Information technology -- Home Electronic System (HES) application model

ISO/IEC 15067-3-3:2019(E) specifies a high-level architecture and a set of models for a demand-response energy management system with multiple interacting EMAs in a home or community housing (such as one or more apartment buildings or a campus of houses). These models specify the structure among multiple EMAs, which can be arranged in a mesh or hierarchical structure. This document builds upon ISO/IEC 15067-3.

Technologies de l'information -- Modèles d'application du système électronique domotique (HES)

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ISO/IEC 15067-3-3
Edition 1.0 2019-10
INTERNATIONAL
STANDARD
colour
inside
Information technology – Home electronic system (HES) application model –
Part 3-3: Model of a system of interacting energy management agents (EMAs)
for demand-response energy management
ISO/IEC 15067-3-3:2019-10(en)
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
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---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO/IEC 15067-3-3
Edition 1.0 2019-10
INTERNATIONAL
STANDARD
colour
inside
Information technology – Home electronic system (HES) application model –
Part 3-3: Model of a system of interacting energy management agents (EMAs)
for demand-response energy management
INTERNATIONAL
ELECTROTECHNICAL
COMMISSION
ICS 35.020 ISBN 978-2-8322-7522-1

Warning! Make sure that you obtained this publication from an authorized distributor.

---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
– 2 – ISO/IEC 15067-3-3:2019
© ISO/IEC 2019
CONTENTS

FOREWORD ........................................................................................................................... 4

INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................................... 5

1 Scope .............................................................................................................................. 6

2 Normative references ...................................................................................................... 6

3 Terms, definitions and abbreviations ............................................................................... 6

3.1 Terms and definitions .............................................................................................. 6

3.2 Abbreviations .......................................................................................................... 7

4 Conformance ................................................................................................................... 7

5 Energy management agent for home or residential community ........................................ 8

5.1 Overview for home or residential community ........................................................... 8

5.2 System architecture for an energy management system with multiple EMAs ........... 8

5.3 Interacting energy management agents................................................................. 10

6 Topology of energy management systems ..................................................................... 12

6.1 Overview of topologies .......................................................................................... 12

6.2 Local EMA topology model .................................................................................... 13

6.3 Hybrid EMA topology model .................................................................................. 14

Annex A (informative) An energy management system with multiple energy

management agents ............................................................................................................. 16

A.1 Use cases for energy management systems with multiple energy

management agents.............................................................................................. 16

A.2 Demand-response functionality of interacting EMAs .............................................. 19

A.3 Communication capability among EMAs ................................................................ 21

Annex B (informative) Service scenarios of an interacting energy management agent .......... 22

B.1 A service scenario of hierarchical interacting energy management agents ............ 22

B.2 A service scenario of mesh interacting energy management agents ...................... 24

Bibliography .......................................................................................................................... 27

Figure 1 – Example of an energy management system in a building with two homes ............... 8

Figure 2 – System architecture of an energy management system for a home with

multiple EMAs ......................................................................................................................... 9

Figure 3 – Example model of hierarchical interacting energy management agents ................ 11

Figure 4 – Example model of mesh interacting energy management agents .......................... 11

Figure 5 – Example model of mixed hierarchical and mesh interacting energy

management agents ............................................................................................................. 12

Figure 6 – Topology models for a system of interacting EMAs............................................... 13

Figure 7 – Physical topology example of local EMA topology model ...................................... 14

Figure 8 – Physical topology example of hybrid EMA topology model .................................... 14

Figure A.1 – Example of local EMA topology model for a home ............................................. 16

Figure A.2 – Example of local EMA topology model for a residential community .................... 17

Figure A.3 – Hybrid EMA topology model example for a home .............................................. 17

Figure A.4 – Hybrid EMA topology model example for a residential community ..................... 18

Figure A.5 – Function of hierarchical interacting energy management agents ....................... 20

Figure A.6 – Function of mesh interacting energy management agents ................................. 20

