Biomimetics -- Terminology, concepts and methodology

ISO 18458:2015 provides a framework for the terminology on biomimetics in scientific, industrial, and educational purposes. ISO 18458:2015 is intended to provide a suitable framework for biomimetic applications. The field of biomimetics is classified and defined, numerous terms are described, and a description of the process of applying biomimetic methods from the development of new ideas to the biomimetic product is provided. The limits and potential of biomimetics as an innovation approach or as a sustainability strategy are also illustrated. In addition, ISO 18458:2015 provides an overview of the various areas of application and describes how biomimetic methods differ from classic forms of research and development. If a technical system is subjected to a development process according to ISO 18458:2015, then it is allowed to be referred to as a "biomimetic" system. ISO 18458:2015 provides guidance and support for developers, designers, and users who want to learn about the biomimetic development process and integrate biomimetic methods into their work aiming at a common language for scientists and engineers working in the field of biomimetics. It can be applied wherever nature has produced a biological system sufficiently similar to the technical target system that can be used to develop a technical equivalent.

Biomimétique -- Terminologie, concepts et méthodologie

L'ISO 18458:2015 fournit un cadre pour la terminologie concernant la biomimétique ŕ des fins scientifiques, industrielles et éducatives. L'ISO 18458:2015 est destinée ŕ fournir un cadre approprié pour les applications biomimétiques. Elle classifie et définit le domaine de la biomimétique, décrit de nombreux termes ainsi que le processus d'application des méthodes biomimétiques au produit biomimétique ŕ partir d'idées nouvelles. Les limites et le potentiel de la biomimétique en tant qu'approche pour l'innovation ou en tant que stratégie de développement durable sont également illustrés. En outre, l'ISO 18458:2015 donne un aperçu général des divers champs d'application et décrit la maničre dont les méthodes biomimétiques diffčrent des formes classiques de recherche et de développement. Si un systčme technique fait l'objet d'un processus de développement conformément ŕ l'ISO 18458:2015, il est alors permis de le mentionner en tant que systčme « biomimétique ». L'ISO 18458:2015 fournit un guide et un soutien aux développeurs, concepteurs et utilisateurs qui souhaitent comprendre le processus de développement biomimétique et intégrer les méthodes biomimétiques dans leurs pratiques professionnelles visant ŕ un langage commun entre scientifiques et ingénieurs travaillant dans le domaine de la biomimétique. Le processus de développement biomimétique peut ętre appliqué chaque fois que la nature a produit un systčme biologique assez similaire au systčme technique visé qui peut ętre utilisé pour élaborer un équivalent technique.

General Information

Status
Published
Publication Date
06-May-2015
Technical Committee
Drafting Committee
Current Stage
9060 - Close of review
Start Date
03-Sep-2020
Ref Project

Buy Standard

Standard
ISO 18458:2015 - Biomimetics -- Terminology, concepts and methodology
English language
25 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview
Standard
ISO 18458:2015 - Biomimétique -- Terminologie, concepts et méthodologie
French language
27 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview

Standards Content (sample)

INTERNATIONAL ISO
STANDARD 18458
First edition
2015-05-15
Biomimetics — Terminology, concepts
and methodology
Biomimétique — Terminologie, concepts et méthodologie
Reference number
ISO 18458:2015(E)
ISO 2015
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO 18458:2015(E)
COPYRIGHT PROTECTED DOCUMENT
© ISO 2015, Published in Switzerland

All rights reserved. Unless otherwise specified, no part of this publication may be reproduced or utilized otherwise in any form

or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, or posting on the internet or an intranet, without prior

written permission. Permission can be requested from either ISO at the address below or ISO’s member body in the country of

the requester.
ISO copyright office
Ch. de Blandonnet 8 • CP 401
CH-1214 Vernier, Geneva, Switzerland
Tel. +41 22 749 01 11
Fax +41 22 749 09 47
copyright@iso.org
www.iso.org
ii © ISO 2015 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO 18458:2015(E)
Contents Page

Foreword ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................iv

Introduction ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................v

1 Scope ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 1

2 Terms and definitions ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3 What is biomimetics?....................................................................................................................................................................................... 3

3.1 Essentials of biomimetics .............................................................................................................................................................. 3

3.2 Boundaries to and areas of overlap with related sciences ................................................................................ 4

3.3 Biomimetic products and processes .................................................................................................................................... 5

4 Reasons and occasions for using biomimetic methods ................................................................................................ 6

4.1 Possibilities, performance, and success factors for biomimetics ................................................................ 6

4.2 Biomimetics and sustainability ................................................................................................................................................ 7

4.3 Limits of biomimetics ........................................................................................................................................................................ 8

4.4 Communication process in biomimetics .......................................................................................................................... 8

5 Biomimetic engineering process ......................................................................................................................................................... 8

5.1 General ........................................................................................................................................................................................................... 8

5.2 Development of new ideas ............................................................................................................................................................ 9

5.3 Abstraction and analogy ..............................................................................................................................................................12

5.4 Planning phase to invention .....................................................................................................................................................13

6 Implementation of biomimetics in the innovation approach .............................................................................14

Annex A (informative) Examples ...........................................................................................................................................................................15

Bibliography .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................23

© ISO 2015 – All rights reserved iii
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO 18458:2015(E)
Foreword

ISO (the International Organization for Standardization) is a worldwide federation of national standards

bodies (ISO member bodies). The work of preparing International Standards is normally carried out

through ISO technical committees. Each member body interested in a subject for which a technical

committee has been established has the right to be represented on that committee. International

organizations, governmental and non-governmental, in liaison with ISO, also take part in the work.

ISO collaborates closely with the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) on all matters of

electrotechnical standardization.

The procedures used to develop this document and those intended for its further maintenance are

described in the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 1. In particular the different approval criteria needed for the

different types of ISO documents should be noted. This document was drafted in accordance with the

editorial rules of the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 2 (see www.iso.org/directives).

Attention is drawn to the possibility that some of the elements of this document may be the subject of

patent rights. ISO shall not be held responsible for identifying any or all such patent rights. Details of

any patent rights identified during the development of the document will be in the Introduction and/or

on the ISO list of patent declarations received (see www.iso.org/patents).

