Corrosion of metals and alloys -- Guidelines for applying statistics to analysis of corrosion data

ISO 14802:2012 gives guidance on some generally accepted methods of statistical analysis which are useful in the interpretation of corrosion test results. ISO 14802:2012 does not cover detailed calculations and methods, but rather considers a range of approaches which have applications in corrosion testing. Only those statistical methods that have wide acceptance in corrosion testing have been considered in ISO 14802:2012.

Corrosion des métaux et alliages -- Lignes directrices pour l'application des statistiques à l'analyse des données de corrosion

L'ISO 14802:2012 donne des recommandations concernant des méthodes d'analyse statistique généralement acceptées qui sont utiles pour l'interprétation des résultats d'essai de corrosion. L'ISO 14802:2012 ne traite pas des calculs et des méthodes détaillés, mais plutôt d'un éventail d'approches qui ont trouvé une application dans les essais de corrosion. Seules les méthodes statistiques largement acceptées pour les essais de corrosion ont été prises en compte dans l'ISO 14802:2012.

General Information

Status
Published
Publication Date
12-Jul-2012
Current Stage
6060 - International Standard published
Start Date
04-Jul-2012
Completion Date
13-Jul-2012
Ref Project

Buy Standard

Standard
ISO 14802:2012 - Corrosion of metals and alloys -- Guidelines for applying statistics to analysis of corrosion data
English language
60 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview
Standard
ISO 14802:2012 - Corrosion des métaux et alliages -- Lignes directrices pour l'application des statistiques a l'analyse des données de corrosion
French language
60 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview

Standards Content (sample)

INTERNATIONAL ISO
STANDARD 14802
First edition
2012-07-15
Corrosion of metals and alloys —
Guidelines for applying statistics to
analysis of corrosion data
Corrosion des métaux et alliages — Lignes directrices pour l’application
des statistiques à l’analyse des données de corrosion
Reference number
ISO 14802:2012(E)
ISO 2012
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO 14802:2012(E)
COPYRIGHT PROTECTED DOCUMENT
© ISO 2012

All rights reserved. Unless otherwise specified, no part of this publication may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means,

electronic or mechanical, including photocopying and microfilm, without permission in writing from either ISO at the address below or ISO’s

member body in the country of the requester.
ISO copyright office
Case postale 56 • CH-1211 Geneva 20
Tel. + 41 22 749 01 11
Fax + 41 22 749 09 47
E-mail copyright@iso.org
Web www.iso.org
Published in Switzerland
ii © ISO 2012 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO 14802:2012(E)
Contents Page

Foreword ............................................................................................................................................................................iv

1 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................................... 1

2 Significance and use .......................................................................................................................................... 1

3 Scatter of data ...................................................................................................................................................... 1

3.1 Distributions ......................................................................................................................................................... 1

3.2 Histograms ............................................................................................................................................................ 1

3.3 Normal distribution ............................................................................................................................................. 2

3.4 Normal probability paper ................................................................................................................................... 2

3.5 Other probability paper ...................................................................................................................................... 2

3.6 Unknown distribution ......................................................................................................................................... 3

3.7 Extreme value analysis ...................................................................................................................................... 3

3.8 Significant digits .................................................................................................................................................. 3

3.9 Propagation of variance .................................................................................................................................... 3

3.10 Mistakes ................................................................................................................................................................. 3

4 Central measures ................................................................................................................................................ 3

4.1 Average .................................................................................................................................................................. 3

4.2 Median .................................................................................................................................................................... 4

4.3 Which to use ......................................................................................................................................................... 4

5 Variability measures ........................................................................................................................................... 4

5.1 General ................................................................................................................................................................... 4

5.2 Variance ................................................................................................................................................................. 4

5.3 Standard deviation .............................................................................................................................................. 5

5.4 Coefficient of variation ....................................................................................................................................... 5

5.5 Range ...................................................................................................................................................................... 5

5.6 Precision ................................................................................................................................................................ 6

5.7 Bias ......................................................................................................................................................................... 6

6 Statistical tests ..................................................................................................................................................... 6

6.1 Null hypothesis .................................................................................................................................................... 6

6.2 Degrees of freedom ............................................................................................................................................ 7

6.3 t-Test ........................................................................................................................................................................ 7

6.4 F-test ....................................................................................................................................................................... 8

6.5 Correlation coefficient ....................................................................................................................................... 8

6.6 Sign test ................................................................................................................................................................. 9

6.7 Outside count ....................................................................................................................................................... 9

7 Curve fitting — Method of least squares ...................................................................................................... 9

7.1 Minimizing variance ............................................................................................................................................ 9

7.2 Linear regression — 2 variables ..................................................................................................................... 9

7.3 Polynomial regression .....................................................................................................................................10

7.4 Multiple regression ...........................................................................................................................................10

8 Analysis of variance ......................................................................................................................................... 11

8.1 Comparison of effects ...................................................................................................................................... 11

8.2 The two-level factorial design ........................................................................................................................ 11

9 Extreme value statistics .................................................................................................................................. 11

9.1 Scope of this clause ......................................................................................................................................... 11

9.2 Gumbel distribution and its probability paper ..........................................................................................12

9.3 Estimation of distribution parameters .........................................................................................................13

9.4 Report ...................................................................................................................................................................15

9.5 Other topics ........................................................................................................................................................15

Annex A (informative) Sample calculations ...............................................................................................................46

Bibliography .....................................................................................................................................................................60

© ISO 2012 – All rights reserved iii
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO 14802:2012(E)
Foreword

ISO (the International Organization for Standardization) is a worldwide federation of national standards bodies

(ISO member bodies). The work of preparing International Standards is normally carried out through ISO

technical committees. Each member body interested in a subject for which a technical committee has been

established has the right to be represented on that committee. International organizations, governmental and

non-governmental, in liaison with ISO, also take part in the work. ISO collaborates closely with the International

Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) on all matters of electrotechnical standardization.

