Biomimetics -- Biomimetic structural optimization

ISO 18459:2015 specifies the functions and scopes of biomimetic structural optimization methods. They consider linear structural problems under static and fatigue loads. The methods described in ISO 18459:2015 are illustrated by examples. The purpose of ISO 18459:2015 is to familiarize users with biomimetic optimization methods as effective tools for increasing the lifespan, reducing the weight of components, and promoting the widespread use of these methods in support of sustainable development. ISO 18459:2015 is intended primarily for designers, developers, engineers, and technicians, but also for all persons entrusted with the design and evaluation of load-bearing structures.

Biomimétique -- Optimisation biomimétique

L'ISO 18459:2015 spécifie les fonctions et domaines d'application des méthodes d'optimisation biomimétique. Celles-ci portent sur des problčmes structuraux linéaires survenant sous des charges statiques et de fatigue. Les méthodes décrites dans la présente Norme internationale sont illustrées par des exemples. L'ISO 18459:2015 a pour objectif de familiariser les utilisateurs avec les méthodes d'optimisation biomimétique en tant qu'outils efficaces permettant d'allonger la durée de vie et de réduire le poids des composants tout en favorisant l'utilisation étendue de ces méthodes en soutien au développement durable. L'ISO 18459:2015 s'adresse en particulier aux concepteurs, développeurs, ingénieurs et techniciens, mais elle s'adresse également ŕ toutes les personnes concernées par la conception et l'évaluation de structures porteuses.

General Information

Status
Published
Publication Date
06-May-2015
Technical Committee
Drafting Committee
Current Stage
9060 - Close of review
Start Date
03-Sep-2020
Ref Project

Buy Standard

Standard
ISO 18459:2015 - Biomimetics -- Biomimetic structural optimization
English language
20 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview
Standard
ISO 18459:2015 - Biomimétique -- Optimisation biomimétique
French language
22 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview

Standards Content (sample)

INTERNATIONAL ISO
STANDARD 18459
First edition
2015-05-15
Biomimetics — Biomimetic
structural optimization
Biomimétisme — Optimisation biomimétique
Reference number
ISO 18459:2015(E)
ISO 2015
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO 18459:2015(E)
COPYRIGHT PROTECTED DOCUMENT
© ISO 2015, Published in Switzerland

All rights reserved. Unless otherwise specified, no part of this publication may be reproduced or utilized otherwise in any form

or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, or posting on the internet or an intranet, without prior

written permission. Permission can be requested from either ISO at the address below or ISO’s member body in the country of

the requester.
ISO copyright office
Ch. de Blandonnet 8 • CP 401
CH-1214 Vernier, Geneva, Switzerland
Tel. +41 22 749 01 11
Fax +41 22 749 09 47
copyright@iso.org
www.iso.org
ii © ISO 2015 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO 18459:2015(E)
Contents Page

Foreword ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................iv

Introduction ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................v

1 Scope ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 1

2 Normative references ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3 Terms and definitions ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

4 Symbols and abbreviated terms ........................................................................................................................................................... 3

5 Principles of self-optimization in nature and hence transferred optimization methods ........3

6 Application of methods .................................................................................................................................................................................. 5

6.1 Application range and limits ....................................................................................................................................................... 5

6.2 Computer Aided Optimization (CAO) .................................................................................................................................. 6

6.2.1 Stress-controlled growth .......................................................................................................................................... 6

6.2.2 Shrinking ................................................................................................................................................................................ 7

6.2.3 Finite elements in practical applications (FEA) .................................................................................... 8

6.3 Soft Kill Option (SKO) ........................................................................................................................................................................ 8

6.3.1 Principle of the SKO method .................................................................................................................................. 8

6.3.2 Implementing the SKO principle in the finite element analysis .............................................. 9

6.3.3 Examples of applications of the SKO method .......................................................................................11

6.4 Computer Aided Internal Optimization (CAIO) .......................................................................................................12

6.4.1 Example of the CAIO method: bent cylinder .........................................................................................13

6.5 Method of Tensile Triangles......................................................................................................................................................14

6.5.1 General...................................................................................................................................................................................14

6.5.2 Tensile triangles for saving material............................................................................................................15

6.5.3 Tensile triangles for optimization of fibre orientation ................................................................17

6.5.4 Example of the Method of Tensile Triangles: shoulder fillet ...................................................18

Bibliography .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................20

© ISO 2015 – All rights reserved iii
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO 18459:2015(E)
Foreword

ISO (the International Organization for Standardization) is a worldwide federation of national standards

bodies (ISO member bodies). The work of preparing International Standards is normally carried out

through ISO technical committees. Each member body interested in a subject for which a technical

committee has been established has the right to be represented on that committee. International

organizations, governmental and non-governmental, in liaison with ISO, also take part in the work.

ISO collaborates closely with the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) on all matters of

electrotechnical standardization.

The procedures used to develop this document and those intended for its further maintenance are

described in the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 1. In particular the different approval criteria needed for the

different types of ISO documents should be noted. This document was drafted in accordance with the

editorial rules of the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 2 (see www.iso.org/directives).

Attention is drawn to the possibility that some of the elements of this document may be the subject of

patent rights. ISO shall not be held responsible for identifying any or all such patent rights. Details of

any patent rights identified during the development of the document will be in the Introduction and/or

on the ISO list of patent declarations received (see www.iso.org/patents).

Any trade name used in this document is information given for the convenience of users and does not

constitute an endorsement.

For an explanation on the meaning of ISO specific terms and expressions related to conformity

assessment, as well as information about ISO’s adherence to the WTO principles in the Technical Barriers

to Trade (TBT) see the following URL: Foreword - Supplementary information
The committee responsible for this document is ISO/TC 266, Biomimetics.
iv © ISO 2015 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
ISO 18459:2015(E)
Introduction

Biomimetic optimization methods are based on the knowledge gained from studying natural biological

structures and processes.

Structural optimization is a special branch of optimization dealing with the ideal design of components

while taking the current boundary conditions into account. Commonly optimized properties include

the weight, the load capacity, the stiffness, or the lifespan. The goal is to optimize one or more of these

properties by maximizing or minimizing their values.

