

3 Principles . . . ..I................................................................................... 3

3.1 Nature of toxic effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

3.2 Relevance of animal data to humans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..*................... 3,

. . 3
3.3 “Classical” inhalation toxicology VS. combustion toxicology
3.4 Determination of qualitative aspects of toxicity (specific

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

toxicity)
Determination of quantitative aspects of toxicity (toxic potency) 4
3.5
Relative toxicity and its significance 4
3.6 .m................,..........,..v.........

3.7 Concentration/time/response relationships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

3.8 Test concepts ,...............-......................................................,........ 5

4 Criteria . ..l.......................................................................................-. 5

4.1 General criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

. . . . . . . . . . . . ..--..................................................................... 6

4.2 Fire model

4.3 Analytical measurements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..~......................................... 6

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..-......-.-............................................................. 6

4.4 Animals

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..~.............. 6

4.5 Experimental design

4.6 “Exposure-Dose” ...................................... ....................................

4.7 Exposure duration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

. . . . . . . 8
4.8 Thermal decomposition methods and exposure methods

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

4.9 Animal exposure modes

4.10 Observations and examinations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4.11 Post mortem examination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

. . ..---................................................ 9
4.12 Results, data and reporting
6 IS0 1990

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or utilized in any form

or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying and microfilm, without

permission in writing from the publisher.
International Organization for Standardization
Case Postale 56 l CH-1211 Geneve 20 l Switzerland
Printed In Switzerland
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122=2:1990(E)

5 Recommendations of methodology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Annex

A Bibliography . . ..-............................................................................ 11

. . .
III
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122-2:1990(E)
Foreword
IS0 (the International Organization for Standardization) is a worldwide
federation of national standards bodies (IS0 member bodies). The work
of preparing International Standards is normally carried out through IS0
technical committees. Each member body interested in a subject for
which a technical committee has been established has the right to be
represented on that committee. International organizations, govern-
mental and non-governmental, in liaison with ISO, also take part in the
work. IS0 collaborates closely with the International Electrotechnical
Commission (IEC) on all matters of electrotechnical standardization.
The main task of technical committees is to prepare International Stan-
dards, but in exceptional circumstances a technical committee may
propose the publication of a Technical Report of one of the following
types:
1, when the required sup cannot b pu bli-
e obtained for the
- type P0r-t
catio nofanl nternational Stan dard despite repeated efforts;
- type 2, when the subject is still under technical development or
where for any other reason there is the future but not immediate
possibility of an agreement on an International Standard;
- type 3, when a technical committee has collected data of a different
kind from that which is normally published as an International Stan-
dard (“state of the art”, for example).
Technical Reports of types 1 and 2 are subject to review within three
years of publication, to decide whether they can be transformed into
International Standards. Technical Reports of type 3 do not necessarily
have to be reviewed until the data they provide are considered to be no
longer valid or useful.
lSO/TR 9122-2, which is a Technical Report of type 2, was prepared by
Technical Committee ISO/TC 92, Fire tests on building maferials, com-
ponents and structures.
IS0 9122 consists of the following parts, under the general title Toxicity
testing of fire effluents:
- Part 1: General
[Technical Report]
- Part 2: Guidelines for biological assays to determine the acute
inhalation toxicity of fire effluents (basic principles, criteria and
methodology)
[Technical Report]
- Part 3: Methods for the analysis of gases and vapours
Annex A of this part of IS0 9122 is for information only.
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122=2:1990(E)
Introduction
Several small-scale test methods for assessing the inhalation toxicity
of the fire effluents of materials and simple composites have been de-
scribed in the literature. They have been used mostly for research and
development purposes.
Such test methods are usually split into three parts: a fire model (gen-
eration of fire effluent), analytical methods, and an animal model (bi-
ological assay procedure). These test methods differ substantially,
especially in the use of various fire models.
ISO/TR 9122-2 considers only the biological assay procedures (animal
model). The approach used in this document has been to recommend
minimum standards of scientific practice. This principle has been suc-
cessfully applied in the toxicity assessment of drugs, pesticides and
chemicals and, as a consequence, international guidelines harmonizing
scientific contributions in toxicity testing have been published.
The guidelines in this Technical Report for the determination of the
acute toxicity of fire effluents have been developed from the collective
experience of the participating experts and from their consideration of
published results as shown in the bibliography (see annex A).
Basic principles of inhalation toxicology (as outlined, for instance, in
international guidelines for toxicity testing of chemicals, pesticides or
drugs) also apply to the determination of the acute inhalation toxicity of
fire effluents. Additionally, criteria have been determined for acceptable
biological assays which consider specific effects in combustion
toxicology. Some criteria have been defined from the toxicologist’s point
of view concerning acceptable fire models (see clause 2) and suitable
analytical methods. Recommendations for an appropriate selection of
suitable methods have been formed by critically reviewing biological
assay procedures against these basic principles and special criteria.
The followi ng basic principles and criteria have been selected and are
disc ussed:
- the nature of toxic effects (narcosis, irritancy, etc.);
- the relevance of animal data to humans;
- suitable endpoints of biological assays (lethality and incapacitation);
- characterization of toxic effects (qualitatively and quantitatively);
- reliability, validity, repeatability, reproducibility and sensitivity;
characterization of doses;
- exposure time period (5 min and 30 min);
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122-2:1990(E)
exposure systems;
modes of exposure;
- fire models;
observations and examinations;
- post mortem examination;
- data evaluation and reporting;
- good laboratory practice;
- personnel.
Test concepts are recommended and the following conclusions are
drawn:
suitable biological assays are available for the determination of
narcotic effects which meet the basic principles and criteria;
- biological assays are available for the determination of sensory
irritant effects which meet the basic principles and criteria. The cor-
relation of the effects found in animals with humans is uncertain;
suitable biological assays are available for the determination of
pulmonary irritant effects, which meet the basic principles and cri-
teria;
suitable biological assays such as the OECD (Organisation for
European Community Development) Guidelines PI are available for
the determination of toxic effects other than narcotic or irritant ones,
which meet the basic principles and criteria;
analytical retests are recomm ended before
tests with animals are
performed i n order to minimize the us e of ani mals.
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
TECHNICAL REPORT ISO/TR 9122=2:1990(E)
Toxicity testing of fire effluents -
Part 2:
Guidelines for biological assays to determine the acute
inhalation toxicity of fire effluents (basic principles, criteria and
methodology)
This Technical Report is mainly intended to be use-
1 Scope
ful in research and development laboratories. It
should be emphasized that the use of toxicity test
results alone to classify materials with respect to
The main objective of IS0 Technical Report 9122-2
their fire safety use is inadequate. The integration
is to provide researchers with basic background in-
of toxicity data into a toxic hazard assessment is
formation on methods suitable to define the acute
essential but is presently not well defined and
inhalation toxicity of fire effluents, as generated by
should be the next major goal for combustion
fire models (see clause 2).
toxicology.
In producing IS0 Technical Report 9122-2, compre-
hensive and critical reviews have been made of the
current state-of-the-art of biological assay methods
2 Definitions
in combustion toxicology. It is, therefore, hoped that
researchers will be encouraged to use common ap-
For the purposes of this Technical Report, the fol-
proaches in research, so that data and test results
lowing definitions apply.
can be more widely used for assessments of com-
parative toxicity, and also to minimize the overall
2.1 acute toxicity: The effects following a single
use of biological assays.
exposure to, or dose of, a toxicant. The effects may

While it has been felt essential to specify minimum be seen immediately, or after a delay of hours or

standards of scientific practice, the selection of days.
suitable and recommended experimental methods
is left to the judgement and responsibility of the sci-
2.2 biological assay (or bioassay): Originally a term
entific experts performing these tests.
reserved for the use of a biological system to detect
and/or measure the amount of a biologically active
The scope of this Technical Report includes
material. In the fire context it refers to the use of
animal exposures, rather than chemical analyses, to
- basic principles of inhalation toxicology applica-
determine the toxicity of a fire effluent.
ble for biological assay of fire effluents;
2.3 chronic toxicity: Toxicity resulting from multiple
- criteria for acceptable biological assays;
doses or exposure to a toxicant over an extended
period of time.
- some criteria on fire models and analytical
methods, from the toxicologist’s point of view.
2.4 concentration: The amount of a contaminant in
This Technical Report does not take into account
the atmosphere per unit of volume of the atmos-
chronic and long-term effects of fire effluents and
phere, usually quoted as mass/volume (milligrams
their adverse effects, such as heat or oxygen de-
per millilitre or milligrams per cubic metre) ot
pletion, arising from fire.
volumejVoIume (parts per million or per cent).
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122=2:1990(E)
2.5 delayed toxicity: A toxic effect which is not
half the animals exposed to a toxicant for a specified
manifested until a period of several hours, days or,
time. It may be expressed in parts per million (ppm)
in some cases, weeks after exposure to the
(by volume), or milligrams per litre (mg/l). In com-
toxicants.
bustion toxicology, two values are often used: a) the
LC&, expressed as milligrams per litre which is the

2.6 dose: The amount of a toxicant received by an starting mass of material in the study divided by the

animal. In combustion inhalation toxicology, the volume of available air (nominal furnace load con-

dose can be determined in terms of the Exposure-
centration), and b) the LCso expressed as milligrams
Dose. per litre which is the mass of material actually
consumed(i.e., the difference between the starting

2.7 E&: Effective concentration 50 %. A concen- mass and the finishing mass) divided by the volume

tration statistically calculated to cause an effect of available air (nominal mass loss concentration).

e. ., incapacitation) in 50 % of the exposed ani- Care must be taken to distinguish between the two.

( g
mals. As explained under Exposure-Dose, the time of ex-
posure is very important in inhalation toxicology,
and the length of exposure should always be quoted
2.8 ECISO: The mathematical product of time of ex-
posure and concentration statistically calculated to for an LC50.
cause an effect in 50 % of the animals.
2;16 LCTSO: The Exposure-Dose statistically calcu-

2.9 exposure-dose: The amount of toxicants to lated to cause the death of 50 % of the animals. This

which a subject is exposed for a specified time pe- value is useful for comparing results obtained in

riod. For individual gaseous toxicants, the experimental regimes employing different exposure

Exposure-Dose is the integrated area under a con- times. The duration time of exposure must always

centration VS. time curve and is expressed in parts be quoted.
per million minutes. In combustion toxicology of fire

effluents, the Exposure-Dose is the integrated area 2.17 LT50: The time exposure statistically calcu-

under a mass loss per unit volume vs. time curve lated to cause the death of 50 % of the animals for

and is expressed in milligrams minutes per litre. It a fixed concentration of toxicant.

is often estimated by multiplying the concentration

(expressed as the nominal furnace load/chamber 2.18 narcosis: Literally “sleep inducing”, but used

volume or nominal mass loss/chamber volume) by in combustion toxicology to describe central nerv-

the time of exposure. ous system depression causing reduced awareness
and reduced ability to escape. At higher concen-

2.10 fire effluent: The total gaseous, particulate or trations of toxicants, unconsciousness and finally

aerosol effluent from combustion or pyrolysis. death will occur

2.11 fire model: A means for the decomposition 2.19 pneumonitis: Inflammation of the lower re-

and/or combustion of test specimens under defined spira tory tract.
conditions to represent a known stage or stages of

fire in order to generate fire effluents for toxicity as- 2.20 pulmonary cledema: Extravasation of blood

sessments. (This term is also used by the fire sci- plasma in the alveolar regions of the lung caused

ence community to mean the mathematical by vascular damage, inflammation or inadequate

simulation of fire characteristics.) venous drainage. The build-up of fluid impairs the

absorption of oxygen into the blood.
2.12 incapacitation: An inability to perform a task
(related to escape from a fire) caused by exposure
2.21 respiratory tract: The nose, pharynx, larynx,
to toxicants. trachea and large bronchi are termed the upper re-
spiratory tract and the bronchioli, alveolar ducts and

2.13 irritation (pulmonary): The action of irritants alveoli are termed the lower respiratory tract.

on the lower respiratory tract which may result in
breathing discomfort (dyspnoea), increase in respir-
2.22 specific toxicity: A particular adverse effect
atory rate and, in severe cases, to pneumonitis or
caused by a toxicant (e.g., narcosis, irritancy).
pulmonary oedema.
2.23 toxic potency: A measure of the amount of

2.14 irritation (sensory): A response evoked in the toxicant required to elicit a specific toxic effect -

eyes and upper respiratory tract by a toxicant and the smaller the amount required, the greater the

causing a painful sensation. This may be a direct potency.
stimulus of specialized receptors or secondary to
tissue damage caused by the toxicants.
2.24 toxicant: A chemical capable of exerting an
adverse effect or effects on an organism. The