International Standards are drafted in accordance with the rules given in the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 2.

The main task of technical committees is to prepare International Standards. Draft International Standards

adopted by the technical committees are circulated to the member bodies for voting. Publication as an

International Standard requires approval by at least 75 % of the member bodies casting a vote.

Attention is drawn to the possibility that some of the elements of this document may be the subject of patent

rights. ISO shall not be held responsible for identifying any or all such patent rights.

ISO 14802 was prepared by Technical Committee ISO/TC 156, Corrosion of metals and alloys.

iv © ISO 2012 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
INTERNATIONAL STANDARD ISO 14802:2012(E)
Corrosion of metals and alloys — Guidelines for applying
statistics to analysis of corrosion data
1 Scope

This International Standard gives guidance on some generally accepted methods of statistical analysis which

are useful in the interpretation of corrosion test results. This International Standard does not cover detailed

calculations and methods, but rather considers a range of approaches which have applications in corrosion

testing. Only those statistical methods that have wide acceptance in corrosion testing have been considered

in this International Standard.
2 Significance and use

Corrosion test results often show more scatter than many other types of tests because of a variety of factors,

including the fact that minor impurities often play a decisive role in controlling corrosion rates. Statistical

analysis can be very helpful in allowing investigators to interpret such results, especially in determining when

test results differ from one another significantly. This can be a difficult task when a variety of materials are

under test, but statistical methods provide a rational approach to this problem.

Modern data reduction programs in combination with computers have allowed sophisticated statistical analyses

to be made on data sets with relative ease. This capability permits investigators to determine whether associations

exist between different variables and, if so, to develop quantitative expressions relating the variables.

Statistical evaluation is a necessary step in the analysis of results from any procedure which provides

quantitative information. This analysis allows confidence intervals to be estimated from the measured results.

3 Scatter of data
3.1 Distributions

When measuring values associated with the corrosion of metals, a variety of factors act to produce measured

values that deviate from expected values for the conditions that are present. Usually the factors which contribute

to the scatter of measured values act in a more or less random way so that the average of several values

approximates the expected value better than a single measurement. The pattern in which data are scattered

is called its distribution, and a variety of distributions such as the normal, log–normal, bi-nominal, Poisson

distribution, and extreme-value distribution (including the Gumbel and Weibull distribution) are observed in

corrosion work.
3.2 Histograms

A bar graph, called a histogram, may be used to display the scatter of data. A histogram is constructed by

dividing the range of data values into equal intervals on the abscissa and then placing a bar over each interval

of a height equal to the number of data points within that interval.
The number of intervals, k, can be calculated using the following equation:
kn=+13,l32 og (1)
where
n is the total number of data.
© ISO 2012 – All rights reserved 1
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
ISO 14802:2012(E)
3.3 Normal distribution

Many statistical techniques are based on the normal distribution. This distribution is bell-shaped and

symmetrical. Use of analysis techniques developed for the normal distribution on data distributed in another

manner can lead to grossly erroneous conclusions. Thus, before attempting data analysis, the data should

either be verified as being scattered like a normal distribution or a transformation should be used to obtain a

data set which is approximately normally distributed. Transformed data may be analysed statistically and the

results transformed back to give the desired results, although the process of transforming the data back can

create problems in terms of not having symmetrical confidence intervals.
3.4 Normal probability paper

3.4.1 If the histogram is not confirmatory in terms of the shape of the distribution, the data may be examined

further to see if it is normally distributed by constructing a normal probability plot as follows (see Reference [2]).

3.4.2 It is easiest to construct a normal probability plot if normal probability paper is available. This paper has

one linear axis and one axis which is arranged to reflect the shape of the cumulative area under the normal

distribution. In practice, the “probability” axis has 0,5 or 50 % at the centre, a number approaching 0 % at one

end, and a number approaching 1,0 or 100 % at the other end. The scale divisions are spaced close in the centre

and wider at both ends. A normal probability plot may be constructed as follows with normal probability paper.

NOTE Data that plot approximately on a straight line on the probability plot may be considered to be normally

distributed. Deviations from a normal distribution may be recognized by the presence of deviations from a straight line,

usually most noticeable at the extreme ends of the data.

3.4.2.1 Rearrange the data in order of magnitude from the smallest to the largest and number them as 1,2, …

i, … n, which are called the rank of the points.

3.4.2.2 In order to plot the ith ranked data on the normal probability paper, calculate the ”midpoint” plotting

position, F(x ), defined by the following equation:
100()i −½
Fx = (2)
3.4.2.3 The data points [x
, F(x )] can be plotted on the normal probability paper.
i i

NOTE Occasionally, two or more identical values are obtained in a set of results. In this case, each point may be

plotted, or a composite point may be located at the average of the plotting positions for all identical values.

It is recommended that probability plotting be used because it is a powerful tool for providing a better

understanding of the population than traditional statements made only about the mean and standard deviation.