Generally, the idea is to utilize the construction material as efficiently as possible while avoiding

overloaded and underloaded areas. Since almost every technical component for functional reasons

exhibits changes in section and, hence, notches, minimizing notch stress is especially important

in structural optimization. In classic structural optimization, the notch shape factor, i.e. the stress

concentration factor on the notch, is reduced by selecting the largest possible radius of curvature for

the notch or by utilizing the mutual interaction of notches and adding relief notches. The shapes of

the notches are not changed by this procedure. The use of other notch shapes (Baud curves, ellipses,

logarithmic spirals, etc.) was suggested as early as in the 1930s. But they are not widely applied in

technology and are only used occasionally.

Computer-based biomimetic optimization tools, such as Computer Aided Optimization (CAO) and the Soft

Kill Option (SKO), modify the shape and topology of the component, respectively, and thus homogenize

the stresses using the finite element analysis (FEA). Such tools have been available since 1990 and are

used in industry. The need to use FEA for optimization in this case limits the number of possible users,

though, because a powerful computer, special software, and an expert are needed for its operation.

The demand for even simpler and faster methods that cannot only be used by specialists to optimize

components, but also by design engineers, led to the development of the “Method of Tensile Triangles”.

Although development of this method began in 2006 only, it is already being used for verified applications

because it is easy to understand and apply. The wide range of applications of biomimetic optimization

methods together with the relative ease with which users are able to understand and apply the methods

enables users to perform component optimization early in the design process. In the case of the Tensile

Triangle Method, this is possible simply by implementing the method in CAD systems.

As every optimization means specialization for the selected cases of load, service loading can be well

known. Other unconsidered loading conditions might even result in higher stresses in a component.

© ISO 2015 – All rights reserved v
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
INTERNATIONAL STANDARD ISO 18459:2015(E)
Biomimetics — Biomimetic structural optimization
1 Scope

The International Standard specifies the functions and scopes of biomimetic structural optimization

methods. They consider linear structural problems under static and fatigue loads. The methods

described in this International Standard are illustrated by examples.

Based on the biological model of natural growth and by use of the FEM optimization methods for

technical components, computer-based biomimetic optimization tools are described as Computer

Aided Optimization (CAO), Soft Kill Option (SKO), and Computer Aided Internal Optimization (CAIO).

The purpose of these methods is an optimal materials application for weight reduction or enhanced

capability and lifespan of the components.

Additionally, a simpler and faster “Method of Tensile Triangles” is described that can be used by every

design engineer. The wide range of applications of biomimetic optimization methods together with the

relative ease with which users are able to understand and apply the methods enables users to perform

component optimization early in the design process.

The purpose of this International Standard is to familiarize users with biomimetic optimization methods

as effective tools for increasing the lifespan, reducing the weight of components, and promoting the

widespread use of these methods in support of sustainable development.

This International Standard is intended primarily for designers, developers, engineers, and technicians,

but also for all persons entrusted with the design and evaluation of load-bearing structures.

2 Normative references

The following documents, in whole or in part, are normatively referenced in this document and are

indispensable for its application. For dated references, only the edition cited applies. For undated

references, the latest edition of the referenced document (including any amendments) applies.

ISO 18458, Biomimetics — Terminology, concepts and methodology
ISO 2394, General principles on reliability for structures

ISO 4866, Mechanical vibration and shock — Vibration of fixed structures — Guidelines for the measurement

of vibrations and evaluation of their effects on structures
ISO 13823, General principles on the design of structures for durability
3 Terms and definitions
For the purposes of this document, the following terms and definitions apply.
3.1
mechanical adaptive growth

appropriate reaction of biological structures, such as trees and bones, to changing conditions (e.g. mechanical

loads) by locally adding material to high-stress areas or removing material from low-stress areas

EXAMPLE Thicker annual rings.
3.2
algorithm
precisely described procedure to complete a task in a finite number of steps
© ISO 2015 – All rights reserved 1
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
ISO 18459:2015(E)
3.3
design space
volume available for a component

Note 1 to entry: The edges of the component to be designed shall not extend beyond the limits of the design space.

3.4
Computer Aided Internal Optimization
CAIO

method based on the finite element analysis (3.6) for the optimization of the local fibre orientation in

fibre composites with the goal of increasing their load capacity
3.5
Computer Aided Optimization
CAO

method for optimizing the shapes of components based on the finite element analysis (3.6)

Note 1 to entry: The stresses in highly stressed areas, such as notches (3.8), are reduced and the component

lifespan is increased.
3.6
finite element analysis
FEA

numerical method for obtaining approximate solutions of partial differential equations subject to

boundary conditions

Note 1 to entry: In the engineering sciences, it is used as an analysis method, for example, to answer questions

relating to structural mechanics. With FEA, a complex structure is divided up using small, simple, and interlinked

elements (FEA mesh). When boundary conditions (loads, bearings, etc.) and material properties are defined, it is

possible to calculate stresses, deformations, etc. in any section of the complex structure.

3.7
shape optimization

modification of the surface of the component to modify a certain target function in a defined manner

(for example, to minimize stresses)
3.8
notch

concavities in components that weaken a component locally due to the notch effect (3.9)

Note 1 to entry: Such weak points are not desired in most cases, but notches are used as predetermined breaking

points in certain cases in order to specify where the component should fail and to limit the load that can be placed

on the component.
3.9
notch effect
local arising of stress peaks on notches (3.8) subjected to a load

Note 1 to entry: The height of the peak usually depends on the size and shape of the notch (3.8). The stresses

decrease as the curvature is decreased and as the size of the notch (3.8) contour is increased.

3.10
Method of Tensile Triangles
simple graphical method for homogenizing stresses in components

Note 1 to entry: It can be used to reduce stresses in high-stress areas, for example, on notches (3.8), and increase

the component lifespan, as well as to remove underloaded areas and save material.