2.15 LC& Lethal concentration 50 %. The concen- toxicant can be characterized by two properties: the

tration statistically calculated to cause the death of specific toxicity - the nature of the adverse effect,

---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122-2:1990(E)
and the toxic potency - the dose required to cause
between the acute effects in humans and the effects
the effect.
in labora animals.
tory
There are, however, some physiological differences
2.25 toxicity: The nature (specific effect) and extent
between small rodents and man which are espe-
(potency) of adverse effects of a substance upon a
cially important in combustion toxicology. For in-
living organism.
stance, the respiratory minute volume to body
weight ratio of small rodents is generally greater
than in humans. This phenomenon has been used
3 Principles
to human advantage in the past where small rodents
or canaries have been used to detect the presence
of narcotic gases in mines and chemical vessels.
3.1 Nature of toxic effects
The rodent is adversely affected before a human
because, at rest, a human breathes 160 ml/(min-kg)
The aim of most toxicity evaluations is to provide
whereas a rat breathes 900 ml/(minkg) - a ratio of
data in order to predict the consequences of expo-
approximately 1:6. However, under conditions of ac-
sure in humans. Suitable available data concerning
tivity, such as may be encountered in a fire, a hu-
the effect of similar substances on humans must be
man’s respiration rate can
increase to
considered in determining the relevance of animal
500 ml/(min-kg) or even higher, giving a ratio of ap-
studies. Data exist, concerning the effect of fire
proximately 1:2. Thus it could be considered that the
effluent atmospheres, which have been derived from
rat provides a reasonable model of “active” human
studies on many fire victims, especially post-mar-tern
respiratory uptake. Any discrepancy resulting from
examinations. Victims are generally found with high
rats being more sensitive than humans can be tol-
carboxyhaemoglobin levels, indicating exposure to
erated as this provides a “safety factor” when ex-
carbon monoxide, and in some cases hydrogen
trapolating the results from animals to humans. It
cyanide exposure has been implicated. Carbon
would also be unrealistic to expect the precision of
monoxide and hydrogen cyanide are both known to
the response in laboratory animals, to a complex
cause progressive central nervous system de-
mixture of compounds present in fire effluents, to be
pression leading to unconsciousness and death.
such that a factor of 2 difference between rat and
This type of toxic effect has been termed
human would significantly affect the extrapolation
“narcosis” and is considered to be very important
of the data.
in the response of humans to fire effluents.
A second physiological difference of importance is
There are many reports of fire effluents being de-
that small laboratory rodents are obligate nose
scribed as “irritant”, causing coughing, choking and
breathers, whereas a human can choose to breathe
an inability to see. Chemical pneumonitis has also
through either the mouth or the nose. In fact, under
been reported in both fire survivors and fatalities.
conditions of high workload, stress, or in the pres-
Irritancy, both sensory and pulmonary, is considered
ence of irritants, man becomes almost totally a
to be a major factor in the response of humans to
mouth breather. This difference is of little or no im-
fire effluents. There have been few, if any, fire cas-
portance with regard to the effects of insoluble
ualty reports due to other significant toxicological
gases, but the rodent nose acts as a “scrubber” to
effects apart from narcosis and irritancy.
remove water soluble gases, such as SO* or HCI
and particulates. This may reduce the effect of these
3.2 Relevance of animal data to humans
materials upon the lower respiratory tract. However,
fine particles (less than 5 IAm) and high concen-
The effects seen in experimental animals have been
trations of soluble gases will still have a significant
very similar to those seen in humans. Death has
impact upon the lungs in rodents as well as humans.
been attributed to the presence of “narcotic” gases
In spite of these differences, the qualitative re-
such as carbon monoxide and hydrogen cyanide.
lationship between the effects of fire effluents on
Irritants have been shown to be present, detected
humans and laboratory animals is excellent and a
by clinical observations of salivation, nasal dis-
reasonably good quantitative correlation has been
charge, Iachrymation and measurements of respir-
observed for fire effluents studies to date.
atory rate. Pulmonary damage has also been
confirmed by histopathological examination of the
lungs of animals exposed to high concentrations of
33 “Classical” inhalation toxicology vs.
corrosive irritants.
cbmbustion toxicology
In general, direct-acting chemicals appear to have
the same spectrum of activity across the species,
Most acute inhalation toxicology studies are carried
including humans. A comprehensive review 1151
out as part of the toxicological characterization of a
compared the action in humans and laboratory ani-
chemical to enable decisions to be made about its
mals for an extensive list of chemicals present in fire
use, transport and safe exposure levels. The aim of
effluents and, in many cases, agreement was found
these considerations is the protection of those mak-
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122-2:1990(E)
ing, using or buying the chemical. Consequently,
Both the LC& and the EC50 are then calculated sta-
rigorous testing regimes are used to provide
tistically.
“worst-case” assessments and l-h or 4-h exposures
In addition to the commonly quoted LC50 and EC50
are often used. The level of adverse effects which
values, two other values are determined: the slope
will be tolerated is very low, so that mere survival
of the concentration-response curve and the confi-
at a concentration is not considered adequate if
dence limits for the L&-o and EC50. The slope of the
there are other, non-fatal consequences. The range
concentration-response curve is important; for in-
of toxic effects which are likely to occur is very
stance, two toxicants with the same LC5e may have
broad and the protocols employed are designed to
different effects at a fraction of the LC50. A com-
reflect this. In contrast, combustion toxicology aims
pound with a steep concentration-response curve
to model an “emergency” situation. Consequently,
would probably have no effect at 0,2 LCsO, whereas
the exposure times used are generally much re-
one with a shallow curve may cause death in 20 %
duced, 5 min to 30 min being typical. Survival is the
of th.e animals at 0,2 LC50. In most combustion
single most important factor and consequently much
toxicity experiments the concentration-response
greater emphasis is placed on incapacitation, se-
curves have been steep. The confidence limits for
vere toxicity and death, rather than changes in body
the LC& describe the certainty with which a given
weight, for instance, which would be significant in a
figure lies within a range. The inherent variability of
conventional study. As knowledge in combustion
L&o determinations is such that differences of less
toxicology has increased, the range of toxic effects
than a factor of 2 to 3 are often not statistically sig-
considered to be important has narrowed to
nificant; in addition, such a factor would not be
narcosis and irritancy. Specific consideration must
toxicologically significant.
be given to these.
3.6 Relative toxicity and its significance
3.4 Determination of qualitative aspects of
The quantitative indices of toxicity are often used to
toxicity (specific toxicity)
compare the toxicities of different materials to as-
sess their relative toxicity. This can be misleading
Toxicology involves the determination of the biolog-
unless it is certain that similar values are being
ical responses caused by toxicants in both qualita-
compared (see 3.5 for some of the problems asso-
tive and quantitative terms. The OECD acute

inhalation protocols PI have been devised to pro- ciated with the expression of “dose” and LC5* val-

ues in combustion toxicology). Even when care has
vide a broad screen for the determination of the
been taken to express the values in an appropriate
qualitative aspects of toxicology, for instance,

whether the toxicant causes death by narcosis, or way, practical differences in relative toxicity are

liver, kidney or pulmonary damage. This can be usually not indicated unless LCsos differ by greater

considered to be the determination of the toxicant’s than one order of magnitude. While reported LCsOs

for individual gases found in fire effluents are dis-
specific toxicity (see clause 2).
tributed over several orders of magnitude, LCsos at-
tributed to the fire effluents derived from most
materials, expressed as either mass loss or furnace
3.5 Determination of quantitative aspects of
load per unit of exposure volume (milligrams per li-
toxicity (toxic potency)
tre), tend to fall into a much narrower range (1 to I,5
orders of magnitude). This narrow LCsO range, com-
The quantitative aspects of a toxicant are addressed
bined with the inherent variability of LC50 values
by varying the dose of toxicant and relating it to the
derived for fire effluents from materials, exerts an
toxicity seen. At each dose level the effects are re-
obvious limitation on the numbers of categories into
corded either as quanta1 or continuous variables.
which the LC50 values can be classified for signif-
The two values most commonly use are the EDs0
icant and practical discrimination of relative toxicity.
(effective dose to cause 50 % response or a re-
sponse in 50 % of the animals) and the “No Effect
Level” (the highest dose which does not cause a 3.7 Concentration/time/response
particular effect). In inhalation toxicology, including
relationships
combustion toxicology, the EC50 type of value is
most often calculated, for instance the LCse (t) (con-
The magnitude or severity of most biological effects
centration to which the animals have been exposed
increases with increasing doses of the causative
for a time t, and which is calculated to kill 50 % of
agent, usually the increase in effects being propor-
the animals) or the incapacitation EC50 (t) (the con-
tional to the logarithm of the dose. In inhalation
centration to which the animals have been exposed
toxicology, the “dose” is a function of many factors,
for a time t which is calculated to cause incapaci-
two of which are: the concentration of the toxicant in
tation in 50 % of the animals). These values are
the atmosphere and the duration of the exposure
calculated from experiments where responses of
WI . Multiplying the atmosphere concentration by
less than 50 % have resulted and from experiments
the exposure time enables a rough estimate to be
where more than 50 % responses have occurred.
made of the “dose” inhaled (but not necessarily re-
---------------------- Page: 10 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122-2:1990(E)

tained) by an animal, assuming constant ventilation. a) consideration of the chemical composition of the

Most inhalation toxicology studies use a fixed time material to suggest which fire effluent compo-

of exposure and the dose-response relationship of
nents should be analysed;
the compound is investigated by varying the atmos-
pher
...

SLOVENSKI STANDARD
SIST ISO/TR 9122-2:1999
01-september-1999
3UHVNXãDQMHWRNVLþQRVWLGLPD±GHO1DYRGLOD]DELRORãNRGRORþHYDQMHDNXWQH
WRNVLþQRVWLGLPDSULYGLKDYDQMX

Toxicity testing of fire effluents -- Part 2: Guidelines for biological assays to determine the

acute inhalation toxicity of fire effluents (basic principles, criteria and methodology)

Essais de toxicité des effluents du feu -- Partie 2: Directives pour les essais biologiques

permettant de déterminer la toxicité aiguë par inhalation des effluents du feu (principes

de base, critères et méthodologie)
Ta slovenski standard je istoveten z: ISO/TR 9122-2:1990
ICS:
13.220.99 Drugi standardi v zvezi z Other standards related to
varstvom pred požarom protection against fire
SIST ISO/TR 9122-2:1999 en

2003-01.Slovenski inštitut za standardizacijo. Razmnoževanje celote ali delov tega standarda ni dovoljeno.

---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
SIST ISO/TR 9122-2:1999
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
SIST ISO/TR 9122-2:1999
TECHNICAL
TR 9122-2
REPORT
First edition
1990-10-15
Toxicity testing of fire effluents -
Part 2:
Guidelines for biological assays to determine the
acute inhalation toxicity of fire effluents (basic
principles, criteria and methodology)
Essais de toxic&? des ef#uents du feu -
Partie 2: Directives pour les essais biologiques permettant de determiner
la toxicit aigui? par inhalation des effluents du feu (principes de base,
wit&-es et m&thodologie)
Reference number
ISWTR 9122-2:1990(E)
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
SIST ISO/TR 9122-2:1999
ISO/TR 9122-2:1990(E)
Contents
Page

1 Scope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..~.................................................... 1

2 Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..-.........-..-.......................................................... 1

3 Principles . . . ..I................................................................................... 3

3.1 Nature of toxic effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

3.2 Relevance of animal data to humans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..*................... 3,

. . 3
3.3 “Classical” inhalation toxicology VS. combustion toxicology
3.4 Determination of qualitative aspects of toxicity (specific

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

toxicity)
Determination of quantitative aspects of toxicity (toxic potency) 4
3.5
Relative toxicity and its significance 4
3.6 .m................,..........,..v.........

3.7 Concentration/time/response relationships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

3.8 Test concepts ,...............-......................................................,........ 5

4 Criteria . ..l.......................................................................................-. 5

4.1 General criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

. . . . . . . . . . . . ..--..................................................................... 6

4.2 Fire model

4.3 Analytical measurements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..~......................................... 6

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..-......-.-............................................................. 6

4.4 Animals

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..~.............. 6

4.5 Experimental design

4.6 “Exposure-Dose” ...................................... ....................................