Any trade name used in this document is information given for the convenience of users and does not

constitute an endorsement.

For an explanation on the meaning of ISO specific terms and expressions related to conformity

assessment, as well as information about ISO’s adherence to the WTO principles in the Technical Barriers

to Trade (TBT) see the following URL: Foreword - Supplementary information
The committee responsible for this document is ISO/TC 266, Biomimetics.
iv © ISO 2015 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
ISO 18458:2015(E)
Introduction

Biomimetics is understood to be the application of research and development approaches of interest

to practical applications and which use knowledge gained from the analysis of biological systems to

find solutions to problems, create new inventions and innovations, and transfer this knowledge to

technical systems. The idea of transferring biological principles to technology is the central element of

biomimetics (see Clause 3 for a definition of biomimetics).

The basic motivation behind the transfer of biological solutions to technical applications is the

assumption that biological structures are optimized to their needs and can be the source of significant

and convincing applications. To date, over 2,5 million different species have been identified and described

to a great extent together with their specific characteristics. In terms of biomimetics, there is therefore

a gigantic pool of ideas available for solutions to practical problems.
[1]

Historically, the development of biomimetics can be divided into the following phases: model-based

biomimetics was introduced starting around 1950 primarily for use in the design and construction of

aircraft, vehicles, and ships by deriving modelling rules based on similarity theory for transferring the

principles of biological systems to technical designs. Around 1960, the two pillars of biomimetics (biology

and technology) were combined linguistically for the first time due to the influence of cybernetics and

placed on a common linguistic and methodical foundation. This foundation then became an important

basis for the central element of the field of biomimetics: the transfer of knowledge. Since about 1980,

biomimetics has also been extended down to the microscale and nanoscale (e.g. the Lotus-EffectText ®)

[2]

. New methods in measurement and manufacturing technology were the keys to these extensions.

Since the 1990s, biomimetics has received further impetus, in particular due to the rapid technological

development in the related fields of computer science, nanotechnology, mechatronics, and biotechnology.

In many cases, it is new developments in these fields that enable the transfer of complex biological

[3]
systems in the first place .

Today, the field of biomimetics is increasingly considered a scientific discipline that has generated

numerous innovations in products and technologies. This highly interdisciplinary collaborative work,

which brings together experts from the fields of biology, engineering sciences, and numerous other

[4]

disciplines, possesses a particularly high potential for innovation . For this reason, biomimetics has

now become an object of research and education at numerous universities and extramural research

institutions. However, manufacturing companies are also increasingly turning to biomimetic methods to

develop new products or to optimize existing products. In spite of the increasing number of researchers

and users active in the field of biomimetics, the transfer of knowledge from the field of biology to

technology is still a complex process that places high demands on the people involved.

Nature has numerous “ingenious solutions” available that can often be understood intuitively. It is

seldom easy, though, to explain the underlying mechanisms and in particular, to explain how they could

be applied to technology. This discrepancy is one reason for the current and ongoing relevance of the

[5]
field of biomimetics, which will also continue into the next decades .
© ISO 2015 – All rights reserved v
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
INTERNATIONAL STANDARD ISO 18458:2015(E)
Biomimetics — Terminology, concepts and methodology
1 Scope

This International Standard provides a framework for the terminology on biomimetics in scientific,

industrial, and educational purposes.

This International Standard is intended to provide a suitable framework for biomimetic applications.

The field of biomimetics is classified and defined, numerous terms are described, and a description of the

process of applying biomimetic methods from the development of new ideas to the biomimetic product

is provided. The limits and potential of biomimetics as an innovation approach or as a sustainability

strategy are also illustrated. In addition, this International Standard provides an overview of the various

areas of application and describes how biomimetic methods differ from classic forms of research and

development. If a technical system is subjected to a development process according to this International

Standard, then it is allowed to be referred to as a “biomimetic” system.

This International Standard provides guidance and support for developers, designers, and users who

want to learn about the biomimetic development process and integrate biomimetic methods into their

work aiming at a common language for scientists and engineers working in the field of biomimetics. It

can be applied wherever nature has produced a biological system sufficiently similar to the technical

target system that can be used to develop a technical equivalent.
2 Terms and definitions
For the purposes of this document, the following terms and definitions apply.
2.1
abstraction

inductive process in which a general conclusion is drawn based on the observation of a specific object

Note 1 to entry: In biomimetics, this conclusion is ideally a physical context for describing the underlying

functional and operating principles of the biological systems.
2.2
analogy

analogy in terms of technology is understood to be a similarity in the relationships between the relevant

parameters used to describe two different systems

Note 1 to entry: The specification of the relevant parameters is the object of abstraction (2.1). In terms of its

definition in the field of biomimetics (2.9), one of these two systems is a biological system (2.6), and the other

system is the technical target system.

Note 2 to entry: In biology, the term “analogy” refers to similarities in functional characteristics between different

organisms that resulted from the need to adapt and not because the organisms are somehow related. In contrast,

similarities based on relationship dependencies, and therefore on similar genetic information, are referred to as

homologies. In biology, the term “analogy” has come to be understood dynamically and emphasizes in particular

the differences between the starting points of two evolutionary developments.
2.3
analysis

systematic examination in which the biological or technical system is decomposed into its component

parts using suitable methods, after which the parts are then organized and evaluated

Note 1 to entry: The opposite of analysis, in terms of its aspect of “resolution into individual parts”, is referred to

as synthesis (recomposition).
© ISO 2015 – All rights reserved 1
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
ISO 18458:2015(E)
2.4
bioengineering
application of engineering knowledge to the fields of medicine or biology
2.5
bioinspiration
creative approach based on the observation of biological systems (2.6)
Note 1 to entry: The relation to the biological system (2.6) may only be loose.
2.6
biological system

coherent group of observable elements originating from the living world spanning from nanoscale

to macroscale
2.7
biology push

biomimetic development process in which the knowledge gained from basic research in the field of

biology is used as the starting point and is applied to the development of new technical products

Note 1 to entry: In technology, biology push is considered as a bottom-up process.

[6]

Note 2 to entry: In design research, biology push is considered as “solution driven” .