Figure B.1 – EMA to EMA interaction model in a hierarchical interacting EMA

environment .......................................................................................................................... 23

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ISO/IEC 15067-3-3:2019 – 3 –
© ISO/IEC 2019

Figure B.2 – EMA to EMA interactions to achieve user's energy cost budget ........................ 25

Table B.1 – Information flows between server EMA and client EMA ...................................... 24

Table B.2 – Information flows among EMAs .......................................................................... 26

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– 4 – ISO/IEC 15067-3-3:2019
© ISO/IEC 2019
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY –
HOME ELECTRONIC SYSTEM (HES) APPLICATION MODEL –
Part 3-3: Model of a system of interacting energy management agents
(EMAs) for demand-response energy management
FOREWORD

1) ISO (the International Organization for Standardization) and IEC (the International Electrotechnical Commission)

form the specialized system for worldwide standardization. National bodies that are members of ISO or IEC

participate in the development of International Standards through technical committees established by the

respective organization to deal with particular fields of technical activity. ISO and IEC technical committees

collaborate in fields of mutual interest. Other international organizations, governmental and non-governmental, in

liaison with ISO and IEC, also take part in the work. In the field of information technology, ISO and IEC have

established a joint technical committee, ISO/IEC JTC 1.

2) The formal decisions or agreements of IEC and ISO on technical matters express, as nearly as possible, an

international consensus of opinion on the relevant subjects since each technical committee has representation

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9) Attention is drawn to the possibility that some of the elements of this ISO/IEC publication may be the subject of

patent rights. ISO and IEC shall not be held responsible for identifying any or all such patent rights.

International Standard ISO/IEC 15067-3-3 was prepared by subcommittee 25: Interconnection

of information technology equipment, of ISO/IEC joint technical committee 1: Information

technology.

The list of all currently available parts of the ISO/IEC 15067 series, under the general title

Information technology – Home electronic system (HES) application model, can be found on

the IEC and ISO websites.

This International Standard has been approved by vote of the member bodies, and the voting

results may be obtained from the address given on the second title page.
The text of this standard is based on the following documents:
FDIS Report on voting
JTC1-SC25/2899/FDIS JTC1-SC25/2907/RVD

Full information on the voting for the approval of this standard can be found in the report on

voting indicated in the above table.

This publication has been drafted in accordance with the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 2.

IMPORTANT – The 'colour inside' logo on the cover page of this publication indicates

that it contains colours which are considered to be useful for the correct

understanding of its contents. Users should therefore print this document using a

colour printer.
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ISO/IEC 15067-3-3:2019 – 5 –
© ISO/IEC 2019
INTRODUCTION

This document specifies a high-level model of interacting energy management agents (EMAs).

These EMAs provide automated demand-response services in a residential community or a

building consisting of multiple apartments. This document extends the energy services for

residential homes specified in ISO/IEC 15067-3.

Interacting EMAs provide coordination among EMAs to offer improved energy management

and overall efficiency. Each EMA enables the allocation of energy among appliances and

switching energy sources from grid to local generation or storage according to consumer

preferences. This document specifies the structure and interfaces among EMAs. In this model,

EMAs may have a hierarchical interacting structure and/or mesh interacting structure. One

EMA connected to the home area network controls and coordinates with other EMAs
connected to other home area networks or with supplemental EMAs in the cloud.

Typical smart energy services may include integrated energy management for multiple energy

systems, energy sharing and trading within the community, energy information sharing for

more efficient energy usage, etc. These energy services offer benefits in electrical energy

management.

The intent of these models is to accommodate flexible and efficient energy management.

Interacting EMAs enable the allocation of energy among houses in a community and

appliances within houses, and the choice of energy supplies from local and/or external

sources. External sources may be public utilities or other suppliers. Local sources may

include local power generators and storage devices. Distributed EMAs extend these

capabilities to an environment with multiple houses and apartments.

Based on this model, a specification of a mechanism for interoperability among EMA products

from different manufacturers will be proposed as an additional subpart of ISO/IEC 15067.

