Respiratory protective devices -- Human factors

ISO/TS 16976-4:2012 describes how to calculate the work performed by a person's respiratory muscles with and without the external respiratory impediments that are imposed by RPD of all kinds, except diving equipment. ISO/TS 16976-4:2012 describes how much additional impediment people can tolerate and contains values that can be used to judge the acceptability of an RPD.

Appareils de protection respiratoire -- Facteurs humains

L'ISO/TS 16976-4:2012 décrit la maničre de calculer le travail que les muscles respiratoires d'une personne doivent fournir avec et sans les difficultés respiratoires externes imposées par tous les types d'APR, ŕ l'exception des appareils de plongée. Le présent document décrit les limites des difficultés supplémentaires que les personnes peuvent tolérer et contient les valeurs pouvant ętre utilisées pour évaluer l'acceptabilité d'un APR.

General Information

Status
Replaced
Publication Date
07-Jun-2012
Withdrawal Date
07-Jun-2012
Current Stage
6060 - International Standard published
Start Date
11-May-2012
Completion Date
08-Jun-2012
Ref Project

RELATIONS

Buy Standard

Technical specification
ISO/TS 16976-4:2012 - Respiratory protective devices -- Human factors
English language
16 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview
Technical specification
ISO/TS 16976-4:2012 - Appareils de protection respiratoire -- Facteurs humains
French language
17 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview

Standards Content (sample)

TECHNICAL ISO/TS
SPECIFICATION 16976-4
First edition
2012-06-15
Respiratory protective devices —
Human factors —
Part 4:
Work of breathing and breathing
resistance: Physiologically based limits
Appareils de protection respiratoire — Facteurs humains —
Partie 4: Travail de respiration et de résistance à la respiration: Limites
physiologiques
Reference number
ISO/TS 16976-4:2012(E)
ISO 2012
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-4:2012(E)
COPYRIGHT PROTECTED DOCUMENT
© ISO 2012

All rights reserved. Unless otherwise specified, no part of this publication may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means,

electronic or mechanical, including photocopying and microfilm, without permission in writing from either ISO at the address below or ISO’s

member body in the country of the requester.
ISO copyright office
Case postale 56 • CH-1211 Geneva 20
Tel. + 41 22 749 01 11
Fax + 41 22 749 09 47
E-mail copyright@iso.org
Web www.iso.org
Published in Switzerland
ii © ISO 2012 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-4:2012(E)
Contents Page

Foreword ............................................................................................................................................................................iv

Introduction ........................................................................................................................................................................ v

1 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................................... 1

2 Normative references ......................................................................................................................................... 1

3 Terms and definitions, symbols and abbreviated terms .......................................................................... 1

3.1 Terms and definitions ......................................................................................................................................... 1

3.2 Symbols and abbreviated terms ..................................................................................................................... 2

4 Pressure and volume changes during breathing ....................................................................................... 2

4.1 Pressure and volume changes in the absence of an RPD ....................................................................... 2

4.2 The effect of RPD flow resistance on pressure and volume changes while using an RPD ............ 6

4.3 The effect of RPD with static pressure on pressure and volume changes while using an RPD .. 6

4.4 The effect of RPD flow resistance and static pressure on pressure and volume changes while

using an RPD ........................................................................................................................................................ 7

4.5 Effects of high static pressure ......................................................................................................................... 8

5 Work of breathing (WOB) .................................................................................................................................. 8

5.1 Physiological work versus physical work .................................................................................................... 8

5.2 Calculations of inspiratory WOB ..................................................................................................................... 9

5.3 Calculations of expiratory WOB ....................................................................................................................10

5.4 Calculations of total WOB ...............................................................................................................................10

5.5 Breathing resistance ........................................................................................................................................12

5.6 Physiologically acceptable WOB ..................................................................................................................12

6 Other respiratory loads ....................................................................................................................................13

6.1 Static load ............................................................................................................................................................13

6.2 Elastic loads .......................................................................................................................................................14

6.3 Other loads ..........................................................................................................................................................14

6.4 How respiratory loads add up ........................................................................................................................14

7 Summary ..............................................................................................................................................................14

Bibliography .....................................................................................................................................................................15

© ISO 2012 – All rights reserved iii
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-4:2012(E)
Foreword

ISO (the International Organization for Standardization) is a worldwide federation of national standards bodies

(ISO member bodies). The work of preparing International Standards is normally carried out through ISO

technical committees. Each member body interested in a subject for which a technical committee has been

established has the right to be represented on that committee. International organizations, governmental and

non-governmental, in liaison with ISO, also take part in the work. ISO collaborates closely with the International

Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) on all matters of electrotechnical standardization.

International Standards are drafted in accordance with the rules given in the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 2.

The main task of technical committees is to prepare International Standards. Draft International Standards

adopted by the technical committees are circulated to the member bodies for voting. Publication as an

International Standard requires approval by at least 75 % of the member bodies casting a vote.

In other circumstances, particularly when there is an urgent market requirement for such documents, a technical

committee may decide to publish other types of document:

— an ISO Publicly Available Specification (ISO/PAS) represents an agreement between technical experts in

an ISO working group and is accepted for publication if it is approved by more than 50 % of the members

of the parent committee casting a vote;

— an ISO Technical Specification (ISO/TS) represents an agreement between the members of a technical

committee and is accepted for publication if it is approved by 2/3 of the members of the committee

casting a vote.