Note 3 to entry: See also technology pull (2.19).
2.8
biomimicry
biomimetism

philosophy and interdisciplinary design approaches taking nature as a model (2.15) to meet the

challenges of sustainable development (2.17) (social, environmental, and economic)

2.9
biomimetics

interdisciplinary cooperation of biology and technology or other fields of innovation with the goal of

solving practical problems through the function analysis of biological systems (2.6), their abstraction

(2.1) into models (2.15), and the transfer into and application of these models to the solution

Note 1 to entry: Criteria 1 to 3 of Table 1 shall be fulfilled for a product to be biomimetic.

2.10
bionics

technical discipline that seeks to replicate, increase, or replace biological functions by their electronic

and/or mechanical equivalents
2.11
component
element of an assembly that cannot be decomposed any further
2.12
function
role played by the behaviour of a system (2.18) in an environment
2.13
invention
act of creating something new or improved or product of this creation

Note 1 to entry: An invention therefore differs from an innovation, for which market diffusion is a prerequisite.

2 © ISO 2015 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
ISO 18458:2015(E)
2.14
material

collective term for the substances needed to manufacture and operate machines, but also to build

constructions

Note 1 to entry: The term “material” is used in the following as a general term for all biological materials and structures.

Note 2 to entry: It includes raw materials, working materials (2.20), semi-finished products, auxiliary supplies, operating

materials, as well as parts and assemblies. The term “material” is used in the sense of working materials (2.20).

Note 3 to entry: Biological materials are organic and/or mineral substances produced by living organisms. Due to

their hierarchical structure from the molecular to the macroscopic level, it is not possible to clearly distinguish

between the terms “material” and “structure” in the field of biology.
2.15
model

coherent and usable abstraction (2.1) originating from observations of biological systems (2.6)

2.16
structure
type and arrangement of the components (2.11) in a system (2.18)
2.17
sustainability
sustainable development

development that satisfies the requirements of the present without risking that future generations will

not be able to satisfy their own requirements

Note 1 to entry: Nature technology is the concept of human and the earth conscious technology learning from the

[7]

perfect circulation of the nature that has super-low environmental burden, high functionality, and sustainability .

2.18
system

set of interacting or interdependent components (2.11) forming an integrated whole with a defined boundary

2.19
technology pull

biomimetic development process in which an existing functional technical product is provided with new

or improved functions through the transfer and application of biological principles

Note 1 to entry: Technology pull is considered as a top-down process.
[6]

Note 2 to entry: In design research technology, pull is considered as “problem driven” .

Note 3 to entry: See also biology push (2.7).
2.20
working material

prepared raw material in a formed or unformed state (solid, liquid, or gaseous state) that is used to

manufacture components, semi-finished products, auxiliary supplies, or operating materials

3 What is biomimetics?
3.1 Essentials of biomimetics

The successful application of biomimetics is characterized as the transfer of knowledge and ideas from

biology to technology or other fields of innovation, i.e. practical development inspired by nature that

usually passes through several steps of abstraction and modification after the biological starting point.

The field of biomimetics is highly interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary, which is indicated by the high

level of cooperation between experts from different fields of research, for example, between biologists,

chemists, physicists, engineers, and social scientists.
© ISO 2015 – All rights reserved 3
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO 18458:2015(E)

Depending on the intensity with which biomimetics is applied, it can be understood as a scientific

discipline, an innovation process, or a creativity technique. In innovation management, biomimetics

is used as one of many creativity techniques. However, its potential is not fully realized when viewed

solely as a creativity technique because the development of new ideas in this case often remains at

the level of a search for obvious analogies between biological systems and technical problems without

performing a systematic analysis, abstracting, or transferring an operating principle.

The innovation process in biomimetics starts by linking a biological system to a specific technical

question. The characteristic feature of biomimetics is that it unites interest in knowledge from the field

of biology with the goal of obtaining a real technical implementation.

In biomimetics, the conceptual interest in and research on the biological system is oriented to obtaining

applications. Structure/function relationships are particularly important in this context. These

relationships are derived primarily from the analysis of the functional morphology in the framework

of organismic biology. An essential part of a successful biomimetic process is the design of the interface

between biological research and product and process development engineering. Biomimetics is not only

about transferring abstracted biological results to technology, but also about applying the engineering

methodology to biological systems and integrating knowledge of biological systems into technical

developments. An efficient and multi-layered transfer of knowledge, and especially of methods, between

the disciplines therefore forms the basis for a successful biomimetic development process.

Biomimetics is founded on basic research in the field of biology. Due to its defined focus on applications,

though, it primarily integrates application-oriented and applied research into the actual development of

the product or process.

Since it is inherently a type of innovation process, biomimetics is currently becoming a separate scientific

discipline. On the one hand, it is steadily developing a system of interrelated scientific statements, theories,

and methods, while on the other hand, associations, research and educational institutions, as well as

communication tools, are being established by certain groups of people under the banner of biomimetics.

3.2 Boundaries to and areas of overlap with related sciences

The expression “technical biology” was introduced by Werner Nachtigall to distinguish it from

[8]

biomimetics . Technical biology consists of the analysis of structure/function relationships between

biological objects with help of methodical approaches taken from physics and the engineering sciences.

Technical biology is therefore the starting point of many research projects in biomimetics because it

allows a deeper understanding of the method of operation of the biological system at the quantitative

level, as well as a suitable implementation in technical applications.

Over the last few years, it has become apparent that knowledge gained through the implementation

of biologically inspired principles of operation in innovative biomimetic products and technologies

can contribute to a better understanding of the biological systems. This relatively recently discovered

transfer process from biomimetics to biology can be referred to as “reverse biomimetics”. In contrast to

technical biology, reverse biomimetics does not apply classical engineering methods and analysis tools

to biological systems, but uses biomimetic prototypes as a whole and/or the simulation of their method

of operation as explanatory models or models for study with which it can be easier to understand the

underlying biology. In an iterative process, the methods of technical biology are then applied again in

the next step in order to test this new or extended explanatory model on the biological system. The

new knowledge of the biological structures and functions gained then flows back into the development

of improved biomimetic products and technologies, which then in turn serve as improved biomimetic

models to which reverse biomimetics can be applied, etc. This results in new knowledge in the form of a

[9]
heuristic spiral of technical biology, biomimetics, and reverse biomimetics .

