Respiratory protective devices -- Human factors

ISO/TS 16976-1:2015 provides information on factors related to human anthropometry, physiology, ergonomics, and performance for the preparation of standards for performance requirements, testing, and use of respiratory protective devices. This part of ISO/TS 16976 contains information related to respiratory and metabolic responses to rest and work at various intensities. Information is provided for the following: - metabolic rates associated with various intensities of work; - oxygen consumption as a function of metabolic rate and minute ventilation for persons representing three body sizes; - peak inspiratory flow rates during conditions of speech and no speech for persons representing three body sizes as a function of metabolic rates. The information contained within this part of ISO/TS 16976 represents data for healthy adult men and women of approximately 30 years of age, b

Appareils de protection respiratoire -- Facteurs humains

L'ISO/TS 16976-1:2015 fournit des informations sur les facteurs liés ŕ l'anthropométrie, la physiologie humaine, l'ergonomie et les performances en vue de l'élaboration de normes relatives aux exigences de performance, aux essais et ŕ l'utilisation des appareils de protection respiratoire. L'ISO/TS 16976-1:2015 contient des informations sur les réponses respiratoires et métaboliques ŕ des conditions de repos et d'activités de différentes intensités. Des informations sont fournies sur les points suivants: - les métabolismes énergétiques associés ŕ différentes intensités d'activité; - la consommation d'oxygčne en fonction du métabolisme énergétique et de la ventilation par minute pour des individus représentant trois corpulences; - les débits de pointe ŕ l'inspiration dans des conditions de parole et de mutisme pour des individus représentant trois corpulences en fonction des métabolismes énergétiques. Les informations contenues dans l'ISO/TS 16976-1:2015 sont des données relatives ŕ des hommes et femmes adultes et en bonne santé de 30 ans environ, mais sont applicables ŕ la tranche d'âge de la population générale.

General Information

Status
Published
Publication Date
24-Nov-2015
Current Stage
9092 - International Standard to be revised
Start Date
03-Sep-2020
Ref Project

RELATIONS

Buy Standard

Technical specification
ISO/TS 16976-1:2015 - Respiratory protective devices -- Human factors
English language
19 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview
Technical specification
ISO/TS 16976-1:2015 - Appareils de protection respiratoire -- Facteurs humains
French language
19 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview

Standards Content (sample)

TECHNICAL ISO/TS
SPECIFICATION 16976-1
Second edition
2015-12-01
Respiratory protective devices —
Human factors —
Part 1:
Metabolic rates and respiratory flow
rates
Appareils de protection respiratoire — Facteurs humains —
Partie 1: Régimes métaboliques et régimes des débits respiratoires
Reference number
ISO/TS 16976-1:2015(E)
ISO 2015
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-1:2015(E)
COPYRIGHT PROTECTED DOCUMENT
© ISO 2015, Published in Switzerland

All rights reserved. Unless otherwise specified, no part of this publication may be reproduced or utilized otherwise in any form

or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, or posting on the internet or an intranet, without prior

written permission. Permission can be requested from either ISO at the address below or ISO’s member body in the country of

the requester.
ISO copyright office
Ch. de Blandonnet 8 • CP 401
CH-1214 Vernier, Geneva, Switzerland
Tel. +41 22 749 01 11
Fax +41 22 749 09 47
copyright@iso.org
www.iso.org
ii © ISO 2015 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-1:2015(E)
Contents Page

Foreword ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................iv

Introduction ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................v

1 Scope ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 1

2 Normative references ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3 Terms and definitions ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

4 Activity and metabolic rate ........................................................................................................................................................................ 2

5 Metabolic rate and oxygen consumption .................................................................................................................................... 4

6 Oxygen consumption and minute volume.................................................................................................................................. 5

7 Minute volume and peak inspiratory flow rates ................................................................................................................. 7

7.1 Normal breathing.................................................................................................................................................................................. 7

7.2 Speech and breathing ........................................................................................................................................................................ 8

7.3 Sneezing and coughing ..................................................................................................................................................................10

8 Individual variation and gender aspects ..................................................................................................................................12

Annex A (informative) Examples for the use of data .........................................................................................................................15

Bibliography .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................18

© ISO 2015 – All rights reserved iii
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-1:2015(E)
Foreword

ISO (the International Organization for Standardization) is a worldwide federation of national standards

bodies (ISO member bodies). The work of preparing International Standards is normally carried out

through ISO technical committees. Each member body interested in a subject for which a technical

committee has been established has the right to be represented on that committee. International

organizations, governmental and non-governmental, in liaison with ISO, also take part in the work.

ISO collaborates closely with the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) on all matters of

electrotechnical standardization.

The procedures used to develop this document and those intended for its further maintenance are

described in the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 1. In particular the different approval criteria needed for the

different types of ISO documents should be noted. This document was drafted in accordance with the

editorial rules of the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 2 (see www.iso.org/directives).

Attention is drawn to the possibility that some of the elements of this document may be the subject of

patent rights. ISO shall not be held responsible for identifying any or all such patent rights. Details of

any patent rights identified during the development of the document will be in the Introduction and/or

on the ISO list of patent declarations received (see www.iso.org/patents).

Any trade name used in this document is information given for the convenience of users and does not

constitute an endorsement.

For an explanation on the meaning of ISO specific terms and expressions related to conformity

assessment, as well as information about ISO’s adherence to the WTO principles in the Technical

Barriers to Trade (TBT) see the following URL: Foreword - Supplementary information

The committee responsible for this document is ISO/TC 94, Personal safety — Protective clothing and

equipment, Subcommittee SC 15, Respiratory protective devices.

This second edition cancels and replaces the first edition (ISO/TS 16976-1:2007), of which it constitutes

a major revision with the following technical change:
— 7.3 has been added.

ISO/TS 16976 consists of the following parts, under the general title Respiratory protective devices —

Human factors:
— Part 1: Metabolic rates and respiratory flow rates [Technical Specification]
— Part 2: Anthropometrics [Technical Specification]

— Part 3: Physiological responses and limitations of oxygen and limitations of carbon dioxide in the

breathing environment [Technical Specification]

— Part 4: Work of breathing and breathing resistance: Physiologically based limits [Technical Specification]

— Part 5: Thermal effects [Technical Specification]
— Part 6: Psycho-physiological effects [Technical Specification]
— Part 7: Hearing and speech [Technical Specification]
— Part 8: Ergonomic factors [Technical Specification]
iv © ISO 2015 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-1:2015(E)
Introduction

For an appropriate design, selection, and use of respiratory protective devices, it is important to

consider the basic physiological demands of the user. The type and intensity of work affect the metabolic

rate (energy expenditure) of the wearer. The weight and weight distribution of the device on the human

body also may influence metabolic rate. Metabolic rate is directly correlated with oxygen consumption,

which determines the respiratory demands and flow rates. The work of breathing is influenced by the

air flow resistances of the device and the lung airways. The work (or energy cost) of a breath is related

to the pressure gradient created by the breathing muscles and the volume that is moved in and out of

the lung during the breath. Anthropometric and biomechanical data are required for the appropriate

design of various components of a respiratory protective device, as well as for the design of relevant

test methods.

