Environmental conditions – Vibration and shock of electrotechnical equipment - Part 8: Transportation by ship

IEC TR 62131-8:2022 reviews available dynamic data relating to the transportation of electrotechnical equipment by marine craft such as ships and boats either at sea or during riverine use. In this instance, there is a clear similarity between dynamic data relating to the transportation of electrotechnical equipment and that of electrotechnical equipment installed on maritime platforms.

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Status
Published
Publication Date
19-Jul-2022
Current Stage
PPUB - Publication issued
Completion Date
20-Jul-2022
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IEC TR 62131-8
Edition 1.0 2022-07
TECHNICAL
REPORT
colour
inside
Environmental conditions – Vibration and shock of electrotechnical equipment –
Part 8: Transportation by ship
IEC TR 62131-8:2022-07(en)
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
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---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
IEC TR 62131-8
Edition 1.0 2022-07
TECHNICAL
REPORT
colour
inside
Environmental conditions – Vibration and shock of electrotechnical equipment
Part 8: Transportation by ship
INTERNATIONAL
ELECTROTECHNICAL
COMMISSION
ICS 19.040 ISBN 978-2-8322-3970-4

Warning! Make sure that you obtained this publication from an authorized distributor.

® Registered trademark of the International Electrotechnical Commission
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
– 2 – IEC TR 62131-8:2022 © IEC 2022
CONTENTS

FOREWORD ........................................................................................................................... 5

1 Scope .............................................................................................................................. 7

2 Normative references ...................................................................................................... 7

3 Terms and definitions ...................................................................................................... 7

4 Data source and quality ................................................................................................... 8

4.1 General ................................................................................................................... 8

4.2 NAV vibration measurements .................................................................................. 8

4.3 RIB vibration measurements ................................................................................... 9

4.4 Supplementary data .............................................................................................. 11

5 Intra data source comparison ........................................................................................ 13

5.1 General ................................................................................................................. 13

5.2 NAV vibration measurements ................................................................................ 13

5.3 RIB vibration measurements ................................................................................. 14

5.4 Supplementary data .............................................................................................. 15

6 Inter data source comparison ........................................................................................ 16

7 Environmental description ............................................................................................. 16

7.1 Conditions causing the environment ...................................................................... 16

7.2 Environmental characteristics ............................................................................... 17

7.3 Test types ............................................................................................................. 17

8 Comparison with the IEC 60721 series .......................................................................... 18

9 Recommendations ......................................................................................................... 21

Bibliography .......................................................................................................................... 54

Figure 1 – RMAS Arrochar specification and layout [3] .......................................................... 23

Figure 2 – RMAS arrochar hold vibration measurement locations [3] ..................................... 24

Figure 3 – RMAS Arrochar hold vibration levels for different sea states [3] ........................... 26

Figure 4 – Envelope of vibration levels in forward and aft holds [3] ....................................... 26

Figure 5 – RIB speed from GPS obtained during measurement events [4] ............................. 27

Figure 6 – RIB transducer locations [4] ................................................................................. 27

Figure 7 – RIB vibration severities forward deck – Fore-aft [4] .............................................. 30

Figure 8 – RIB vibration severities forward deck – Lateral [4] ................................................ 31

Figure 9 – RIB vibration severities forward deck – Vertical [4] ............................................... 31

Figure 10 – RIB vibration severities centre port deck – Fore-aft [4] ....................................... 32

Figure 11 – RIB vibration severities centre port deck – Lateral [4] ......................................... 32

Figure 12 – RIB vibration severities centre port deck – Vertical [4] ........................................ 33

Figure 13 – RIB vibration severities rear deck – Fore-aft [4] .................................................. 33

Figure 14 – RIB vibration severities rear deck – Vertical [4] .................................................. 34

Figure 15 – RIB vibration severities starboard gearbox [4] .................................................... 34

Figure 16 – RIB vibration amplitude probability density – Forward deck [4] ........................... 35

Figure 17 – Vibration RIB amplitude probability density – Aft (rear deck) deck [4] ................. 35

Figure 18 – RIB vibration time history – Forward deck [4] ..................................................... 36

Figure 19 – Naval supply tanker at 20 kn [5] ......................................................................... 36