3.5 Other probability paper

If the histogram is not symmetrical and bell-shaped, or if the probability plot shows non-linearity, a transformation

may be used to obtain a new, transformed data set that may be normally distributed. Although it is sometimes

possible to guess the type of distribution by looking at the histogram, and thus determine the exact transformation

to be used, it is usually just as easy to use a computer to calculate a number of different transformations and

to check each for the normality of the transformed data. Some transformations based on known non-normal

distributions, or that have been found to work in some situations, are listed as follows:

y = log x y = exp x
0,5 2
y = x y = x
−1 0,5
y = 1/x y = sin (x/n)
2 © ISO 2012 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
ISO 14802:2012(E)
where
y is the transformed datum;
x is the original datum;
n is the number of data points.

Time to failure in stress corrosion cracking is often fitted with a log x transformation (see References [3][4]).

Once a set of transformed data is found that yields an approximately straight line on a probability plot, the

statistical procedures of interest can be carried out on the transformed data. It is essential that results, such as

predicted data values or confidence intervals, be transformed back using the reverse transformation.

3.6 Unknown distribution
3.6.1 General

If there are insufficient data points or if, for any other reason, the distribution type of the data cannot be

determined, then two possibilities exist for analysis.

3.6.1.1 A distribution type may be hypothesized, based on the behaviour of similar types of data. If this

distribution is not normal, a transformation may be sought which will normalize that particular distribution. See

3.5 for suggestions. Analysis may then be conducted on the transformed data.

3.6.1.2 Statistical analysis procedures that do not require any specific data distribution type, known as non-

parametric methods, may be used to analyse the data. Non-parametric tests do not use the data as efficiently.

3.7 Extreme value analysis

If determining the probability of perforation by a pitting or cracking mechanism, the usual descriptive statistics

for the normal distribution are not the most useful. Extreme value statistics should be used instead (see

Reference [5]).
3.8 Significant digits

The proper number of significant digits should be used when reporting numerical results.

3.9 Propagation of variance

If a calculated value is a function of several independent variables and those variables have errors associated

with them, the error of the calculated value can be estimated by a propagation of variance technique. See

References [6][7] for details.
3.10 Mistakes

Mistakes when carrying out an experiment or in the calculations are not a characteristic of the population

and can preclude statistical treatment of data or lead to erroneous conclusions if included in the analysis.

Sometimes mistakes can be identified by statistical methods by recognizing that the probability of obtaining a

particular result is very low. In this way, outlying observations can be identified and dealt with.

4 Central measures
4.1 Average

It is accepted practice to employ several independent (replicate) measurements of any experimental quantity

to improve the estimate of precision and to reduce the variance of the average value. If it is assumed that the

© ISO 2012 – All rights reserved 3
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
ISO 14802:2012(E)

processes operating to create error in the measurement are random in nature and are as likely to overestimate

the true unknown value as to underestimate it, then the average value is the best estimate of the unknown

value in question. The average value is usually indicated by placing a bar over the symbol representing the

measured variable and calculated by
x = (3)

NOTE In this International Standard, the term “mean” is reserved to describe a central measure of a population, while

“average” refers to a sample.
4.2 Median

If processes operate to exaggerate the magnitude of the error, either in overestimating or underestimating the

correct measurement, then the median value is usually a better estimate. The median value, x , is defined as

the value in the middle of all data and can be determined from the m-th ranked data.

xnfor an even number, , of data points
 n/2
x = (4)
x for an odd number, n, of data points
 ()n+12/
4.3 Which to use

If the processes operating to create error affect both the probability and magnitude of the error, then other approaches

are required to find the best estimation procedure. A qualified statistician should be consulted in this case.

In corrosion testing, it is generally observed that average values are useful in characterizing corrosion rates.

In cases of penetration from pitting and cracking, failure is often defined as the first through-penetration and

average penetration rates or times are of little value. Extreme value analysis has been used in these instances.

When the average value is calculated and reported as the only result in experiments where several replicate

runs were made, information on the scatter of data is lost.
5 Variability measures
5.1 General

Several measures of distribution variability are available, which can be useful in estimating confidence intervals

and making predictions from the observed data. In the case of normal distribution, a number of procedures

are available and can be handled by computer programs. These measures include the following: variance,

standard deviation, and coefficient of variation. The range is a useful non-parametric estimate of variability and

can be used with both normal and other distributions.
5.2 Variance

Variance, σ , may be estimated for an experimental data set of n observations by computing the sample

estimated variance, S , assuming that all observations are subject to the same errors:

d ()xx−
∑∑ i
S = = (5)
()n−11()n−
where
is the difference between the average and the measured value;
n − 1 is the number of degrees of freedom available.
4 © ISO 2012 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO 14802:2012(E)

Variance is a useful measure because it is additive in systems that can be described by a normal distribution,

but the dimensions of variance are the square of units. A procedure known as analysis of variance (ANOVA)

has been developed for data sets involving several factors at different levels in order to estimate the effects of

these factors.
5.3 Standard deviation

Standard deviation, σ, is defined as the square root of the variance. It has the property of having the same

dimensions as the average value and the original measurements from which it was calculated, and is generally

used to describe the scatter of the observations.

The standard deviation of an average is different from the standard deviation of a single measured value, but

the two standard deviations are related as in the following equation:
S = (6)
where

n is the total number of measurements which were used to calculate the average value.

When reporting standard deviation calculations, it is important to note clearly whether the value reported is the

standard deviation of the average or of a single value. In either case, the number of measurements should also

be reported. The sample estimate of the standard deviation is S.
5.4 Coefficient of variation

The population coefficient of variation is defined as the standard deviation divided by the mean. The sample

coefficient of variation may be calculated as S/x and is usually reported as a percentage. This measure of

variability is particularly useful in cases where the size of the errors is proportional to the magnitude of the

measured value, so that the coefficient of variation is approximately constant over a wide range of values.