4.7 Exposure duration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

. . . . . . . 8
4.8 Thermal decomposition methods and exposure methods

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

4.9 Animal exposure modes

4.10 Observations and examinations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4.11 Post mortem examination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

. . ..---................................................ 9
4.12 Results, data and reporting
6 IS0 1990

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or utilized in any form

or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying and microfilm, without

permission in writing from the publisher.
International Organization for Standardization
Case Postale 56 l CH-1211 Geneve 20 l Switzerland
Printed In Switzerland
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
SIST ISO/TR 9122-2:1999
ISO/TR 9122=2:1990(E)

5 Recommendations of methodology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Annex

A Bibliography . . ..-............................................................................ 11

. . .
III
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
SIST ISO/TR 9122-2:1999
ISO/TR 9122-2:1990(E)
Foreword
IS0 (the International Organization for Standardization) is a worldwide
federation of national standards bodies (IS0 member bodies). The work
of preparing International Standards is normally carried out through IS0
technical committees. Each member body interested in a subject for
which a technical committee has been established has the right to be
represented on that committee. International organizations, govern-
mental and non-governmental, in liaison with ISO, also take part in the
work. IS0 collaborates closely with the International Electrotechnical
Commission (IEC) on all matters of electrotechnical standardization.
The main task of technical committees is to prepare International Stan-
dards, but in exceptional circumstances a technical committee may
propose the publication of a Technical Report of one of the following
types:
1, when the required sup cannot b pu bli-
e obtained for the
- type P0r-t
catio nofanl nternational Stan dard despite repeated efforts;
- type 2, when the subject is still under technical development or
where for any other reason there is the future but not immediate
possibility of an agreement on an International Standard;
- type 3, when a technical committee has collected data of a different
kind from that which is normally published as an International Stan-
dard (“state of the art”, for example).
Technical Reports of types 1 and 2 are subject to review within three
years of publication, to decide whether they can be transformed into
International Standards. Technical Reports of type 3 do not necessarily
have to be reviewed until the data they provide are considered to be no
longer valid or useful.
lSO/TR 9122-2, which is a Technical Report of type 2, was prepared by
Technical Committee ISO/TC 92, Fire tests on building maferials, com-
ponents and structures.
IS0 9122 consists of the following parts, under the general title Toxicity
testing of fire effluents:
- Part 1: General
[Technical Report]
- Part 2: Guidelines for biological assays to determine the acute
inhalation toxicity of fire effluents (basic principles, criteria and
methodology)
[Technical Report]
- Part 3: Methods for the analysis of gases and vapours
Annex A of this part of IS0 9122 is for information only.
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
SIST ISO/TR 9122-2:1999
ISO/TR 9122=2:1990(E)
Introduction
Several small-scale test methods for assessing the inhalation toxicity
of the fire effluents of materials and simple composites have been de-
scribed in the literature. They have been used mostly for research and
development purposes.
Such test methods are usually split into three parts: a fire model (gen-
eration of fire effluent), analytical methods, and an animal model (bi-
ological assay procedure). These test methods differ substantially,
especially in the use of various fire models.
ISO/TR 9122-2 considers only the biological assay procedures (animal
model). The approach used in this document has been to recommend
minimum standards of scientific practice. This principle has been suc-
cessfully applied in the toxicity assessment of drugs, pesticides and
chemicals and, as a consequence, international guidelines harmonizing
scientific contributions in toxicity testing have been published.
The guidelines in this Technical Report for the determination of the
acute toxicity of fire effluents have been developed from the collective
experience of the participating experts and from their consideration of
published results as shown in the bibliography (see annex A).
Basic principles of inhalation toxicology (as outlined, for instance, in
international guidelines for toxicity testing of chemicals, pesticides or
drugs) also apply to the determination of the acute inhalation toxicity of
fire effluents. Additionally, criteria have been determined for acceptable
biological assays which consider specific effects in combustion
toxicology. Some criteria have been defined from the toxicologist’s point
of view concerning acceptable fire models (see clause 2) and suitable
analytical methods. Recommendations for an appropriate selection of
suitable methods have been formed by critically reviewing biological
assay procedures against these basic principles and special criteria.
The followi ng basic principles and criteria have been selected and are
disc ussed:
- the nature of toxic effects (narcosis, irritancy, etc.);
- the relevance of animal data to humans;
- suitable endpoints of biological assays (lethality and incapacitation);
- characterization of toxic effects (qualitatively and quantitatively);
- reliability, validity, repeatability, reproducibility and sensitivity;
characterization of doses;
- exposure time period (5 min and 30 min);
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
SIST ISO/TR 9122-2:1999
ISO/TR 9122-2:1990(E)
exposure systems;
modes of exposure;
- fire models;
observations and examinations;
- post mortem examination;
- data evaluation and reporting;
- good laboratory practice;
- personnel.
Test concepts are recommended and the following conclusions are
drawn:
suitable biological assays are available for the determination of
narcotic effects which meet the basic principles and criteria;
- biological assays are available for the determination of sensory
irritant effects which meet the basic principles and criteria. The cor-
relation of the effects found in animals with humans is uncertain;
suitable biological assays are available for the determination of
pulmonary irritant effects, which meet the basic principles and cri-
teria;
suitable biological assays such as the OECD (Organisation for
European Community Development) Guidelines PI are available for
the determination of toxic effects other than narcotic or irritant ones,
which meet the basic principles and criteria;
analytical retests are recomm ended before
tests with animals are
performed i n order to minimize the us e of ani mals.
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
SIST ISO/TR 9122-2:1999
TECHNICAL REPORT ISO/TR 9122=2:1990(E)
Toxicity testing of fire effluents -
Part 2:
Guidelines for biological assays to determine the acute
inhalation toxicity of fire effluents (basic principles, criteria and
methodology)
This Technical Report is mainly intended to be use-
1 Scope
ful in research and development laboratories. It
should be emphasized that the use of toxicity test
results alone to classify materials with respect to
The main objective of IS0 Technical Report 9122-2
their fire safety use is inadequate. The integration
is to provide researchers with basic background in-
of toxicity data into a toxic hazard assessment is
formation on methods suitable to define the acute
essential but is presently not well defined and
inhalation toxicity of fire effluents, as generated by
should be the next major goal for combustion
fire models (see clause 2).
toxicology.
In producing IS0 Technical Report 9122-2, compre-
hensive and critical reviews have been made of the
current state-of-the-art of biological assay methods
2 Definitions
in combustion toxicology. It is, therefore, hoped that
researchers will be encouraged to use common ap-
For the purposes of this Technical Report, the fol-
proaches in research, so that data and test results
lowing definitions apply.
can be more widely used for assessments of com-
parative toxicity, and also to minimize the overall
2.1 acute toxicity: The effects following a single
use of biological assays.
exposure to, or dose of, a toxicant. The effects may

While it has been felt essential to specify minimum be seen immediately, or after a delay of hours or

standards of scientific practice, the selection of days.
suitable and recommended experimental methods
is left to the judgement and responsibility of the sci-
2.2 biological assay (or bioassay): Originally a term
entific experts performing these tests.
reserved for the use of a biological system to detect
and/or measure the amount of a biologically active
The scope of this Technical Report includes
material. In the fire context it refers to the use of
animal exposures, rather than chemical analyses, to
- basic principles of inhalation toxicology applica-
determine the toxicity of a fire effluent.
ble for biological assay of fire effluents;
2.3 chronic toxicity: Toxicity resulting from multiple
- criteria for acceptable biological assays;
doses or exposure to a toxicant over an extended
period of time.
- some criteria on fire models and analytical
methods, from the toxicologist’s point of view.
2.4 concentration: The amount of a contaminant in
This Technical Report does not take into account
the atmosphere per unit of volume of the atmos-
chronic and long-term effects of fire effluents and
phere, usually quoted as mass/volume (milligrams
their adverse effects, such as heat or oxygen de-
per millilitre or milligrams per cubic metre) ot
pletion, arising from fire.
volumejVoIume (parts per million or per cent).
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
SIST ISO/TR 9122-2:1999
ISO/TR 9122=2:1990(E)
2.5 delayed toxicity: A toxic effect which is not
half the animals exposed to a toxicant for a specified
manifested until a period of several hours, days or,
time. It may be expressed in parts per million (ppm)
in some cases, weeks after exposure to the
(by volume), or milligrams per litre (mg/l). In com-
toxicants.
bustion toxicology, two values are often used: a) the
LC&, expressed as milligrams per litre which is the

2.6 dose: The amount of a toxicant received by an starting mass of material in the study divided by the

animal. In combustion inhalation toxicology, the volume of available air (nominal furnace load con-

dose can be determined in terms of the Exposure-
centration), and b) the LCso expressed as milligrams
Dose. per litre which is the mass of material actually
consumed(i.e., the difference between the starting

2.7 E&: Effective concentration 50 %. A concen- mass and the finishing mass) divided by the volume

tration statistically calculated to cause an effect of available air (nominal mass loss concentration).

e. ., incapacitation) in 50 % of the exposed ani- Care must be taken to distinguish between the two.

( g
mals. As explained under Exposure-Dose, the time of ex-
posure is very important in inhalation toxicology,
and the length of exposure should always be quoted
2.8 ECISO: The mathematical product of time of ex-
posure and concentration statistically calculated to for an LC50.
cause an effect in 50 % of the animals.
2;16 LCTSO: The Exposure-Dose statistically calcu-

2.9 exposure-dose: The amount of toxicants to lated to cause the death of 50 % of the animals. This

which a subject is exposed for a specified time pe- value is useful for comparing results obtained in

riod. For individual gaseous toxicants, the experimental regimes employing different exposure

Exposure-Dose is the integrated area under a con- times. The duration time of exposure must always

centration VS. time curve and is expressed in parts be quoted.
per million minutes. In combustion toxicology of fire

effluents, the Exposure-Dose is the integrated area 2.17 LT50: The time exposure statistically calcu-

under a mass loss per unit volume vs. time curve lated to cause the death of 50 % of the animals for

and is expressed in milligrams minutes per litre. It a fixed concentration of toxicant.

is often estimated by multiplying the concentration

(expressed as the nominal furnace load/chamber 2.18 narcosis: Literally “sleep inducing”, but used

volume or nominal mass loss/chamber volume) by in combustion toxicology to describe central nerv-

the time of exposure. ous system depression causing reduced awareness
and reduced ability to escape. At higher concen-

2.10 fire effluent: The total gaseous, particulate or trations of toxicants, unconsciousness and finally

aerosol effluent from combustion or pyrolysis. death will occur

2.11 fire model: A means for the decomposition 2.19 pneumonitis: Inflammation of the lower re-

and/or combustion of test specimens under defined spira tory tract.
conditions to represent a known stage or stages of

fire in order to generate fire effluents for toxicity as- 2.20 pulmonary cledema: Extravasation of blood

sessments. (This term is also used by the fire sci- plasma in the alveolar regions of the lung caused

ence community to mean the mathematical by vascular damage, inflammation or inadequate

simulation of fire characteristics.) venous drainage. The build-up of fluid impairs the

absorption of oxygen into the blood.
2.12 incapacitation: An inability to perform a task
(related to escape from a fire) caused by exposure
2.21 respiratory tract: The nose, pharynx, larynx,
to toxicants. trachea and large bronchi are termed the upper re-
spiratory tract and the bronchioli, alveolar ducts and

2.13 irritation (pulmonary): The action of irritants alveoli are termed the lower respiratory tract.

on the lower respiratory tract which may result in
breathing discomfort (dyspnoea), increase in respir-
2.22 specific toxicity: A particular adverse effect
atory rate and, in severe cases, to pneumonitis or
caused by a toxicant (e.g., narcosis, irritancy).
pulmonary oedema.
2.23 toxic potency: A measure of the amount of

2.14 irritation (sensory): A response evoked in the toxicant required to elicit a specific toxic effect -

eyes and upper respiratory tract by a toxicant and the smaller the amount required, the greater the

causing a painful sensation. This may be a direct potency.
stimulus of specialized receptors or secondary to
tissue damage caused by the toxicants.
2.24 toxicant: A chemical capable of exerting an
adverse effect or effects on an organism. The

2.15 LC& Lethal concentration 50 %. The concen- toxicant can be characterized by two properties: the

tration statistically calculated to cause the death of specific toxicity - the nature of the adverse effect,