The boundary separating biomimetics and biotechnology is also important. Both fields are areas of applied

biological research (translational biology). Biotechnology is understood to be the application of scientific

and technical principles to convert substances using biological agents with the goal of providing goods

and services (based on Reference [10]). In contrast, biomimetics uses living organisms as generators

of ideas for innovative technical implementations, but the organisms themselves are not necessarily

involved in the manufacturing of biomimetic products. Even though the concepts of biotechnology and

4 © ISO 2015 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
ISO 18458:2015(E)

biomimetics are not the same, they can be combined, as has been demonstrated by research projects on

the development of artificial spider silk, for example, see Reference [11] (see Table 1 and A.2).

Biomimetics is a highly interdisciplinary science possessing numerous facets. In fact, there are also

publications containing biomimetics terminology in the economic sciences and in organization

management that, based on the analysis of biological systems, provide suggestions for improvement

[12][13][14]

to existing concepts and strategies . However, it is not always easy to recognize the aspect of

technology in these fields as it is used in the definition of biomimetics or it might be necessary to expand

the definition of the term “technology” to recognize it.

In contrast, areas of research that deal only with inanimate elements of nature (geo-inspired) are

incompatible with the definition of biomimetics provided above. This includes, for example, research on

snow crystals, which can provide valuable information for the production of nanostructures like those

[15]
needed for microchips or for the development of sound-absorbing materials.

The use of shapes designed based on biological systems alone cannot be considered a biomimetic

approach, particularly when the shapes appear from the outside as if they could be based on a shape

found in nature but are really based on sophisticated CAD technology or other mathematical methods

for designing surfaces, for example. In these cases, biomimetics only plays a role when the design of the

shape is an integral part of the functionality developed according to biomimetic principles.

3.3 Biomimetic products and processes

The decision as to whether a product or technology can be considered biomimetic can be made based on

three criteria (steps) (see Table 1).

A product can be considered biomimetic if, and only if, it follows the following three steps defining the

biomimetic process:
— function analysis has been made of an available biological system;
— biological system has been abstracted into a model;
— model has been transferred and applied to design the product.

Parallel developments in nature and technology are not biomimetics. In the course of the development

of technology, many technical products were developed and in many cases without any knowledge of

natural phenomena that were amazingly similar to biological structures with comparable tasks in terms

of their function and sometimes even in terms of their shape.

Table 1 — Differentiating between biomimetic and non-biomimetic products based on

Reference [16]
Criteria for a biomimetic product
3. Transfer
How new CONCLUSION:
1. Function and applica-
2. Abstraction
ideas are Biomimetics
analysis of tion without
from system to
developed yes or no
biological using the
model
system biological
system
CAO method technology
+ + + yes
(see A.1) pull
Biomimetic spider silk
biology push
(see A.2)
Process step1: Molecular
+ + + yes
biomimetics
Criteria 1 to 3 shall be fulfilled before “yes” is entered as the conclusion.
© ISO 2015 – All rights reserved 5
---------------------- Page: 10 ----------------------
ISO 18458:2015(E)
Table 1 (continued)
Criteria for a biomimetic product
3. Transfer
How new CONCLUSION:
1. Function and applica-
2. Abstraction
ideas are Biomimetics
analysis of tion without
from system to
developed yes or no
biological using the
model
system biological
system
Process step 2: Recombi-
- - - no
nant protein production
Process step 3: Material
+ + + yes
processing
Evolutionary algorithms
technology
(EA) for optimization + + + yes
pull
(see A.3)
Fin ray structure
biology push + + + yes
(see A. 4)
Lotus-Effect
biology push + + + yes
(see A.5)
Self-sharpening cutting
technology
tools + + + yes
pull
(see A.6)
Art Nouveau
+/– +/– – no
(see A.7)
Fibonacci sequence
+/– +/– – no
(see A.8)
Olympia roof in Munich independent
– – – no
(see A.9) development
Reinforced concrete
+ – +/– no
(see A.10)
Result of optimization with
EA + – – no
(see A.3)
Soap film analogies independent
– – – no
(see A.11) development
Criteria 1 to 3 shall be fulfilled before “yes” is entered as the conclusion.
4 Reasons and occasions for using biomimetic methods
4.1 Possibilities, performance, and success factors for biomimetics

In the search for innovative solutions, biomimetics acts as a supplement to the classic methods for

developing new ideas and is a way of approaching scientific engineering work methods (see Reference [17],

Chapter 2). The diversity of biological solutions is particularly interesting for biomimetic developments.

Today, millions of species inhabit every type of environment and their amazing adaptations offer a

[18]

virtually infinite number of potentially relevant solutions from a technology point of view .

A general reason for the ability to transfer a biological property to a technical system is the fact that the

same physical laws and constants are valid in biology and in technology. The study of plants and animals

sometimes leads to problem solutions that are amazingly similar at first glance to the corresponding

technical solutions, but when subjected to more detailed analysis, often exhibit significant differences (see

Reference [19], p 477-478). Characteristics of biological structures include multi-criteria optimizations

with sometimes contradictory functions (multifunctionality) while simultaneously providing a high

6 © ISO 2015 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 11 ----------------------
ISO 18458:2015(E)
level of operational reliability, the ability to adapt to varia
...