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– 6 – ISO/IEC 15067-3-3:2019
© ISO/IEC 2019
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY –
HOME ELECTRONIC SYSTEM (HES) APPLICATION MODEL –
Part 3-3: Model of a system of interacting energy management agents
(EMAs) for demand-response energy management
1 Scope

This part of ISO/IEC 15067 specifies a high-level architecture and a set of models for a

demand-response energy management system with multiple interacting EMAs in a home or

community housing (such as one or more apartment buildings or a campus of houses). These

models specify the structure among multiple EMAs, which can be arranged in a mesh or

hierarchical structure. This document builds upon ISO/IEC 15067-3.
2 Normative references

The following documents are referred to in the text in such a way that some or all of their

content constitutes requirements of this document. For dated references, only the edition

cited applies. For undated references, the latest edition of the referenced document (including

any amendments) applies.

ISO/IEC 15067-3:2012, Information technology – Home electronic system (HES) application

model – Part 3: Model of a demand-response energy management system for HES
3 Terms, definitions and abbreviations
3.1 Terms and definitions

For the purposes of this document, the terms and definitions given in ISO/IEC 15067-3:2012

and the following apply.

ISO and IEC maintain terminological databases for use in standardization at the following

addresses:
• IEC Electropedia: available at http://www.electropedia.org/
• ISO Online browsing platform: available at http://www.iso.org/obp
3.1.1
client EMA
EMA that acts as a client to another EMA
3.1.2
service provider
business that provides demand-response services as specified in ISO/IEC 15067-3
3.1.3
distributed energy resources
DER

energy generation and storage resources possibly supplied by non-utilities and customers

Note 1 to entry: As used in this document, this term applies to resources inside a home or building.

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ISO/IEC 15067-3-3:2019 – 7 –
© ISO/IEC 2019
3.1.4
energy management agent
EMA

set of control functions that manage energy consumption as an agent for the customer

Note 1 to entry: An energy management agent (EMA) is specified in ISO/IEC 15067-3.

3.1.5
HES gateway
residential gateway that conforms to ISO/IEC 15045-1 and ISO/IEC 15045-2
3.1.6
residential community

one or more multi-dwelling buildings or housing units for the purpose of residence

Note 1 to entry: A typical residential community is an apartment building. The residential community may contain

a public common use area with a community energy system and a private use area in homes, each with an HES

energy system.
3.1.7
server EMA
EMA that acts as a server to other EMAs
3.1.8
smart energy management appliance

home appliance equipped with built-in energy management agent components that provide

energy management capabilities for demand-response
3.1.9
supplemental EMA
EMA located outside of the home or building
3.2 Abbreviations
iEMA interacting energy management agent
EMA energy management agent
EV electric vehicle
DER distributed energy resources
DR demand reponse
HAN home area network
HES home electronic system
ID identity
SP service provider
SSL secure sockets layer
TV television
WAN wide area network
4 Conformance

Implementations of an energy management system with multiple EMAs shall conform to one

of the two logical models specified in Clause 5. The chosen model shall conform to one of the

two topology models specified in Clause 6.

If there is a supplemental EMA in the cloud, all data flowing into the residential community

from the supplemental EMA and/or from the residential community into the supplemental EMA

shall pass through an HES gateway located in a residence or serving the entire community.

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– 8 – ISO/IEC 15067-3-3:2019
© ISO/IEC 2019
5 Energy management agent for home or residential community
5.1 Overview for home or residential community

Figure 1 shows an example of a physical energy management system in a single community

domain that includes multiple private residential homes and common spaces in a residential

community. In some cases, one or more EMAs may be physically located in a home and one or

more supplemental EMAs in a cloud.

NOTE 1 The HAN networks are shown with a dashed line in red; the WAN network is shown with a dashed line in

blue; the power line is shown in solid green.
NOTE 2 The shapes within Figure 1 are explained in 5.2.
Figure 1 – Example of an energy management system in a building with two homes

The configuration shown in Figure 1 consists of multiple interacting EMAs in the homes and

supplemental EMAs in the cloud for two reasons.