---------------------- Page: 10 ----------------------
SIST ISO/TR 9122-2:1999
ISO/TR 9122-2:1990(E)
and the toxic potency - the dose required to cause
between the acute effects in humans and the effects
the effect.
in labora animals.
tory
There are, however, some physiological differences
2.25 toxicity: The nature (specific effect) and extent
between small rodents and man which are espe-
(potency) of adverse effects of a substance upon a
cially important in combustion toxicology. For in-
living organism.
stance, the respiratory minute volume to body
weight ratio of small rodents is generally greater
than in humans. This phenomenon has been used
3 Principles
to human advantage in the past where small rodents
or canaries have been used to detect the presence
of narcotic gases in mines and chemical vessels.
3.1 Nature of toxic effects
The rodent is adversely affected before a human
because, at rest, a human breathes 160 ml/(min-kg)
The aim of most toxicity evaluations is to provide
whereas a rat breathes 900 ml/(minkg) - a ratio of
data in order to predict the consequences of expo-
approximately 1:6. However, under conditions of ac-
sure in humans. Suitable available data concerning
tivity, such as may be encountered in a fire, a hu-
the effect of similar substances on humans must be
man’s respiration rate can
increase to
considered in determining the relevance of animal
500 ml/(min-kg) or even higher, giving a ratio of ap-
studies. Data exist, concerning the effect of fire
proximately 1:2. Thus it could be considered that the
effluent atmospheres, which have been derived from
rat provides a reasonable model of “active” human
studies on many fire victims, especially post-mar-tern
respiratory uptake. Any discrepancy resulting from
examinations. Victims are generally found with high
rats being more sensitive than humans can be tol-
carboxyhaemoglobin levels, indicating exposure to
erated as this provides a “safety factor” when ex-
carbon monoxide, and in some cases hydrogen
trapolating the results from animals to humans. It
cyanide exposure has been implicated. Carbon
would also be unrealistic to expect the precision of
monoxide and hydrogen cyanide are both known to
the response in laboratory animals, to a complex
cause progressive central nervous system de-
mixture of compounds present in fire effluents, to be
pression leading to unconsciousness and death.
such that a factor of 2 difference between rat and
This type of toxic effect has been termed
human would significantly affect the extrapolation
“narcosis” and is considered to be very important
of the data.
in the response of humans to fire effluents.
A second physiological difference of importance is
There are many reports of fire effluents being de-
that small laboratory rodents are obligate nose
scribed as “irritant”, causing coughing, choking and
breathers, whereas a human can choose to breathe
an inability to see. Chemical pneumonitis has also
through either the mouth or the nose. In fact, under
been reported in both fire survivors and fatalities.
conditions of high workload, stress, or in the pres-
Irritancy, both sensory and pulmonary, is considered
ence of irritants, man becomes almost totally a
to be a major factor in the response of humans to
mouth breather. This difference is of little or no im-
fire effluents. There have been few, if any, fire cas-
portance with regard to the effects of insoluble
ualty reports due to other significant toxicological
gases, but the rodent nose acts as a “scrubber” to
effects apart from narcosis and irritancy.
remove water soluble gases, such as SO* or HCI
and particulates. This may reduce the effect of these
3.2 Relevance of animal data to humans
materials upon the lower respiratory tract. However,
fine particles (less than 5 IAm) and high concen-
The effects seen in experimental animals have been
trations of soluble gases will still have a significant
very similar to those seen in humans. Death has
impact upon the lungs in rodents as well as humans.
been attributed to the presence of “narcotic” gases
In spite of these differences, the qualitative re-
such as carbon monoxide and hydrogen cyanide.
lationship between the effects of fire effluents on
Irritants have been shown to be present, detected
humans and laboratory animals is excellent and a
by clinical observations of salivation, nasal dis-
reasonably good quantitative correlation has been
charge, Iachrymation and measurements of respir-
observed for fire effluents studies to date.
atory rate. Pulmonary damage has also been
confirmed by histopathological examination of the
lungs of animals exposed to high concentrations of
33 “Classical” inhalation toxicology vs.
corrosive irritants.
cbmbustion toxicology
In general, direct-acting chemicals appear to have
the same spectrum of activity across the species,
Most acute inhalation toxicology studies are carried
including humans. A comprehensive review 1151
out as part of the toxicological characterization of a
compared the action in humans and laboratory ani-
chemical to enable decisions to be made about its
mals for an extensive list of chemicals present in fire
use, transport and safe exposure levels. The aim of
effluents and, in many cases, agreement was found
these considerations is the protection of those mak-
---------------------- Page: 11 ----------------------
SIST ISO/TR 9122-2:1999
ISO/TR 9122-2:1990(E)
ing, using or buying the chemical. Consequently,
Both the LC& and the EC50 are then calculated sta-
rigorous testing regimes are used to provide
tistically.
“worst-case” assessments and l-h or 4-h exposures
In addition to the commonly quoted LC50 and EC50
are often used. The level of adverse effects which
values, two other values are determined: the slope
will be tolerated is very low, so that mere survival
of the concentration-response curve and the confi-
at a concentration is not considered adequate if
dence limits for the L&-o and EC50. The slope of the
there are other, non-fatal consequences. The range
concentration-response curve is important; for in-
of toxic effects which are likely to occur is very
stance, two toxicants with the same LC5e may have
broad and the protocols employed are designed to
different effects at a fraction of the LC50. A com-
reflect this. In contrast, combustion toxicology aims
pound with a steep concentration-response curve
to model an “emergency” situation. Consequently,
would probably have no effect at 0,2 LCsO, whereas
the exposure times used are generally much re-
one with a shallow curve may cause death in 20 %
duced, 5 min to 30 min being typical. Survival is the
of th.e animals at 0,2 LC50. In most combustion
single most important factor and consequently much
toxicity experiments the concentration-response
greater emphasis is placed on incapacitation, se-
curves have been steep. The confidence limits for
vere toxicity and death, rather than changes in body
the LC& describe the certainty with which a given
weight, for instance, which would be significant in a
figure lies within a range. The inherent variability of
conventional study. As knowledge in combustion
L&o determinations is such that differences of less
toxicology has increased, the range of toxic effects
than a factor of 2 to 3 are often not statistically sig-
considered to be important has narrowed to
nificant; in addition, such a factor would not be
narcosis and irritancy. Specific consideration must
toxicologically significant.
be given to these.
3.6 Relative toxicity and its significance
3.4 Determination of qualitative aspects of
The quantitative indices of toxicity are often used to
toxicity (specific toxicity)
compare the toxicities of different materials to as-
sess their relative toxicity. This can be misleading
Toxicology involves the determination of the biolog-
unless it is certain that similar values are being
ical responses caused by toxicants in both qualita-
compared (see 3.5 for some of the problems asso-
tive and quantitative terms. The OECD acute

inhalation protocols PI have been devised to pro- ciated with the expression of “dose” and LC5* val-

ues in combustion toxicology). Even when care has
vide a broad screen for the determination of the
been taken to express the values in an appropriate
qualitative aspects of toxicology, for instance,

whether the toxicant causes death by narcosis, or way, practical differences in relative toxicity are

liver, kidney or pulmonary damage. This can be usually not indicated unless LCsos differ by greater

considered to be the determination of the toxicant’s than one order of magnitude. While reported LCsOs

for individual gases found in fire effluents are dis-
specific toxicity (see clause 2).
tributed over several orders of magnitude, LCsos at-
tributed to the fire effluents derived from most
materials, expressed as either mass loss or furnace
3.5 Determination of quantitative aspects of
load per unit of exposure volume (milligrams per li-
toxicity (toxic potency)
tre), tend to fall into a much narrower range (1 to I,5
orders of magnitude). This narrow LCsO range, com-
The quantitative aspects of a toxicant are addressed
bined with the inherent variability of LC50 values
by varying the dose of toxicant and relating it to the
derived for fire effluents from materials, exerts an
toxicity seen. At each dose level the effects are re-
obvious limitation on the numbers of categories into
corded either as quanta1 or continuous variables.
which the LC50 values can be classified for signif-
The two values most commonly use are the EDs0
icant and practical discrimination of relative toxicity.
(effective dose to cause 50 % response or a re-
sponse in 50 % of the animals) and the “No Effect
Level” (the highest dose which does not cause a 3.7 Concentration/time/response
particular effect). In inhalation toxicology, including
relationships
combustion toxicology, the EC50 type of value is
most often calculated, for instance the LCse (t) (con-
The magnitude or severity of most biological effects
centration to which the animals have been exposed
increases with
...

ISO
RAPPORT
TECHNIQUE
TR 912212
Première édition
1990-l o-1 5
Essais de toxicité des effluents du feu -
Partie 2:
Directives pour les essais biologiques permettant
de déterminer la toxicité aiguë par inhalation des
effluents du feu (principes de base, critères et
méthodologie)
Toxicity testing of #Ire effluents -
Part 2: Guideiines for biologie al assays t ‘0 determine the acute inhala tion
toxicity
of fire effluents (basic principles, criteria and methodology)
Numéro de référence
ISO/TR 9 122-2: 1990(F)
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122-2:1990(F)
Sommaire
Page

1 Domaine d’application ..................................................................... 1

2 Définitions ........................................................................................

3 Principes .......................................................................................... 3

3.1 Nature des effets toxiques ........................................................... 3

3.2 Pertinence des données animales pour les individus
. ..1 ......... 3
3.3 Toxicologie de l’inhalation (classique,, par rapport à fa toxicologie

de la combustion ..........................................................................

Détermination des aspects qualitatifs de la toxicité (toxicité
3.4
.......................................
spécifique) .............................................. 4
3.5 Détermination des aspects quantitatifs de la toxicité (puissance
toxique) ....................................................
...................................... 4

3.6 Toxicité relative et sa signification .............................................

3.7 Relations concentration/durée/réponse
.................................... 5

3.8 Concepts d’essai ..........................................................................

4 Critères ............................................................................................

Critères généraux
41 I ........................................................................ 6

42 . Modèle feu ....................................................................................

4.3 Mesurages analytiques ................................................................

4.4 Animaux ........................................................................................ 7

45 . Conception expérimentale .......................................................... 7

Dose d’exposition
4.6 ......................................................................... 7

4.7 Durée de l’exposition ...................................................................

4.8 Méthodes de décomposition thermique et méthodes

d’exposition ...................................................................................

4.9 Modes d’exposition des animaux ...............................................

4.10 Observations et examens
.......................................................... 9

4.11 Examens post modem ............................................................. 10

0 ISO 1990

Droits de reproduction réservés. Aucune partie de cette publication ne peut être repro-

duite ni utilisée sous quelque forme que ce soit et par aucun procédé, électronique ou

mécanique, y compris la photocopie et les microfilms, sans l’accord écrit de l’éditeur.