This part of ISO/TS 16976 is the first part of a series of documents providing basic physiological and

anthropometric data on humans. It contains information about metabolic rates and respiratory flow

rates for various types of physical activity.
© ISO 2015 – All rights reserved v
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
TECHNICAL SPECIFICATION ISO/TS 16976-1:2015(E)
Respiratory protective devices — Human factors —
Part 1:
Metabolic rates and respiratory flow rates
1 Scope

This part of ISO/TS 16976 provides information on factors related to human anthropometry, physiology,

ergonomics, and performance for the preparation of standards for performance requirements, testing,

and use of respiratory protective devices. This part of ISO/TS 16976 contains information related to

respiratory and metabolic responses to rest and work at various intensities. Information is provided for

the following:
— metabolic rates associated with various intensities of work;

— oxygen consumption as a function of metabolic rate and minute ventilation for persons representing

three body sizes;

— peak inspiratory flow rates during conditions of speech and no speech for persons representing

three body sizes as a function of metabolic rates.

The information contained within this part of ISO/TS 16976 represents data for healthy adult men and

women of approximately 30 years of age, but is applicable for the age range of the general population.

2 Normative references

The following documents, in whole or in part, are normatively referenced in this document and are

indispensable for its application. For dated references, only the edition cited applies. For undated

references, the latest edition of the referenced document (including any amendments) applies.

ISO 8996:2004, Ergonomics of the thermal environment — Determination of metabolic rate

3 Terms and definitions
For the purposes of this document, the following terms and definitions apply.
3.1
aerobic energy production

biochemical process in the human cells that delivers energy by combustion of fat, carbohydrates and, to

a lesser extent, protein in the presence of oxygen, with water and carbon dioxide as end products

3.2
anaerobic energy production

biochemical process in the human cells that delivers energy by combustion of carbohydrates without

oxygen, with lactic acid as the end product
3.3
ambient temperature pressure saturated
ATPS

standard condition for the expression of ventilation parameters related to expired air

Note 1 to entry: Actual ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure; saturated water vapour pressure.

© ISO 2015 – All rights reserved 1
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-1:2015(E)
3.4
ambient temperature pressure humidity
ATPH

standard condition for the expression of ventilation parameters related to inspired air

Note 1 to entry: Actual ambient temperature, atmospheric pressure and water vapour pressure.

3.5
breath cycle
respiratory period comprising an inhalation and an exhalation phase
3.6
body temperature pressure saturated
BTPS
standard condition for the expression of ventilation parameters

Note 1 to entry: Body temperature (37 °C), atmospheric pressure 101,3 kPa (760 mmHg), and water vapour

pressure (6,27 kPa) in saturated air.
3.7
peak inspiratory flow rate
highest instantaneous flow rate during the inhalation phase of a breath cycle
Note 1 to entry: It is expressed in l/s BTPS.

Note 2 to entry: L/s is the preferred unit as the flow takes place during only a short fraction of the breath cycle.

3.8
minute ventilation
total volume of air inspired (or expired) in the lungs during 1 min
Note 1 to entry: It is expressed in l/s BTPS.
3.9
oxygen consumption
amount of oxygen consumed by the human tissues for aerobic energy production
Note 1 to entry: It is expressed in l/min STPD.
3.10
physical work capacity
ability of a person to engage in muscular work
3.11
standard temperature pressure dry
STPD
standard conditions for expression of oxygen consumption

Note 1 to entry: Standard temperature (0 °C) and pressure (101,3 kPa, 760 mmHg), dry air (0 % relative humidity).

4 Activity and metabolic rate

Users of respiratory protective devices (RPD) perform physical work at various intensities. Physical

work, in particular when associated with large muscle groups as is the case with firefighting, requires

high levels of metabolic energy production (metabolic rate). The energy is produced in human cells by

aerobic or anaerobic processes.

Aerobic energy production is by far the most common form of energy yield for all types of human cells.

It is also the normal form of energy production for the muscles. Depending on physical fitness and other

2 © ISO 2015 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-1:2015(E)

factors, humans can sustain high levels of aerobic energy production for long periods of time. Very high

activity levels, however, can only be sustained for short periods of time (minutes) and they also engage

the anaerobic energy yielding processes. The associated production of lactic acid is one reason for the

early development of fatigue and exhaustion.

Aerobic energy production is strictly dependent on the constant delivery of oxygen to the active

cells. Oxygen is extracted from inspired air, bound to haemoglobin in red blood cells in the alveolar

capillaries and transported to the target tissues via the circulation. Consequently, there is a direct,

linear relationship between the rate of oxygen consumption and the metabolic rate. The relationship is

described in ISO 8996.

Table 1 of this part of ISO/TS 16976 is derived from ISO 8996:2004, Table A.2, which defines five classes

of metabolic rate. This table forms the basis for developing a standard for the assessment of heat stress.

The classes represent types of work found in industry. The figures represent average metabolic rates

for work periods or full work shifts, generally including breaks. Metabolic rate shall not be confused

with external work rates, such as those defined on a bicycle ergometer.

Rescue work and firefighting are by nature temporary and often unpredictable. Activities may become

very demanding and high levels of metabolic rate have been reported in References [1], [13], [14], [16],

[17], [21], [23], and [25]. According to Reference [21], mean values for oxygen uptake of between 40 ml/

(kg × min) and 45 ml/(kg × min) are reported for the most demanding tasks in firefighting drills (see

References [6], [8], and [13]). Assuming an average body weight of 80 kg, the absolute oxygen uptake is

between about 3,2 l/min and 3,6 l/min. In Reference [21], mean values of (2,4 ± 0,5) l/min for a 17-min

test drill exercise were reported; Reference [16] reported a mean value of (2,75 ± 0,3) l/min for a 22-min

test drill. The average value for the most demanding task (ascending a tower) was (3,55 ± 0,27) l/min.