2 © ISO 2015 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
ISO 18459:2015(E)
3.11
Soft Kill Option
SKO

method for optimizing the topology (3.12) of components based on the finite element analysis (3.6)

Note 1 to entry: Lightweight design proposals are generated by successively removing low-stressed material

from the design space (3.3).
3.12
topology

relationship (position and orientation, for example) between the structural elements (holes, supports,

etc.) of a component
4 Symbols and abbreviated terms
E modulus of elasticity
E variation of the modulus of elasticity, E = f(σ)
F force
M torque
T (x,y,z) thermal load
α coefficient of thermal expansion
σ equivalent stress according to von Mises
mises
5 Principles of self-optimization in nature and hence transferred
optimization methods

With the help of the finite element analysis (FEA), numerous studies of biological load-bearing structures,

such as trees, bones, claws, and thorns, revealed that these load-bearing structures are optimally

adapted to the stresses they are subject to and that the same design principles apply to all structures.

The axiom of uniform stress has been shown to be a fundamental principle that applies when load-

bearing biological structures, such as trees or the bones of mammals, grow. This axiom states that the

surface of a load-bearing structure will not exhibit weak points (areas under high stress) or underloaded

areas (unnecessary ballast or wasted material) so that a uniform stress is applied to the surface. This

mechanically advantageous stress state is realized through adaptive growth. Trees, for example, detect

local stress concentrations using internal receptors and repair themselves by growing adaptively. On

overloaded areas, they grow annual rings that are thicker locally and therefore reduce stress peaks.

However, trees cannot remove superfluous material from areas relieved of stress, in contrast to the

bones of humans and animals.

The self-optimization of biological structures is not limited to their exterior structure; even their

inner structures are superbly adapted to the stresses they are subjected to. Adaptive mineralization

processes in bones make areas subject to higher stresses stiffer, while less stressed areas are softened

and finally removed.

In general, biological materials can be considered as fibre-composite materials consisting of several

components. In addition to the component mixture, other decisive factors contributing to their

extraordinary mechanical properties include the hierarchical organization of their molecules over

several orders of magnitude to form entire structures and the inner orientation of material adapted

to the force flow. In soft curves, the wood fibres in the trunk are deflected around imperfections, such

as knots, to follow the direction of force. The same applies to the wood rays which wrap around the

vascular cells in a corresponding manner. Even the cellulose fibrils forming the walls of wood cells

exhibit this type of optimization. On all scales in trees, fibres oriented in the direction of the force flow

can be found. The same applies to bones, which basically consist of plywood-like lamellae structures

© ISO 2015 – All rights reserved 3
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO 18459:2015(E)

with tough fibres and more brittle material. Areas near joints, for example, on the femur (thigh bone),

are filled with trabecular bone, which is also referred to as spongiosa or cancellous bone. This type of

bone is a micro-framework made of fine trabeculae that fill the entire femoral head and neck and is

oriented to follow the flow of force.

As a fundamental design rule, the axiom of uniform stress was implemented systematically in computer-

based methods first, which made it possible to apply this optimization principle for biological load-

bearing structures to any type of load-bearing structure. This is a major prerequisite for utilizing the

wealth of nature’s experience in technical designs.

Computer Aided Optimization (CAO) and Soft Kill Option (SKO) are methods used in industry that were

developed to optimize the shape and topology of technical components. CAO is used very effectively

to homogenize stresses. Local stress peaks are reduced, which then increases the lifespan of the

components significantly, especially when they are subject to vibrating or alternating loads. In contrast,

SKO provides design proposals that do not contain underloaded material anymore. This allows the

designer to identify the relevant paths of force in the component and design lightweight components

while simultaneously taking into account manufacturing limitations, for example.

Finally, Computer Aided Internal Optimization (CAIO) allows designers to transfer the internal designs

of biological load-bearing structures containing fibres oriented in the direction of the force flow to

technical fibre-composite materials using computer simulations and increase their load capacities.

[1]

A deeper understanding of notch stress and further development work led to the purely graphical

“Method of Tensile Triangles”, which allows components to be optimized with minimal effort. The

optimization methods developed contribute significantly to the elimination of weak points during

the development process. In the case of the computer-based methods, its application results in longer

calculation and simulation times, but in the end leads to shorter overall development times, fewer

prototypes, and shorter test phases. The biomimetic structural optimization methods presented here

are examples; further methods are under development.

As defined in ISO 18458, a product or technology is biomimetic when three criteria are met namely,

when there is a biological system available, the model has been abstracted, and the model has been

transferred to a technical application in the form of a prototype at the minimum. As shown in Table 1,

according to these three criteria, the methods described above fulfil the three steps given in ISO 18458.

The CAO method is biomimetic, because the biological system is the growth of trees, a part of this phenomenon

has been abstracted to a load-adaptive process, and this process has been implemented in simple algorithms,

transferred to technical application, and is used in industry to optimize technical components.

The SKO method is biomimetic, because the biological system used for SKO is the mineralization of bone,

a part of this phenomenon has been abstracted to a load-adaptive process, and this process has been

abstracted, implemented in simple algorithms, and also transferred to technical application. SKO is used

for designing lightweight components.

The CAIO method is biomimetic, because CAIO is based on the biological system of the alignment of

wood fibres in trees, a part of this phenomenon has been abstracted to a load-adaptive process, and this

process has been abstracted, implemented in simple algorithms, and transferred to application for the

optimization of technical fibre composites.

The Method of Tensile Triangles is biomimetic, because the Method of Tensile Triangles is based on

the system of stem root junctions of trees, a part of this phenomenon has been abstracted to a load-

adaptive process, and this process has been implemented in simple algorithms, transferred to technical

application, and is used in industry to optimize technical components.