Organisation internationale de normalisation
Case Postale 56 l CH-1211 Genève 20 * Suisse
Imprimé en Suisse
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122-2:1990(F)
...................................
4.12 Résultats, données et rapport d’essai
..................................... 11
5 Recommandations sur la méthodologie
Annexe
................................................................................
A Bibliographie
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122-2:1990(F)
Avant-propos
L’ISO (Organisation internationale de normalisation) est une fédération
mondiale d’organismes nationaux de normalisation (comités membres
de I’ISO). L’élaboration des Normes internationales est en général
confiée aux comités techniques de I’ISO. Chaque comité membre inté-
ressé par une étude a le droit de faire partie du comité technique créé
à cet effet. Les organisations internationales, gouvernementales et non
gouvernementales, en liaison avec I’ISO participent également aux tra-
vaux. L’ISO collabore étroitement avec la Commission électrotechnique
internationale (CEI) en ce qui concerne la normalisation électrotech-
nique.
La tâche principale des comités techniques est d’élaborer les Normes
internationales, mais, exceptionnellement, un comité technique peut
proposer la publication d’un rapport technique de l’un des types sui-
vants:
1, lors dépit de maints efforts, If accord requis ne peut
> en
- type que
être réalisé en fave ur de la publicati on d’une Norme interna tionale;
- type 2, lorsque le sujet en question est encore en cours de dévelop-
pement technique ou lorsque, pour toute autre raison, la possibilité
d’un accord pour la publication d’une Norme internationale peut être
envisagée pour l’avenir mais pas dans l’immédiat;
- type 3, lorsqu’un comité technique a réuni des données de nature
différente de celles qui sont normalement publiées comme Normes
internationales (ceci pouvant comprendre des informations sur l’état
de la technique, par exemple).
Les rapports techniques des types 1 et 2 font l’objet d’un nouvel examen
trois ans au plus tard après leur publication afin de décider éven-
tuellement de leur transformation en Normes internationales. Les rap-
ports techniques du type 3 ne doivent pas nécessairement être révisés
avant que les données fournies ne soient plus jugées valables ou utiles.
L’ISO/TR 9122-2, rapport technique du type 2, a été élaboré par le co-
mité technique lSO/TC 92, Essais au feu sur les matériaux de construc-
tion, composants et structures.
L’ISO 9122 comprend les parties suivantes, présentées sous le titre gé-
néral Essais de toxicité des emuents du feu:
- Partie 1: Généralités
[Rapport technique]
- Partie 2: Directives pour les essais biologiques permettant de dé-
terminer la toxicité aiguë par inhalation des effluents du feu (Prin-
cipes de base, critères et méthodologie)
[Rapport technique]
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122=2:1990(F)
- Partie 3: Méthodes d’analyse des gas et des vapeurs
L’annexe A de la présente partie de I’iSO 9122 est donnée uniquement
à titre d’information.
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122=2:1990(F)
Introduction
Plusieurs méthodes d’essai à petite échelle ont été décrites dans la
documentation que l’on utilisait pour évaluer la toxicité par inhalation
des effluents du feu de matériaux et composites simples. Elles ont été
utilisées principalement pour la recherche et le développement.’
Ces méthodes d’essai se divisent généralement en trois parties: un
modèle feu (génération d’effluents du feu), des méthodes analytiques
et un modèle animai (mode opératoire biologique). Ces méthodes d’es-
sai diffèrent nettement, surtout dans l’utilisation des divers modèles feu.
L’iSO/TR 9122-2 ne traite que des modes opératoires biologiques (mo-
dèle animal). L’approche utilisée dans ce document d’information a
consisté à recommander des normes minimales de pratique scientifi-
que. Ce principe a été appliqué avec succès à l’évaluation de la toxicité
des médicaments, des pesticides et des produits chimiques, et, par
conséquent, des directives internationales pour l’harmonisation des
contributions scientifiques aux essais de toxicité ont été publiées.
Les directives de ce présent Rapport technique pour la détermination
de la toxicité aiguë par inhalation des effluents du feu ont été élaborées
à partir de l’expérience collective des experts participants et de leur
examen des résultats publiés indiqués dans la bibliographie (voir an-
nexe A).
Les principes de base de la toxicologie de l’inhalation (tels qu’ils sont
précisés par exemple dans les directives internationales sur les essais
de toxicité des produits chimiques, des pesticides ou des médicaments)
s’appliquent également à la détermination de la toxicité aiguë par
inhalation des effluents du feu. En outre, on a déterminé des critères
pour les essais biologiques acceptables qui tiennent compte des effets
spécifiques dans la toxicologie de la combustion. Certains critères ont
été définis du point de vue du toxicologue pour ce qui est des modèles
feu acceptables (voir article 2) et des méthodes analytiques appro-
priées. Des recommandations portant sur le choix approprié de métho-
des convenables ont été élaborées en faisant un examen critique des
modes opératoires des essais biologiques par rapport à ces principes
de base et aux critères spéciaux.
Les principes de base et les critères ont été déterminés pour
- la nature des effets toxiques (narcose, irritation, etc.);
- la pertinence pour les humains des données relevées sur les ani-
maux;
- l’aboutissement approprié des essais biologiques (iéthaiité et inva-
lidité);
- la caractérisation des effets toxiques (qualitative et quantitative);
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122-2:1990(F)
- la fiabilité, la validité, la répétabiiité, la reproductibiiité et la sensi-
bilité;
- la caractérisation des doses;
- la durée de l’exposition (5 min et 30 min);
- les systèmes d’exposition;
- les modes d’exposition;
- les modèles feu;
- l’observation et les examens;
- l’examen post mortem;
- l’évaluation et le relevé des données;
- la bonne pratique de laboratoire;
- le personnel.
Des concepts d’essai sont recommandés et l’on peut en tirer les
conclusions suivantes:
- des essais biologiques appropriés sont disponibles pour déterminet
les effets narcotiques qui satisfont aux principes de base et aux cri-
tères;
- des essais biologiques sont disponibles pour déterminer les effets
sensoriels irritants qui satisfont aux principes de base et aux critè-
res. La corrélation entre les effets chez les animaux et les effets chez
l’homme est incertaine;
- des essais biologiques appropriés sont disponibles pour déterminer
les effets d’irritation des poumons qui satisfont aux principes de
base et aux critères;
- des essais biologiques appropriés tels que les directives OCDE sont
disponibles pour déterminer les effets toxiques autres que
narcotiques ou irritants qui satisfont aux principes de base et aux
critères;
- des essais analytiques préalables sont recommandés avant d’effec-
tuer les essais sur les animaux pour réduire au maximum i’utiii-
sation des animaux.
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
Page blanche
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
__-_--- .--.~
ISO/TR 9122-2:1990(F)
RAPPORT TECHNIQUE
Essais de toxicité des effluents du feu -
Partie 2:
Directives pour les essais biologiques permettant de déterminer
la toxicité aiguë par inhalation des effluents du feu (principes de
base, critères et méthodologie)
- certains critères portant sur les modèles feu et
1 Domaine d’application
les méthodes analytiques du point de vue du
toxicologue.
Le Rapport technique ne tient pas compte des effets
chroniques et à long terme des effiuents du feu et
L’objectif principal du présent Rapport technique est
des effets négatifs, tels que la chaleur ou i’appau-
de fournir aux chercheurs les informations de base
vrissement en oxygène dus au feu.
sur les méthodes appropriées pour définir la toxicité
aiguë par inhalation des effiuents du feu tels qu’ils
Le présent Rapport technique est principalement
sont générés par des modèles feu (voir Définitions).
prévu pour servir aux laboratoires de recherche et
de développement. ii convient de souligner que
Pour l’élaboration du présent Rapport technique,
l’utilisation des résultats d’essais de toxicité seuls
des compte-rendus complets et critiques de l’état
pour classifier les matériaux pour une utilisation
d’avancement actuel des méthodes d’essais bioio-
plus sûre est inadéquate. L’intégration des données
giques pour la toxicologie de la combustion ont été
de toxicité dans une évaluation des dangers de
effectués. On espère donc que les chercheurs se-
toxicité est essentielle, mais n’est pas actuellement
ront encouragés à utiliser des approches communes
bien définie et devrait être le prochain objectif prin-
en matière de recherche, pour que les données et
cipal de la toxicologie de la combustion.
résultats d’essai puissent être utilisés plus iar-
gement pour les évaluations de toxicité compa-
rative, et également à réduire au maximum
2 Définitions
l’utilisation générale des essais biologiques.
Pour les besoins du présent Rapport technique, les
Comme on a pensé qu’il était essentiel de spécifier
définitions suivantes s’appliquent.
des normes minimales de pratique scientifique, le
choix des méthodes expérimentales appropriées et
2.1 toxicité aiguë: Effets dus à une exposition ou
recommandées est laissé à l’appréciation des ex-
dose unique d’un toxique. Les effets peuvent appa-
perts scientifiques qui effectuent ces essais et à leur
raître immédiatement ou après quelques heures ou
entière responsabilité.
quelques jours.
L’objet du présent Rapport technique comprend
2.2 essai biologique (ou bioessai): À l’origine,
terme réservé à l’utilisation d’un système biologique
- les principes de base de la toxicologie de
pour détecter et/ou mesurer la quantité d’un maté-
l’inhalation applicable aux essais biologiques
riau biologiquement actif. Dans le contexte de i’in-
des effluents du feu;
cendie, ce terme se réfère à l’utilisation
d’expositions d’animaux plutôt qu’à des analyses
- les critères s’appliquant aux essais biologiques
chimiques pour déterminer la toxicité d’un effluent
acceptables;
du feu.
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122=2:1990(F)

2.3 toxicité chronique: Toxicité due à des doses 2.12 invalidité: Incapacité à effectuer une tâche

multiples ou à l’exposition à un toxique sur une pé- (par rapport au temps nécessaire pour s’échapper

riode prolongée. d’un incendie) due à l’exposition aux toxiques.
2.13 irritation (pulmonaire): Action des irritants sur
2.4 concentration: Quantité d’un contaminant dans
les voies respiratoires inférieures pouvant provoquer
l’atmosphère par unité de volume de l’atmosphère,
une gêne respiratoire (dyspnée) une augmentation
généralement indiquée en masse/volume (milli-
de la vitesse respiratoire et, dans certains cas, une
grammes par millilitre ou milligrammes par mètre
pneumonite ou un œdème pulmonaire.
cube) ou en volume/volume (en parties par million
ou en pourcents).
2.14 irritation (sensorielle): Réponse provoquée au
niveau des yeux et des voies respiratoires supé-
2.5 toxicité retardée: Effet toxique qui ne s’est pas
rieures par un toxique et provoquant une sensation
manifesté avant plusieurs heures, plusieurs jours
douloureuse. Cela peut être un stimulus direct des
ou, dans certains cas, plusieurs semaines après
récepteurs spécialisés ou faisant suite à un endom-
l’exposition aux toxiques.
magement des tissus dû aux toxiques.
2.6 dose: Quantité de toxiques recue par un ani-
2.15 LC& Concentration Iéthale 50 %. Concen-
mal. Pour la toxicité d’inhalation de’ la combustion,
tration calculée statistiquement, provoquant la mort
on peut évaluer la dose en termes de dose d’expo-
de la moitié des animaux exposés à un toxique
sition.
pendant une durée spécifiée. Elle peut être expri-
mée en parties par millions (ppm) (par volume), ou
en milligrammes par litre (mg/l). En toxicologie de
2.7 ECSO: Concentration pour effet à 50 %.
la combustion, on utilise souvent deux valeurs: a) le
Concentration calculée statistiquement pour provo-
LC50, exprimé en milligrammes par litre, qui est la
quer un effet chez 50 % des animaux exposés, par
exemple, l’invalidité. masse de départ du matériau dans l’étude, divisé
par le volume d’air disponible (concentration nomi-
nale de la charge du four), et b) le LC50, exprimé en
2.8 ECl&: Produit mathématique de la durée d’ex-
milligrammes par litre, qui est la masse du matériau
position et de la concentration calculée statisti-
réellement. consommée (c’est-à-dire la différence
quement pour provoquer un effet chez 50 % des
entre la masse de départ et la masse finale) divisée
animaux.
par le volume d’air disponible (concentration nomi-
nale de la perte de masse). II faut veiller à distinguer
2,9 dose d’exposition: Quantité de toxiques à la-
les deux. Comme cela a été expliqué à la rubrique
quelle un sujet est exposé pendant une période de
dose d’exposition, la durée d’exposition est très im-
temps déterminée. Pour des toxiques gazeux indivi-
portante en toxicité d’inhalation, et il convient de
duels, la dose d’exposition est l’aire intégrée de la
toujours indiquer la durée d’exposition pour un
courbe concentration/temps et est exprimée en
LC50.
parties par miilion/minutes. En toxicologie de com-
bustion des effluents du feu, la dose d’exposition est
2.16 LCTSo: Dose d’exposition calculée statisti-
l’aire intégrée de la courbe perte de masse par
quement, provoquant la mort de 50 % des animaux.
unité de volume/temps et est exprimée en milli-
Cette valeur est utile pour comparer les résultats
grammes minutes par litre. La dose d’exposition est
obtenus dans des régimes expérimentaux utilisant
souvent évaluée en multipliant la concentration (ex-
différentes durées d’exposition. La durée d’expo-
primée sous forme de concentration nominale de la
sition doit toujours être indiquée.
charge du four/voIume de la chambre ou sous forme
de concentration nominale de la perte de
2.17 LTSo: Durée d’exposition, calculée statisti-
masse/voiume de la chambre) par la durée d’expo-
quement, provoquant la mort de 50 % des animaux
sition.
pour une concentration fixe de toxiques.
2.10 effluent du feu: Ensemble de produits gazeux,
2.18 narcose: Littéralement ( de particules ou d’aérosols provenant de la com-
meil,, ,
mais utilisé en toxicologie de la combustion
bustion ou de la pyrolyse.
pour décrire une dépression du système nerveux
central réduisant la vigilance et l’aptitude à
s’échapper. Pour de fortes concentrations de toxi-
2.11 modèle feu: Moyen de décomposer et/ou de
ques, il y aura perte de conscience et, à la fin, mort.
soumettre à la combustion des éprouvettes d’essai
dans des conditions définies permettant de repré-
2.19 pneumonite: Inflammation des voies respi-
senter une ou plusieurs phases connues de I’incen-
die afin de générer des effluents du feu pour évaluer ratoires inférieures.
la toxicité. (Ce terme est également utilisé par les
spécialistes d’essai au feu pour la simulation ma- 2.20 oedème
Imonaire: Extrav asation d u plasma
sanguin dans

thématique des caractéristiques d’un incendie.) le s régions alvéo Iaires du poumon,