The range of values for this task was between 3,24 l/min and 4,13 l/min. This corresponded to average

2 2
metabolic rates of 474 W/m and 612 W/m , respectively.
Table 1 — Classification of work based on metabolic rate (MR)
Average metabolic rate
Class Work
W/m
1 Resting 65
2 Light work 100
3 Moderate work 165
4 Heavy work 230
5 Very heavy work 290
6 Very, very heavy work (2 h) 400
7 Extremely heavy work (15 min) 475
8 Maximal work (5 min) 600

NOTE The first five classes in this table are derived from ISO 8996. These classes are valid

for repeated activities during work shifts in every day occupational exposure. Classes 6 to 8

are added as examples of metabolic rates associated with temporary activities of an escape

and rescue nature while wearing RPD.

Table 1 of this part of ISO/TS 16976 contains three additional classes compared with ISO 8996:2004,

Table A.2, in order to cover work that is, by its nature, limited by time, such as firefighting and rescue.

One class refers to sustained rescue action, as can be found in mining or in wild land firefighting, with

time periods of up to 2 h of work (class 6). The other two classes refer to firefighting or rescue operations

of short duration and very high intensity, i.e. 15 min (class 7) and 5 min (class 8), respectively. Table 1

presents values expected from individuals with a high level of physical fitness. The highest class

(class 8) represents maximal or close to maximal work and can only be endured by fit men for durations

2 2

of 3 min to 5 min. The three new classes are defined by metabolic rates at 400 W/m , 475 W/m , and

600 W/m , respectively. The values represent the average metabolic rate for the specified period of

time, excluding any breaks.
© ISO 2015 – All rights reserved 3
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-1:2015(E)

For natural reasons, many types of rescue and emergency work are carried out with personal protective

equipment. This adds to the physical workload and is one reason for the high values of metabolic rate

in classes 6 to 8. The data given for the types of work shown in classes 1 to 5 are carried out without

wearing RPD and/or personal protective equipment.
5 Metabolic rate and oxygen consumption

The energetic equivalent (EE) of oxygen as described in ISO 8996:2004, 7.1.2, is determined using

Formula (1):
EE=×(,0230RQ+×,)77 58, 8 (1)

where RQ is the respiratory quotient [the ratio of the amount of carbon dioxide produced to the amount

of oxygen consumed (V /V )] and the energetic equivalent of oxygen is 5,88 Wh/l O , which

CO O
2 2

corresponds approximately to the value of 5 kcal/l O , a value that is commonly found in the

physiological literature.

Assuming a value of 5 kcal/l O (equal to 5,815 Wh/l O ), the following expressions apply for the

2 2
conversion of metabolic rates (in W/m ) to V (in l/min):
MA× MA× MA×
Du Du Du
V = = = (2)
EE 60×5,815 349
where
is the oxygen consumption, in l/min;
V
M is the metabolic rate, in W/m ;
A is the Dubois body surface area, in m;
60 is the conversion factor for min/h;
and the energy equivalent of oxygen is 5,815 Wh/l O .

For the same metabolic rate, the oxygen consumption will vary dependant on body size. Examples are

given in Tables 3, 4, and 5 for persons representing three body sizes. The associated body surface area is

2 2 2

1,69 m , 1,84 m , and 2,11 m , respectively. As defined in ISO 8996, a person’s body surface area, A , is

determined on the basis of values for body weight, W , in kg, and body height, H , in m, by Formula (3):

b b
0,,425 0725
AW=×0,202 ×H (3)
Values for V in Tables 3, 4, and 5 are based on Formulae (4), (5), and (6).
4 © ISO 2015 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-1:2015(E)

A small-sized person is defined by W = 60 kg, H = 1,7 m, and A = 1,69 m . The oxygen consumption,

b b Du
V , is calculated by Formula (4):
V = (4)
207

A medium-sized person is defined by W = 70 kg, H = 1,75 m, and A = 1,84 m . The oxygen

b b Du
consumption, V , is calculated by Formula (5):
V = (5)
190

A large-sized person is defined by W = 85 kg, H = 1,88 m, and A = 2,11 m . The oxygen consumption,

b b Du
V , is calculated by Formula (6):
V = (6)
160
6 Oxygen consumption and minute volume

Oxygen transport to tissues requires its extraction from inspired air in the lungs. Concentration of

oxygen in inspired air is equivalent to atmospheric concentration of 20,93 % by volume in dry air.

Normally, only 15 % to 30 % of this fraction is consumed. The expired air still contains approximately

15 % to 18 % O by volume. This means that the minute ventilation of air, V , required for most levels of

2 E

oxygen consumption, is about 20 to 25 times higher (see Reference [3]). At high activity levels, the value

may be even higher, as there is a tendency for hyperventilation.

Reference [9] contains a review of 19 papers published in the relevant literature. The data for 14 non-

respirator studies are plotted again in Figure 1, together with data from References [7], [17], and [18].

Each data point represents the mean value of several individual subjects. The linear regression line for

the mean values is plotted. A power function regression line differs only marginally from the linear

model. The Hagan equation (at the bottom of the graph) provides an exponential regression that

overestimates V at low and very high V levels and underestimates at medium levels. Exponential

relations have also been proposed by others (see References [1] and [12]). All three of the studies

mentioned used incremental exercise as a means of increasing the workload. It can be questioned if V

and V equilibrate in such a short time. In particular, V should have a time constant of more than a

O O
2 2
minute. In the Hagan study, workload was increased every minute.

From a physiological point of view, one would not expect an exponential relationship. Indeed, individual

curves show that, up to 60 % to 70 % of maximum V , the relation is almost linear. At higher levels of

V , hyperventilation increases V in a curvilinear manner (see Reference [3]). Respiratory adaptation

to increased workloads is likely to represent a two-component equation: one linear and one power or

exponential. The model equation would be described by Formula (7):
bx×
ya=×xe+ (7)
where
a, b are constants;
y represents V ;
x
represents V .
© ISO 2015 – All rights reserved 5
---------------------- Page: 10 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-1:2015(E)

At low values of x, the first term is determinant. With increasing x, the second component becomes

more and more important. The highest correlation coefficient is obtained for a = 27,1 and b = 0,839. The

value of R = 0,90.

Applying a linear regression forced through zero provides a value of R = 0,90. For simplicity, the linear

regression is selected. The regression equation for the mean values is given by Formula (8). Calculating

V for two times the standard error (S ) of the average V , representing 95 % of the populations, gives

E E E

Formula (9). S defines the error in the prediction of V , based on the regression equation, Formula (7).

E E

These equations are subsequently used for estimations of V and peak flows (see Tables 3 to 5).