Figure 20 – Train ferry at 20 kn [5] ........................................................................................ 37

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IEC TR 62131-8:2022 © IEC 2022 – 3 –

Figure 21 – MIL STD 810 [6] random vibration test severity for shipborne equipment ............ 37

Figure 22 – MIL STD 810 [6] sinusoidal vibration test severity for shipborne equipment ........ 38

Figure 23 – DEF STAN 00-035 [7] test severity for transportation of equipment by sea ......... 38

Figure 24 – DEF STAN 00-035 [7] test severity for equipment installed in large ships ........... 39

Figure 25 – DEF STAN 00-035 [7] test severity for equipment installed in smaller ships

– Aft locations ....................................................................................................................... 39

Figure 26 – DEF STAN 00-035 [7] test severity for equipment installed in small ships –

Mid and forward locations ..................................................................................................... 40

Figure 27 – DEF STAN 00-035 [7] information – Typical acceleration power spectral

density at aft region of naval frigate ...................................................................................... 40

Figure 28 – DEF STAN 00-035 [7] information – Overall vibration RMS variations with

power demand ...................................................................................................................... 41

Figure 29 – DEF STAN 00-035 [7] information – Overall vibration RMS variations with

manoeuvre condition ............................................................................................................. 41

Figure 30 – EXACT DK 1–237 [8] composite vibration spectrum of engine room

measurements from five different ship types ......................................................................... 42

Figure 31 – American Bureau of Shipping recommendations for vibration severities

[10] ....................................................................................................................................... 42

Figure 32 – ISO 20283 [11] recommendations for passenger comfort.................................... 43

Figure 33 – IEC 60945 [14] severity for ship installed equipment .......................................... 43

Figure 34 – Comparison of random severities ....................................................................... 44

Figure 35 – Comparison of sinusoidal severities ................................................................... 44

Figure 36 – IEC 60721-3-2 [28] – Stationary vibration random severities .............................. 45

Figure 37 – IEC TR 60721-4-2 [30] – Stationary vibration random severities ......................... 45

Figure 38 – IEC 60721-3-2 [28] – Stationary vibration sinusoidal severities .......................... 46

Figure 39 – IEC TR 60721-4-2 [30] – Stationary vibration sinusoidal severities ..................... 46

Figure 40 – IEC 60721-3-2 [28] – Shock severities ............................................................... 47

Figure 41 – IEC TR 60721-4-2 [30] – Shock severities for IEC 60068-2-27 [32] test

procedure ............................................................................................................................. 47

Figure 42 – IEC TR 60721-4-2 [30] – Shock severities for IEC 60068-2-29 [33] test

procedure ............................................................................................................................. 48

Figure 43 – IEC 60721-3-6 [13] stationary vibration sinusoidal severities .............................. 48

Figure 44 – IEC 60721-3-6 [13] shock severities ................................................................... 49

Figure 45 – Comparison of NAV vibrations [3] with IEC 60721-3-2 [28] ................................. 49

Figure 46 – Comparison of RIB vibrations [4] with IEC 60721-3-2 [28] .................................. 50

Figure 47 – Comparison of RIB vibrations [4] (less rear floor measurements) with

IEC 60721-3-2 [28] ............................................................................................................... 50

Figure 48 – Comparison of GAM-EG-13 vibrations [5] with IEC 60721-3-2 [28] ..................... 51

Figure 49 – Comparison of EXACT DK 1–237 composite vibration spectrum of engine

room measurements (from [8]) with IEC 60721-3-2 [28] ........................................................ 51

Figure 50 – Comparison of MIL STD 810 [6] and DEF STAN 00-035 [7] ship

transportation severities with IEC 60721-3-2 [28] .................................................................. 52

Figure 51 – Comparison of sinusoidal installed equipment severities with IEC 60721-3-

2 [28] .................................................................................................................................... 52

Figure 52 – Comparison of Sinusoidal Installed Equipment Severities with IEC 60721-

3-6 [13] ................................................................................................................................. 53

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– 4 – IEC TR 62131-8:2022 © IEC 2022

Table 1 – RMAS Arrochar hold low frequency (up to 10 Hz) accelerations levels [3] ............. 24