An ISO/PAS or ISO/TS is reviewed after three years in order to decide whether it will be confirmed for a further

three years, revised to become an International Standard, or withdrawn. If the ISO/PAS or ISO/TS is confirmed,

it is reviewed again after a further three years, at which time it must either be transformed into an International

Standard or be withdrawn.

Attention is drawn to the possibility that some of the elements of this document may be the subject of patent

rights. ISO shall not be held responsible for identifying any or all such patent rights.

ISO/TS 16976-4 was prepared by Technical Committee ISO/TC 94, Personal Safety — Protective clothing and

equipment, Subcommittee SC 15, Respiratory protective devices.

ISO/TS 16976 consists of the following parts, under the general title Respiratory protective devices —

Human factors:
— Part 1: Metabolic rates and respiratory flow rates
— Part 2: Anthropometrics

— Part 3: Physiological responses and limitations of oxygen and limitations of carbon dioxide in the

breathing environment

— Part 4: Work of breathing and breathing resistance: Physiologically based limits

The following parts are under preparation:
— Part 5: Thermal effects
— Part 7: Hearing and speech
— Part 8: Ergonomic factors
iv © ISO 2012 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-4:2012(E)
Introduction

A respiratory protective device (RPD) is designed to offer protection from the inhalation of hazardous

substances. However, this protection requires extra effort by the respiratory muscles as they need to generate

higher pressures to overcome the associated respiratory loads imposed by the RPD.

© ISO 2012 – All rights reserved v
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
TECHNICAL SPECIFICATION ISO/TS 16976-4:2012(E)
Respiratory protective devices — Human factors —
Part 4:
Work of breathing and breathing resistance: Physiologically
based limits
1 Scope

This Technical Specification describes how to calculate the work performed by a person’s respiratory muscles

with and without the external respiratory impediments that are imposed by RPD of all kinds, except diving

equipment. This Technical Specification describes how much additional impediment people can tolerate and

contains values that can be used to judge the acceptability of an RPD.

NOTE These calculations are explained in some textbooks on respiratory physiology (in the absence of an RPD), but

most omit them or are incomplete in their explanations.
2 Normative references

The following referenced documents are indispensable for the application of this document. For dated

references, only the edition cited applies. For undated references, the latest edition of the referenced document

(including any amendments) applies.

ISO 16972, Respiratory protective devices — Terms, definitions, graphical symbols and units of measurement

ISO/TS 16976-1, Respiratory protective devices — Human factors — Part 1: Metabolic rates and respiratory

flow rates
3 Terms and definitions, symbols and abbreviated terms
3.1 Terms and definitions

For the purposes of this document, the terms and definitions given in ISO 16972 and the following apply.

3.1.1
body temperature pressure saturated
BTPS
standard condition for the expression of ventilation parameters

NOTE 1 Body temperature (37 °C), ambient pressure and water vapour pressure (6,27 kPa) in saturated air.

NOTE 2 Adapted from ISO 16972.
3.1.2
compliance

change in volume of the human lung that results from a change in pressure, measured in l kPa

NOTE This term is the typical term for the elastic behaviour of the lungs and chest. Compliance is the inverse of elastance.

3.1.3
elastance

change in pressure that results from a given volume change of the human lung, measured in kPa/l

NOTE This term is the typical term for the elastic behaviour of an RPD. Elastance is the inverse of compliance.

© ISO 2012 – All rights reserved 1
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-4:2012(E)
3.1.4
relaxation volume

lung volume when respiratory muscles are relaxed, i.e. the volume at the beginning of an inspiration, also

known as functional residual capacity (FRC) and expiratory reserve volume (ERV)
3.1.5
tidal volume
volume of a breath, measured in litres BTPS
3.1.6
vital capacity

volume of the largest breath a person can take, i.e. the volume difference between a maximum inspiration and

a maximum expiration, measured in litres BTPS
3.1.7
work of breathing
WOB
work required for an entire breathing cycle, measured in Joules
NOTE Adapted from ISO 16972.
3.1.8
work of breathing per tidal volume
WOB/V

normalized WOB (equivalent to volume-averaged pressure), measured in Joules per litre = kPa

3.2 Symbols and abbreviated terms
BTPS body temperature pressure saturated
ERV expiratory reserve volume
FRC functional residual capacity
RPD respiratory protective device
VC vital capacity
WOB work of breathing
p pressure required to overcome the elastance
p pressure required to overcome the flow resistance of the airways
p pressure required to overcome the inspiratory flow resistance of the RPD
i,ext
4 Pressure and volume changes during breathing
4.1 Pressure and volume changes in the absence of an RPD

During an inspiration the inspiratory muscles contract which makes the chest expand and the diaphragm

flatten. This action causes the lungs to expand to a larger volume. Even in the absence of flow resistance, it

takes a certain pressure to expand the chest and lungs. The term used in respiratory physiology for this elastic

behaviour is compliance. The term compliance is also used in laws and regulations; to avoid confusion

with this use of the word, the remainder of this Technical Specification will use the term elastance instead.

By definition, elastance is the inverse of compliance. Elastance describes how much an elastic material

changes when a force or a pressure is applied.
2 © ISO 2012 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-4:2012(E)

Figure 1 shows the lungs (Key 1) inside the chest wall (Key 2) and diaphragm (Key 3). The lungs are connected

to the airway (Key 4). The elastance of the lungs tries to act to shrink them (shown by the arrows), similarly to a

stretched balloon trying to shrink in volume. The elastance of the chest acts by trying to expand it. Thus, in the

absence of muscle effort, the forces on the chest and lungs oppose each other and will, at some volume, be

equal and opposite and come to a position of rest. The lung volume at which this happens is referred to as the

relaxation volume. During an inhalation the chest wall expands and the diaphragm (Key 3) moves downwards.