VV=×31,85 (8)
VV=×41,48 +2S (9)
EO E
where
is the mean value of V ;
V
is the standard error.
S
6 © ISO 2015 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 11 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-1:2015(E)
180
160
140
120
100
Key
oxygen consumption, V , in l/min STPD
Y minute ventilation, V , in l/min BTPS
1 y = 41,48 × x
2 y = (27,18 × x) + exp(0,839 × x)
3 y = 31,85 × x
4 Hagen equation

NOTE 1 Each dot represents the average of a sample of subjects exposed to various conditions of work (without

respiratory protective device).
NOTE 2 Data include 14 studies reported in References [9] and [16].
Figure 1 — Relation between minute ventilation, V , and oxygen consumption, V
7 Minute volume and peak inspiratory flow rates
7.1 Normal breathing

During the respiratory cycle, the inspired (and expired) volume and its flow rate changes with time. A

simple description of the respiratory cycle can be described by a sinus curve.

The mean flow rate during an inhalation is the inspired volume (tidal volume) divided by the time. The

minute ventilation is the total volume of air exchanged in the lungs during 1 min.

The instantaneous flow rate during the respiratory cycle is described by the derivative of the volume

curve, which is in fact a sinus curve. Peak inspiratory flow rate (PIFR) is mathematically defined by

© ISO 2015 – All rights reserved 7
---------------------- Page: 12 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-1:2015(E)

the minute ventilation multiplied by π, if the respiratory pattern follows a sinus curve. PIFR occurs for

fractions of a second within the inhalation cycle and is best expressed in l/s.

As ventilation increases in response to increasing workload, the breathing pattern transforms from

a predominantly sinusoidal to a trapezoidal pattern, indicating that flow rates and in particular peak

flow rates may be different than for the sinus cycle (see Reference [20]). It was concluded that peak

inspiratory flow rates were 2,5 to 3,7 times as high as the mean minute volumes. The highest ratio was

achieved at rest and reduced with exercise intensity. During work, the ratio was lower and relatively

constant, independent of workload. At maximal voluntary hyperventilation, the peak values were 2,5

times as high as the mean minute volume values.

Similar results were reported in Reference [28], which re-analysed data reported in Reference [29].

The ratio for peak flows and mean minute ventilation was also calculated, with the ranges found to be

from 2,5 to 3,9.

Reference [21] provides an analysis of several independent sets of data for PIFR/V . The data (see

Figure 2) were well correlated (R = 0,986 7) and fitted Formula (10):
PIFR =×2,,346 V +20 828 (10)

In Reference [7], PIFR during incremental bicycle exercise, breathing through several types of negative

pressure filtering devices, is reported. Similar data have been obtained in Reference [18]. The relation

between PIFR and V is shown in Figure 3. The data in Reference [9] have been converted and are

included in Figure 3 a). There is a tendency for higher ratio at low minute volumes.

7.2 Speech and breathing

Several investigators report that speech during use of respiratory protective devices changes the

respiratory dynamics. Speech is performed during the expiration phase of the breathing cycle. This

shortens the inspiration phase accordingly and it may become critically short during very high activity

levels (see References [10], [18] and [30]). This shortening of the inspiratory phase suggests that speech

becomes very difficult at very high activity levels.

Minute ventilation during speech is related almost linearly to minute ventilation without speech.

In Reference [7], a regression line of V = 0,83 × V is reported. Similarly, a regression line of

E,speech E

V = 0,78 × V is reported in Reference [18]. It can be assumed that V during speech reduces by

E,speech E E

about 20 % compared with V in no speech conditions. The reduction appears to be similar, independent

of work rate. Accordingly, the following relation is applied:
VV=×08, (11)
E,speechE

With shorter inspiration time, the peak flow rates are reported to increase even more than during a

normal breath. Peak inspiratory flow rates about six times higher than the mean minute ventilation

have been reported (see References [7] and [18]).

In References [7] and [18], PIFR was investigated during work sessions with standardized speech

communication. Results are given in Figure 3 b). In Reference [7], incremental bicycle exercise was used,

whereas in Reference [18], treadmill walking with incremental increases in slope was used. Results for

the PIFR/V ratio are in good agreement. It is apparent that the ratio is high at low minute volumes, but

that it approaches the “no speech” values at high minute volumes. The power function regression line

shows a high correlation factor. It is apparent from these data that speech is not a significant contributor

to PIFR at extremely heavy work, most probably because it is difficult to sustain continuous speech, but

it is still possible to say single words at very high ventilation rates.
Formulae (12) and (13) apply to the calculation of PIFR from V .
8 © ISO 2015 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 13 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-1:2015(E)
For no speech:
−0,167 5 0,832 5
PIFR =5,605××VV =5,605×fV or no speech (12)
E EE
For speech:
−0,474 3 0,5255 7
PIFR =36,707×(0,8×VV)×(0,8×)=36,707×(0,8×V ) for speech (13)
E EE
300
250
200
150
100
Key
X minute ventilation, V , in l/min BTPS
Y peak inspiratory flow, in l/min
NOTE For details, see Reference [21].
Figure 2 — Relation between peak inspiratory flow rate and minute ventilation
© ISO 2015 – All rights reserved 9
---------------------- Page: 14 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-1:2015(E)
a) Relation for no speech conditions
b) Relation measured when subjects read a standard text during exercise
Key
X minute ventilation, V , in l/min BTPS
Y ratio PIFR/V

NOTE 1 Figure 3 a) is based on mean values for 37 conditions in four independent studies.

NOTE 2 In Figure 3 b), the data report mean values from 13 conditions in two independent studies.

Figure 3 — Ratio of peak inspiratory flow rate to minute ventilation as a function of minute

ventilation during work using negative pressure (filter) breathing apparatus
7.3 Sneezing and coughing
7.3.1 General

During use of respiratory devices, it may happen that wearers will sneeze or cough, which has a different

aerodynamic effect from a typical breathing pattern. A number of studies have been performed which

give measurements of effects of these phenomena.
10 © ISO 2015 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 15 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-1:2015(E)
7.3.2 Maximum pressures
7.3.2.1 Maximum expiratory pressures

In Reference [10], the reported maximum expiratory pressures were 14,9 (SD = 3,5) kPa in women, 24,2

(SD = 4,6) kPa in 29-year-old men, and 15,6 (SD = 6,4) kPa in 59-year-old men. In Reference [23], the

measured maximum expiratory pressures were (13 ± 2,6) kPa in men and (10 ± 1,8) kPa in

...