NORME ISO
INTERNATIONALE 18458
Première édition
2015-05-15
Biomimétique — Terminologie,
concepts et méthodologie
Biomimetics — Terminology, concepts and methodology
Numéro de référence
ISO 18458:2015(F)
ISO 2015
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO 18458:2015(F)
DOCUMENT PROTÉGÉ PAR COPYRIGHT
© ISO 2015, Publié en Suisse

Droits de reproduction réservés. Sauf indication contraire, aucune partie de cette publication ne peut être reproduite ni utilisée

sous quelque forme que ce soit et par aucun procédé, électronique ou mécanique, y compris la photocopie, l’affichage sur

l’internet ou sur un Intranet, sans autorisation écrite préalable. Les demandes d’autorisation peuvent être adressées à l’ISO à

l’adresse ci-après ou au comité membre de l’ISO dans le pays du demandeur.
ISO copyright office
Ch. de Blandonnet 8 • CP 401
CH-1214 Vernier, Geneva, Switzerland
Tel. +41 22 749 01 11
Fax +41 22 749 09 47
copyright@iso.org
www.iso.org
ii © ISO 2015 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO 18458:2015(F)
Sommaire Page

Avant-propos ..............................................................................................................................................................................................................................iv

Introduction ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................v

1 Domaine d’application ................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

2 Termes et définitions ....................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3 Qu’est-ce que la biomimétique ? .......................................................................................................................................................... 4

3.1 Bases de la biomimétique .............................................................................................................................................................. 4

3.2 Limites et domaines de chevauchement avec les sciences associées ...................................................... 4

3.3 Produits et processus biomimétiques ................................................................................................................................ 5

4 Raisons et occasions pour l’utilisation de méthodes biomimétiques ...........................................................7

4.1 Possibilités, performances et facteurs de réussite concernant la biomimétique .......................... 7

4.2 Biomimétique et durabilité .......................................................................................................................................................... 7

4.3 Limites de la biomimétique ......................................................................................................................................................... 8

4.4 Processus de communication en biomimétique ........................................................................................................ 9

5 Processus d’ingénierie biomimétique ........................................................................................................................................... 9

5.1 Généralités .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 9

5.2 Développement de nouvelles idées ....................................................................................................................................11

5.3 Abstraction et analogie .................................................................................................................................................................13

5.4 Phase de planification à l’invention ...................................................................................................................................15

6 Mise en œuvre de la biomimétique dans l’approche pour l’innovation ..................................................15

Annexe A (informative) Exemples ........................................................................................................................................................................17

Bibliographie ...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................25

© ISO 2015 – Tous droits réservés iii
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO 18458:2015(F)
Avant-propos

L’ISO (Organisation internationale de normalisation) est une fédération mondiale d’organismes

nationaux de normalisation (comités membres de l’ISO). L’élaboration des Normes internationales est

en général confiée aux comités techniques de l’ISO. Chaque comité membre intéressé par une étude

a le droit de faire partie du comité technique créé à cet effet. Les organisations internationales,

gouvernementales et non gouvernementales, en liaison avec l’ISO participent également aux travaux.

L’ISO collabore étroitement avec la Commission électrotechnique internationale (IEC) en ce qui concerne

la normalisation électrotechnique.

Les procédures utilisées pour élaborer le présent document et celles destinées à sa mise à jour sont

décrites dans les Directives ISO/IEC, Partie 1. Il convient, en particulier de prendre note des différents

critères d’approbation requis pour les différents types de documents ISO. Le présent document a été

rédigé conformément aux règles de rédaction données dans les Directives ISO/IEC, Partie 2 (voir www.

iso.org/directives).

L’attention est appelée sur le fait que certains des éléments du présent document peuvent faire l’objet de

droits de propriété intellectuelle ou de droits analogues. L’ISO ne saurait être tenue pour responsable

de ne pas avoir identifié de tels droits de propriété et averti de leur existence. Les détails concernant les

références aux droits de propriété intellectuelle ou autres droits analogues identifiés lors de l’élaboration

du document sont indiqués dans l’Introduction et/ou dans la liste des déclarations de brevets reçues par

l’ISO (voir www.iso.org/brevets).

Les appellations commerciales éventuellement mentionnées dans le présent document sont données pour

information, par souci de commodité, à l’intention des utilisateurs et ne sauraient constituer un engagement.

Pour une explication de la signification des termes et expressions spécifiques de l’ISO liés à l’évaluation de

la conformité, ou pour toute information au sujet de l’adhésion de l’ISO aux principes de l’OMC concernant

les obstacles techniques au commerce (OTC), voir le lien suivant: Avant-propos — Informations

supplémentaires.

Le comité chargé de l’élaboration du présent document est l’ISO/TC 266, Biomimétique.

iv © ISO 2015 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
ISO 18458:2015(F)
Introduction

La biomimétique est considérée comme le transfert de méthodes de recherche et de développement

intéressantes vers des applications pratiques et qui utilise les connaissances acquises grâce à l’analyse

des systèmes biologiques pour trouver des solutions à des problèmes, créer de nouvelles inventions et

innovations, et pour transférer ces connaissances à des systèmes techniques. L’idée de transférer les

principes biologiques à la technologie constitue l’élément central de la biomimétique (voir l’Article 3

pour une définition de la biomimétique).

La motivation fondamentale qui sous-tend le transfert de solutions biologiques vers des applications

techniques est l’hypothèse selon laquelle les structures biologiques sont optimisées par rapport à leurs

besoins et peuvent être la source d’applications significatives et probantes. À ce jour, plus de 2,5 millions

d’espèces ont été identifiées et décrites en grande partie avec leurs caractéristiques spécifiques. En

termes de biomimétique, on dispose donc d’un gigantesque réservoir d’idées pour trouver des solutions

à des problèmes pratiques.
[1]

Historiquement, le développement de la biomimétique peut être divisé en phases de la manière suivante:

le concept de biomimétique basée sur des modèles a été introduit vers 1950; il était principalement

destiné à la conception et la construction d’aéronefs, de véhicules et de navires en utilisant des règles

de modélisation fondées sur la théorie de la similitude pour transférer les principes des systèmes

biologiques vers les conceptions techniques. Vers 1960, les deux piliers de la biomimétique (la biologie

et la technologie) ont été combinés linguistiquement pour la première fois en raison de l’influence de

la cybernétique et placés sur un socle linguistique et méthodologique commun. Ce socle est ensuite

devenu une base importante pour l’élément central de la biomimétique: le transfert des connaissances.

Depuis environ 1980, la biomimétique s’est également étendue à l’échelle micrométrique et à l’échelle

[2]

nanométrique (par exemple, le Lotus-EffectText ®) . Ces extensions étaient essentiellement dues aux

nouvelles méthodes de mesure des techniques de fabrication. Depuis les années 1990, la biomimétique

a connu un essor supplémentaire, dû notamment aux développements technologiques rapides dans les

domaines de l’informatique, des nanotechnologies, de la mécatronique et des biotechnologies. Dans bon

nombre de cas, ce sont les nouveaux développements dans ces domaines qui ont permis de hisser les

[3]
systèmes biologiques complexes à la première place .