Key
1 lungs
2 chest wall
3 diaphragm
4 airway
Figure 1 — Schematic cross-section of a person’s chest and lungs

Figure 2 illustrates/defines changes in breathing. An inspiration is shown to start at point A and the lung volume

increases until it reaches its end, point B, where the following expiration starts. The volume difference between

points A and B is the size of the breath, referred to as the tidal volume.

A maximum inspiration is shown at point C and a maximum expiration at point D. The volume difference

between these two points is the maximum volume change achievable and is referred to as the vital capacity,

VC. The range of VC varies from 3 l to 6 l and depends on a person’s age, height and gender. Even with

a maximum expiratory effort some volume remains in the lungs. Had the lungs been able to be emptied

completely the volume illustrated by line E would have been reached.

Point A is the point where the respiratory muscles are relaxed and that volume is referred to as “relaxation

volume”. Another term used for this point is “expiratory reserve volume”, ERV, which can be calculated as

the difference between points A and D. A third term used is “functional residual capacity”, FRC, which is the

volume difference between points A and E.
© ISO 2012 – All rights reserved 3
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-4:2012(E)
Key
X time
Y lung volume
A start of an inspiration
B end of an inspiration and start of the following expiration
C maximum inspiration
D maximum expiration
E lungs and chest completely empty
Figure 2 — Definitions of volume changes

In order to inhale, effort is required to overcome the combined elastance of the chest and lungs, as well as the

flow resistance in the airways. Figure 3 illustrates the pressure generated and the resulting volume changes.

4 © ISO 2012 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-4:2012(E)
Key
X alveolar pressure, in kPa
Y volume, in percent of VC
A start of an inspiration and end of the following expiration
B end of an inspiration and start of the following expiration
C point on the elastance line partway through an inspiration
D point on the combined elastance and pressure drop line during an inspiration
E point on the combined elastance and pressure drop line during an expiration

NOTE The interrupted line is not a straight line but becomes less steep at low and high volume.

Figure 3 — Lung volume versus pressure in the absence of an RPD (see 4.1 for details)

For a person, the muscles generate the pressure which in turn generates a change in lung volume. Therefore,

the pressure is the independent variable and the volume is the dependent one. It is the opposite for an RPD,

for which it is the change in volume in the lungs (i.e. gas flow) that generates pressure across a flow resistance.

At the beginning of the inspiration (point A in Figure 3) no pressure is generated, i.e. it is the relaxation volume.

At the end of the inspiration (point B) the greatest volume has been achieved, called the tidal volume, V . The

interrupted line shows the interaction of the pressures and volumes from the combined elastance of the chest

and lungs. For instance, at point C the elastance requires a pressure of about 0,8 kPa to change the volume to

about 50 % of VC; values given are based on a VC of 4 l and a typical textbook value for elastance of 1 kPa/l.

The lower solid line ADB shows the total pressure (elastance plus pressure due to flow resistance) generated

by the respiratory muscles and the resulting change in volume during the inspiration. The expiration follows

the upper solid line BEA. To reach the volume of 50 % VC during inspiration (point D), a total pressure of about

1,3 kPa is required. This is the sum of the pressure of about 0,8 kPa required for the total elastance, p , and an

additional 0,5 kPa (approximately) for the flow resistance of the airway, p . Towards the end of the inspiration

the flow slows down and the pressure drop due to flow resistance decreases and the inspiration ends at point

B where there is no flow. The tidal volume becomes 70 % VC – 30 % VC = 40 % VC. The inspiratory and

expiratory curves combine to form a volume-pressure loop.

At the end of the inspiration (point B) pressure is stored due to the total elastance. During low breathing rates

this pressure is sufficient to move the gas out during the following expiration. Thus, such an expiration is said

to be passive because the expiratory muscles are inactive. However, the inspiratory muscles are active by

controlling the flow. When more ventilation is desired, the pressure due to elastance is not sufficient and the

expiratory muscles take an active part.
© ISO 2012 – All rights reserved 5
---------------------- Page: 10 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-4:2012(E)

4.2 The effect of RPD flow resistance on pressure and volume changes while using an RPD

An RPD imposes additional flow resistance. This external flow resistance is present both during inspiration

and expiration, but does not have to be of the same magnitude. For instance, an unassisted filtering RPD

will generally have a larger inspiratory flow resistance. Figure 4 illustrates how the internal and external flow

resistances add up. The pressure needed to achieve a volume of 50 % VC is now the pressure at point E. At

this point, the external, inspiratory flow resistance requires an additional pressure increase by about 0,7 kPa

p for a total pressure of about 2 kPa (p + p + p ).
i,ext el aw i,ext
Key
X alveolar pressure, in kPa
Y volume, in percent of VC
A start of an inspiration and end of the following expiration
B end of an inspiration and start of the following expiration
C point on the elastance line partway through an inspiration

D point on the combined line for elastance and internal pressure drop during an inspiration

E point on the combined line for elastance and pressure drop (internal and external) during an inspiration

F point during an expiration where expiratory muscles start to generate pressure to continue expiration

G point during expiration, beyond point F, where the expiratory muscles generate pressure

Figure 4 — Lung volume versus pressure in the presence of an RPD (see 4.2 for details)

4.3 The effect of RPD with static pressure on pressure and volume changes while using

an RPD

Some RPD are designed to have a positive pressure to improve protection against contaminants. Figure 5

illustrates how such a pressure influences lung mechanics. For this illustration, a static pressure (i.e. the

pressure in the RPD in the absence of gas flow) of +0,5 kPa is assumed. Without the positive pressure, an

inspiration starts a
...