SPÉCIFICATION ISO/TS
TECHNIQUE 16976-1
Deuxième édition
2015-12-01
Appareils de protection
respiratoire — Facteurs humains —
Partie 1:
Métabolismes énergétiques et régimes
des débits respiratoires
Respiratory protective devices — Human factors —
Part 1: Metabolic rates and respiratory flow rates
Numéro de référence
ISO/TS 16976-1:2015(F)
ISO 2015
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-1:2015(F)
DOCUMENT PROTÉGÉ PAR COPYRIGHT
© ISO 2015, Publié en Suisse

Droits de reproduction réservés. Sauf indication contraire, aucune partie de cette publication ne peut être reproduite ni utilisée

sous quelque forme que ce soit et par aucun procédé, électronique ou mécanique, y compris la photocopie, l’affichage sur

l’internet ou sur un Intranet, sans autorisation écrite préalable. Les demandes d’autorisation peuvent être adressées à l’ISO à

l’adresse ci-après ou au comité membre de l’ISO dans le pays du demandeur.
ISO copyright office
Ch. de Blandonnet 8 • CP 401
CH-1214 Vernier, Geneva, Switzerland
Tel. +41 22 749 01 11
Fax +41 22 749 09 47
copyright@iso.org
www.iso.org
ii © ISO 2015 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-1:2015(F)
Sommaire Page

Avant-propos ..............................................................................................................................................................................................................................iv

Introduction ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................v

1 Domaine d’application ................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

2 Références normatives ................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3 Termes et définitions ....................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

4 Activité et métabolisme énergétique .............................................................................................................................................. 3

5 Métabolisme énergétique et consommation d’oxygène .............................................................................................. 4

6 Consommation d’oxygène et ventilation par minute ..................................................................................................... 5

7 Ventilation par minute et débits de pointe à l’inspiration ........................................................................................ 7

7.1 Respiration normale ........................................................................................................................................................................... 7

7.2 Parole et respiration ........................................................................................................................................................................... 8

7.3 Éternuements et toux .....................................................................................................................................................................10

7.3.1 Généralités .........................................................................................................................................................................10

7.3.2 Pressions maximales .................................................................................................................................................11

7.3.3 Débits d’air maximaux et vitesses de l’air maximales ..................................................................11

8 Variation individuelle et aspects liés au sexe ......................................................................................................................12

Annexe A (informative) Exemples d’utilisation des données ..................................................................................................15

Bibliographie ...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................18

© ISO 2015 – Tous droits réservés iii
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-1:2015(F)
Avant-propos

L’ISO (Organisation internationale de normalisation) est une fédération mondiale d’organismes

nationaux de normalisation (comités membres de l’ISO). L’élaboration des Normes internationales est

en général confiée aux comités techniques de l’ISO. Chaque comité membre intéressé par une étude

a le droit de faire partie du comité technique créé à cet effet. Les organisations internationales,

gouvernementales et non gouvernementales, en liaison avec l’ISO participent également aux travaux.

L’ISO collabore étroitement avec la Commission électrotechnique internationale (IEC) en ce qui

concerne la normalisation électrotechnique.

Les procédures utilisées pour élaborer le présent document et celles destinées à sa mise à jour sont

décrites dans les Directives ISO/IEC, Partie 1. Il convient, en particulier de prendre note des différents

critères d’approbation requis pour les différents types de documents ISO. Le présent document a été

rédigé conformément aux règles de rédaction données dans les Directives ISO/IEC, Partie 2 (voir www.

iso.org/directives).

L’attention est appelée sur le fait que certains des éléments du présent document peuvent faire l’objet de

droits de propriété intellectuelle ou de droits analogues. L’ISO ne saurait être tenue pour responsable

de ne pas avoir identifié de tels droits de propriété et averti de leur existence. Les détails concernant

les références aux droits de propriété intellectuelle ou autres droits analogues identifiés lors de

l’élaboration du document sont indiqués dans l’Introduction et/ou dans la liste des déclarations de

brevets reçues par l’ISO (voir www.iso.org/brevets).

Les appellations commerciales éventuellement mentionnées dans le présent document sont données

pour information, par souci de commodité, à l’intention des utilisateurs et ne sauraient constituer un

engagement.

Pour une explication de la signification des termes et expressions spécifiques de l’ISO liés à

l’évaluation de la conformité, ou pour toute information au sujet de l’adhésion de l’ISO aux principes

de l’OMC concernant les obstacles techniques au commerce (OTC), voir le lien suivant: Avant-propos —

Informations supplémentaires.

Le comité chargé de l’élaboration du présent document est l’ISO/TC 94, Sécurité individuelle — Vêtements

et équipements de protection, sous-comité SC 15, Appareils de protection respiratoire.

Cette deuxième édition annule et remplace la première édition (ISO/TS 16976-1:2007), dont elle

constitue une révision majeure avec les modifications techniques suivantes:
— le paragraphe 7.3 a été ajouté.

L’ISO/TS 16976 comprend les parties suivantes, présentées sous le titre général Appareils de protection

respiratoire — Facteurs humains:

— Partie 1: Métabolismes énergétiques et régimes des débits respiratoires [Spécification technique]

— Partie 2: Anthropométrie [Spécification technique]

— Partie 3: Réponses physiologiques et limitations en oxygène et en gaz carbonique dans l’environnement

respiratoire [Spécification technique]

— Partie 4: Travail de respiration et de résistance à la respiration: limites physiologiques [Spécification

technique]
— Partie 5: Effets thermiques [Spécification technique]
— Partie 6: Effets psycho-physiologiques [Spécification technique]
— Partie 7: Discours et audition [Spécification technique]
— Partie 8: Facteurs ergonomiques [Spécification technique]
iv © ISO 2015 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-1:2015(F)
Introduction

Pour une conception, une sélection et une utilisation appropriées des appareils de protection

respiratoire, il est important de prendre en compte les besoins physiologiques élémentaires de

l’utilisateur. Le type et l’intensité des activités ont une incidence sur le métabolisme énergétique

(dépense énergétique) de l’utilisateur. Le poids et la répartition du poids du dispositif sur le corps

humain peuvent également avoir une influence sur le métabolisme énergétique. Le métabolisme

énergétique est en corrélation directe avec la consommation d’oxygène qui détermine les besoins et

débits respiratoires. Le travail ventilatoire est influencé par les résistances à l’écoulement de l’air de

l’appareil et des voies respiratoires pulmonaires. Le travail (ou coût énergétique) d’une respiration est

lié au gradient de pression produit par les muscles respiratoires et le volume qui est déplacé dans les

poumons pendant la respiration. Des données anthropométriques et biomécaniques sont nécessaires

pour une conception appropriée des divers composants d’un appareil de protection respiratoire ainsi

que pour la conception des méthodes d’essai correspondantes.

La présente partie de l’ISO/TS 16976 est la première partie d’une série de documents fournissant

des données physiologiques et anthropométriques élémentaires pour l’homme. Elle contient des

informations sur les métabolismes énergétiques et les débits respiratoires pour différents types

d’activité physique.
© ISO 2015 – Tous droits réservés v
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
SPÉCIFICATION TECHNIQUE ISO/TS 16976-1:2015(F)
Appareils de protection respiratoire — Facteurs
humains —
Partie 1:
Métabolismes énergétiques et régimes des débits
respiratoires
1 Domaine d’application

La présente partie de l’ISO/TS 16976 fournit des informations sur les facteurs liés à l’anthropométrie,

la physiologie humaine, l’ergonomie et les performances en vue de l’élaboration de normes relatives

aux exigences de performance, aux essais et à l’utilisation des appareils de protection respiratoire.