5.5 Range

The range, w, is defined as the difference between the maximum, x , and minimum, x , values in a set of

max min

replicate data values. The range is non-parametric in nature, i.e. its calculation makes no assumption about

the distribution of error.
wx=−x (7)
maxmin

In cases when small numbers of replicate values are involved and the data are normally distributed, the range

can be used to estimate the standard deviation by the relationship:
S = (8)
where
S is the estimated sample standard deviation;
w is the range;
n is the number of observations.
The range has the same dimensions as the standard deviation.
© ISO 2012 – All rights reserved 5
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
ISO 14802:2012(E)
5.6 Precision
5.6.1 General

Precision is the closeness of agreement between randomly selected individual measurements or test results.

The standard deviation of the error of measurement may be used as a measure of imprecision.

5.6.1.1 One aspect of precision concerns the ability of one investigator or laboratory to reproduce a

measurement previously made at the same location with the same method. This aspect is sometimes called

repeatability.

5.6.2.1 Another aspect of precision concerns the ability of different investigators and laboratories to reproduce

a measurement. This aspect is sometimes called reproducibility.
5.7 Bias
5.7.1 General

Bias is the closeness of agreement between an observed value and an accepted reference value. When

applied to individual observations, bias includes a combination of a random component and a component due

to systematic error. Under these circumstances, accuracy contains elements of both precision and bias. Bias

refers to the tendency of a measurement technique to consistently underestimate or overestimate. In cases

where a specific quantity such as corrosion rate is being estimated, a quantitative bias may be determined.

5.7.1.1 Corrosion test methods which are intended to simulate service conditions, for example natural

environments, often produce a different severity of corrosion and relative ranking of performance of materials, as

compared to severity and ranking under the conditions which the test is simulating. This is particularly true for test

procedures which produce damage rapidly as compared to the service experience. In such cases, it is important

to establish the correspondence between results from the service environment and test results for the class of

material in question. Bias in this case refers to the variation in the acceleration of corrosion for different materials.

5.7.1.2 Another type of corrosion test method measures a characteristic that is related to the tendency of a

material to suffer a form of corrosion damage, for example pitting potential. Bias in this type of test refers to the

inability of the test to properly rank the materials to which the test applies as compared to service results.

6 Statistical tests
6.1 Null hypothesis

Null-hypothesis statistical tests are usually carried out by postulating a hypothesis of the form: the distribution

of data under test is not significantly different from some postulated distribution. It is necessary to establish a

probability that will be acceptable for rejecting the null hypothesis. In experimental work, it is conventional to

use probabilities of 0,05 or 0,01 to reject the null hypothesis.

6.1.1 Type I errors occur when the null hypothesis is rejected falsely. The probability of rejecting the null

hypothesis falsely is described as the significance level and is often designated as α.

6.1.2 Type II errors occur when the null hypothesis is accepted falsely. If the significance level is set too low,

the probability of a Type II error, β, becomes larger. When a value of α is set, the value of β is also set. With a

fixed value of β, it is possible to decrease β only by increasing the sample size, assuming that no other factors

can be changed to improve the test.
6 © ISO 2012 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 10 ----------------------
ISO 14802:2012(E)
6.2 Degrees of freedom

The number of degrees of freedom of a statistical test refers to the number of independent measurements that

are available for the calculation.
6.3 t-Test
The t-statistic may be written in the form:
x −μ
t = (9)
where
is the sample average;
µ is the population mean;
is the estimated standard deviation of the sample average.
Sx()

The t-distribution is usually tabulated in terms of significance levels and degrees of freedom.

6.3.1 The t-test may be used to test the null hypothesis:
m = µ

For example, the value m is not significantly different from µ, the population mean. The t-test is then:

xm−
t = (10)

The calculated value of t may be compared to the value of t for the number of degrees of freedom, n, and the

significance level.

6.3.2 The t-statistic may be used to obtain a confidence interval for an unknown value, for example a corrosion-

rate value calculated from several independent measurements:
xt− Sx <<μ xt+ Sx (11)
() ()
() ()

where tS x represents the one-half width confidence interval associated with the sign

...

NORME ISO
INTERNATIONALE 14802
Première édition
2012-07-15
Corrosion des métaux et alliages —
Lignes directrices pour l’application
des statistiques à l’analyse des
données de corrosion
Corrosion of metals and alloys — Guidelines for applying statistics to
analysis of corrosion data
Numéro de référence
ISO 14802:2012(F)
ISO 2012
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO 14802:2012(F)
DOCUMENT PROTÉGÉ PAR COPYRIGHT
© ISO 2012

Droits de reproduction réservés. Sauf prescription différente, aucune partie de cette publication ne peut être reproduite ni utilisée sous

quelque forme que ce soit et par aucun procédé, électronique ou mécanique, y compris la photocopie et les microfilms, sans l’accord écrit

de l’ISO à l’adresse ci-après ou du comité membre de l’ISO dans le pays du demandeur.