Table 2 – RMAS Arrochar hold vibration levels for different sea states [3] ........................... 25

Table 3 – Definition of sea states .......................................................................................... 25

Table 4 – RIB measurement events [4] ................................................................................. 28

Table 5 – RIB statistics of vibration measurements from sea segment [4] ............................. 28

Table 6 – RIB statistics of vibration measurements riverine events – RMS [4] ....................... 29

Table 7 – RIB statistics of vibration measurements riverine events – Maximum and

minimum [4] .......................................................................................................................... 29

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IEC TR 62131-8:2022 © IEC 2022 – 5 –
INTERNATIONAL ELECTROTECHNICAL COMMISSION
____________
ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS – VIBRATION AND
SHOCK OF ELECTROTECHNICAL EQUIPMENT –
Part 8: Transportation by ship
FOREWORD

1) The International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) is a worldwide organization for standardization comprising

all national electrotechnical committees (IEC National Committees). The object of IEC is to promote

international co-operation on all questions concerning standardization in the electrical and electronic fields. To

this end and in addition to other activities, IEC publishes International Standards, Technical Specifications,

Technical Reports, Publicly Available Specifications (PAS) and Guides (hereafter referred to as “IEC

Publication(s)”). Their preparation is entrusted to technical committees; any IEC National Committee interested

in the subject dealt with may participate in this preparatory work. International, governmental and non-

governmental organizations liaising with the IEC also participate in this preparation. IEC collaborates closely

with the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) in accordance with conditions determined by

agreement between the two organizations.

2) The formal decisions or agreements of IEC on technical matters express, as nearly as possible, an international

consensus of opinion on the relevant subjects since each technical committee has representation from all

interested IEC National Committees.

3) IEC Publications have the form of recommendations for international use and are accepted by IEC National

Committees in that sense. While all reasonable efforts are made to ensure that the technical content of IEC

Publications is accurate, IEC cannot be held responsible for the way in which they are used or for any

misinterpretation by any end user.

4) In order to promote international uniformity, IEC National Committees undertake to apply IEC Publications

transparently to the maximum extent possible in their national and regional publications. Any divergence

between any IEC Publication and the corresponding national or regional publication shall be clearly indicated in

the latter.

5) IEC itself does not provide any attestation of conformity. Independent certification bodies provide conformity

assessment services and, in some areas, access to IEC marks of conformity. IEC is not responsible for any

services carried out by independent certification bodies.

6) All users should ensure that they have the latest edition of this publication.

7) No liability shall attach to IEC or its directors, employees, servants or agents including individual experts and

members of its technical committees and IEC National Committees for any personal injury, property damage or

other damage of any nature whatsoever, whether direct or indirect, or for costs (including legal fees) and

expenses arising out of the publication, use of, or reliance upon, this IEC Publication or any other IEC

Publications.

8) Attention is drawn to the Normative references cited in this publication. Use of the referenced publications is

indispensable for the correct application of this publication.

9) Attention is drawn to the possibility that some of the elements of this IEC Publication may be the subject of

patent rights. IEC shall not be held responsible for identifying any or all such patent rights.

IEC TR 62131-8 has been prepared by IEC technical committee 104: Environmental
conditions, classification and methods of test. It is a Technical Report.
The text of this Technical Report is based on the following documents:
Draft Report on voting
104/912/DTR 104/921A/RVDTR

Full information on the voting for its approval can be found in the report on voting indicated in

the above table.
The language used for the development of this Technical Report is English.

This document was drafted in accordance with ISO/IEC Directives, Part 2, and developed in

accordance with ISO/IEC Directives, Part 1 and ISO/IEC Directives, IEC Supplement,

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– 6 – IEC TR 62131-8:2022 © IEC 2022

available at www.iec.ch/members_experts/refdocs. The main document types developed by

IEC are described in greater detail at www.iec.ch/standardsdev/publications.

A list of all parts in the IEC 62131 series, published under the general title Environmental

conditions – Vibration and shock of electrotechnical equipment, can be found on the IEC

website.