SPÉCIFICATION ISO/TS
TECHNIQUE 16976-4
Première édition
2012-06-15
Appareils de protection respiratoire —
Facteurs humains —
Partie 4:
Travail de respiration et de résistance à la
respiration: limites physiologiques
Respiratory protective devices — Human factors —
Part 4: Work of breathing and breathing resistance: Physiologically
based limits
Numéro de référence
ISO/TS 16976-4:2012(F)
ISO 2012
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-4:2012(F)
DOCUMENT PROTÉGÉ PAR COPYRIGHT
© ISO 2012

Droits de reproduction réservés. Sauf prescription différente, aucune partie de cette publication ne peut être reproduite ni utilisée sous

quelque forme que ce soit et par aucun procédé, électronique ou mécanique, y compris la photocopie et les microfilms, sans l’accord écrit

de l’ISO à l’adresse ci-après ou du comité membre de l’ISO dans le pays du demandeur.

ISO copyright office
Case postale 56 • CH-1211 Geneva 20
Tel. + 41 22 749 01 11
Fax + 41 22 749 09 47
E-mail copyright@iso.org
Web www.iso.org
Publié en Suisse
ii © ISO 2012 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-4:2012(F)
Sommaire Page

Avant-propos .....................................................................................................................................................................iv

Introduction ........................................................................................................................................................................ v

1 Domaine d’application ....................................................................................................................................... 1

2 Références normatives ...................................................................................................................................... 1

3 Termes, définitions, symboles et abréviations ............................................................................................ 1

3.1 Termes et définitions .......................................................................................................................................... 1

3.2 Symboles et abréviations .................................................................................................................................. 2

4 Variations de pression et de pression pendant la respiration ................................................................ 2

4.1 Variations de pression et de volume en l’absence d’un APR .................................................................. 2

4.2 Effet de la résistance au débit d’air d’un APR sur les variations de pression et de volume lors

de l’utilisation d’un APR .................................................................................................................................... 6

4.3 Effet d’un APR avec pression statique sur les variations de pression et de volume lors de

l’utilisation d’un APR .......................................................................................................................................... 6

4.4 Effet de la résistance au débit d’air et de la pression statique d’un APR sur les variations de

pression et de volume lors de l’utilisation d’un APR ................................................................................ 7

4.5 Effets d’une pression statique élevée ........................................................................................................... 8

5 Travail respiratoire (W ) .................................................................................................................................. 8

5.1 Travail physiologique contre travail physique ............................................................................................ 8

5.2 Calculs du travail inspiratoire .......................................................................................................................... 9

5.3 Calculs du travail expiratoire .........................................................................................................................10

5.4 Calculs du travail expiratoire total ................................................................................................................10

5.5 Résistance respiratoire ....................................................................................................................................12

5.6 Travail respiratoire physiologiquement acceptable .................................................................................12

6 Autres charges respiratoires .........................................................................................................................14

6.1 Charge statique ..................................................................................................................................................14

6.2 Charges élastiques ...........................................................................................................................................14

6.3 Autres charges ...................................................................................................................................................14

6.4 Cumul des charges respiratoires ..................................................................................................................15

7 Synthèse ..............................................................................................................................................................15

Bibliographie ....................................................................................................................................................................16

© ISO 2012 – Tous droits réservés iii
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-4:2012(F)
Avant-propos

L’ISO (Organisation internationale de normalisation) est une fédération mondiale d’organismes nationaux de

normalisation (comités membres de l’ISO). L’élaboration des Normes internationales est en général confiée aux

comités techniques de l’ISO. Chaque comité membre intéressé par une étude a le droit de faire partie du comité

technique créé à cet effet. Les organisations internationales, gouvernementales et non gouvernementales,

en liaison avec l’ISO participent également aux travaux. L’ISO collabore étroitement avec la Commission

électrotechnique internationale (CEI) en ce qui concerne la normalisation électrotechnique.

Les Normes internationales sont rédigées conformément aux règles données dans les Directives ISO/CEI, Partie 2.

La tâche principale des comités techniques est d’élaborer les Normes internationales. Les projets de Normes

internationales adoptés par les comités techniques sont soumis aux comités membres pour vote. Leur publication

comme Normes internationales requiert l’approbation de 75 % au moins des comités membres votants.

Dans d’autres circonstances, en particulier lorsqu’il existe une demande urgente du marché, un comité

technique peut décider de publier d’autres types de documents:

— une Spécification publiquement disponible ISO (ISO/PAS) représente un accord entre les experts dans un

groupe de travail ISO et est acceptée pour publication si elle est approuvée par plus de 50 % des membres

votants du comité dont relève le groupe de travail;

— une Spécification technique ISO (ISO/TS) représente un accord entre les membres d’un comité technique

et est acceptée pour publication si elle est approuvée par 2/3 des membres votants du comité.