ISO copyright office
Case postale 56 • CH-1211 Geneva 20
Tel. + 41 22 749 01 11
Fax + 41 22 749 09 47
E-mail copyright@iso.org
Web www.iso.org
Publié en Suisse
ii © ISO 2012 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO 14802:2012(F)
Sommaire Page

Avant-propos ...................................................................................................................................................................... v

1 Domaine d’application ....................................................................................................................................... 1

2 Signification et usage ......................................................................................................................................... 1

3 Dispersion des données .................................................................................................................................... 1

3.1 Distributions ......................................................................................................................................................... 1

3.2 Histogrammes ...................................................................................................................................................... 1

3.3 Distribution normale ........................................................................................................................................... 2

3.4 Papier de probabilité normale .......................................................................................................................... 2

3.5 Autre papier de probabilité ............................................................................................................................... 2

3.6 Distribution inconnue ......................................................................................................................................... 3

3.7 Analyse des valeurs extrêmes ......................................................................................................................... 3

3.8 Chiffres significatifs ........................................................................................................................................... 3

3.9 Propagation de la variance ............................................................................................................................... 3

3.10 Erreurs .................................................................................................................................................................... 3

4 Mesures centrales ............................................................................................................................................... 4

4.1 Moyenne ................................................................................................................................................................. 4

4.2 Valeur médiane ..................................................................................................................................................... 4

4.3 Laquelle utiliser ................................................................................................................................................... 4

5 Mesures de la variabilité .................................................................................................................................... 4

5.1 Généralités ............................................................................................................................................................ 4

5.2 Variance ................................................................................................................................................................. 5

5.3 Écart-type .............................................................................................................................................................. 5

5.4 Coefficient de variation ...................................................................................................................................... 5

5.5 Étendue .................................................................................................................................................................. 6

5.6 Précision ................................................................................................................................................................ 6

5.7 Erreur systématique ........................................................................................................................................... 6

6 Essais statistiques .............................................................................................................................................. 7

6.1 Hypothèse nulle ................................................................................................................................................... 7

6.2 Degrés de liberté ................................................................................................................................................. 7

6.3 Essai t ..................................................................................................................................................................... 7

6.4 Essai F .................................................................................................................................................................... 9

6.5 Coefficient de corrélation .................................................................................................................................. 9

6.6 Essai du signe ...................................................................................................................................................... 9

6.7 Dénombrement extérieur .................................................................................................................................10

7 Ajustement de courbe — Méthode des moindres carrés .......................................................................10

7.1 Réduction de la variance .................................................................................................................................10

7.2 Régression linéaire — 2 variables ................................................................................................................10

7.3 Régression polynomiale .................................................................................................................................. 11

7.4 Régression multiple .......................................................................................................................................... 11

8 Analyse de variance .........................................................................................................................................12

8.1 Comparaison des effets ...................................................................................................................................12

8.2 Le plan factoriel à deux niveaux ...................................................................................................................12

9 Statistiques des valeurs extrêmes ...............................................................................................................12

9.1 Domaine d’application du présent article ...................................................................................................12

9.2 Distribution de Gumbel et son papier de probabilité ..............................................................................12

9.3 Estimation des paramètres de distribution ................................................................................................14

9.4 Rapport d’essai ..................................................................................................................................................15

9.5 Autres sujets .......................................................................................................................................................16

Annexe A (informative) Exemples de calculs ............................................................................................................47

Bibliographie ....................................................................................................................................................................61

© ISO 2012 – Tous droits réservés iii
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO 14802:2012(F)
iv © ISO 2012 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
ISO 14802:2012(F)
Avant-propos

L’ISO (Organisation internationale de normalisation) est une fédération mondiale d’organismes nationaux de

normalisation (comités membres de l’ISO). L’élaboration des Normes internationales est en général confiée aux

comités techniques de l’ISO. Chaque comité membre intéressé par une étude a le droit de faire partie du comité

technique créé à cet effet. Les organisations internationales, gouvernementales et non gouvernementales,

en liaison avec l’ISO participent également aux travaux. L’ISO collabore étroitement avec la Commission

électrotechnique internationale (CEI) en ce qui concerne la normalisation électrotechnique.

Les Normes internationales sont rédigées conformément aux règles données dans les Directives ISO/CEI, Partie 2.

La tâche principale des comités techniques est d’élaborer les Normes internationales. Les projets de Normes

internationales adoptés par les comités techniques sont soumis aux comités membres pour vote. Leur publication

comme Normes internationales requiert l’approbation de 75 % au moins des comités membres votants.

L’attention est appelée sur le fait que certains des éléments du présent document peuvent faire l’objet de droits

de propriété intellectuelle ou de droits analogues. L’ISO ne saurait être tenue pour responsable de ne pas avoir

identifié de tels droits de propriété et averti de leur existence.

L’ISO 14802 a été élaborée par le comité technique ISO/TC 156, Corrosion des métaux et alliages.

© ISO 2012 – Tous droits réservés v
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
NORME INTERNATIONALE ISO 14802:2012(F)
Corrosion des métaux et alliages — Lignes directrices pour
l’application des statistiques à l’analyse des données de corrosion
1 Domaine d’application

La présente Norme internationale donne des recommandations concernant des méthodes d’analyse statistique

généralement acceptées qui sont utiles pour l’interprétation des résultats d’essai de corrosion. La présente

Norme internationale ne traite pas des calculs et des méthodes détaillés, mais plutôt d’un éventail d’approches

qui ont trouvé une application dans les essais de corrosion. Seules les méthodes statistiques largement

acceptées pour les essais de corrosion ont été prises en compte dans la présente Norme internationale.

2 Signification et usage

Les résultats des essais de corrosion montrent souvent une dispersion plus importante que d’autres types

d’essais à cause de divers facteurs, dont le fait que des impuretés mineures jouent souvent un rôle décisif dans

la maîtrise des vitesses de corrosion. L’analyse statistique peut être très utile, car elle permet aux opérateurs

d’interpréter de tels résultats, surtout lorsque des résultats d’essai montrent des différences significatives entre

eux. Cela peut être une tâche difficile lorsque plusieurs matériaux sont soumis à l’essai, mais les méthodes

statistiques fournissent une approche rationnelle de ce problème.