Aujourd’hui, le domaine de la biomimétique est de plus en plus considéré comme une discipline scientifique

qui a donné naissance à de nombreuses innovations concernant les produits et les technologies. Ces

travaux collaboratifs interdisciplinaires, rassemblant des experts issus des domaines de la biologie, des

sciences de l’ingénierie et de nombreuses autres disciplines, présentent un potentiel particulièrement

[4]

élevé en matière d’innovation . C’est la raison pour laquelle la biomimétique est devenue à présent un

objet de recherche et d’enseignement dans de nombreuses universités et instituts de recherche externes.

Par ailleurs, les entreprises manufacturières se tournent également de plus en plus vers les méthodes

biomimétiques pour développer des nouveaux produits ou pour optimiser les produits existants. Malgré

le nombre croissant de chercheurs et d’utilisateurs actifs dans le domaine de la biomimétique, le transfert

des connaissances du domaine de la biologie à la technologie demeure un processus complexe qui place

la barre très haut pour les personnes impliquées.

La nature dispose d’un grand nombre de « solutions ingénieuses » qui peuvent être souvent comprises de

façon intuitive. Il est rarement facile d’expliquer les mécanismes sous-jacents, et notamment d’expliquer

comment ces mécanismes pourraient être appliqués à la technologie. Cette contradiction justifie la

[5]

pertinence actuelle et future de la biomimétique, qui se poursuivra lors des décennies à venir .

© ISO 2015 – Tous droits réservés v
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
NORME INTERNATIONALE ISO 18458:2015(F)
Biomimétique — Terminologie, concepts et méthodologie
1 Domaine d’application

La présente Norme internationale fournit un cadre pour la terminologie concernant la biomimétique à

des fins scientifiques, industrielles et éducatives.

La présente Norme internationale est destinée à fournir un cadre approprié pour les applications

biomimétiques. Elle classifie et définit le domaine de la biomimétique, décrit de nombreux termes ainsi

que le processus d’application des méthodes biomimétiques au produit biomimétique à partir d’idées

nouvelles. Les limites et le potentiel de la biomimétique en tant qu’approche pour l’innovation ou en

tant que stratégie de développement durable sont également illustrés. En outre, la présente Norme

internationale donne un aperçu général des divers champs d’application et décrit la manière dont les

méthodes biomimétiques diffèrent des formes classiques de recherche et de développement. Si un

système technique fait l’objet d’un processus de développement conformément à la présente Norme

internationale, il est alors permis de le mentionner en tant que système « biomimétique ».

La présente Norme internationale fournit un guide et un soutien aux développeurs, concepteurs et

utilisateurs qui souhaitent comprendre le processus de développement biomimétique et intégrer les

méthodes biomimétiques dans leurs pratiques professionnelles visant à un langage commun entre

scientifiques et ingénieurs travaillant dans le domaine de la biomimétique. Le processus de développement

biomimétique peut être appliqué chaque fois que la nature a produit un système biologique assez

similaire au système technique visé qui peut être utilisé pour élaborer un équivalent technique.

2 Termes et définitions

Pour les besoins du présent document, les termes et définitions suivants s’appliquent.

2.1
abstraction

processus inductif dans lequel une conclusion générale est tirée sur la base de l’observation d’un

objet spécifique

Note 1 à l’article: En biomimétique, cette conclusion est théoriquement un contexte physique pour décrire les

principes fonctionnels et opératoires sous-jacents des systèmes biologiques
2.2
analogie

l’analogie, en termes de technologie, est considérée comme une similitude dans les relations entre les

paramètres appropriés utilisés pour décrire deux systèmes différents

Note 1 à l’article: Les spécifications des paramètres appropriés font l’objet d’une abstraction (2.1). Compte tenu de

sa définition dans le domaine de la biomimétique (2.9), l’un de ses deux systèmes est un système biologique (2.6) et

l’autre est le système technique visé.

Note 2 à l’article: En biologie, le terme « analogie » fait référence à des similitudes au niveau de caractéristiques

fonctionnelles entre des organismes différents qui ont résulté de la nécessité d’adaptation et non d’un lien

quelconque entre ces organismes. En revanche, les similitudes basées sur des dépendances relationnelles, et donc

sur des informations génétiques similaires, sont désignées par « homologies ». En biologie, le terme « analogie »

est compris de manière dynamique et met notamment l’accent sur les différences des points de départ de deux

développements évolutifs.
© ISO 2015 – Tous droits réservés 1
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
ISO 18458:2015(F)
2.3
analyse

examen systématique dans lequel le système biologique ou technique est décomposé en ses constituants

élémentaires, en utilisant des méthodes appropriées, suite à quoi les constituants élémentaires sont

organisés et évalués

Note 1 à l’article: L’opposé de l’analyse, compte tenu de son aspect de décomposition en parties individuelles, est

désigné par « synthèse » (recomposition).
2.4
bioingénierie

application des connaissances issues des sciences de l’ingénieur aux domaines de la médecine ou de la biologie

2.5
bio-inspiration
approche créative basée sur l’observation des systèmes biologiques (2.6)

Note 1 à l’article: La relation au système biologique (2.6) ne peut être que vague.

2.6
système biologique

groupe cohérent d’éléments observables issus du monde vivant, allant de l’échelle nanométrique à

l’échelle macrométrique
2.7
poussée biologique (biology push)

processus de développement biomimétique dans lequel les connaissances acquises grâce à la recherche

fondamentale dans de domaine de la biologie servent de point de départ et sont appliquées au

développement de nouveaux produits techniques

Note 1 à l’article: En technologie, la poussée biologique (biology push) est considérée comme un processus

ascendant (bottom-up).

Note 2 à l’article: Dans le protocole de recherche, la poussée biologique (biology push) est considérée comme

[6]
« axée sur les solutions » .

Note 3 à l’article: Voir également attrait technologique (technology pull) (2.19).