---------------------- Page: 10 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122-2:1990(F)

due à un endommagement vasculaire, une inflam- considérée comme un facteur primordial dans la

mation ou un drainage veineux inadéquat. L’accu-
réponse des individus aux effluents du feu. Il y a eu
mulation de liquide
empêche l’absorption de très peu de cas d’accidents par incendie dus à des
l’oxygène dans le sang.
effets toxicologiques importants autres que la
narcose et l’irritation.
2.21 voies respiratoires: Nez, pharynx, larynx
trachée et grandes bronches sont appelés voie;
3.2 Pertinence des données animales pour les
respiratoires supérieures, et les bronchioles, les
individus
conduits alvéolaires et les alvéoles sont appelés
voies respiratoires inférieures.
cobayes se sont avérés
Les effets relevés sur des
très semblables à ceux relevés sur les individus. La
2.22 toxicité spécifique: Effet particulièrement no-
mort a été attribuée à la présence de gaz
cif, dû à un toxique, par exemple, narcose, irritation.
<(narcotiques,>, tels que l’oxyde de carbone et le
cyanure d’hydrogène. On a remarqué que les irri-
2.23 pouvoir toxique:
Mesure de la quantité de
tants étaient présents, on les a détectés par obser-
substance toxique requise pour produire un effet
vations cliniques de salive, d’écoulement nasal, de
toxique spécifique. La toxicité est plus élevée lors-
larmes et par mesurage du taux respiratoire. Des
que la quantité est plus petite.
dégâts pulmonaires ont également été confirmés
par l’examen histopathologique des poumons d’ani-
2.24 toxique: Produit chimique capable d’avoir un
maux exposés à de fortes concentrations d’irritants
ou plusieurs effet(s) nocif(s) ou spécifique(s) sur un
corrosifs.
organisme. Le toxique peut se caractériser par deux
propriétés: la toxicité spécifique, nature de l’effet
En règle générale, en toxicologie, les produits chi-
nocif, et le pouvoir toxique, dose prescrite pour
miques qui agissent directement semblent avoir le
provoquer l’effet.
même spectre d’activité dans toutes les espèces, y
compris l’espèce humaine. Un rapport complet PI
2.25 toxicité: Nature (effet spécifique), et étendue
a comparé les actions, chez l’homme et les co-
(puissance) des effets nocifs d’une substance sur un
bayes, d’une liste complète de produits chimiques
organisme vivant.
présents dans les effluents du feu et l’on a trouvé
une concordance certaine entre les effets aigus
chez l’homme et les effets sur les cobayes.
3 Principes
II existe cependant certaines différences physiologi-
ques entre les petits rongeurs et l’homme qui sont
3.1 Nature des effets toxiques
particulièrement importantes en toxicologie de la
combustion. Par exemple, le rapport volume respi-
Le but de la plupart des évaluations de toxicité est
ratoire minute/poids du corps des petits rongeurs
de fournir des données permettant de prévoir les
est généralement plus grand que celui de l’homme.
conséquences de l’exposition sur les individus, et il
Ce phénomène a été utilisé à l’avantage de
faut tenir compte de toutes les données disponibles
l’homme par le passé où l’on a utilisé des petits
concernant l’effet de substances similaires sur les
rongeurs ou des canaris pour déterminer la pré-
individus lors de la détermination de la pertinence
sence de gaz narcotiques dans les mines et les ré-
des études sur les animaux. II existe des données
cipients chimiques. Le rongeur est touché avant
portant sur l’effet des atmosphères d’effluents du
l’homme car au
repos, l’homme respire
feu, qui proviennent des études faites sur de nom-
160 mI/(minkg),
tandis que le rat respire
breuses victimes d’incendie, surtout les examens
900 ml/(minkg), ce qui fait un rapport d’environ 1 à
posl modem. Les victimes présentent généralement
6. Cependant, en activité comme cela peut se ren-
des niveaux élevés de carboxyhémoglobine qui in-
contrer dans un incendie, le taux de l’homme peut
diquent l’exposition à l’oxyde de carbone et, dans
monter jusqu’à 500 ml/(min-kg) ou même plus, ce
certains cas, l’influence du cyanure d’hydrogène.
qui donne un rapport d’environ 1 à 2. On pourrait
On sait que l’oxyde de carbone et le cyanure d’hy-
donc considérer que le rat est un modèle convena-
drogène provoquent une dépression progressive du
ble de prise respiratoire humaine ((active)). Toute
système nerveux central aboutissant à la perte de
différence due à la plus grande sensibilité des rats
connaissance et à la mort. Ce type d’effet toxique a
par rapport a l’homme peut être tolérée étant donné
été appelé <’ et ii est jugé très important
que cela fournit un ((facteur de sécurité>, lorsqu’on
dans la réponse des individus aux effluents du feu.
extrapole les résultats des animaux à l’homme. il
Dans de nombreux rapports, les effluents du feu
serait également irréaliste d’attendre une fidélité de
sont décrits comme 4rritantw, provoquant la toux,
réponse chez les cobayes pour un mélange com-
la suffocation et inhibant les facultés visuelles. On
plexe de composés présents dans les effluents du
a également relevé une pneumonite chimique à la
feu qui soit telle qu’une différence d’un facteur de 2
fois chez les survivants et chez les personnes dé-
entre le rat et l’homme influencerait nettement I’ex-
cédées. L’irritation sensorielle et pulmonaire est
trapolation des données.
---------------------- Page: 11 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122-2:1990(F)
3.4 Détermination des aspects qualitatifs de
Une seconde différence physiologique d’importance
est que les petits rongeurs de laboratoire respirent
la toxicité (toxicité spécifique)
essentiellement par le nez tandis que l’homme peut

choisir de respirer soit par la bouche, soit par le La toxicologie implique la détermination des répon-

nez. En fait, dans des conditions de charge de travail ses biologiques provoquées par les produits toxi-

importante, de contrainte ou en présence d’irritants, ques en termes qualitatifs et quantitatifs. Les

l’homme respire presque totalement par la bouche. protocoles OCDE d’inhalation aiguë PI ont été éia-

La différence a peu ou pas d’importance par rapport borés pour servir de trame large à la détermination

aux effets des gaz non solubles, mais le nez du des aspects qualitatifs de la toxicologie, par exem-

rongeur agit comme un <<épurateur>, pour enlever ple si le toxique provoque la mort par narcose, ou

les gaz solubles dans l’eau tels que le SO* ou le HC1 un endommagement du foie, des reins ou des pou-

et les matières particulaires. Cela peut réduire I’ef- mons. On peut considérer qu’il s’agit là de la déter-

mination de la toxicité spécifique du toxique (voir
fet de ces matières sur les voies respiratoires infé-
article 2). .
rieures. Cependant, les particules fines (inférieures
à 5 pm) et les fortes concentrations de gaz solubles
auront toujours un impact important sur les pou-
3.5 Détermination des aspects quantitatifs de
mons de l’homme et des rongeurs.
la toxicité (puissance toxique)
Malgré ces différences, la relation qualitative entre
Les aspects quantitatifs d’un toxique sont étudiés
les effets des effluents du feu sur les individus et les
en variant la dose de toxique et en la reliant à la
cobayes est excellente et l’on a noté une corrélation
toxicité observée. Pour chaque niveau de dose, les
quantitative relativement bonne pour les effluents
effets sont enregistrés soit sous forme de variables
du feu étudiés jusqu’à présent.
quantiques, soit sous forme de variables continues.
Les deux valeurs les plus souvent utilisées sont
l’ECSo (dose efficace pour provoquer une réponse à
50 % ou une réponse chez 50 % des animaux) et le
((Niveau sans effet)) (dose la plus élevée qui ne pro-
3.3 Toxicologie de l’inhalation wlassiqueb) par
voque pas d’effet particulier). En toxicologie de
rapport à la toxicologie de la combustion
l’inhalation, laquelle comprend la toxicologie de la
combustion, le type de valeur EC50 est le plus sou-
études sur la toxicologie de
La plupart des
vent calculé, par exemple le LC50 (t) (concentration
l’inhalation aiguë sont effectuées comme faisant
pour un temps t calculée pour tuer 50 % des ani-
partie de la caractérisation toxicologique d’un pro-
maux) ou l’invalidité ECSO (t) (concentration pour un
duit chimique, laquelle permet de décider de son
temps t calculée pour provoquer une invalidité chez
utilisation, de son transport et de ses niveaux d’ex-
50 % des animaux). Ces valeurs sont calculées à
position sans danger. Le but de ces considérations
partir d’expériences où l’on a eu des réponses infé-
est de protéger ceux qui fabriquent, utilisent ou
rieures à 50 % et d’expériences où l’on a eu plus
achètent le produit chimique. En conséquence, on
de 50 % de réponses. On calcule alors le LC50 et
utilise des régimes d’essai rigoureux pour permet-
I’EC50 de facon statistique.
tre une évaluation du <

souvent des expositions d’l h à 4 h. Le niveau d’ef- Outre le LC50 et I’ECso qui sont souvent cités, on

fets néfastes qui sera toléré est très faible, si bien détermine deux autres valeurs: la pente de la

que la simple survivance à une quelconque courbe de réponse à la concentration et les limites

concentration n’est pas considérée comme adé- de confiance du LCSo et de I’ECSO. La pente de la

courbe de réponse à la concentration est impor-
quate s’il y a d’autres conséquences non fatales. La
tante; par exemple, deux produits toxiques ayant le
gamme des effets toxiques susceptibles d’apparaî-
même LCSO peuvent avoir des effets différents sur
tre est très large et les protocoles utilisés sont
une fraction du LCSo. Un composant ayant une
convus en conséquence. Au contraire, la toxicologie
courbe de réponse à la dose verticale n’aura pro-
de la combustion vise à créer un modèle de si-

tuation d’((urgencejb. Par conséquent, les durées bablement aucun effet pour 0,2 LC50, tandis qu’un

composant présentant une courbe en pente faible
d’exposition utilisées sont généralement plus ré-
peut provoquer la mort chez 20 % des animaux pour
duites, 5 min à 30 min étant des durées types. La

survie est le facteur le plus important, c’est pourquoi 0,2 LC50. Dans la plupart des expériences de toxi-

on met beaucoup plus l’accent sur l’invalidité, la cité, les courbes de réponse aux concentrations

toxicité importante et la mort que sur les chan- présentent une forte pente. Les limites de confiance

gements du poids du corps, par exemple, qui se- pour l’EC50 décrivent la certitude avec laquelle un

raient significatifs dans une étude conventionnelle. chiffre donné se trouve dans la plage. La variabilité

inhérente de la détermination du LC50 est telle que
Comme la connaissance de la toxicologie de la
combustion s’est amélioré
...

ISO
RAPPORT
TECHNIQUE
TR 912212
Première édition
1990-l o-1 5
Essais de toxicité des effluents du feu -
Partie 2:
Directives pour les essais biologiques permettant
de déterminer la toxicité aiguë par inhalation des
effluents du feu (principes de base, critères et
méthodologie)
Toxicity testing of #Ire effluents -
Part 2: Guideiines for biologie al assays t ‘0 determine the acute inhala tion
toxicity
of fire effluents (basic principles, criteria and methodology)
Numéro de référence
ISO/TR 9 122-2: 1990(F)
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122-2:1990(F)
Sommaire
Page

1 Domaine d’application ..................................................................... 1

2 Définitions ........................................................................................

3 Principes .......................................................................................... 3

3.1 Nature des effets toxiques ........................................................... 3

3.2 Pertinence des données animales pour les individus
. ..1 ......... 3
3.3 Toxicologie de l’inhalation (classique,, par rapport à fa toxicologie

de la combustion ..........................................................................

Détermination des aspects qualitatifs de la toxicité (toxicité
3.4
.......................................
spécifique) .............................................. 4
3.5 Détermination des aspects quantitatifs de la toxicité (puissance
toxique) ....................................................
...................................... 4

3.6 Toxicité relative et sa signification .............................................

3.7 Relations concentration/durée/réponse
.................................... 5

3.8 Concepts d’essai ..........................................................................

4 Critères ............................................................................................

Critères généraux
41 I ........................................................................ 6

42 . Modèle feu ....................................................................................

4.3 Mesurages analytiques ................................................................

4.4 Animaux ........................................................................................ 7

45 . Conception expérimentale .......................................................... 7

Dose d’exposition
4.6 ......................................................................... 7

4.7 Durée de l’exposition ...................................................................

4.8 Méthodes de décomposition thermique et méthodes

d’exposition ...................................................................................

4.9 Modes d’exposition des animaux ...............................................

4.10 Observations et examens
.......................................................... 9

4.11 Examens post modem ............................................................. 10

0 ISO 1990

Droits de reproduction réservés. Aucune partie de cette publication ne peut être repro-

duite ni utilisée sous quelque forme que ce soit et par aucun procédé, électronique ou

mécanique, y compris la photocopie et les microfilms, sans l’accord écrit de l’éditeur.