Les programmes modernes de réduction des données associés à l’outil informatique permettent d’effectuer,

avec une relative simplicité, des analyses statistiques sophistiquées sur des ensembles de données. Cette

capacité permet aux opérateurs de déterminer s’il existe des associations entre plusieurs variables et, le cas

échéant, de développer des expressions quantitatives liant les variables.

L’évaluation statistique est une étape nécessaire de l’analyse des résultats à partir de tout mode opératoire qui

fournit des informations quantitatives. Cette analyse permet l’estimation des intervalles de confiance à partir

des résultats mesurés.
3 Dispersion des données
3.1 Distributions

Dans le mesurage des valeurs associées à la corrosion des métaux, divers facteurs entrent en jeu pour

produire des valeurs mesurées qui s’écartent des valeurs attendues pour les conditions existantes. En général,

les facteurs qui contribuent à la dispersion des valeurs mesurées s’appliquent de manière plus ou moins

aléatoire, de sorte que la moyenne de plusieurs valeurs est une meilleure estimation de la valeur attendue

qu’une seule mesure. L’allure de la dispersion des données est appelée sa distribution, et diverses distributions

apparaissent dans les travaux liés à la corrosion, telles que les distributions normale, log-normale, binomiale,

de Poisson et des valeurs extrêmes, dont les distributions de Gumbel et Weibull.
3.2 Histogrammes

Un graphique à barres, nommé histogramme, peut être utilisé pour afficher la dispersion des données. Un

histogramme est construit en divisant l’étendue des valeurs des données en intervalles égaux sur l’axe des

abscisses, puis en plaçant sur chaque intervalle une barre de hauteur égale au nombre de points de données

compris dans cet intervalle.

Le nombre d’intervalles, k, peut être calculé à l’aide de l’Équation (1) suivante:

kn=+13,l32 og (1)
où n est le nombre total de données.
© ISO 2012 – Tous droits réservés 1
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
ISO 14802:2012(F)
3.3 Distribution normale

De nombreuses techniques statistiques sont basées sur la distribution normale. Cette distribution est en forme

de cloche et symétrique. L’utilisation des techniques d’analyse développées pour la distribution normale sur

des données distribuées d’une autre manière peut entraîner des conclusions grossièrement fausses. Ainsi,

avant d’essayer d’analyser les données, il convient de vérifier que celles-ci sont bien dispersées suivant une

distribution normale ou d’utiliser une transformation pour obtenir un ensemble de données distribué de manière

approximativement normale. Les données transformées peuvent être analysées statistiquement et les résultats

transformés dans le sens inverse pour obtenir les résultats souhaités, bien que le processus de transformation

inverse des données puisse créer des problèmes dus à l’absence de symétrie des intervalles de confiance.

3.4 Papier de probabilité normale

3.4.1 Si l’histogramme ne confirme pas en termes de forme de la distribution, les données peuvent être

examinées de manière plus approfondie, pour voir si elles suivent une distribution normale, en traçant un

graphique de probabilité normale conformément à la description suivante (voir Référence [2]).

3.4.2 Si du papier de probabilité normale est disponible, le plus simple est de tracer un graphique de probabilité

normale. Sur ce papier figurent un axe linéaire et un axe conçu pour refléter la forme de l’aire cumulée sous

la distribution normale. En pratique, l’axe des «probabilités» porte 0,5 ou 50 % en son milieu, un nombre

approchant 0 % à une extrémité et un nombre approchant 1,0 ou 100 % à l’autre extrémité. Les graduations

sont serrées au centre et plus espacées aux deux extrémités. Un graphique de probabilité normale peut être

tracé de la manière suivante avec du papier de probabilité normale.

NOTE Si les données sont alignées sur le diagramme de probabilité, on peut considérer qu’elles sont distribuées

normalement. Un écart par rapport à une distribution normale peut être reconnu par la présence d’écarts par rapport à

une ligne droite, généralement plus marqués aux valeurs extrêmes des données.

3.4.2.1 Réorganiser les données par ordre d’amplitude, de la plus petite à la plus grande, et leur associer les

numéros 1, 2, …, i, ..., n, qui représentent ce qui est nommé le rang des points.

3.4.2.2 Pour tracer la valeur de rang i sur le papier de probabilité normale, calculer la position de tracé du

«point milieu», F(x ), définie par l’équation suivante:
100 i −½
Fx = (2)

3.4.2.3 Les points de donnée [x , F(x )] peuvent être tracés sur le papier de probabilité normale.

i i

NOTE Parfois, deux valeurs identiques ou plus sont obtenues dans un ensemble de résultats. Dans ce cas, chaque point

peut être tracé ou un point composite peut être placé à la moyenne des positions de traçage pour toutes les valeurs identiques.

Il est recommandé d’utiliser le graphique de probabilité car il s’agit d’un outil puissant permettant une meilleure

compréhension de la population que les conclusions traditionnelles ne s’appuyant que sur la moyenne et

l’écart-type.
3.5 Autre papier de probabilité

Si l’histogramme n’est pas symétrique et en forme de cloche, ou si le graphique de probabilité indique une non-

linéarité, une transformation peut être utilisée pour obtenir un nouvel ensemble de données transformé qui peut

suivre une distribution normale. Bien qu’il soit parfois possible de deviner le type de distribution en regardant

l’histogramme, et de déterminer ainsi la transformation exacte à utiliser, il est généralement aussi simple d’utiliser

un ordinateur pour calculer un certain nombre de transformations différentes et de vérifier la normalité des

données transformées pour chacune. Une liste de transformations basées sur des distributions non normales

connues, ou dont il est reconnu qu’elles fonctionnent dans certaines situations, est fournie ci-après:

2 © ISO 2012 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
ISO 14802:2012(F)
y = log x y = exp x
0,5 2
y = x y = x
−1 0,5
y = 1/x y = sin (x/n)
y est la donnée transformée;
x est la donnée d’origine;
n est le nombre de points de données.