Table 1 lists the methods for biomimetic structural optimization, their biological system, main aim, and

an example of use which shows their application in technology.
4 © ISO 2015 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
ISO 18459:2015(E)

Table 1 — Biomimetic structural optimization methods, their biological system, main aim, and

technical application
Method Biological system Main aim Technical application
Computer Aided adaptive growth of trees shape optimization microactuator
Optimization for increasing the lifespan
(CAO) or the load capacities of
components by stress
homogenization
Soft Kill Option mineralization process in bone topology optimization car frame
(SKO) for designing lightweight
components by removing
underloaded material

Computer Aided alignment of fibre orientation optimization of local fibre bicycle seat

Internal Opti- in trees direction for increasing
mization (CAIO) the load capacities of fibre
composites by adapting
the local fibre orientation
to the load
Method of Ten- stem root junction shape optimization screw
sile Triangles for increasing the lifespan
or the load capacities of
components by stress
homogenization
6 Application of methods
6.1 Application range and limits

The optimization methods mentioned in this International Standard consider linear structural problems

under static load. The results of FEM can serve as static strength verification.

Where dynamic loads are in place, they may be transformed into equivalent static loads (ESLs).

NOTE Structures, optimized by these methods for static loads, will respond to dynamic loads as well, much

better than non-optimized structures.

The notch shape optimization is most effective when high numbers of load cycles are expected and for

components made of brittle material. Statically loaded ductile materials are little notch-sensitive and

can release stress by plastic deformation.
© ISO 2015 – All rights reserved 5
---------------------- Page: 10 ----------------------
ISO 18459:2015(E)

The choice of the stress to optimize depends on the mechanical problem. Mostly, the von Mises stress or

normal stresses are used. If needed, other equivalent stresses can be implemented.

Several loadings can be analysed and optimized separately or as load collectives. Often, an optimization

of the critical cases is sufficient, but the results should be verified for all loadings.

Instable failure, e.g. buckling, is not covered by these methods. Therefore, optimization results are to be

checked to that effect.

In general, optimization results shall be verified by FEA or experiments. General principles on reliability

for structures are described in ISO 2394. To verify dynamic strength, vibration strength, and durability

of a structure, ISO 13823 and ISO 4866 may be considered.
6.2 Computer Aided Optimization (CAO)

The CAO method is an aid for optimizing the shape of components. It was developed to counteract stress

concentrations on critical sections in components through “growth”.
6.2.1 Stress-controlled growth

The process of load-adaptive growth of a component can be simulated on a computer by displacing the

surface of the component in the direction of its normal according to the local magnitude of the stress.

Using finite elements as a basis, this can be achieved by determining the direction of the normal to the

surface and the stress values on nodes or with the help of the thermal displacement method.

An FEA model and, as a rule, the von Mises reference stresses calculated from the model serve as the

basis for performing a stress optimization. It is also possible to use other stress values, such as the

principal normal stress or other reference stresses, instead of von Mises stresses. The first step after

specifying the load and position conditions is to perform an FEA stress analysis. After that, growth is

simulated on the model based on the stresses calculated. This can be done in a variety of ways.

For example, the second step may consist of modelling the applied stress distribution by a fictitious

temperature distribution. A “soft” growth layer with constant thickness and a prescribed coefficient

of thermal expansion is then defined. Reducing the modulus of elasticity to 1/400 of its original value

helps to avoid deflection of the underlying structure, which means the growth simulated in the form of

thermal expansion is restricted to the soft boundary layer. Growth is now performed based on an FEA

calculation of the thermal expansion of the material. In this case, the locations subject to higher stress,

and, hence, to higher (fictitious) temperatures, expand more than those areas subject to less stress.

The thermal displacements calculated in this step are then added to the coordinates of the nodes of the

FEA mesh, which creates a new mesh with a new geometry. Finally, the modulus of elasticity of the growth

layer is reset to its original value and a new FEA stress analysis can be performed. The optimization

can be considered complete when geometric restrictions are reached or when a homogeneous stress

distribution is achieved (see Figure 1).

In addition to simulating growth, CAO can also be used to simulate shrinking, although stress-controlled

growth is used more frequently in nature, as well as in technology.
6 © ISO 2015 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 11 ----------------------
ISO 18459:2015(E)
Key
1 notch to be optimized
2 growth layer of uniform thickness
Figure 1 — Schematic flowchart of the CAO method according to Reference [3]
6.2.2 Shrinking

CAO can be used to shrink components using the same procedure as for stress-controlled growth. In this

method, areas with low stresses are defined to be “growth areas” or more appropriately, “shrink areas”.

Shrinking is performed just like in the previous subclause after executing an FEA stress analysis. In this

case, however, the displacement vector points into the material and not away from it. A value is specified

for the temperature that defines the point up to which the elements are allowed to shrink. To ensure

faster processing, it also makes sense to include a weighting factor in the calculation. However, do not

select weighting factors that are so large that the nodes of the mesh are moved out of the design space

when the shrink area shrinks to its minimum size. If the displacements are large, then problems can

arise in practice. Displacing the neighbouring nodes in the same direction can also help in this case. If the

displacements are large, then the mesh shall be regenerated. An iterative procedure is recommended for

this version of CAO and it is also recommended to perform a stress analysis after regenerating the

...

NORME ISO
INTERNATIONALE 18459
Première édition
2015-05-15
Biomimétisme — Optimisation
biomimétique
Biomimetics — Biomimetic structural optimization
Numéro de référence
ISO 18459:2015(F)
ISO 2015
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO 18459:2015(F)
DOCUMENT PROTÉGÉ PAR COPYRIGHT
© ISO 2015, Publié en Suisse

Droits de reproduction réservés. Sauf indication contraire, aucune partie de cette publication ne peut être reproduite ni utilisée

sous quelque forme que ce soit et par aucun procédé, électronique ou mécanique, y compris la photocopie, l’affichage sur

l’internet ou sur un Intranet, sans autorisation écrite préalable. Les demandes d’autorisation peuvent être adressées à l’ISO à

l’adresse ci-après ou au comité membre de l’ISO dans le pays du demandeur.
ISO copyright office
Ch. de Blandonnet 8 • CP 401
CH-1214 Vernier, Geneva, Switzerland
Tel. +41 22 749 01 11
Fax +41 22 749 09 47
copyright@iso.org
www.iso.org
ii © ISO 2015 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO 18459:2015(F)
Sommaire Page

Avant-propos ..............................................................................................................................................................................................................................iv

Introduction ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................v

1 Domaine d’application ................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

2 Références normatives ................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3 Termes et définitions ....................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