Une ISO/PAS ou ISO/TS fait l’objet d’un examen après trois ans afin de décider si elle est confirmée pour trois

nouvelles années, révisée pour devenir une Norme internationale, ou annulée. Lorsqu’une ISO/PAS ou ISO/TS

a été confirmée, elle fait l’objet d’un nouvel examen après trois ans qui décidera soit de sa transformation en

Norme internationale soit de son annulation.

L’attention est appelée sur le fait que certains des éléments du présent document peuvent faire l’objet de droits

de propriété intellectuelle ou de droits analogues. L’ISO ne saurait être tenue pour responsable de ne pas avoir

identifié de tels droits de propriété et averti de leur existence.

L’ISO/TS 16976-4 a été élaborée par le comité technique ISO/TC 94, Sécurité individuelle — Vêtements et

équipements de protection, sous-comité SC 15, Appareils de protection respiratoire.

L’ISO/TS 16976 comprend les parties suivantes, présentées sous le titre général Appareils de protection

respiratoire — Facteurs humains:
— Partie 1: Régimes métaboliques et régimes des débits respiratoires
— Partie 2: Anthropométrie

— Partie 3: Réponses physiologiques et limitations en oxygène et en gaz carbonique dans l’environnement

respiratoire

— Partie 4: Travail de respiration et de résistance respiratoire: limites physiologiques

Les futures parties sont en cours d’élaboration :
— Partie 5: Effets thermiques
— Partie 7: Discours et audition
— Partie 8: Facteurs ergonomiques
iv © ISO 2012 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-4:2012(F)
Introduction

Un appareil de protection respiratoire (APR) est destiné à assurer la protection contre l’inhalation de substances

dangereuses. Cependant, cette protection nécessite un effort supplémentaire de la part des muscles

respiratoires car ils doivent produire des pressions plus élevées pour compenser les charges respiratoires

associées imposées par l’APR.
© ISO 2012 – Tous droits réservés v
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
SPÉCIFICATION TECHNIQUE ISO/TS 16976-4:2012(F)
Appareils de protection respiratoire — Facteurs humains —
Partie 4:
Travail de respiration et de résistance à la respiration: limites
physiologiques
1 Domaine d’application

La présente Spécification technique décrit la manière de calculer le travail que les muscles respiratoires d’une

personne doivent fournir avec et sans les difficultés respiratoires externes imposées par tous les types d’APR, à

l’exception des appareils de plongée. Le présent document décrit les limites des difficultés supplémentaires que

les personnes peuvent tolérer et contient les valeurs pouvant être utilisées pour évaluer l’acceptabilité d’un APR.

NOTE Quelques ouvrages traitant de physiologie respiratoire expliquent ces calculs (en l’absence d’un APR), mais

la plupart d’entre eux ne les mentionnent pas ou fournissent des explications incomplètes.

2 Références normatives

Les documents ci-après, dans leur intégralité ou non, sont des références normatives indispensables

à l’application du présent document. Pour les références datées, seule l’édition citée s’applique. Pour les

références non datées, la dernière édition du document de référence s’applique (y compris les éventuels

amendements).

ISO 16972, Appareils de protection respiratoire — Termes, définitions, symboles graphiques et unités de mesure

ISO/TS 16976-1, Appareils de protection respiratoire — Facteurs humains — Partie 1: Régimes métaboliques

et régimes des débits respiratoires
3 Termes, définitions, symboles et abréviations
3.1 Termes et définitions

Pour les besoins du présent document, les termes et définitions donnés dans l’ISO 16972 ainsi que les suivants

s’appliquent.
3.1.1
température du corps à pression saturée
BTPS
condition normale pour l’expression des paramètres de ventilation

NOTE 1 Température corporelle (37 °C), pression atmosphérique et pression de vapeur d’eau (6,27 kPa) dans un air saturé.

NOTE 2 Adapté de l’ISO 16972.
3.1.2
compliance

variation du volume pulmonaire humain résultant d’une variation de pression, mesurée en l⋅kPa

NOTE Ce terme est le terme type pour le comportement élastique des poumons et de la poitrine. La compliance est

l’inverse de l’élastance.
© ISO 2012 – Tous droits réservés 1
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-4:2012(F)
3.1.3
élastance

variation de pression résultant d’une variation d’un volume pulmonaire humain donné, mesurée en kPa⋅l

NOTE Ce terme est le terme type pour le comportement élastique d’un APR. L’élastance est l’inverse de la compliance.

3.1.4
volume de relaxation

volume pulmonaire lorsque les muscles respiratoires sont relâchés, c’est-à-dire le volume au début d’une

inspiration, également connu en tant que «capacité résiduelle fonctionnelle (CRF)» et «volume de réserve

expiratoire (VRE)»
3.1.5
volume courant
volume à chaque respiration, mesuré en litres aux conditions BTPS
3.1.6
capacité vitale

volume de la plus grande respiration qu’une personne peut prendre, c’est-à-dire la différence de volume entre

une inspiration maximale et une expiration maximale, mesurée en litres aux conditions BTPS

3.1.7
travail respiratoire
travail requis pour un cycle respiratoire complet, mesuré en Joules
NOTE Adapté de l’ISO 16972.
3.1.8
travail respiratoire par volume courant
W /V
OB T

W normalisé (équivalent à la pression moyenne sur le volume), mesuré en Joules par litre = kPa

3.2 Symboles et abréviations
BTPS température du corps à pression saturée
VRE volume de réserve expiratoire
CRF capacité résiduelle fonctionnelle
APR appareil de protection respiratoire
CV capacité vitale
W travail respiratoire
p pression nécessaire pour surmonter l’élastance

p pression nécessaire pour surmonter la résistance au débit d’air des voies respiratoires

p pression nécessaire pour surmonter la résistance inspiratoire au débit d’air de l’APR

i,ext
4 Variations de pression et de pression pendant la respiration
4.1 Variations de pression et de volume en l’absence d’un APR

Lors d’une inspiration, les muscles inspiratoires se contractent entraînant une augmentation du volume du

thorax et un aplatissement du diaphragme. Cette action provoque l’augmentation du volume des poumons.