La présente partie de l’ISO/TS 16976 contient des informations sur les réponses respiratoires et

métaboliques à des conditions de repos et d’activités de différentes intensités. Des informations sont

fournies sur les points suivants:
— les métabolismes énergétiques associés à différentes intensités d’activité;

— la consommation d’oxygène en fonction du métabolisme énergétique et de la ventilation par minute

pour des individus représentant trois corpulences;

— les débits de pointe à l’inspiration dans des conditions de parole et de mutisme pour des individus

représentant trois corpulences en fonction des métabolismes énergétiques.

Les informations contenues dans la présente partie de l’ISO/TS 16976 sont des données relatives à des

hommes et femmes adultes et en bonne santé de 30 ans environ, mais sont applicables à la tranche d’âge

de la population générale.
2 Références normatives

Les documents ci-après, dans leur intégralité ou non, sont des références normatives indispensables à

l’application du présent document. Pour les références datées, seule l’édition citée s’applique. Pour les

références non datées, la dernière édition du document de référence s’applique (y compris les éventuels

amendements).

ISO 8996:2004, Ergonomie de l’environnement thermique — Détermination du métabolisme énergétique

3 Termes et définitions

Pour les besoins du présent document, les termes et définitions suivants s’appliquent.

3.1
production d’énergie aérobie

processus biochimique se déroulant dans les cellules humaines qui fournit de l’énergie par combustion

des graisses, des glucides et dans une moindre mesure des protéines en présence d’oxygène, et qui

produit de l’eau et du dioxyde de carbone comme produits finaux
3.2
production d’énergie anaérobie

processus biochimique se déroulant dans les cellules humaines qui fournit de l’énergie par combustion

des glucides sans oxygène et produit de l’acide lactique comme produit final
© ISO 2015 – Tous droits réservés 1
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-1:2015(F)
3.3
température et pression ambiantes, saturé
ATPS

condition normale pour l’expression des paramètres de ventilation liés à l’air expiré

Note 1 à l’article: Température ambiante et pression atmosphérique réelles; pression de vapeur d’eau saturante.

3.4
température, pression et humidité ambiantes
ATPH

condition normale pour l’expression des paramètres de ventilation liés à l’air inspiré

Note 1 à l’article: Température ambiante, pression atmosphérique et pression de vapeur d’eau réelles.

3.5
cycle respiratoire

période respiratoire comprenant une phase d’inspiration et une phase d’expiration

3.6
température et pression corporelles, saturé
BTPS
condition normale pour l’expression des paramètres de ventilation

Note 1 à l’article: Température corporelle (37 °C), pression atmosphérique 101,3 kPa (760 mmHg) et pression de

vapeur d’eau (6,27 kPa) dans un air saturé.
3.7
débit de pointe à l’inspiration
débit instantané maximal pendant la phase d’inspiration d’un cycle respiratoire
Note 1 à l’article: Il est exprimé en en l/s BTPS.

Note 2 à l’article: Le litre par seconde est l’unité préconisée dans la mesure où le débit ne se produit que pendant

une fraction courte du cycle respiratoire.
3.8
ventilation par minute
volume total d’air inspiré (ou expiré) à l’intérieur des poumons en une minute
Note 1 à l’article: Elle est exprimée en l/s BTPS.
3.9
consommation d’oxygène

volume d’oxygène consommé par les tissus humains pour une production d’énergie aérobie

Note 1 à l’article: Elle est exprimée en en l/min STPD.
3.10
capacité de travail physique
aptitude d’une personne à effectuer un travail musculaire
3.11
température et pression normales, sec
STPD
conditions normalisées pour l’expression de la consommation d’oxygène

Note 1 à l’article: Température normale (0 °C) et pression normale (101,3 kPa, 760 mmHg), air sec (humidité

relative de 0 %).
2 © ISO 2015 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-1:2015(F)
4 Activité et métabolisme énergétique

Les utilisateurs d’appareils de protection respiratoire (APR) exercent un travail physique d’intensité

variable. Le travail physique, en particulier lorsqu’il concerne de grands groupes musculaires comme

dans la lutte contre l’incendie, nécessite des niveaux élevés de production d’énergie métabolique

(métabolisme énergétique). L’énergie est produite dans les cellules humaines par des processus aérobies

ou anaérobies.

La production d’énergie aérobie est de loin la forme d’extrant énergétique la plus courante pour tous

les types de cellules humaines. Elle est également la forme normale de production d’énergie pour les

muscles. Selon sa condition physique et d’autres facteurs, l’homme peut soutenir des niveaux élevés de

production d’énergie aérobie pendant de longues périodes. Toutefois, des niveaux d’activité très élevés

ne peuvent être soutenus que pendant de courtes périodes (minutes) et engagent aussi les processus de

production d’énergie anaérobie. La production d’acide lactique qui leur est associée est l’une des raisons

de l’apparition rapide de fatigue et d’épuisement.

La production d’énergie aérobie dépend strictement de la fourniture constante d’oxygène aux cellules

actives. L’oxygène est extrait de l’air inspiré, lié à l’hémoglobine des globules rouges dans les capillaires

alvéolaires et transporté vers les tissus cibles par la circulation. En conséquence, il existe une relation

linéaire directe entre le taux de consommation d’oxygène et le métabolisme énergétique. Cette relation

est décrite dans l’ISO 8996.

Le Tableau 1 de la présente partie de l’ISO/TS 16976 est tiré du Tableau A.2 de l’ISO 8996:2004, qui

définit cinq classes de métabolisme énergétique. Ce tableau sert de base à l’élaboration d’une norme

pour l’évaluation de la contrainte thermique. Les classes représentent les types d’activités rencontrés

dans l’industrie. Les chiffres représentent des métabolismes énergétiques moyens pour des périodes de

travail ou des postes de travail complets, incluant généralement les pauses. Le métabolisme énergétique

ne doit pas être confondu avec les taux de travail externes tels que ceux définis sur une bicyclette

ergométrique.

Les activités de sauvetage et de lutte contre l’incendie sont par nature temporaires et souvent

imprévisibles. Les activités peuvent devenir très exigeantes et des niveaux élevés de métabolisme

énergétique ont été rapportées dans les Références [1], [13], [14], [16], [17], [21], [23] et [25].