4 Symboles et abréviations ............................................................................................................................................................................. 3

5 Principes d’auto-optimisation dans la nature et méthodes d’optimisation

transférées en conséquence ..................................................................................................................................................................... 3

6 Application des méthodes .......................................................................................................................................................................... 6

6.1 Étendue et limites des applications ...................................................................................................................................... 6

6.2 Optimisation assistée par ordinateur (OAO) ................................................................................................................ 7

6.2.1 Croissance par contrôle des contraintes ..................................................................................................... 7

6.2.2 Rétrécissement .................................................................................................................................................................. 8

6.2.3 Analyse par éléments finis (FEA) dans les applications pratiques .................. ..................... 9

6.3 Méthode SKO (Soft Kill Option) ................................................................................................................................................ 9

6.3.1 Principe de la méthode SKO ................................................................................................................................... 9

6.3.2 Mise en œuvre du principe SKO dans l’analyse par éléments finis ...................................10

6.3.3 Exemples d’applications de la méthode SKO ........................................................................................12

6.4 Optimisation interne assistée par ordinateur (OIAO) .......................................................................................14

6.4.1 Exemple d’utilisation de la méthode OIAO : cylindre cintré ...................................................15

6.5 Méthode des triangles de traction .......................................................................................................................................16

6.5.1 Généralités .........................................................................................................................................................................16

6.5.2 Triangles de traction pour économiser du matériau .....................................................................18

6.5.3 Triangles de traction pour l’optimisation de l’orientation des fibres .............................19

6.5.4 Exemple d’utilisation de la méthode des triangles de traction : congé de

raccordement d’épaulement ...............................................................................................................................20

Bibliographie ...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................22

© ISO 2015 – Tous droits réservés iii
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO 18459:2015(F)
Avant-propos

L’ISO (Organisation internationale de normalisation) est une fédération mondiale d’organismes

nationaux de normalisation (comités membres de l’ISO). L’élaboration des Normes internationales est

en général confiée aux comités techniques de l’ISO. Chaque comité membre intéressé par une étude

a le droit de faire partie du comité technique créé à cet effet. Les organisations internationales,

gouvernementales et non gouvernementales, en liaison avec l’ISO participent également aux travaux.

L’ISO collabore étroitement avec la Commission électrotechnique internationale (IEC) en ce qui concerne

la normalisation électrotechnique.

Les procédures utilisées pour élaborer le présent document et celles destinées à sa mise à jour sont

décrites dans les Directives ISO/IEC, Partie 1. Il convient, en particulier de prendre note des différents

critères d’approbation requis pour les différents types de documents ISO. Le présent document a été

rédigé conformément aux règles de rédaction données dans les Directives ISO/IEC, Partie 2 (voir www.

iso.org/directives).

L’attention est appelée sur le fait que certains des éléments du présent document peuvent faire l’objet de

droits de propriété intellectuelle ou de droits analogues. L’ISO ne saurait être tenue pour responsable

de ne pas avoir identifié de tels droits de propriété et averti de leur existence. Les détails concernant les

références aux droits de propriété intellectuelle ou autres droits analogues identifiés lors de l’élaboration

du document sont indiqués dans l’Introduction et/ou dans la liste des déclarations de brevets reçues par

l’ISO (voir www.iso.org/brevets).

Les appellations commerciales éventuellement mentionnées dans le présent document sont données

pour information, par souci de commodité, à l’intention des utilisateurs et ne sauraient constituer un

engagement.

Pour une explication de la signification des termes et expressions spécifiques de l’ISO liés à l’évaluation

de la conformité, ou pour toute information au sujet de l’adhésion de l’ISO aux principes de l’OMC

concernant les obstacles techniques au commerce (OTC), voir le lien suivant : Avant-propos —

Informations supplémentaires.

Le comité chargé de l’élaboration du présent document est l’ISO/TC 266, Biomimétique.

iv © ISO 2015 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
ISO 18459:2015(F)
Introduction

Les méthodes d’optimisation biomimétique sont basées sur les connaissances acquises grâce à l’étude

des structures et processus biologiques.

L’optimisation structurale est une branche particulière de l’optimisation, qui traite de la conception

théorique de composants tout en tenant compte des conditions limites actuelles. Les propriétés

couramment optimisées comprennent le poids, la capacité de charge, la rigidité ou la durée de vie. Le

but est d’optimiser une ou plusieurs de ces propriétés en augmentant au maximum ou en réduisant au

minimum leurs valeurs.

L’idée générale est d’utiliser aussi efficacement que possible le matériau tout en évitant les zones

excessivement chargées et les zones insuffisamment chargées. Sachant que, pour des raisons

fonctionnelles, les composants techniques présentent presque tous des variations de section, et donc des

entailles, la réduction de la contrainte à l’entaille est particulièrement importante dans l’optimisation

structurale. Dans le cadre d’une optimisation structurale classique, le facteur de forme de l’entaille,

c’est-à-dire le coefficient de concentration de contraintes sur l’entaille, est réduit en choisissant le plus

grand rayon de courbure possible pour l’entaille ou en utilisant l’interaction mutuelle des entailles

et en ajoutant les entailles de dégagement. Les formes des entailles ne sont pas modifiées par cette

procédure. L’utilisation d’autres formes d’entailles (courbes de Baud, ellipses, spirales logarithmiques,

etc.) a été suggérée dès les années 1930. Mais elles ne sont pas largement appliquées en technologie et

leur utilisation est sporadique.

Des outils informatiques d’optimisation biomimétique, tels que l’optimisation assistée par

ordinateur (OAO) et la méthode SKO (Soft Kill Option), modifient respectivement la forme et la topologie

du composant et homogénéisent ainsi les contraintes en utilisant l’analyse par éléments finis (AEF). De

tels outils sont disponibles depuis 1990 et sont utilisés dans l’industrie. La nécessité d’utiliser, dans ce

cas, l’analyse par éléments finis (AEF) pour l’optimisation, limiterait le nombre d’utilisateurs potentiels

car il faudrait pour cela un ordinateur puissant, un logiciel spécial et un expert pour les faire fonctionner.