2 © ISO 2012 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-4:2012(F)

Même en l’absence de résistance au débit d’air, une certaine pression est nécessaire pour augmenter le

volume du thorax et des poumons. Le terme utilisé en physiologie respiratoire pour ce comportement

élastique est la compliance. Le terme «compliance» est également utilisé dans les domaines juridique et

réglementaire; par conséquent, pour éviter toute confusion, on utilisera, à sa place, dans le reste du document,

le terme «élastance». Par définition, l’élastance est l’inverse de la compliance. L’élastance décrit le niveau

de variation d’un matériau élastique lorsqu’une force ou une pression est appliquée.

La Figure 1 illustre les poumons (repère 1) à l’intérieur de la cage thoracique (repère 2) et le diaphragme

(repère 3). Les poumons sont reliés aux voies respiratoires (repère 4). L’élastance des poumons tente d’agir

pour les rétracter (sens indiqué par les flèches), à la manière d’un ballon gonflé qui tente de se rétracter afin

de réduire son volume. L’élastance du thorax agit pour tenter d’augmenter leur volume. Ainsi, en l’absence

d’effort musculaire, les forces qui s’exercent sur le thorax et les poumons s’opposent entre elles et, à un certain

volume, seront égales et opposées et conduiront à une position de repos. Le volume pulmonaire auquel cela

se produit est désigné par «volume de relaxation». Lors d’une inspiration, le thorax augmente de volume et le

diaphragme (repère 3) descend.
Légende
1 poumons
2 cage thoracique
3 diaphragme
4 voies respiratoires

Figure 1 — Représentation schématique du thorax et des poumons d’une personne (vue en coupe

transversale)

La Figure 2 illustre/définit les variations se produisant lors de la respiration. L’illustration montre qu’une

inspiration commence au point A et que le volume pulmonaire augmente jusqu’à ce qu’il atteigne le point B, où

l’expiration suivante commence. La différence de volume entre les points A et B est le volume de la respiration,

désigné par «volume courant».

Une inspiration maximale est indiquée comme le point C et une expiration maximale comme le point D. La

différence de volume entre ces deux points correspond à la variation de volume maximale envisageable et est

désignée comme la capacité vitale, CV. La plage de CV varie de 3 l à 6 l et dépend de l’âge, de la taille et du

sexe de la personne. Même avec un effort expiratoire maximal, un certain volume reste dans les poumons. Si

les poumons pouvaient être complètement vidés, le volume représenté par la ligne E serait atteint.

Le point A est celui où les muscles respiratoires sont relâchés et le volume concerné est désigné par «volume

de relaxation». Pour désigner ce point, on utilise également le terme «volume de réserve expiratoire», VRE,

qui peut être calculé comme la différence entre les points A et D. Le troisième terme employé est la capacité

résiduelle fonctionnelle, CRF, qui représente la différence de volume entre les points A et E.

© ISO 2012 – Tous droits réservés 3
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-4:2012(F)
Légende
X temps
Y volume pulmonaire
A début d’une inspiration
B fin d’une inspiration et début de l’expiration suivante
C inspiration maximale
D expiration maximale
E poumons et thorax complètement vides
Figure 2 — Définitions des variations de volumes

Pour inspirer, un effort est nécessaire pour venir à bout de l’élastance combinée de la cage thoracique et des

poumons, ainsi que de la résistance au débit d’air dans les voies respiratoires. La Figure 3 illustre la pression

générée et les variations de volume qui en résultent.
4 © ISO 2012 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-4:2012(F)
Légende
X pression alvéolaire, en kPa
Y volume, en pourcentage de CV
A début d’une inspiration et fin de l’expiration suivante
B fin d’une inspiration et début de l’expiration suivante
C un point sur la ligne d’élastance lors d’une inspiration

D un point sur la ligne combinée d’élastance et de chute de pression lors d’une inspiration

E un point sur la ligne combinée d’élastance et de chute de pression lors d’une expiration

NOTE La ligne tiretée n’est pas une droite mais sa pente devient moins abrupte à volume faible et à volume élevé.

Figure 3 — Volume pulmonaire en fonction de la pression en l’absence d’un APR
(voir 4.1 pour les détails)

Pour une personne, les muscles génèrent la pression qui, à son tour, génère une variation du volume pulmonaire.

Par conséquent, la pression représente la variable indépendante et le volume représente la variable dépendante.