1) One reason is that it may be advantageous to assign responsibilities for a subset of

appliances to different EMAs within one home. For example, one EMA may be assigned to

a washing machine, refrigerator and TV, another EMA assigned for lighting, heating and

air-conditioning, and another EMA assigned to electric vehicles, local power generators

and storage devices.
2) The other reason is that EMAs may coordinate energy management among multiple

homes within a residential community to optimize desired parameters, such as cost and

comfort.
5.2 System architecture for an energy management system with multiple EMAs
ISO/IEC 15067–3:2012, 5.1 introduces the HES energy management model. The model
shows the system architecture and interrelationship among the elements.

This document extends ISO/IEC 15067-3 for installation of multiple EMAs within a house,

multiple houses in a community, an apartment building or a campus of apartment buildings.

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ISO/IEC 15067-3-3:2019 – 9 –
© ISO/IEC 2019

Figure 2 shows the extended model of a home or a community energy management system

with multiple EMAs. The system may be extended to manage multiple EMAs in a home and

supplemental EMAs in the cloud.

At least one EMA is located on a home area network. Supplemental EMAs may be located in

the cloud.

The models specified in this document are organized into one of the following topologies:

• local EMA topology model (multiple EMAs within a home);
• hybrid EMA topology model (multiple EMAs in the home and supplemental EMAs in
the cloud).

Figure 2 shows the system architecture and interrelationship among the elements. The

framework is very similar to the HES model using an EMA. Within this figure, the rectangle

box in blue represents the HES gateway. The circles represent power-using smart appliances

that can communicate via a home area network (HAN). The rectangular shapes represent

appliances that are not able to communicate. The octagonal shape represents a power

conversion device. The cross shapes represent power storage devices. The triangle shapes

represent DER power-generating devices. The rectangle with a curved corner represents the

utility elements such as a meter. The diamond shape represents the controller element

(e.g. EMA, sensor or DR switch). The pentagon shape represents the energy supplier, such

as the utility, transmitters, and distributors.
NOTE Elements of the HES model are specified in ISO/IEC 15067-3.
Figure 2 – System architecture of an energy management system
for a home with multiple EMAs
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– 10 – ISO/IEC 15067-3-3:2019
© ISO/IEC 2019
5.3 Interacting energy management agents

ISO/IEC 15067–3:2012, 6.3.1 introduces the EMA. The EMA enables the allocation of limited

energy (or a limited budget for energy) among appliances or the switching of energy sources

from local generation or battery according to consumer preferences.

The EMA functions are extended from ISO/IEC 15067-3 to support multiple EMAs. An EMA

allocates energy for appliances in the corresponding service area. The EMA can be extended

to interact with other EMAs in different locations to optimize energy consumption and

generation. The EMA performs specialized interacting functions by applying complex

algorithms to exchange data among EMAs and devices, for example, for energy consumption

targets, cost of energy, usage data, and budget for appliances, distributed energy resources

(DER), and EMAs under the management of the community.

There are two options for the design of interacting functions among EMAs: hierarchical

interacting design and mesh interacting design. In a hierarchical interacting design a

centralized EMA coordinates and allocates energy consumption and generation among

multiple EMAs in different locations. Among multiple EMAs within a domain, one becomes a

server and the others remain clients in a distributed architecture. The server EMA provides

demand-response optimization through the interaction of multiple client EMAs. The server and

client EMAs are technically the same except for the logical relationships. A server or client

EMA may supervise energy allocation among devices with or without an intervening EMA.

In a mesh interacting design, each EMA allocates energy consumption of appliances in the

corresponding service area. Each EMA includes an algorithm to manage energy. EMAs are

able to co-operate autonomously and interact with each other to optimize control. For instance,

the optimization can be done by controlling the operation of smart appliances, local power

generators and storage devices via interactions with other EMAs. To support these

interactions, each EMA provides a common communications interface.