Le besoin de disposer de méthodes plus simples et plus rapides, pouvant être utilisées non seulement

par des spécialistes pour optimiser les composants, mais également par des ingénieurs d’études, a

conduit à l’élaboration de la « méthode des triangles de traction » (Method of Tensile Triangles). Bien

que le développement de cette méthode n’ait commencé qu’en 2006, celle-ci est déjà utilisée pour des

applications reconnues car elle est facile à comprendre et à mettre en œuvre. La vaste étendue des

applications des méthodes d’optimisation biomimétique ainsi que la facilité relative avec laquelle les

utilisateurs sont capables de comprendre et d’appliquer les méthodes permet aux utilisateurs de procéder

à l’optimisation des composants très tôt dans le processus de conception. Dans le cas de la méthode des

triangles de traction, il suffit de mettre en œuvre la méthode dans des systèmes de conception assistée

par ordinateur (CAO).

Dans la mesure où chaque optimisation signifie une spécialisation pour les cas de charge sélectionnés,

les charges de service peuvent être bien connues. D’autres conditions de charge non prises en compte

peuvent même engendrer des contraintes plus élevées dans un composant.
© ISO 2015 – Tous droits réservés v
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
NORME INTERNATIONALE ISO 18459:2015(F)
Biomimétisme — Optimisation biomimétique
1 Domaine d’application

La présente Norme internationale spécifie les fonctions et domaines d’application des méthodes

d’optimisation biomimétique. Celles-ci portent sur des problèmes structuraux linéaires survenant sous

des charges statiques et de fatigue. Les méthodes décrites dans la présente Norme internationale sont

illustrées par des exemples.

Fondés sur le modèle biologique de la croissance naturelle et utilisant des méthodes par éléments

finis (MEF) d’optimisation pour composants techniques, des outils informatiques d’optimisation

biomimétique sont décrits en tant qu’optimisation assistée par ordinateur (OAO), méthode SKO (Soft

Kill Option) et optimisation interne assistée par ordinateur (OIAO). Ces méthodes ont pour objectif une

application optimale dans le domaine des matériaux pour une réduction du poids ou une amélioration

de la capacité et de la durée de vie des composants.

En outre, une « méthode des triangles de traction » (Method of Tensile Triangles) plus simple et plus

rapide est décrite, celle-ci pouvant être utilisée par chaque ingénieur en conception. La vaste étendue

des applications des méthodes d’optimisation biomimétique ainsi que la facilité relative avec laquelle

les utilisateurs sont capables de comprendre et d’appliquer ces méthodes permet aux utilisateurs de

procéder à l’optimisation des composants très tôt dans le processus de conception.

La présente Norme internationale a pour objectif de familiariser les utilisateurs avec les méthodes

d’optimisation biomimétique en tant qu’outils efficaces permettant d’allonger la durée de vie et de

réduire le poids des composants tout en favorisant l’utilisation étendue de ces méthodes en soutien au

développement durable.

La présente Norme internationale s’adresse en particulier aux concepteurs, développeurs, ingénieurs

et techniciens, mais elle s’adresse également à toutes les personnes concernées par la conception et

l’évaluation de structures porteuses.
2 Références normatives

Les documents suivants, en totalité ou en partie, sont référencés de manière normative dans le présent

document et sont indispensables pour son application. Pour les références datées, seule l’édition citée

s’applique. Pour les références non datées, la dernière édition du document de référence s’applique (y

compris les éventuels amendements).
ISO 18458, Biomimétique — Terminologie, concepts et méthodologie
ISO 2394, Principes généraux de la fiabilité des constructions

ISO 4866, Vibrations et chocs mécaniques — Vibration des structures fixes — Lignes directrices pour le

mesurage des vibrations et l’évaluation de leurs effets sur les structures
ISO 13823, Principes généraux du calcul des constructions pour la durabilité
3 Termes et définitions

Pour les besoins du présent document, les termes et définitions suivants s’appliquent.

© ISO 2015 – Tous droits réservés 1
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
ISO 18459:2015(F)
3.1
croissance adaptative mécanique

réaction appropriée de structures biologiques, telles que des arbres et des os, à un changement de

conditions (par exemple, charges mécaniques) en ajoutant localement de la matière à des zones soumises

à des contraintes élevées ou en enlevant de la matière à des zones soumises à de faibles contraintes

EXEMPLE Cernes annuels plus épais.
3.2
algorithme

procédure décrite avec précision pour accomplir une tâche suivant un nombre fini d’étapes

3.3
espace de conception
volume disponible pour un composant

Note 1 à l’article: Les bords du composant à concevoir ne doivent pas s’étendre au-delà des limites de l’espace de

conception.
3.4
optimisation interne assistée par ordinateur
OIAO

méthode basée sur l’analyse par éléments finis (3.6) pour l’optimisation de l’orientation locale des fibres

dans des matériaux composites à fibres dans le but d’augmenter leur capacité de charge

3.5
optimisation assistée par ordinateur
OAO

méthode d’optimisation des formes des composants fondée sur l’analyse par éléments finis (3.6)

Note 1 à l’article: Les contraintes dans des zones soumises à des contraintes élevées, telles que des entailles (3.8),

sont réduites, et la durée de vie du composant est allongée.
3.6
analyse par éléments finis
AEF

méthode numérique permettant de trouver des solutions approximatives à des équations différentielles

partielles soumises à des conditions limites

Note 1 à l’article: Dans les sciences de l’ingénieur, elle est utilisée comme une méthode d’analyse, par exemple

pour répondre à des questions se rapportant à la mécanique structurale. Avec l’analyse par éléments finis (AEF),

une structure complexe est subdivisée en petits éléments simples interdépendants (maillage AEF). Lorsque les

conditions limites (charges, supports, etc.) et les propriétés des matériaux sont définies, il est possible de calculer

les contraintes, les déformations, etc. dans toute section de la structure complexe.