C’est le contraire qui se produit pour un APR car, pour celui-ci, c’est la variation de volume dans les poumons

(c’est-à-dire le débit de gaz) qui génère une pression due à la résistance au débit d’air. Au début de l’inspiration

(point A dans la Figure 3), aucune pression n’est générée, c’est-à-dire qu’il s’agit du volume de relaxation. A la

fin de l’inspiration (point B), le volume le plus élevé a été atteint; il s’agit du volume courant, V . La ligne tiretée

représente l’interaction des pressions et des volumes à partir de l’élastance combinée de la cage thoracique et

des poumons. Par exemple, au point C, l’élastance nécessite une pression d’environ 0,8 kPa pour faire varier

le volume jusqu’à environ 50 % de la CV; les valeurs données sont fondées sur une CV de 4 litres et une valeur

théorique type d’élastance de 1 kPa⋅l . La ligne inférieure en trait plein ADB représente la pression totale

(élastance plus pression due à la résistance au débit d’air) générée par les muscles respiratoires et la variation

de volume résultante lors de l’inspiration. L’expiration suit la ligne supérieure en trait plein BEA. Pour atteindre le

volume de 50 % de la CV au cours de l’inspiration (point D), une pression totale d’environ 1,3 kPa est nécessaire.

Il s’agit de la somme de la pression d’environ 0,8 kPa requise pour l’élastance totale, p . et d’une pression

supplémentaire d’environ 0,5 kPa pour la résistance au débit d’air des voies respiratoires, p . Vers la fin de

l’inspiration, le débit diminue et la baisse de pression due à la résistance au débit d’air décroît et l’inspiration

prend fin au point B où il n’y a aucun débit. Le volume courant devient 70 % de la CV – 30 % de la CV = 40 % de

la CV. Les courbes inspiratoire et expiratoire se combinent pour former une boucle volume-pression.

A la fin de l’inspiration (point B), la pression est conservée en raison de l’élastance totale. Lors de respirations

à faibles débits, cette pression est suffisante pour expulser le gaz lors de l’expiration suivante. Ainsi, une telle

expiration est dite passive parce que les muscles expiratoires sont inactifs. Cependant, les muscles inspiratoires

sont actifs par contrôle du débit d’air. Lorsqu’une ventilation plus importante est requise, la pression due à

l’élastance n’est pas suffisante et les muscles expiratoires doivent participer activement.

© ISO 2012 – Tous droits réservés 5
---------------------- Page: 10 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-4:2012(F)

4.2 Effet de la résistance au débit d’air d’un APR sur les variations de pression et de vol-

ume lors de l’utilisation d’un APR

Un APR impose une résistance supplémentaire au débit d’air. Cette résistance au débit d’air externe est

présente aussi bien lors de l’inspiration que de l’expiration, mais il n’est pas nécessaire qu’elle soit de même

ordre de grandeur. Par exemple, un APR à filtration non assistée aura une plus grande résistance au débit

d’air à l’inspiration. La Figure 4 montre comment les résistances au débit d’air interne et externe s’ajoutent.

La pression nécessaire pour atteindre un volume de 50 % de CV correspond à présent à la pression au

point E. En ce point, la résistance externe au débit d’air à l’inspiration nécessite une pression supplémentaire

augmentée d’environ 0,7 kPa p pour une pression totale d’environ 2 kPa (p + p + p ).

i,ext el aw i,ext
Légende
X pression alvéolaire, en kPa
Y volume, en pourcentage de CV
A début d’une inspiration et fin de l’expiration suivante
B fin d’une inspiration et début de l’expiration suivante
C un point sur la ligne d’élastance lors d’une inspiration

D un point sur la ligne combinée d’élastance et de chute de pression interne lors d’une inspiration

E un point sur la ligne combinée d’élastance et de chute de pression (interne et externe) lors d’une inspiration

F le point lors d’une expiration au niveau duquel les muscles expiratoires doivent commencer à générer une pression

pour poursuivre l’expiration

G un point lors de l’expiration, situé au-delà du point F, au niveau duquel les muscles expiratoires génèrent une pression

Figure 4 — Volume pulmonaire en fonction de la pression en présence d’un APR (voir 4.2 pour les détails)

4.3 Effet d’un APR avec pression statique sur les variations de pression et de volume lors

de l’utilisation d’un APR

Certains APR sont conçus de manière à avoir une pression positive pour améliorer la protection contre les

contaminants. La Figure 5 montre comment une telle pression influe sur la mécanique pulmonaire. Pour cette

illustration, on suppose une pression statique (c’est-à-dire la pression dans l’APR en l’absence de débit de

gaz) de + 0,5 kPa. Sans la pression positive, une inspiration commence au point A. La pression statique de

0,5 kPa déplace le nouveau volume de relaxation (point A’) horizontalement. La courbe d’élastance détermine

le mouvement vertical qui devient égal à 10 % de CV. De ce fait, cette pression statique suffit à déplacer le

volume de relaxation de 30 % de CV à 40 % de CV.
6 © ISO 2012 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 11 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-4:2012(F)
Légende
X pression alvéolaire, en kPa
Y volume, en pourcentage de CV
A début d’une inspiration
A′ début d’une inspiration avec une pression statique positive

Figure 5 — Volume pulmonaire en fonction de la pression en présence d’un APR avec pression

statique (voir 4.3 pour les détails)

4.4 Effet de la résistance au débit d’air et de la pression statique d’un APR sur les varia-

tions de pression et de volume lors de l’utilisation d’un APR

Pour ce type d’APR, la pression statique fait varier le volume de relaxation. Si l’on utilise les nombres issus

de l’exemple donné en 4.3 et en Figure 5, le nouveau point de départ se situe à 40 % de CV. La Figure 6

représente la courbe de variation du volume en fonction de la pression. La comparaison entre les Figures 4

et 6 permet de noter que la seule différence notable se situe au niveau des points de début et de fin (A’ et B’).