2.8
biomimétisme

philosophie et approches conceptuelles interdisciplinaires prenant pour modèle (2.15) la nature afin de

relever les défis du développement durable (2.17) (social, environnemental et économique)

2.9
biomimétique

coopération interdisciplinaire de la biologie et de la technologie ou d’autres domaines d’innovation

dans le but de résoudre des problèmes pratiques par le biais de l’analyse fonctionnelle des systèmes

biologiques (2.6), de leur abstraction (2.1) en modèles (2.15) ainsi que le transfert et l’application de ces

modèles à la solution

Note 1 à l’article: Les critères 1 à 3 du Tableau 1 doivent être remplis pour qu’un produit soit considéré comme

biomimétique.
2.10
bionique

discipline technique qui cherche à reproduire, améliorer ou remplacer des fonctions biologiques par

leurs équivalents électroniques et/ou mécaniques
2.11
composant
élément d’un ensemble qui ne peut pas être subdivisé davantage
2 © ISO 2015 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
ISO 18458:2015(F)
2.12
fonction
rôle joué par le comportement d’un système (2.18) dans un environnement
2.13
invention

acte consistant à créer quelque chose de nouveau ou à l’améliorer, ou produit de cette création

Note 1 à l’article: Une invention est donc différente d’une innovation, pour laquelle la diffusion sur le marché est

une condition préalable.
2.14
matériau

terme collectif désignant les substances nécessaires pour fabriquer et exploiter des machines, mais

également pour réaliser des constructions

Note 1 à l’article: Le terme « matériau » est utilisé dans le reste du document comme un terme général pour

désigner tous les matériaux et structures biologiques.

Note 2 à l’article: Il comprend les matières premières, les matériaux de travail (2.20), les produits semi-finis, les

fournitures connexes, les matériaux de production, ainsi que les pièces et les assemblages. Le terme « matériau »

est utilisé dans le sens de matériaux de travail (2.20).

Note 3 à l’article: Les matériaux biologiques sont des substances organiques et/ou minérales produites par

des organismes vivants. En raison de leur structure hiérarchique, du niveau moléculaire jusqu’au niveau

macroscopique, il n’est pas possible de faire clairement la distinction entre les termes « matériau » et « structure »

dans le domaine de la biologie.
2.15
modèle

abstraction cohérente et utilisable (2.1) issue de l’observation des systèmes biologiques (2.6)

2.16
structure
type et disposition des composants (2.11) dans un système (2.18)
2.17
durabilité
développement durable

mode de développement répondant aux besoins d’aujourd’hui sans compromettre la capacité des

générations futures à répondre à leurs propres besoins

Note 1 à l’article: La technologie de la nature est le concept de l’apprentissage de technologies respectueuses de

l’homme et de l’environnement, inspirées de l’équilibre parfait de la nature, exerçant une infime pression sur

[7]
l’environnement, hautement fonctionnelles et pérennes .
2.18
système

ensemble de composants (2.11) interactifs ou interdépendants formant un tout intégré avec une limite définie

2.19
attrait technologique (technology pull)

processus de développement biomimétique dans lequel un produit technique fonctionnel existant est

pourvu de fonctions nouvelles ou améliorées grâce au transfert et à l’application de principes biologiques

Note 1 à l’article: L’attrait technologique est considéré comme un processus descendant (top-down).

Note 2 à l’article: Dans le protocole de recherche, la poussée biologique (biology push) est considérée comme

[6]
« axée sur les problèmes » .
Note 3 à l’article: Voir également poussée biologique (biology push) (2.7).
© ISO 2015 – Tous droits réservés 3
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO 18458:2015(F)
2.20
matériau de travail

matière première préparée dans un état formé ou non formé (état solide, liquide ou gazeux), utilisée pour

fabriquer des composants, des produits semi-finis, des fournitures connexes, ou des matériaux de production

3 Qu’est-ce que la biomimétique ?
3.1 Bases de la biomimétique

L’application réussie de la biomimétique se définit comme étant le transfert de connaissances et d’idées de

la biologie vers la technologie ou vers d’autres champs d’innovation, c’est-à-dire le développement pratique

inspiré de la nature qui passe habituellement par plusieurs étapes d’abstraction et de modification après

le point de départ biologique. Le caractère hautement interdisciplinaire et multidisciplinaire du domaine

de la biomimétique est indiqué par le niveau élevé de collaboration entre des experts issus des divers

domaines de la recherche, par exemple collaboration entre biologistes, chimistes, physiciens, ingénieurs

et spécialistes en sciences sociales.

Selon l’intensité avec laquelle elle est appliquée, la biomimétique peut être considérée comme une

discipline scientifique, un processus d’innovation, ou une technique de créativité. En management de

l’innovation, la biomimétique est utilisée comme une technique de créativité parmi d’autres. Cependant,

on ne réalise pas totalement son potentiel lorsqu’on la perçoit uniquement comme une technique de

créativité car, dans ce cas, le développement de nouvelles idées demeure souvent au niveau de la recherche

d’analogies évidentes entre des systèmes biologiques et des problèmes techniques, sans effectuer une

analyse systématique, une abstraction, ou un transfert de principe de fonctionnement.

Le processus d’innovation en biomimétique commence par faire le lien entre un système biologique et

une question technique spécifique. La spécificité de la biomimétique réside dans le fait qu’elle concentre

l’intérêt pour des connaissances issues du domaine de la biologie dans le but d’obtenir une mise en

œuvre technique réelle.

En biomimétique, l’intérêt conceptuel pour et la recherche sur le système biologique sont orientés de

manière à obtenir des applications. Les relations entre la structure et la fonction sont particulièrement

importantes dans ce contexte. Ces relations découlent principalement de l’analyse de la morphologie

fonctionnelle dans le cadre de la biologie organismique. La réussite d’un processus biomimétique

repose essentiellement sur la conception de l’interface entre la recherche biologique et l’ingénierie de

développement de procédés et de produits. La biomimétique ne se limite pas au transfert de résultats

biologiques analysés vers la technologie; elle couvre également l’application de la méthodologie

d’ingénierie aux systèmes biologiques, ainsi que l’intégration des connaissances relatives aux systèmes

biologiques dans les développements techniques. Un transfert efficace et multicouche des connaissances,

et notamment des méthodes, entre les disciplines constitue donc la base pour un processus de

développement biomimétique qui a abouti.