3.7
optimisation de la forme

modification de la surface du composant pour modifier, d’une manière définie, une certaine fonction

visée (par exemple pour réduire les contraintes au minimum)
3.8
entaille

concavités qui affaiblissent localement un composant en raison de l’effet d’entaille (3.9)

Note 1 à l’article: De tels points faibles sont indésirables dans la plupart des cas, mais les entailles sont utilisées

comme des points de rupture prédéterminés dans certains cas pour spécifier l’endroit où le composant doit

normalement rompre et pour limiter la charge pouvant être placée sur le composant.

2 © ISO 2015 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
ISO 18459:2015(F)
3.9
effet d’entaille

apparition localisée de pics de contraintes sur des entailles (3.8) soumises à une charge

Note 1 à l’article: La hauteur du pic dépend en général de la taille et de la forme de l’entaille (3.8). Les contraintes

diminuent en même temps que la courbure et au fur et à mesure que la taille du contour de l’entaille (3.8) augmente.

3.10
méthode des triangles de traction

méthode graphique simple utilisée pour homogénéiser les contraintes dans les composants

Note 1 à l’article: Cette méthode peut être utilisée pour réduire les contraintes dans des zones soumises à des

contraintes élevées, par exemple sur des entailles (3.8), ainsi que pour allonger la durée de vie du composant et

éliminer des zones non soumises à des charges et économiser de la matière.
3.11
méthode « Soft Kill Option »
SKO

méthode d’optimisation de la topologie (3.12) des composants fondée sur l’analyse par éléments finis (3.6)

Note 1 à l’article: Des modèles de conceptions légères sont proposés en éliminant successivement de la matière

soumise à de faibles contraintes de l’espace de conception (3.3).
3.12
topologie

relation (position et orientation, par exemple) entre les éléments structuraux (orifices, supports, etc.)

d’un composant
4 Symboles et abréviations
E module d’élasticité
E variation du module d’élasticité, E = f(σ)
F force
M couple
T (x,y,z) charge thermique
α coefficient de dilatation thermique
σ contrainte équivalente de von Mises
mises
5 Principes d’auto-optimisation dans la nature et méthodes d’optimisation
transférées en conséquence

À l’aide de l’analyse par éléments finis (AEF), de nombreuses études ont été effectuées à propos de

structures biologiques soumises à des charges, telles que les arbres, les os, les griffes et les épines.

Ces études ont montré que ces structures porteuses sont adaptées de façon optimale aux contraintes

auxquelles elles sont soumises et que les mêmes principes de conception s’appliquent à toutes les

structures. Ces études ont démontré que l’axiome de contrainte uniforme constitue un principe

fondamental qui s’applique lors de la croissance de structures biologiques porteuses telles que les arbres

ou les os des mammifères. Cet axiome énonce que la surface d’une structure porteuse ne présentera pas

de points faibles (zones soumises à une contrainte élevée) ni de zones soumises à de faibles charges (lest

ou matière non nécessaire) de sorte qu’une contrainte uniforme soit appliquée à la surface. Cet état de

contrainte avantageux au point de vue mécanique est obtenu par le biais d’une croissance adaptative.

Les arbres, par exemple, détectent des concentrations de contraintes locales à l’aide de récepteurs

internes et procèdent à leur propre réparation en croissant de façon adaptée. Sur les zones soumises à

© ISO 2015 – Tous droits réservés 3
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO 18459:2015(F)

des charges excessives, les arbres développent des cernes annuels localement plus épais qui réduisent

les pics de contraintes. Cependant, contrairement aux os des humains et des animaux, les arbres ne sont

pas capables d’éliminer de la matière superflue dans des zones non soumises à des contraintes.

L’auto-optimisation des structures biologiques n’est pas limitée à leur structure extérieure car même

leurs structures intérieures sont parfaitement adaptées aux contraintes auxquelles elles sont soumises.

Les processus de minéralisation adaptative dans les os rendent plus rigides des zones soumises à des

contraintes plus élevées, alors que les zones soumises à des contraintes plus faibles sont ramollies et en

fin de compte éliminées.

En règle générale, les matériaux biologiques peuvent être considérés comme des matériaux composites

à fibres comprenant plusieurs composants. En plus du mélange de composants, parmi les autres facteurs

déterminants contribuant à leurs propriétés mécaniques extraordinaires, il est possible de mentionner

l’organisation hiérarchique de leurs molécules sur plusieurs ordres de grandeur pour former des

structures complètes et l’orientation intérieure du matériau adaptée au cheminement des forces.

Dans les courbes lisses, les fibres de bois dans le tronc contournent les imperfections telles que les

nœuds pour suivre la direction de la force. Il en est de même pour les rayons de xylème qui s’enroulent

autour des cellules vasculaires de façon similaire. Même les fibrilles de cellulose formant les parois

des cellules ligneuses démontrent ce type d’optimisation. Dans les arbres, on peut trouver, à toutes les

échelles, des fibres orientées selon le cheminement des forces. Il en est de même pour les os, qui se

composent essentiellement de structures lamellaires similaires au contreplaqué, avec des fibres dures

et une quantité supérieure de matériau fragile. Les zones situées près des articulations, par exemple

sur le fémur (os de la cuisse), sont remplies d’os trabéculaire; également désigné tissu spongieux ou

os spongieux. Ce type d’os est une micro-trame constituée de trabécules, qui remplit complètement

l’épiphyse et le col du fémur et qui est orientée de manière à suivre le cheminement des forces.

En tant que règle fondamentale de conception, l’axiome de la contrainte uniforme était systématiquement

mis en œuvre en premier dans les méthodes informatisées, ce qui a permis d’appliquer ce principe

d’optimisation pour les structures porteuses biologiques à n’importe quel type de structure porteuse.

Il s’agit d’une condition préalable majeure pour l’utilisation de l’expérience de la nature dans les

conceptions techniques.

L’optimisation assistée par ordinateur (OAO) et la méthode SKO (Soft Kill Option) sont des méthodes

utilisées dans l’industrie ; elles ont été développées pour optimiser la forme et la topologie de

composants techniques. L’OAO est utilisée de manière très efficace pour homogénéiser les contraintes.