The committee has decided that the contents of this document will remain unchanged until the

stability date indicated on the IEC website under webstore.iec.ch in the data related to the

specific document. At this date, the document will be
• reconfirmed,
• withdrawn,
• replaced by a revised edition, or
• amended.

IMPORTANT – The "colour inside" logo on the cover page of this document indicates that it

contains colours which are considered to be useful for the correct understanding of its

contents. Users should therefore print this document using a colour printer.
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IEC TR 62131-8:2022 © IEC 2022 – 7 –
ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS – VIBRATION AND
SHOCK OF ELECTROTECHNICAL EQUIPMENT –
Part 8: Transportation by ship
1 Scope

This part of IEC 62131 reviews available dynamic data relating to the transportation of

electrotechnical equipment by marine craft such as ships and boats either at sea or during

riverine use. In this instance, there is a clear similarity between dynamic data relating to the

transportation of electrotechnical equipment and that of electrotechnical equipment installed

on maritime platforms.

The intent is that from all the available data, an environmental description will be generated

and compared to that set out in the IEC 60721 series [1] .

For each of the sources identified, the quality of the data is reviewed and checked for

self-consistency. The process used to undertake this check of data quality and that used to

intrinsically categorize the various data sources is set out in IEC TR 62131-1 [2].

This document primarily addresses data extracted from several different sources for which

reasonable confidence exists in their quality and validity. This document also reviews some

data for which the quality and validity cannot realistically be verified. These data are included

to facilitate validation of information from other sources. This document clearly indicates when

utilizing information in this latter category.

The aim of this document is to review information from a number of different data gathering

exercises. The quantity and quality of information in these exercises is expected to vary

considerably.

Not all the data reviewed were made available in electronic form. To permit comparison to be

made, in this assessment, a quantity of the original (non-electronic) data has been manually

digitized.
2 Normative references
There are no normative references in this document.
3 Terms and definitions
No terms and definitions are listed in this document.

ISO and IEC maintain terminological databases for use in standardization at the following

addresses:
• IEC Electropedia: available at http://www.electropedia.org/
• ISO Online browsing platform: available at http://www.iso.org/obp
___________
Numbers in square brackets refer to the bibliography.
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
– 8 – IEC TR 62131-8:2022 © IEC 2022
4 Data source and quality
4.1 General

The first step in the process of reviewing available dynamic data, in this case relating to the

transportation of electrotechnical equipment by marine craft, is to identify measurement

exercises containing vibration and shock data which are likely to meet the validation criteria

set out in IEC TR 62131-1. Whilst several exercises have been identified for this purpose,

relatively few contain suitable vibration and shock data which can be realistically assessed

against the validation criteria. There appears to be two underlying issues as to why little

measured vibration data are available. The first is that the vibration levels experienced during

sea transportation are generally of particularly low amplitude and consequently of insufficient

concern to justify a measurement exercise. The second issue is that vibrations tend to occur

for significant periods of time and vary with sea state. Consequently, presenting real

measured data can be difficult and it is generally easier to present worst case conditions in

terms of test severities. Essentially, most of the identified exercises would be classified as

"supplementary data" according to the process of IEC TR 62131-1. Only two measurement

exercises have been identified which have the potential to meet the required criteria and

neither of those relate to large transport marine craft. For that purpose, this document has

had to rely on evidence from the "supplementary data".
4.2 NAV vibration measurements

This measurement exercise [3] established the accelerations and vibrations on the floor of the

forward and aft holds, of a relatively small (approximately 2 000 tonnes) transport vessel

(RMAS Arrochar) on a three-day transit from Zeebrugge dockyard (Netherlands) to

Glen Mallen on the west coast of Scotland. The journey was via the English Channel and the

Irish Sea and occurred in March 1990. The measurements encompass all the prevailing

conditions arising during the journey, which includes sea states from 1 to 6. This was the

second of two similar measurement exercises on this class of vessel. The first exercise was

on RMAS Kinterbury in July 1987 and employed a similar measurement layout in the forward

and aft holds. Although measured data from the first exercise was not available for this work,

the measurements and test severities derived from both exercises were compared and found

to be similar. In this case, the measurement exercise and the data analysis were undertaken

by separate agencies. The results of both measurement exercises were utilized to ensure the

vibration experienced by an equipment were less than those to which it had been evaluated.