Conformément à la Référence [21], des valeurs moyennes de consommation d’oxygène comprises

entre 40 ml/(kg × min) et 45 ml/(kg × min) sont rapportées pour les tâches les plus exigeantes au cours

des exercices de lutte contre l’incendie (voir les Références [6], [8] et [13]). En supposant une masse

corporelle moyenne de 80 kg, la consommation absolue d’oxygène est de l’ordre de 3,2 l/min à 3,6 l/min.

Dans la Référence [21], des valeurs moyennes de (2,4 ± 0,5) l/min ont été rapportées pour un exercice de

17 min; la Référence [16] a rapporté une valeur moyenne de (2,75 ± 0,3) l/min pour un exercice de 22 min.

La valeur moyenne pour la tâche la plus exigeante (ascension d’une tour) est de (3,55 ± 0,27) l/min.

Pour cette tâche, la fourchette de valeurs est comprise entre 3,24 l/min et 4,13 l/min, correspondant

2 2

respectivement à des métabolismes énergétiques moyens compris entre 474 W/m et 612 W/m .

Tableau 1 — Classification des activités basée sur le métabolisme énergétique (MR)

Métabolisme énergétique
Classe Activité
W/m
1 Repos 65
2 Activité légère 100
3 Activité modérée 165
4 Activité intense 230
5 Activité très intense 290

NOTE Les cinq premières classes données dans ce tableau sont extraites de l’ISO 8996. Ces classes sont valables pour des

activités répétées pendant les postes de travail dans le cadre d’une exposition professionnelle courante. Les classes de 6

à 8 sont ajoutées comme exemples de métabolismes énergétiques associés à des activités temporaires de type secours et

sauvetage avec port d’un appareil de protection respiratoire.
© ISO 2015 – Tous droits réservés 3
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-1:2015(F)
Tableau 1 (suite)
Métabolisme énergétique
Classe Activité
W/m
6 Activité très très intense (2 h) 400
7 Activité extrêmement intense (15 min) 475
8 Activité maximale (5 min) 600

NOTE Les cinq premières classes données dans ce tableau sont extraites de l’ISO 8996. Ces classes sont valables pour des

activités répétées pendant les postes de travail dans le cadre d’une exposition professionnelle courante. Les classes de 6

à 8 sont ajoutées comme exemples de métabolismes énergétiques associés à des activités temporaires de type secours et

sauvetage avec port d’un appareil de protection respiratoire.

Le Tableau 1 de la présente partie de l’ISO/TS 16976 contient trois classes supplémentaires par rapport

au Tableau A.2 de l’ISO 8996:2004, pour couvrir les activités qui sont, par nature, limitées dans le

temps, telles que la lutte contre l’incendie et le sauvetage. Une classe se rapporte à des activités de

sauvetage soutenues telles que l’on peut en rencontrer dans l’exploitation minière ou dans la lutte

contre les feux de broussailles, avec des périodes de travail pouvant aller jusqu’à 2 h (classe 6). Les

deux autres classes se rapportent à des opérations de lutte contre l’incendie ou de sauvetage de courte

durée et de très haute intensité, c’est-à-dire, respectivement de 15 min (classe 7) et de 5 min (classe 8).

Le Tableau 1 présente les valeurs attendues pour des individus en très bonne condition physique. La

classe la plus élevée (classe 8) représente une activité maximale ou proche de la maximale qui ne peut

être endurée que pour des durées de 3 min à 5 min par des individus en bonne condition physique. Les

trois nouvelles classes sont respectivement définies par des métabolismes énergétiques à 400 W/m ,

2 2

475 W/m , et 600 W/m . Les valeurs représentent le métabolisme énergétique moyen pour la durée

spécifiée, en excluant les pauses.

Pour des raisons naturelles, de nombreux types d’activités de sauvetage et d’urgence sont effectués

avec un équipement de protection individuelle. Cela augmente la charge de travail physique et explique

en partie les valeurs élevées de métabolisme énergétique dans les classes 6 à 8. Les données fournies

pour les types d’activités indiqués dans les classes 1 à 5 sont obtenues sans port d’appareil de protection

respiratoire et/ou équipement de protection individuelle.
5 Métabolisme énergétique et consommation d’oxygène

L’équivalent énergétique (EE) d’oxygène, tel que décrit dans l’ISO 8996:2004, 7.1.2, est déterminé à

l’aide de la Formule (1):
EE=×(,0230RQ+×,)77 58, 8 (1)

où RQ est le quotient respiratoire (rapport entre la quantité de dioxyde de carbone produit et la quantité

d’oxygène consommée (V /V )) et l’équivalent énergétique d’oxygène est 5,88 Wh/l de O , qui

CO O
2 2

correspond approximativement à la valeur de 5 kcal/l de O , valeur que l’on rencontre couramment

dans les publications de physiologie.

En supposant une valeur de 5 kcal/l de O (égale à 5,815 Wh/l de O ), les expressions suivantes

2 2

s’appliquent pour convertir les métabolismes énergétiques en (en W/m ) en V (en l/min):

MA× MA× MA×
Du Du Du
V = = = (2)
EE 60×5,815 349
4 © ISO 2015 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-1:2015(F)
est la consommation d’oxygène, en l/min;
V
M est le métabolisme énergétique, en W/m
A est la surface corporelle de Dubois, en m;
60 est le facteur de conversion pour min/h;
et l’équivalent énergétique d’oxygène est 5,815 Wh/l de O .

Pour le même métabolisme énergétique, la consommation d’oxygène variera en fonction des

corpulences. Des exemples sont donnés dans les Tableaux 3, 4, et 5 pour des individus représentant

2 2 2

trois corpulences. La surface corporelle associée est respectivement de 1,69 m , 1,84 m , et 2,11 m .

Comme défini dans l’ISO 8996, la surface corporelle d’un individu, A , est déterminée en se basant sur

la masse corporelle, W , en kg, et la taille, H , en m, selon la Formule (3):
b b
0,,425 0725
AW=×0,202 ×H (3)

Les valeurs de V dans les Tableaux 3, 4 et 5 sont basées sur les Formules (4), (5) et (6).