Le temps à rupture en corrosion sous contrainte est souvent ajusté à l’aide d’une transformation en log x (voir

Références [3], [4]).

Une fois qu’un ensemble de données transformées produisant une ligne presque droite sur un graphique

de probabilité a été trouvé, les modes opératoires statistiques d’intérêt peuvent être appliqués aux données

transformées. Il est primordial que les résultats, tels que les valeurs prévues ou les intervalles de confiance,

soient soumis à la transformation inverse.
3.6 Distribution inconnue
3.6.1 Généralités

Si le nombre de points de données est insuffisant, ou si, pour toute autre raison, le type de distribution des

données ne peut pas être déterminé, il existe deux possibilités en ce qui concerne l’analyse.

3.6.1.1 Un type de distribution peut faire l’objet d’une hypothèse basée sur le comportement de types de

données similaires. Si la distribution n’est pas normale, une transformation qui normalisera cette distribution

particulière peut être recherchée. Voir 3.5 pour des suggestions. Une analyse pourra alors être effectuée sur les

données transformées.

3.6.1.2 Des modes opératoires d’analyse statistique ne nécessitant aucun type de distribution de données

spécifique, connus sous le nom de méthodes non paramétriques, peuvent être utilisés pour analyser les

données. Les essais non paramétriques n’utilisent pas les données aussi efficacement.

3.7 Analyse des valeurs extrêmes

Dans le cas de la détermination de la probabilité de perforation par un mécanisme de piqûration ou de

fissuration, les statistiques descriptives habituelles pour la distribution normale ne sont pas les plus utiles. Il

convient d’utiliser plutôt les statistiques des valeurs extrêmes (voir Référence [5]).

3.8 Chiffres significatifs

Il convient d’utiliser le nombre approprié de chiffres significatifs lors de la consignation des résultats numériques.

3.9 Propagation de la variance

Si une valeur calculée est une fonction de plusieurs variables indépendantes et que des erreurs sont associées

à ces variables, l’erreur de la valeur calculée peut être estimée par une technique de propagation de la variance.

Voir les Références [6] et [7] pour de plus amples détails.
3.10 Erreurs

Les erreurs dans la réalisation d’une expérience ou dans les calculs ne sont pas une caractéristique de la

population et peuvent empêcher le traitement statistique des données ou mener à des conclusions erronées si

© ISO 2012 – Tous droits réservés 3
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO 14802:2012(F)

elles sont incluses dans l’analyse. Parfois, des erreurs peuvent être identifiées par des méthodes statistiques,

en reconnaissant que la probabilité d’obtenir un résultat spécifique est très faible. De cette manière, les

observations aberrantes peuvent être identifiées et prises en compte.
4 Mesures centrales
4.1 Moyenne

L’emploi de plusieurs mesurages (répétés) indépendants de toute quantité expérimentale est une pratique

acceptée pour améliorer l’estimation de la précision et réduire la variance de la valeur moyenne. S’il est

supposé que les processus en jeu pour la création de l’erreur de mesure sont de nature aléatoire et que les

probabilités de surestimer ou de sous-estimer la valeur inconnue sont égales, la valeur moyenne est alors

la meilleure estimation de la valeur inconnue en question. La valeur moyenne est généralement indiquée en

plaçant une barre au-dessus du symbole représentant la variable mesurée et est calculée par

x = (3)

NOTE Dans la présente Norme internationale, l’expression «moyenne d’une population» est réservée à la description

d’une mesure centrale d’une population, alors que «moyenne» se rapporte à un échantillon.

4.2 Valeur médiane

Si les processus en jeu mènent à une exagération de l’amplitude de l’erreur, qu’il s’agisse d’une surestimation ou

d’une sous-estimation de la mesure correcte, la valeur médiane fournit généralement une meilleure estimation.

La valeur médiane, x , est définie comme étant la valeur située au milieu de toutes les données et peut être

déterminée à partir de la donnée de rang m.
xnpour un nombre pair, , de points de données
 n/2
x = (4)
x pour un nombre impair, n, de points de données
()n+1 /22
4.3 Laquelle utiliser

Si les processus en jeu à l’origine de l’erreur affectent aussi bien la probabilité que l’amplitude de l’erreur,

d’autres méthodes doivent être employées pour trouver le meilleur mode opératoire d’estimation. Dans ce cas,

il convient de consulter un statisticien qualifié.

Pour les essais de corrosion, on observe généralement que les valeurs moyennes sont pertinentes pour la

caractérisation des vitesses de corrosion. Dans les cas de pénétration par piqûration et fissuration, une défaillance

est souvent définie comme étant la première pénétration traversante et, dans ces cas, des vitesses ou des temps

de pénétration moyens n’ont que peu de valeur. L’analyse des valeurs extrêmes est utilisée dans ces cas-là.

Si la valeur moyenne est calculée et consignée comme seul résultat des expériences lorsque plusieurs

mesurages répétés ont eu lieu, les informations concernant la dispersion des données sont perdues.