For this purpose, a third independent agency reviewed the results.

The transport vessels used for this work, RMAS Arrochar and RMAS Kinterbury, were both

naval armament vessels (NAVs) of the same class, both operated by the UK Royal Maritime

Auxiliary Service (RMAS). Both vessels are now decommissioned. The vessels had two holds,

both located in the centre of the ship, with the aft hold (Hold 2) the closest to the propulsion

system. However, as the vessels are relatively small, both holds are in proximity to some

rotating machinery, particularly the generators. Information on the overall vessel

configuration, in this case for RMAS Arrochar, is shown in Figure 1.

The measurement exercise employed 24 accelerometers and three dummy loads. The latter

were utilized to establish the underlying measurement noise levels at various locations in the

holds. This is an issue when measuring vibration on marine craft as the vibrations can be

quite low level and consequently easily influenced by contamination from electrical and

mechanical noise. The exercise measured both low frequency acceleration transducers to

establish payload loadings (up to 10 Hz) as well as higher frequency vibration transducers (up

to 200 Hz).

The vibration measurement locations used in both measurement exercises are shown in

Figure 2. Vibration measurements, on the floor of both holds, were made simultaneously.

Eight piezo-electric transducers were located in the aft hold, four measuring vertical (Z)

vibrations and two each for the lateral (X) and longitudinal (Y) vibrations. The transducers

were configured as two triaxial assemblies and two uniaxial devices. Two triaxial transducer

assemblies were located in the forward hold, each measuring in the vertical, lateral and

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IEC TR 62131-8:2022 © IEC 2022 – 9 –

longitudinal axis. The measurements from the two holds were recorded on separate magnetic

FM tape recorders, but with measurements from one location common to both recorders. This

was to enable synchronization and correlation to be undertaken for data analysis purposes.

All the spectral information presented in the available report [3] is in terms of "equivalent peak

acceleration" with a frequency resolution of 0,5 Hz. Most of the measured vibration data are

for conditions less than sea state 4, but with some limited data at sea state 5 to 6. Vibration

severities for different sea states are presented for each hold. Noise measurements are

around 0,000 1 g /Hz.

As the report only presents data in the form of "equivalent peak acceleration" it can only

realistically be compared with sine-based environmental descriptions. It cannot be easily

compared with power spectral density environmental descriptions without resorting to

comparison of the effects of the vibration (for example using the maximum response spectrum

and fatigue damage spectrum). This is an underlying issue with vibration measurements made

on marine craft. Such measurements often contain sinusoidal vibrations arising from rotating

machinery. Consequently, the vibration analysis methods utilized are often those appropriate

for quantifying such sinusoidal vibrations. However, measurements made away from rotating

machinery can be more consistent with random vibration analysis assumptions, and hence

can utilize power spectral density analysis methods.

Most of the data analysis plots, included within the report, cannot be easily reproduced here.

However, summary information from that data analysis is included here as Table 1 and Table

2 and Figure 3 and Figure 4. Table 1 shows the most severe acceleration levels measured for

different sea states, for each vessel axis and for each hold. These measurements are limited

to 10 Hz (no information on the filtering used is provided) and are intended to indicate the

acceleration loading that equipment could experience during transportation. Essentially, the

values are indicators of the acceleration loading any payload tie down system would need to

resist. Table 2 shows the most severe vibration levels measured for different sea states, for

each vessel axis and each hold. Two parameters are provided, one for the long-term root

mean square of the vibrations, the other the peak-to-peak value. Table 2 is shown graphically

in Figure 3.

Envelopes of the "equivalent peak acceleration" for the vertical and lateral axes and for each

hold are shown in Figure 4. Also included in that figure are similar values obtained from the

earlier exercise on RMAS Kinterbury. The values of "equivalent peak acceleration" shown in

Figure 4 are composed of envelopes of all sea states and measurement locations in each hold

and axis.

The sea state definitions for wind and sea levels, adopted for the NAV measurement exercise,

were from the Douglas sea scale and information is provided in Table 3.

Although the information in the NAV vibration measurement report has some limitations, the

quality of the information is reasonable and meets the required validation criteria for data

quality (singl
...

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