La réduction des pics de contraintes locales a pour effet un allongement considérable de la durée de vie

des composants, notamment lorsqu’ils sont soumis à des charges vibratoires ou alternées. En revanche,

la méthode SKO fournit des propositions de conceptions qui ne contiennent plus aucun matériau non

soumis à des charges. Cela permet au concepteur d’identifier les trajets pertinents des forces dans le

composant et de concevoir des composants légers, tout en tenant compte des restrictions liées à la

fabrication, par exemple.

Enfin, l’optimisation interne assistée par ordinateur (OIAO) permet aux concepteurs de transférer

les conceptions internes des structures porteuses biologiques contenant des fibres orientées dans la

direction du cheminement des forces vers des matériaux composites à fibres techniques, à l’aide de

simulations sur ordinateur, et d’augmenter leurs capacités de charges.
[1]

Une compréhension approfondie de la contrainte à l’entaille et d’autres travaux de développement

ont conduit aux « méthodes des triangles de traction », qui sont des méthodes purement graphiques

permettant d’optimiser des composants au prix d’un effort minimal. Les méthodes d’optimisation

développées contribuent considérablement à l’élimination des points faibles au cours du processus de

développement. Dans le cas des méthodes assistées par ordinateur, son application donne lieu à des

temps de calcul et de simulation plus longs mais, au bout du compte, à des temps de développement global

plus courts, à un nombre plus réduit de prototypes et à des phases d’essai plus courtes. Les méthodes

biomimétiques d’optimisation structurale présentées ici ne sont que des exemples ; d’autres méthodes

sont en cours de développement.

Comme défini dans l’ISO 18458, un produit ou une technologie est biomimétique lorsque les trois

critères suivants sont remplis : un système biologique est disponible, l’abstraction du modèle a eu lieu

et le modèle a été transféré vers une application technique sous la forme d’un prototype au minimum.

4 © ISO 2015 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
ISO 18459:2015(F)

Comme indiqué dans le Tableau 1, les méthodes décrites ci-dessus remplissent les trois critères énoncés

dans l’ISO 18458.

La méthode d’optimisation assistée par ordinateur (OAO) est biomimétique parce que le système

biologique est la croissance des arbres, qu’il y a eu abstraction d’une partie de ce phénomène au processus

adaptatif à la charge et que ce processus a été mis en œuvre sous forme d’algorithmes simples, transféré

vers une application technique puis utilisé dans l’industrie pour optimiser des composants techniques.

La méthode SKO est biomimétique parce que le système biologique utilisé pour la méthode SKO est

la minéralisation osseuse, parce qu’il y a eu abstraction d’une partie de ce phénomène au processus

adaptatif à la charge et que ce processus a fait l’objet d’une abstraction, d’une mise en œuvre en

algorithmes simples et également d’un transfert vers une application technique. La méthode SKO est

utilisée pour la conception de composants légers.

La méthode OIAO est biomimétique parce que la méthode OIAO est basée sur le système biologique

de l’alignement des fibres ligneuses dans les arbres, parce qu’il y a eu abstraction d’une partie de ce

phénomène au processus adaptatif à la charge et que ce processus a fait l’objet d’une abstraction, d’une

mise en œuvre en algorithmes simples et d’un transfert vers une application pour l’optimisation de

matériaux composites à fibres techniques.

La méthode des triangles de traction est biomimétique parce que la méthode des triangles de traction

est basée sur un système de jonctions des racines axiales des arbres, parce qu’il y a eu abstraction d’une

partie de ce phénomène au processus adaptatif à la charge et que ce processus a été mis en œuvre sous

forme d’algorithmes simples, transféré vers une application technique puis utilisé dans l’industrie pour

optimiser des composants techniques.

Le Tableau 1 répertorie les méthodes pour l’optimisation structurale biomimétique, leur système

biologique, leur objectif principal et fournit un exemple d’utilisation illustrant leur application en

technologie.

Tableau 1 — Méthodes biomimétiques d’optimisation structurale, leur système biologique, leur

objectif principal et leur application technique
Méthode Système biologique Objectif principal Application technique
Optimisation croissance adaptative des optimisation de la forme Micro-actionneur
assistée par arbres pour allonger la durée
ordinateur de vie ou augmenter les
(OAO) capacités de charges des
composants par homogé-
néisation des contraintes

Méthode SKO processus de minéralisation optimisation de la topo- châssis de voiture

(Soft Kill dans l’os logie pour la conception
Option) de composants légers par
élimination de matériau
non soumis à des charges
© ISO 2015 – Tous droits réservés 5
---------------------- Page: 10 ----------------------
ISO 18459:2015(F)
Tableau 1 (suite)
Méthode Système biologique Objectif principal Application technique

Optimisation alignement de l’orientation des optimisation de l’orienta- selle de bicyclette

interne assistée fibres dans les arbres tion locale des fibres pour
par ordinateur augmenter les capacités
(OIAO) de charges des composites
à fibres par adaptation
de l’orientation locale des
fibres par rapport à la
charge
Méthode des jonction des racines axiales optimisation de la forme vis
triangles de pour allonger la durée
traction de vie ou augmenter les
capacités de charges des
composants par homogé-
néisation des contraintes
6 Application des méthodes
6.1 Étendue et limites des applications

Les méthodes d’optimisation mentionnées dans la présente Norme internationale tiennent compte des

problèmes structuraux linéaires sous charge statique. Les résultats de la méthode par éléments finis

(MEF) peuvent servir pour la vérification de la résistance statique.

Lorsque des charges dynamiques sont présentes, elles peuvent être transformées en charges statiques

équivalentes (CSE).

NOTE Les structures, optimisées par ces méthodes pour les charges statiques, répondront aux charges

dynamiques de bien meilleure manière que des structures non optimisées.

Il s’avère que l’optimisation de la forme des entailles est la plus efficace lorsqu’un nombre élevé de cycles

de charges est attendu et que les composants sont réalisés en matériaux fragiles. Les matériaux ductiles

soumis à des charges statiques sont peu sensibles à l’effet d’entaille et peuvent libérer les contraintes par

...

Questions, Comments and Discussion

Ask us and Technical Secretary will try to provide an answer. You can facilitate discussion about the standard in here.