Organisation internationale de normalisation
Case Postale 56 l CH-1211 Genève 20 * Suisse
Imprimé en Suisse
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122-2:1990(F)
...................................
4.12 Résultats, données et rapport d’essai
..................................... 11
5 Recommandations sur la méthodologie
Annexe
................................................................................
A Bibliographie
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122-2:1990(F)
Avant-propos
L’ISO (Organisation internationale de normalisation) est une fédération
mondiale d’organismes nationaux de normalisation (comités membres
de I’ISO). L’élaboration des Normes internationales est en général
confiée aux comités techniques de I’ISO. Chaque comité membre inté-
ressé par une étude a le droit de faire partie du comité technique créé
à cet effet. Les organisations internationales, gouvernementales et non
gouvernementales, en liaison avec I’ISO participent également aux tra-
vaux. L’ISO collabore étroitement avec la Commission électrotechnique
internationale (CEI) en ce qui concerne la normalisation électrotech-
nique.
La tâche principale des comités techniques est d’élaborer les Normes
internationales, mais, exceptionnellement, un comité technique peut
proposer la publication d’un rapport technique de l’un des types sui-
vants:
1, lors dépit de maints efforts, If accord requis ne peut
> en
- type que
être réalisé en fave ur de la publicati on d’une Norme interna tionale;
- type 2, lorsque le sujet en question est encore en cours de dévelop-
pement technique ou lorsque, pour toute autre raison, la possibilité
d’un accord pour la publication d’une Norme internationale peut être
envisagée pour l’avenir mais pas dans l’immédiat;
- type 3, lorsqu’un comité technique a réuni des données de nature
différente de celles qui sont normalement publiées comme Normes
internationales (ceci pouvant comprendre des informations sur l’état
de la technique, par exemple).
Les rapports techniques des types 1 et 2 font l’objet d’un nouvel examen
trois ans au plus tard après leur publication afin de décider éven-
tuellement de leur transformation en Normes internationales. Les rap-
ports techniques du type 3 ne doivent pas nécessairement être révisés
avant que les données fournies ne soient plus jugées valables ou utiles.
L’ISO/TR 9122-2, rapport technique du type 2, a été élaboré par le co-
mité technique lSO/TC 92, Essais au feu sur les matériaux de construc-
tion, composants et structures.
L’ISO 9122 comprend les parties suivantes, présentées sous le titre gé-
néral Essais de toxicité des emuents du feu:
- Partie 1: Généralités
[Rapport technique]
- Partie 2: Directives pour les essais biologiques permettant de dé-
terminer la toxicité aiguë par inhalation des effluents du feu (Prin-
cipes de base, critères et méthodologie)
[Rapport technique]
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122=2:1990(F)
- Partie 3: Méthodes d’analyse des gas et des vapeurs
L’annexe A de la présente partie de I’iSO 9122 est donnée uniquement
à titre d’information.
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122=2:1990(F)
Introduction
Plusieurs méthodes d’essai à petite échelle ont été décrites dans la
documentation que l’on utilisait pour évaluer la toxicité par inhalation
des effluents du feu de matériaux et composites simples. Elles ont été
utilisées principalement pour la recherche et le développement.’
Ces méthodes d’essai se divisent généralement en trois parties: un
modèle feu (génération d’effluents du feu), des méthodes analytiques
et un modèle animai (mode opératoire biologique). Ces méthodes d’es-
sai diffèrent nettement, surtout dans l’utilisation des divers modèles feu.
L’iSO/TR 9122-2 ne traite que des modes opératoires biologiques (mo-
dèle animal). L’approche utilisée dans ce document d’information a
consisté à recommander des normes minimales de pratique scientifi-
que. Ce principe a été appliqué avec succès à l’évaluation de la toxicité
des médicaments, des pesticides et des produits chimiques, et, par
conséquent, des directives internationales pour l’harmonisation des
contributions scientifiques aux essais de toxicité ont été publiées.
Les directives de ce présent Rapport technique pour la détermination
de la toxicité aiguë par inhalation des effluents du feu ont été élaborées
à partir de l’expérience collective des experts participants et de leur
examen des résultats publiés indiqués dans la bibliographie (voir an-
nexe A).
Les principes de base de la toxicologie de l’inhalation (tels qu’ils sont
précisés par exemple dans les directives internationales sur les essais
de toxicité des produits chimiques, des pesticides ou des médicaments)
s’appliquent également à la détermination de la toxicité aiguë par
inhalation des effluents du feu. En outre, on a déterminé des critères
pour les essais biologiques acceptables qui tiennent compte des effets
spécifiques dans la toxicologie de la combustion. Certains critères ont
été définis du point de vue du toxicologue pour ce qui est des modèles
feu acceptables (voir article 2) et des méthodes analytiques appro-
priées. Des recommandations portant sur le choix approprié de métho-
des convenables ont été élaborées en faisant un examen critique des
modes opératoires des essais biologiques par rapport à ces principes
de base et aux critères spéciaux.
Les principes de base et les critères ont été déterminés pour
- la nature des effets toxiques (narcose, irritation, etc.);
- la pertinence pour les humains des données relevées sur les ani-
maux;
- l’aboutissement approprié des essais biologiques (iéthaiité et inva-
lidité);
- la caractérisation des effets toxiques (qualitative et quantitative);
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122-2:1990(F)
- la fiabilité, la validité, la répétabiiité, la reproductibiiité et la sensi-
bilité;
- la caractérisation des doses;
- la durée de l’exposition (5 min et 30 min);
- les systèmes d’exposition;
- les modes d’exposition;
- les modèles feu;
- l’observation et les examens;
- l’examen post mortem;
- l’évaluation et le relevé des données;
- la bonne pratique de laboratoire;
- le personnel.
Des concepts d’essai sont recommandés et l’on peut en tirer les
conclusions suivantes:
- des essais biologiques appropriés sont disponibles pour déterminet
les effets narcotiques qui satisfont aux principes de base et aux cri-
tères;
- des essais biologiques sont disponibles pour déterminer les effets
sensoriels irritants qui satisfont aux principes de base et aux critè-
res. La corrélation entre les effets chez les animaux et les effets chez
l’homme est incertaine;
- des essais biologiques appropriés sont disponibles pour déterminer
les effets d’irritation des poumons qui satisfont aux principes de
base et aux critères;
- des essais biologiques appropriés tels que les directives OCDE sont
disponibles pour déterminer les effets toxiques autres que
narcotiques ou irritants qui satisfont aux principes de base et aux
critères;
- des essais analytiques préalables sont recommandés avant d’effec-
tuer les essais sur les animaux pour réduire au maximum i’utiii-
sation des animaux.
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
Page blanche
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
__-_--- .--.~
ISO/TR 9122-2:1990(F)
RAPPORT TECHNIQUE
Essais de toxicité des effluents du feu -
Partie 2:
Directives pour les essais biologiques permettant de déterminer
la toxicité aiguë par inhalation des effluents du feu (principes de
base, critères et méthodologie)
- certains critères portant sur les modèles feu et
1 Domaine d’application
les méthodes analytiques du point de vue du
toxicologue.
Le Rapport technique ne tient pas compte des effets
chroniques et à long terme des effiuents du feu et
L’objectif principal du présent Rapport technique est
des effets négatifs, tels que la chaleur ou i’appau-
de fournir aux chercheurs les informations de base
vrissement en oxygène dus au feu.
sur les méthodes appropriées pour définir la toxicité
aiguë par inhalation des effiuents du feu tels qu’ils
Le présent Rapport technique est principalement
sont générés par des modèles feu (voir Définitions).
prévu pour servir aux laboratoires de recherche et
de développement. ii convient de souligner que
Pour l’élaboration du présent Rapport technique,
l’utilisation des résultats d’essais de toxicité seuls
des compte-rendus complets et critiques de l’état
pour classifier les matériaux pour une utilisation
d’avancement actuel des méthodes d’essais bioio-
plus sûre est inadéquate. L’intégration des données
giques pour la toxicologie de la combustion ont été
de toxicité dans une évaluation des dangers de
effectués. On espère donc que les chercheurs se-
toxicité est essentielle, mais n’est pas actuellement
ront encouragés à utiliser des approches communes
bien définie et devrait être le prochain objectif prin-
en matière de recherche, pour que les données et
cipal de la toxicologie de la combustion.
résultats d’essai puissent être utilisés plus iar-
gement pour les évaluations de toxicité compa-
rative, et également à réduire au maximum
2 Définitions
l’utilisation générale des essais biologiques.
Pour les besoins du présent Rapport technique, les
Comme on a pensé qu’il était essentiel de spécifier
définitions suivantes s’appliquent.
des normes minimales de pratique scientifique, le
choix des méthodes expérimentales appropriées et
2.1 toxicité aiguë: Effets dus à une exposition ou
recommandées est laissé à l’appréciation des ex-
dose unique d’un toxique. Les effets peuvent appa-
perts scientifiques qui effectuent ces essais et à leur
raître immédiatement ou après quelques heures ou
entière responsabilité.
quelques jours.
L’objet du présent Rapport technique comprend
2.2 essai biologique (ou bioessai): À l’origine,
terme réservé à l’utilisation d’un système biologique
- les principes de base de la toxicologie de
pour détecter et/ou mesurer la quantité d’un maté-
l’inhalation applicable aux essais biologiques
riau biologiquement actif. Dans le contexte de i’in-
des effluents du feu;
cendie, ce terme se réfère à l’utilisation
d’expositions d’animaux plutôt qu’à des analyses
- les critères s’appliquant aux essais biologiques
chimiques pour déterminer la toxicité d’un effluent
acceptables;
du feu.
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122=2:1990(F)

2.3 toxicité chronique: Toxicité due à des doses 2.12 invalidité: Incapacité à effectuer une tâche

multiples ou à l’exposition à un toxique sur une pé- (par rapport au temps nécessaire pour s’échapper

riode prolongée. d’un incendie) due à l’exposition aux toxiques.
2.13 irritation (pulmonaire): Action des irritants sur
2.4 concentration: Quantité d’un contaminant dans
les voies respiratoires inférieures pouvant provoquer
l’atmosphère par unité de volume de l’atmosphère,
une gêne respiratoire (dyspnée) une augmentation
généralement indiquée en masse/volume (milli-
de la vitesse respiratoire et, dans certains cas, une
grammes par millilitre ou milligrammes par mètre
pneumonite ou un œdème pulmonaire.
cube) ou en volume/volume (en parties par million
ou en pourcents).
2.14 irritation (sensorielle): Réponse provoquée au
niveau des yeux et des voies respiratoires supé-
2.5 toxicité retardée: Effet toxique qui ne s’est pas
rieures par un toxique et provoquant une sensation
manifesté avant plusieurs heures, plusieurs jours
douloureuse. Cela peut être un stimulus direct des
ou, dans certains cas, plusieurs semaines après
récepteurs spécialisés ou faisant suite à un endom-
l’exposition aux toxiques.
magement des tissus dû aux toxiques.
2.6 dose: Quantité de toxiques recue par un ani-
2.15 LC& Concentration Iéthale 50 %. Concen-
mal. Pour la toxicité d’inhalation de’ la combustion,
tration calculée statistiquement, provoquant la mort
on peut évaluer la dose en termes de dose d’expo-
de la moitié des animaux exposés à un toxique
sition.
pendant une durée spécifiée. Elle peut être expri-
mée en parties par millions (ppm) (par volume), ou
en milligrammes par litre (mg/l). En toxicologie de
2.7 ECSO: Concentration pour effet à 50 %.
la combustion, on utilise souvent deux valeurs: a) le
Concentration calculée statistiquement pour provo-
LC50, exprimé en milligrammes par litre, qui est la
quer un effet chez 50 % des animaux exposés, par
exemple, l’invalidité. masse de départ du matériau dans l’étude, divisé
par le volume d’air disponible (concentration nomi-
nale de la charge du four), et b) le LC50, exprimé en
2.8 ECl&: Produit mathématique de la durée d’ex-
milligrammes par litre, qui est la masse du matériau
position et de la concentration calculée statisti-
réellement. consommée (c’est-à-dire la différence
quement pour provoquer un effet chez 50 % des
entre la masse de départ et la masse finale) divisée
animaux.
par le volume d’air disponible (concentration nomi-
nale de la perte de masse). II faut veiller à distinguer
2,9 dose d’exposition: Quantité de toxiques à la-
les deux. Comme cela a été expliqué à la rubrique
quelle un sujet est exposé pendant une période de
dose d’exposition, la durée d’exposition est très im-
temps déterminée. Pour des toxiques gazeux indivi-
portante en toxicité d’inhalation, et il convient de
duels, la dose d’exposition est l’aire intégrée de la
toujours indiquer la durée d’exposition pour un
courbe concentration/temps et est exprimée en
LC50.
parties par miilion/minutes. En toxicologie de com-
bustion des effluents du feu, la dose d’exposition est
2.16 LCTSo: Dose d’exposition calculée statisti-
l’aire intégrée de la courbe perte de masse par
quement, provoquant la mort de 50 % des animaux.
unité de volume/temps et est exprimée en milli-
Cette valeur est utile pour comparer les résultats
grammes minutes par litre. La dose d’exposition est
obtenus dans des régimes expérimentaux utilisant
souvent évaluée en multipliant la concentration (ex-
différentes durées d’exposition. La durée d’expo-
primée sous forme de concentration nominale de la
sition doit toujours être indiquée.
charge du four/voIume de la chambre ou sous forme
de concentration nominale de la perte de
2.17 LTSo: Durée d’exposition, calculée statisti-
masse/voiume de la chambre) par la durée d’expo-
quement, provoquant la mort de 50 % des animaux
sition.
pour une concentration fixe de toxiques.
2.10 effluent du feu: Ensemble de produits gazeux,
2.18 narcose: Littéralement ( de particules ou d’aérosols provenant de la com-
meil,, ,
mais utilisé en toxicologie de la combustion
bustion ou de la pyrolyse.
pour décrire une dépression du système nerveux
central réduisant la vigilance et l’aptitude à
s’échapper. Pour de fortes concentrations de toxi-
2.11 modèle feu: Moyen de décomposer et/ou de
ques, il y aura perte de conscience et, à la fin, mort.
soumettre à la combustion des éprouvettes d’essai
dans des conditions définies permettant de repré-
2.19 pneumonite: Inflammation des voies respi-
senter une ou plusieurs phases connues de I’incen-
die afin de générer des effluents du feu pour évaluer ratoires inférieures.
la toxicité. (Ce terme est également utilisé par les
spécialistes d’essai au feu pour la simulation ma- 2.20 oedème
Imonaire: Extrav asation d u plasma
sanguin dans

thématique des caractéristiques d’un incendie.) le s régions alvéo Iaires du poumon,