Figure 3 shows the model of hierarchical interacting EMAs, where EMAs can be divided into

two types: the server EMA and the client EMA. The server EMA for energy management

included in Figure 3 is a specialized controller that coordinates and allocates energy

consumption and generation among multiple client EMAs. The client EMA enables the

allocation of energy among smart appliances by switching energy sources from grid to local

generation or modifying the operation of energy sources.

Figure 4 shows the model of mesh interacting EMAs, where each EMA can be a server EMA

as well as a client EMA. The EMA interacts with other EMAs to coordinate energy
consumption and generation.

Figure 5 shows a combination of hierarchical interacting and mesh interacting approaches to

coordinate energy consumption among EMAs and/or to allocate energy consumption of smart

energy management appliances.
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ISO/IEC 15067-3-3:2019 – 11 –
© ISO/IEC 2019
Figure 3 – Example model of hierarchical interacting energy management agents
Figure 4 – Example model of mesh interacting energy management agents
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– 12 – ISO/IEC 15067-3-3:2019
© ISO/IEC 2019
Figure 5 – Example model of mixed hierarchical and mesh interacting
energy management agents

The interfaces to energy service providers and appliances are outside the scope of this

document. Use cases and service scenarios for a hierarchical interacting approach and a

mesh interacting approach are described in Annexes A and B, respectively.
6 Topology of energy management systems
6.1 Overview of topologies

The EMA can be modelled as two topology types depending on the physical location of the

EMAs: local EMA topology model and hybrid EMA topology model.

• In the local EMA topology model, all the EMAs are located within a home or a residential

community.

• In the hybrid EMA topology model, the EMAs are located within a home, and one or more

supplemental EMAs are in a cloud. EMAs on a HAN may interact with appliances in a

home or a residential community.

NOTE 1 Multiple EMAs can be used when there are multiple energy subsystems inside a home or a residential

community. For example, a wind turbine, local power generators and a battery may be combined into a subsystem

and controlled by a DER EMA acting as a smart DER. A washing machine, refrigerator and TV may be combined

into a subsystem controlled by an appliance EMA. A lighting, heating and air-conditioning system may be combined

into a subsystem controlled by a facility EMA.

NOTE 2 In a home or a residential community with multiple EMAs, EMAs are divided into two types depending on

the physical location: the local type and the cloud type. The local type is an EMA within a home or a residential

community where an EMA controls the appliance according to the algorithm installed in the EMA. The cloud type

has the remote control capability with one-way or two-way communication functions, and the cloud-based

supplemental EMA controls the operation of selected devices remotely through the EMA from outside the home. To

implement local or remote load control, EMAs send control signals to interrupt the operation of selected appliances

to the EMA via the HES gateway within a home or from outside the home.

Figure 6 shows the EMA models with two topologies that illustrate the physical locations of

the EMAs. Models that meet these requirements may be compared in terms of control

functions, communication interfaces and other relevant factors such as cost and availability.

These topologies of the models are described in 6.2 and 6.3, and include benefits for various

energy management services.
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ISO/IEC 15067-3-3:2019 – 13 –
© ISO/IEC 2019
a) Local EMA topology model
1) Implement multiple EMAs depending on the capabilities of the appliances.
2) Coordinate energy management among EMAs to optimize energy management and
overall efficiency.
3) Provide automated failover service from continuous energy management.
b) Hybrid EMA topology model
1) Integrate EMAs with supplemental EMAs in the cloud.

2) Balance the functionalities between the EMAs and the supplemental EMAs based in

the cloud.

3) Improve computing resources by complementing EMAs with supplemental EMAs based

in the cloud.
a) Local EMA model b) Hybrid EMA model
Figure 6 – Topology models for a system of interacting EMAs
6.2 Local EMA topology model

Case 1 is a topology model of one or more EMAs based on a tree, bus or mesh topology in a

home or a residential community. The basic physical system model of a bus topology i

...

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