La biomimétique est fondée sur la recherche fondamentale dans le domaine de la biologie. Dans la

mesure où elle se focalise essentiellement sur les applications, la biomimétique intègre principalement

la recherche orientée vers les applications et la recherche appliquée dans le développement réel du

produit ou du processus.

Dans la mesure où elle constitue intrinsèquement un type de processus d’innovation, la biomimétique

est en train de devenir actuellement une discipline scientifique à part entière. D’une part, elle développe

de façon régulière un système de déclarations scientifiques, de théories et de méthodes reliées entre

elles; d’autre part, des associations, des instituts de recherche et d’enseignement ainsi que des outils

de communication sont en train d’être mis en place par certains groupes de personnes réunis sous la

bannière de la biomimétique.
3.2 Limites et domaines de chevauchement avec les sciences associées

L’expression « biologie technique » (technical biology) a été introduite par Werner Nachtigall pour

[8]

la distinguer de la biomimétique . La biologie technique se compose des sciences de l’ingénierie

4 © ISO 2015 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
ISO 18458:2015(F)

ainsi que de l’analyse des relations structure/fonction entre objets biologiques à l’aide d’approches

méthodologiques empruntées à la physique. Par conséquent, la biologie technique constitue le point

de départ de nombreux projets de recherche en biomimétique car elle permet une compréhension plus

approfondie du mode de fonctionnement du système biologique au niveau quantitatif ainsi qu’une mise

en œuvre appropriée dans des applications techniques.

Au cours des dernières années, on s’est aperçu que les connaissances acquises grâce à la mise en œuvre

de principes de fonctionnement inspirés de la biologie dans des produits et technologies biomimétiques

innovants pouvaient contribuer à une meilleure compréhension des systèmes biologiques. Ce processus

de transfert depuis la biomimétique vers la biologie, dont la découverte est relativement récente, peut

être désigné par « biomimétique inverse ». Contrairement à la biologie technique, la biomimétique inverse

n’applique pas des méthodes d’ingénierie et des outils d’analyse classiques aux systèmes biologiques;

elle utilise plutôt des prototypes biomimétiques dans leur ensemble et/ou la simulation de leur méthode

de fonctionnement comme modèles explicatifs ou modèles d’étude pouvant faciliter la compréhension

de la biologie sous-jacente. Dans un processus itératif, les méthodes de biologie technique sont ensuite

appliquées une nouvelle fois lors de l’étape suivante afin d’essayer ce modèle explicatif neuf ou étendu

sur le système biologique. Les connaissances nouvellement acquises sur les structures et les fonctions

biologiques sont appliquées au développement de produits et technologies biomimétiques améliorés

qui, à leur tour, servent de modèles biomimétiques améliorés auxquels la biomimétique inverse peut

être appliquée, etc. Cela aboutit à de nouvelles connaissances sous la forme d’une spirale heuristique de

[9]
biologie technique, de biomimétique et de biomimétique inverse .

La limite séparant la biomimétique et la biotechnologie est également importante. La biomimétique et

la biotechnologie sont des domaines de recherche biologique appliquée (biologie translationnelle). La

biotechnologie est considérée comme l’application de principes scientifiques et techniques pour convertir

des substances à l’aide d’agents biologiques dans le but de fournir des biens et des services (basée

[10]

sur la Référence ). Par contre, la biomimétique utilise des organismes vivants comme générateurs

d’idées pour les mises en œuvre de techniques innovantes, mais les organismes eux-mêmes ne sont

pas nécessairement impliqués dans la fabrication de produits biomimétiques. Bien que les concepts de

biotechnologie et de biomimétique ne soient pas identiques, ils doivent être combinés, comme cela a été

démontré par des projets de recherche sur le développement de soie d’araignée artificielle, par exemple,

voir la Référence [11] (voir Tableau 1 et A.2).

La biomimétique est une science hautement interdisciplinaire présentant de nombreuses facettes.

En fait, il existe également des publications qui contiennent une terminologie biomimétique dans

les sciences économiques et dans le management des organisations et qui, sur la base de l’analyse de

systèmes biologiques, font des suggestions pour l’amélioration des systèmes concepts et des stratégies

[12][13][14]

existantes . Toutefois, il n’est pas toujours facile d’identifier l’aspect lié à la technologie dans

ces domaines vu qu’il est utilisé dans la définition de la biomimétique, ou qu’il peut être nécessaire

d’étendre la définition du terme « technologie »pour l’identifier.

En revanche, des secteurs de recherche traitant uniquement d’éléments inanimés de la nature (géo-

inspirés) sont incompatibles avec la définition de la biomimétique fournie ci-dessus. Cela comprend,

par exemple, la recherche sur les cristaux de neige qui peuvent fournir des informations intéressantes

[15]

pour la production de nanostructures telles que celles requises pour les micropuces ou pour le

développement de matériaux absorbants acoustiques.

L’utilisation de formes conçues sur la base des seuls systèmes biologiques ne peut pas être considérée

comme une approche biomimétique, en particulier lorsque, vues de l’extérieur, les formes semblent

basées sur une forme trouvée dans la nature alors que, dans les faits, elles sont basées sur une technologie

OAO (optimisation assistée par ordinateur) sophistiquée ou sur d’autres méthodes mathématiques

pour la conception des surfaces, par exemple. Dans ces cas, la biomimétique n’intervient que lorsque

la conception de la forme fait partie intégrante de la fonctionnalité développée selon des principes

biomimétiques.
3.3 Produits et processus biomimétiques

La décision portant sur le fait qu’un produit ou une technologie peut être considéré ou non comme

biomimétique peut être prise en se fondant sur trois critères (étapes) (voir Tableau 1).

© ISO 2015 – Tous droits réservés 5
---------------------- Page: 10 ----------------------
ISO 18458:2015(F)

Un produit ne peut être considéré comme biomimétique que si, et seulement si, les trois étapes ci-dessous

définissant le processus biomimétique sont suivies:
— une analyse fonctionnelle d’un système biologique disponible a été effe
...

Questions, Comments and Discussion

Ask us and Technical Secretary will try to provide an answer. You can facilitate discussion about the standard in here.