---------------------- Page: 10 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122-2:1990(F)

due à un endommagement vasculaire, une inflam- considérée comme un facteur primordial dans la

mation ou un drainage veineux inadéquat. L’accu-
réponse des individus aux effluents du feu. Il y a eu
mulation de liquide
empêche l’absorption de très peu de cas d’accidents par incendie dus à des
l’oxygène dans le sang.
effets toxicologiques importants autres que la
narcose et l’irritation.
2.21 voies respiratoires: Nez, pharynx, larynx
trachée et grandes bronches sont appelés voie;
3.2 Pertinence des données animales pour les
respiratoires supérieures, et les bronchioles, les
individus
conduits alvéolaires et les alvéoles sont appelés
voies respiratoires inférieures.
cobayes se sont avérés
Les effets relevés sur des
très semblables à ceux relevés sur les individus. La
2.22 toxicité spécifique: Effet particulièrement no-
mort a été attribuée à la présence de gaz
cif, dû à un toxique, par exemple, narcose, irritation.
<(narcotiques,>, tels que l’oxyde de carbone et le
cyanure d’hydrogène. On a remarqué que les irri-
2.23 pouvoir toxique:
Mesure de la quantité de
tants étaient présents, on les a détectés par obser-
substance toxique requise pour produire un effet
vations cliniques de salive, d’écoulement nasal, de
toxique spécifique. La toxicité est plus élevée lors-
larmes et par mesurage du taux respiratoire. Des
que la quantité est plus petite.
dégâts pulmonaires ont également été confirmés
par l’examen histopathologique des poumons d’ani-
2.24 toxique: Produit chimique capable d’avoir un
maux exposés à de fortes concentrations d’irritants
ou plusieurs effet(s) nocif(s) ou spécifique(s) sur un
corrosifs.
organisme. Le toxique peut se caractériser par deux
propriétés: la toxicité spécifique, nature de l’effet
En règle générale, en toxicologie, les produits chi-
nocif, et le pouvoir toxique, dose prescrite pour
miques qui agissent directement semblent avoir le
provoquer l’effet.
même spectre d’activité dans toutes les espèces, y
compris l’espèce humaine. Un rapport complet PI
2.25 toxicité: Nature (effet spécifique), et étendue
a comparé les actions, chez l’homme et les co-
(puissance) des effets nocifs d’une substance sur un
bayes, d’une liste complète de produits chimiques
organisme vivant.
présents dans les effluents du feu et l’on a trouvé
une concordance certaine entre les effets aigus
chez l’homme et les effets sur les cobayes.
3 Principes
II existe cependant certaines différences physiologi-
ques entre les petits rongeurs et l’homme qui sont
3.1 Nature des effets toxiques
particulièrement importantes en toxicologie de la
combustion. Par exemple, le rapport volume respi-
Le but de la plupart des évaluations de toxicité est
ratoire minute/poids du corps des petits rongeurs
de fournir des données permettant de prévoir les
est généralement plus grand que celui de l’homme.
conséquences de l’exposition sur les individus, et il
Ce phénomène a été utilisé à l’avantage de
faut tenir compte de toutes les données disponibles
l’homme par le passé où l’on a utilisé des petits
concernant l’effet de substances similaires sur les
rongeurs ou des canaris pour déterminer la pré-
individus lors de la détermination de la pertinence
sence de gaz narcotiques dans les mines et les ré-
des études sur les animaux. II existe des données
cipients chimiques. Le rongeur est touché avant
portant sur l’effet des atmosphères d’effluents du
l’homme car au
repos, l’homme respire
feu, qui proviennent des études faites sur de nom-
160 mI/(minkg),
tandis que le rat respire
breuses victimes d’incendie, surtout les examens
900 ml/(minkg), ce qui fait un rapport d’environ 1 à
posl modem. Les victimes présentent généralement
6. Cependant, en activité comme cela peut se ren-
des niveaux élevés de carboxyhémoglobine qui in-
contrer dans un incendie, le taux de l’homme peut
diquent l’exposition à l’oxyde de carbone et, dans
monter jusqu’à 500 ml/(min-kg) ou même plus, ce
certains cas, l’influence du cyanure d’hydrogène.
qui donne un rapport d’environ 1 à 2. On pourrait
On sait que l’oxyde de carbone et le cyanure d’hy-
donc considérer que le rat est un modèle convena-
drogène provoquent une dépression progressive du
ble de prise respiratoire humaine ((active)). Toute
système nerveux central aboutissant à la perte de
différence due à la plus grande sensibilité des rats
connaissance et à la mort. Ce type d’effet toxique a
par rapport a l’homme peut être tolérée étant donné
été appelé <’ et ii est jugé très important
que cela fournit un ((facteur de sécurité>, lorsqu’on
dans la réponse des individus aux effluents du feu.
extrapole les résultats des animaux à l’homme. il
Dans de nombreux rapports, les effluents du feu
serait également irréaliste d’attendre une fidélité de
sont décrits comme 4rritantw, provoquant la toux,
réponse chez les cobayes pour un mélange com-
la suffocation et inhibant les facultés visuelles. On
plexe de composés présents dans les effluents du
a également relevé une pneumonite chimique à la
feu qui soit telle qu’une différence d’un facteur de 2
fois chez les survivants et chez les personnes dé-
entre le rat et l’homme influencerait nettement I’ex-
cédées. L’irritation sensorielle et pulmonaire est
trapolation des données.
---------------------- Page: 11 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122-2:1990(F)
3.4 Détermination des aspects qualitatifs de
Une seconde différence physiologique d’importance
est que les petits rongeurs de laboratoire respirent
la toxicité (toxicité spécifique)
essentiellement par le nez tandis que l’homme peut

choisir de respirer soit par la bouche, soit par le La toxicologie implique la détermination des répon-

nez. En fait, dans des conditions de charge de travail ses biologiques provoquées par les produits toxi-

importante, de contrainte ou en présence d’irritants, ques en termes qualitatifs et quantitatifs. Les

l’homme respire presque totalement par la bouche. protocoles OCDE d’inhalation aiguë PI ont été éia-

La différence a peu ou pas d’importance par rapport borés pour servir de trame large à la détermination

aux effets des gaz non solubles, mais le nez du des aspects qualitatifs de la toxicologie, par exem-

rongeur agit comme un <<épurateur>, pour enlever ple si le toxique provoque la mort par narcose, ou

les gaz solubles dans l’eau tels que le SO* ou le HC1 un endommagement du foie, des reins ou des pou-

et les matières particulaires. Cela peut réduire I’ef- mons. On peut considérer qu’il s’agit là de la déter-

mination de la toxicité spécifique du toxique (voir
fet de ces matières sur les voies respiratoires infé-
article 2). .
rieures. Cependant, les particules fines (inférieures
à 5 pm) et les fortes concentrations de gaz solubles
auront toujours un impact important sur les pou-
3.5 Détermination des aspects quantitatifs de
mons de l’homme et des rongeurs.
la toxicité (puissance toxique)
Malgré ces différences, la relation qualitative entre
Les aspects quantitatifs d’un toxique sont étudiés
les effets des effluents du feu sur les individus et les
en variant la dose de toxique et en la reliant à la
cobayes est excellente et l’on a noté une corrélation
toxicité observée. Pour chaque niveau de dose, les
quantitative relativement bonne pour les effluents
effets sont enregistrés soit sous forme de variables
du feu étudiés jusqu’à présent.
quantiques, soit sous forme de variables continues.
Les deux valeurs les plus souvent utilisées sont
l’ECSo (dose efficace pour provoquer une réponse à
50 % ou une réponse chez 50 % des animaux) et le
((Niveau sans effet)) (dose la plus élevée qui ne pro-
3.3 Toxicologie de l’inhalation wlassiqueb) par
voque pas d’effet particulier). En toxicologie de
rapport à la toxicologie de la combustion
l’inhalation, laquelle comprend la toxicologie de la
combustion, le type de valeur EC50 est le plus sou-
études sur la toxicologie de
La plupart des
vent calculé, par exemple le LC50 (t) (concentration
l’inhalation aiguë sont effectuées comme faisant
pour un temps t calculée pour tuer 50 % des ani-
partie de la caractérisation toxicologique d’un pro-
maux) ou l’invalidité ECSO (t) (concentration pour un
duit chimique, laquelle permet de décider de son
temps t calculée pour provoquer une invalidité chez
utilisation, de son transport et de ses niveaux d’ex-
50 % des animaux). Ces valeurs sont calculées à
position sans danger. Le but de ces considérations
partir d’expériences où l’on a eu des réponses infé-
est de protéger ceux qui fabriquent, utilisent ou
rieures à 50 % et d’expériences où l’on a eu plus
achètent le produit chimique. En conséquence, on
de 50 % de réponses. On calcule alors le LC50 et
utilise des régimes d’essai rigoureux pour permet-
I’EC50 de facon statistique.
tre une évaluation du <

souvent des expositions d’l h à 4 h. Le niveau d’ef- Outre le LC50 et I’ECso qui sont souvent cités, on

fets néfastes qui sera toléré est très faible, si bien détermine deux autres valeurs: la pente de la

que la simple survivance à une quelconque courbe de réponse à la concentration et les limites

concentration n’est pas considérée comme adé- de confiance du LCSo et de I’ECSO. La pente de la

courbe de réponse à la concentration est impor-
quate s’il y a d’autres conséquences non fatales. La
tante; par exemple, deux produits toxiques ayant le
gamme des effets toxiques susceptibles d’apparaî-
même LCSO peuvent avoir des effets différents sur
tre est très large et les protocoles utilisés sont
une fraction du LCSo. Un composant ayant une
convus en conséquence. Au contraire, la toxicologie
courbe de réponse à la dose verticale n’aura pro-
de la combustion vise à créer un modèle de si-

tuation d’((urgencejb. Par conséquent, les durées bablement aucun effet pour 0,2 LC50, tandis qu’un

composant présentant une courbe en pente faible
d’exposition utilisées sont généralement plus ré-
peut provoquer la mort chez 20 % des animaux pour
duites, 5 min à 30 min étant des durées types. La

survie est le facteur le plus important, c’est pourquoi 0,2 LC50. Dans la plupart des expériences de toxi-

on met beaucoup plus l’accent sur l’invalidité, la cité, les courbes de réponse aux concentrations

toxicité importante et la mort que sur les chan- présentent une forte pente. Les limites de confiance

gements du poids du corps, par exemple, qui se- pour l’EC50 décrivent la certitude avec laquelle un

raient significatifs dans une étude conventionnelle. chiffre donné se trouve dans la plage. La variabilité

inhérente de la détermination du LC50 est telle que
Comme la connaissance de la toxicologie de la
combustion s’est amélioré
...

Questions, Comments and Discussion

Ask us and Technical Secretary will try to provide an answer. You can facilitate discussion about the standard in here.