5 Mesures de la variabilité
5.1 Généralités

Plusieurs mesures de la variabilité d’une distribution sont disponibles et peuvent être utiles pour l’estimation

des intervalles de confiance et la réalisation de prévisions à partir des données observées. Dans le cas

d’une distribution normale, plusieurs modes opératoires sont disponibles et peuvent être manipulés à l’aide

de programmes informatiques. Les mesures suivantes en font partie: variance, écart-type et coefficient de

variation. L’étendue est une estimation non paramétrique utile de la variabilité et peut être utilisée pour la

distribution normale ainsi que pour les autres.
4 © ISO 2012 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
ISO 14802:2012(F)
5.2 Variance

La variance, σ , peut être estimée, pour un ensemble de données expérimentales de n observations, en

calculant la variance estimée de l’échantillon, S , en supposant que toutes les observations sont soumises aux

mêmes erreurs:
d ()xx−
∑∑ i
S = = (5)
()n−11()n−
d est la différence entre la moyenne et la valeur mesurée;
n − 1 est le nombre de degrés de liberté disponibles.

La variance est une mesure utile car elle est additive dans les systèmes qui peuvent être décrits par une

distribution normale, mais la dimension de la variance est le carré de l’unité. Un mode opératoire connu sous

le nom d’analyse de la variance (ANOVA) a été développé pour les ensembles de données impliquant plusieurs

facteurs à différents niveaux, afin d’estimer les effets de ces facteurs.
5.3 Écart-type

L’écart-type, σ, est défini comme la racine carrée de la variance. Il présente la propriété d’avoir la même

dimension que la valeur moyenne et que les mesures originales à partir desquelles il a été calculé et il est

généralement utilisé pour décrire la dispersion des observations.

L’écart-type d’une moyenne est différent de l’écart-type d’une valeur mesurée seule, mais les deux écarts-

types sont liés par l’équation suivante:
S = (6)
où n est le nombre total de mesures utilisées pour calculer la valeur moyenne.

Lors de la consignation des calculs de l’écart-type, il est important de noter clairement si la valeur reportée est

l’écart-type de la moyenne ou d’une valeur seule. Dans les deux cas, il convient également de consigner le

nombre de mesures. L’estimation de l’écart-type pour un échantillon est S.
5.4 Coefficient de variation

Le coefficient de variation d’une population est défini comme l’écart-type divisé par la moyenne de la

population. Le coefficient de variation de l’échantillon peut être calculé par S/x et est généralement exprimé

en pourcentage. Cette mesure de la variabilité est particulièrement utile dans les cas où l’amplitude des

erreurs est proportionnelle à l’amplitude de la valeur mesurée, de sorte que le coefficient de variation est

approximativement constant sur une large étendue de valeurs.
© ISO 2012 – Tous droits réservés 5
---------------------- Page: 10 ----------------------
ISO 14802:2012(F)
5.5 Étendue

L’étendue, w, est définie comme étant la différence entre les valeurs maximale, x , et minimale, x , dans

max min

un ensemble de valeurs répétées. L’étendue est non paramétrique par nature, c’est-à-dire que son calcul ne

s’appuie sur aucune supposition concernant la distribution de l’erreur.
wx=−x (7)
maxmin

Dans les cas où un petit nombre de valeurs répétées sont impliquées et où les données suivent une distribution

normale, l’étendue peut être utilisée pour estimer l’écart-type à l’aide de la relation:

S = (8)
S est l’écart-type estimé de l’échantillon;
w est l’étendue;
n est le nombre d’observations.
L’étendue a la même dimension que l’écart-type.
5.6 Précision
5.6.1 Généralités

La précision est la proximité de concordance entre des mesures individuelles ou des résultats d’essai choisis

aléatoirement. L’écart-type de l’erreur de mesure peut être utilisé comme mesure de l’imprécision.

5.6.1.1 Un aspect de la précision concerne la capacité d’un opérateur ou d’un laboratoire à reproduire une

mesure obtenue préalablement au même endroit et avec la même méthode. Cet aspect est parfois nommé

répétabilité.

5.6.2.1 Un autre aspect de la précision concerne la capacité de différents opérateurs et laboratoires à

reproduire la mesure. Cet aspect est parfois nommé reproductibilité.
5.7 Erreur systématique
5.7.1 Généralités

L’erreur systématique est la proximité de concordance entre une valeur observée et une valeur de référence

acceptée. Lorsqu’elle est appliquée à des observations individuelles, l’erreur systématique est une combinaison

d’une composante aléatoire et d’une composante due à une erreur systématique. Dans ces circonstances, la

précision comporte des éléments de reproductibilité et d’erreur systématique. L’erreur systématique se rapporte

à la tendance d’une technique de mesure à sous-estimer ou surestimer. Dans les cas où une quantité spécifique

telle que la vitesse de corrosion est estimée, une erreur systématique quantitative peut être déterminée.

5.7.1.1 Les méthodes d’essai de la corrosion destinées à simuler les conditions de service, par exemple, les

environnements naturels, produisent souvent une sévérité de corrosion et un classement relatif des performances

des matériaux différents, par rapport à la sévérité et au classement dans les conditions que simule l’essai.

Cela est particulièrement vrai pour les modes opératoires d’essai qui produisent rapidement des dommages par

comparaison à l’expérience en service. Dans de tels cas, il est important d’établir la correspondance entre les

résultats dans l’environnement de service et les résultats d’essai pour la classe de matériaux concernée. Dans

ce cas, l’erreur systématique se rapporte à la variation de l’accélération de la corrosion pour différents matériaux.

6 © ISO 2012 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 11 ----------------------
ISO 14802:2012(F)
5.7.1.2 Un a
...

Questions, Comments and Discussion

Ask us and Technical Secretary will try to provide an answer. You can facilitate discussion about the standard in here.