Un individu de faible corpulence est défini par W = 60 kg, H = 1,7 m et A = 1,69 m . La consommation

b b Du
d’oxygène, V , est calculée avec la Formule (4):
V = (4)
207

Un individu de corpulence moyenne est défini par W = 70 kg, H = 1,75 m et A = 1,84 m . La

b b Du
consommation d’oxygène, V , est calculée avec la Formule (5):
V = (5)
190

Un individu de forte corpulence est défini par W = 85 kg, H = 1,88 m et A = 2,11 m . La consommation

b b Du
d’oxygène, V , est calculée avec la Formule (6):
V = (6)
160
6 Consommation d’oxygène et ventilation par minute

Le transport de l’oxygène vers les tissus nécessite son extraction de l’air inspiré dans les poumons. La

concentration d’oxygène dans l’air inspiré est équivalente à la concentration atmosphérique de 20,93 %

en volume dans l’air sec. Normalement, 15 % à 30 % seulement de cette fraction est consommée. L’air

expiré contient encore de l’ordre de 15 % à 18 % en volume de O . Cela signifie que la ventilation par

minute en air, V , requise pour les niveaux de consommation d’oxygène les plus élevés est environ 20

à 25 fois plus élevée (voir la Référence [3]). Pour des niveaux d’activité élevés, la valeur peut être encore

plus élevée en raison d’une tendance à l’hyperventilation.

La Référence [9] contient une analyse de 19 articles publiés dans la littérature applicable. Les données

relatives à 14 études sans appareil respiratoire sont reproduites dans la Figure 1, avec les données

issues des Références [7], [17] et [18]. Chaque point de données représente la valeur moyenne de

plusieurs sujets. La droite de régression linéaire est tracée pour les valeurs moyennes. La droite de

régression d’une fonction de puissance ne diffère du modèle linéaire que d’une façon marginale.

L’équation de Hagan (en bas du graphique) donne une régression exponentielle qui surestime V à des

niveaux de V bas et très élevés et le sous-estime aux niveaux intermédiaires. Des relations

exponentielles ont également été proposées par d’autres (voir les Références [1] et [12]). Les trois études

mentionnées appliquent une méthode incrémentale pour augmenter la charge de travail. On peut se

© ISO 2015 – Tous droits réservés 5
---------------------- Page: 10 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-1:2015(F)

demander si V et V s’équilibrent dans un temps aussi court. Il convient en particulier que V ait une

O O
2 2

constante de temps de plus d’une minute. Dans l’étude de Hagan, la charge de travail est augmentée

toutes les minutes.

D’un point de vue physiologique, on ne devrait pas s’attendre à une relation exponentielle. En réalité, les

courbes individuelles montrent que, jusqu’à 60 % à 70 % de V maximum, la relation est presque

linéaire. À des niveaux plus élevés de V , l’hyperventilation augmente V de manière curviligne (voir

[3]

la référence ). Il est probable que l’adaptation respiratoire à des charges de travail croissantes

représente une équation à deux composantes: une composante linéaire et une composante de puissance

ou exponentielle. Le modèle d’équation serait décrit par la Formule (7):
bx×
ya=×xe+ (7)
a, b sont des constantes;
y représente V ;
x
représenteV .

Pour de faibles valeurs de x, le premier terme est déterminant. Lorsque x augmente, la deuxième

composante devient de plus en plus importante. Le coefficient de corrélation le plus élevé est obtenu

pour a = 27,1 et b = 0,839. La valeur de R = 0,90.

Appliquer une régression linéaire centrée sur zéro donne une valeur de R = 0,90. Pour simplifier, la

régression linéaire est choisie. L’équation de régression relative aux valeurs moyennes est donnée

par la Formule (8). Le calcul de V pour deux écarts-types (S ) de la moyenne V , représentant 95 %

E E E

des populations, donne la Formule (9). S définit l’erreur de prédiction de V , basée sur l’équation de

E E

régression, Formule (7). Ces équations sont ensuite utilisées pour estimer V et les débits de pointe

(voir les Tableaux 3 à 5).
VV=×31,85 (8)
VV=×41,48 +2S (9)
EO E
6 © ISO 2015 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 11 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-1:2015(F)
180
160
140
120
100
est la valeur moyenne de V ;
V
O 2
S est l’écart-type.
Légende
consommation d’oxygène, V , en l/min STPD
Y ventilation par minute, V , en l/min BTPS
1 y = 41,48 × x
2 y = (27,18 × x) + exp(0,839 × x)
3 y = 31,85 × x
4 Équation de Hagan

NOTE 1 Chaque point représente la moyenne d’un échantillon de sujets exposés à diverses conditions de

travail (sans appareil de protection respiratoire).

NOTE 2 Les données concernent 14 études rapportées dans les Références [9] et [16].

Figure 1 — Relation entre la ventilation par minute, V , et la consommation d’oxygène, V

7 Ventilation par minute et débits de pointe à l’inspiration
7.1 Respiration normale

Pendant le cycle respiratoire, le volume inspiré (et expiré) et son débit varient dans le temps. Une simple

description du cycle respiratoire peut être une courbe sinusoïdale.

Le débit moyen pendant une inspiration est le volume inspiré (volume courant) divisé par le temps. La

ventilation par minute est le volume total de l’air échangé à l’intérieur des poumons en 1 min.

© ISO 2015 – Tous droits réservés 7
---------------------- Page: 12 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-1:2015(F)

Le débit instantané pendant le cycle respiratoire est décrit par la dérivée de la courbe de volume qui

est en fait une courbe sinusoïdale. Le débit de pointe à l’inspiration (DPI) est défini mathématiquement

par la ventilation par minute multipliée par π, si le modèle respiratoire suit une courbe sinusoïdale.

Le DPI intervient pendant quelques fractions de seconde au cours du cycle d’inspiration et il est mieux

exprimé en l/s.

Lorsque la ventilation augmente en réponse à une charge de travail croissante, le modèle respiratoire

passe d’un modèle essentiellement sinusoïdal à un modèle trapézoïdal, indiquant que les débits

et en particulier les débits de pointe peuvent être différents de ceux du cycle sinusoïdal (voir la

Référence [20]). Il a été déduit que les débits de pointe à l’inspiration étaient 2,5 à 3,7 fois plus élevés

que les ventilations minute moyennes. Le rapport le plus élevé est atteint au repos et diminue avec

l’intensité de l’activité. Pendant le travail, le rapport est plus faible et relativement constant, quelle que

soit la charge de travail. Lorsque l’hyperventilation volontaire est maximale, les valeurs de pointe sont

2,5 fois plus élevées que les valeurs de ventilation par minute moyenne.

Des résultats similaires ont été rapportés dans la Référence [28], qui analyse à nouveau les données

rapportées dans la Référence [29]. Le rapport entre les débits de pointe et la ventilation par minute

moyenne a également été calculé et se situe dans une fourchette de 2,5 à 3,9.

La Référence [21] fournit une analyse de plusieurs ensembles de données indépendants pour DPI/V .

Les données (voir Figure 2) présentent toutes une bonne corrélation (R = 0,9867) et sont en

...

Questions, Comments and Discussion

Ask us and Technical Secretary will try to provide an answer. You can facilitate discussion about the standard in here.