Dans la mesure où A’ représente le volume de relaxation, la pression engendrée par les muscles respiratoires

est nulle. Toutefois, la pression mesurée dans l’APR devrait être de 0,5 kPa.
© ISO 2012 – Tous droits réservés 7
---------------------- Page: 12 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-4:2012(F)
Légende
X pression alvéolaire (par rapport à la pression de relaxation), en kPa
Y volume, en pourcentage de CV

Figure 6 — Volume pulmonaire en fonction de la présence d’un APR avec résistance au débit d’air et

pression statique (voir 4.5 pour les détails)
4.5 Effets d’une pression statique élevée

Comme le montre la Figure 6, une pression statique élevée déplace la fin d’une respiration (B’) vers des

volumes pulmonaires plus élevés et limite le volume courant au fur et à mesure que le point B’ s’approche de

100 % de CV. En outre, à des volumes pulmonaires élevés, les poumons et la cage thoracique deviennent

moins élastiques et il devient de plus en plus difficile d’atteindre le volume requis à la fin de l’inspiration. Il a été

démontré que les personnes pouvaient résister à la variation de volume imposée par des pressions statiques,

[7][10]

aussi bien positives que négatives . La variation de volume se limite au tiers ou à la moitié de la variation

de volume qui aurait dû réellement se produire. Cela signifie que les muscles respiratoires sont actifs et qu’ils

génèrent la pression nécessaire pour résister à la pression statique imposée. Une telle activité musculaire

constitue une charge physiologique.

La pression diastolique type (c’est-à-dire la pression entre les battements du cœur) dans la circulation sanguine

[3][15]

dans le poumon est comprise entre 0,7 kPa et 1,1 kPa (voir ). Par conséquent, une pression positive

excessive peut aussi avoir des effets indésirables en réduisant le débit sanguin dans les poumons et donc le

retour veineux. Des pressions statiques élevées rendront également l’expiration plus difficile en augmentant

le travail des muscles expiratoires.
5 Travail respiratoire (W )
5.1 Travail physiologique contre travail physique
5.1.1 Généralités

Il existe une différence entre le travail physiologique et le travail physique. Cela s’observe notamment lors d’un

travail statique ou lorsque le travail est effectué sur des matériaux élastiques.

8 © ISO 2012 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 13 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-4:2012(F)
5.1.2 Travail statique

Un travail statique est effectué lorsqu’un muscle est actif mais ne provoque aucun mouvement, par exemple

lorsqu’un bras est maintenu en extension. Ce type de travail peut être fatiguant. Il y a un travail physiologique

puisque le muscle consomme de l’énergie. Cependant, d’un point de vue physique, aucun travail n’est effectué

puisqu’ il n’y a pas de mouvement.
5.1.3 Travail élastique

Un travail physiologique est également effectué contre les matériaux élastiques. Cas d’un élastique: lorsque

l’élastique est étiré, de l’énergie est emmagasinée puis restituée lorsque l’élastique retrouve sa longueur initiale.

Par conséquent, aucun travail physique net n’a été effectué. Si un muscle est utilisé pour étirer cet élastique,

l’effort est donc fourni par le muscle. Lorsqu’on laisse l’élastique retrouver sa longueur initiale de manière

maîtrisée (sans le relâcher brusquement), un effort supplémentaire est fourni. En d’autres termes, l’énergie

emmagasinée dans l’élastique n’est pas restituée au muscle. Au contraire, de l’énergie est consommée aussi

bien durant la phase d’étirement de l’élastique que durant la phase de relâchement. Dans la mesure où la force

est toujours appliquée dans la même direction, mais que la direction du mouvement résultant varie lorsque

l’élastique retrouve sa longueur initiale, le produit peut être soit positif, soit négatif.

5.1.4 Travail physique positif et négatif

D’un point de vue physique, un travail négatif peut être perçu comme une restitution d’énergie. Cependant,

d’un point de vue physiologique, le travail physique positif et le travail physique négatif coûtent tous deux

de l’énergie. Le coût physiologique du travail négatif est inférieur à celui du travail positif (par exemple, voir

Références [1] et [9]).
5.2 Calculs du travail inspiratoire

Le travail inspiratoire peut être calculé à partir des enregistrements de pression et du volume résultant. Le

travail peut être divisé en trois parties: travail contre l’élastance, la résistance au débit d’air interne et externe,

la résistance au débit d’air à l’inspiration. Le travail contre l’élastance peut être vu dans la Figure 7 comme

le triangle formé par les points ACBFA. Le travail contre la résistance au débit d’air interne est représenté

comme la zone formée par les points ADBCA. De même, le travail contre la résistance externe au débit d’air

à l’inspiration est représenté comme la zone définie par les points AEBDA. Ainsi, le travail total (physique et

physiologique) de l’inspiration est la zone définie par les points AEBFA.
© ISO 2012 – Tous droits réservés 9
---------------------- Page: 14 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-4:2012(F)
Légende
X pression alvéolaire, en kPa
Y volume, en pourcentage de CV
A début d’une inspiration et fin de l’expiration suivante
B fin d’une inspiration et début de l’expiration suivante
C un point sur la ligne d’élastance lors d’une inspiration
D un
...

Questions, Comments and Discussion

Ask us and Technical Secretary will try to provide an answer. You can facilitate discussion about the standard in here.