Information technology — Data centres key performance indicators — Part 6: Energy Reuse Factor (ERF)

This document specifies the energy reuse factor (ERF) as a KPI to quantify the reuse of the energy consumed in a data centre. ERF is defined as the ratio of energy being reused divided by the sum of all energy consumed in a data centre. The ERF does reflect the efficiency of the reuse process; the reuse process is not part of a data centre.

Technologies de l'information — Indicateurs de performance clés des centres de données — Partie 6: Indicateur de réutilisation de l'énergie (ERF)

Le présent document spécifie l'indicateur de réutilisation de l'énergie (ERF) en tant que KPI permettant de quantifier la réutilisation de l'énergie consommée dans un centre de données. L'indicateur ERF est défini comme étant le rapport de l'énergie réutilisée sur la somme de toutes les énergies consommées dans un centre de données. L'indicateur ERF permet de rendre compte d'un processus de réutilisation, qui se déroule hors du centre de données.

General Information

Status
Published
Publication Date
10-Aug-2021
Current Stage
6060 - International Standard published
Start Date
11-Aug-2021
Completion Date
11-Aug-2021
Ref Project

RELATIONS

Buy Standard

Standard
ISO/IEC 30134-6:2021 - Information technology -- Data centres key performance indicators
English language
14 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview
Standard
ISO/IEC 30134-6:2021 - Technologies de l'information -- Indicateurs de performance clés des centres de données
French language
15 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview
Draft
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:Version 12-jun-2021 - Information technology -- Data centres key performance indicators
English language
14 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview
Draft
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:Version 12-dec-2020 - Information technology -- Data centres key performance indicators
English language
14 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview
Draft
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6 - Information technology -- Data centres key performance indicators
English language
14 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview
Draft
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6 - Information technology -- Data centres key performance indicators
English language
14 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview
Draft
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6 - Information technology -- Data centres key performance indicators
English language
14 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview
Draft
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6 - Information technology -- Data centres key performance indicators
English language
14 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview
Draft
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6 - Information technology -- Data centres key performance indicators
English language
14 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview
Draft
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:Version 12-jun-2021 - Technologies de l'information -- Indicateurs de performance clés des centres de données
French language
15 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview
Draft
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:Version 22-jan-2021 - Technologies de l'information -- Indicateurs de performance clés des centres de données
French language
15 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview

Standards Content (sample)

INTERNATIONAL ISO/IEC
STANDARD 30134-6
First edition
2021-08
Information technology — Data
centres key performance indicators —
Part 6:
Energy Reuse Factor (ERF)
Technologies de l'information — Indicateurs de performance clés des
centres de données —
Partie 6: Indicateur de réutilisation de l'énergie (ERF)
Reference number
ISO/IEC 30134-6:2021(E)
ISO/IEC 2021
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO/IEC 30134-6:2021(E)
COPYRIGHT PROTECTED DOCUMENT
© ISO/IEC 2021

All rights reserved. Unless otherwise specified, or required in the context of its implementation, no part of this publication may

be reproduced or utilized otherwise in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, or posting

on the internet or an intranet, without prior written permission. Permission can be requested from either ISO at the address

below or ISO’s member body in the country of the requester.
ISO copyright office
CP 401 • Ch. de Blandonnet 8
CH-1214 Vernier, Geneva
Phone: +41 22 749 01 11
Email: copyright@iso.org
Website: www.iso.org
Published in Switzerland
ii © ISO/IEC 2021 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO/IEC 30134-6:2021(E)
Contents Page

Foreword ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................iv

Introduction ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................v

1 Scope ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 1

2 Normative references ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3 Terms, definitions, abbreviated terms and symbols ....................................................................................................... 1

3.1 Terms and definitions ....................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3.2 Abbreviated terms ............................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3.3 Symbols ......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 2

4 Applicable area of the data centre ..................................................................................................................................................... 2

5 Determination of ERF ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 4

6 Measurement of E and E .............................................................................................................................................................. 5

Reuse DC

7 Application of ERF ............................................................................................................................................................................................... 5

8 Reporting of ERF ................................................................................................................................................................................................... 5

8.1 Requirements ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 5

8.1.1 Standard construct for communicating ERF data ............................................................................... 5

8.1.2 Data for public reporting of ERF ........................................................................................................................ 6

8.2 Recommendations ............................................................................................................................................................................... 6

8.2.1 Trend tracking data ....................................................................................................................................................... 6

8.3 ERF derivatives, interim ERF ...................................................................................................................................................... 7

Annex A (informative) Examples of use ............................................................................................................................................................. 8

Annex B (informative) Energy conversion factors ...............................................................................................................................13

Bibliography .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................14

© ISO/IEC 2021 – All rights reserved iii
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO/IEC 30134-6:2021(E)
Foreword

ISO (the International Organization for Standardization) and IEC (the International Electrotechnical

Commission) form the specialized system for worldwide standardization. National bodies that are

members of ISO or IEC participate in the development of International Standards through technical

committees established by the respective organization to deal with particular fields of technical

activity. ISO and IEC technical committees collaborate in fields of mutual interest. Other international

organizations, governmental and non-governmental, in liaison with ISO and IEC, also take part in the

work.

The procedures used to develop this document and those intended for its further maintenance are

described in the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 1. In particular, the different approval criteria needed for

the different types of document should be noted. This document was drafted in accordance with the

editorial rules of the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 2 (see www .iso .org/ directives or www .iec .ch/ members

_experts/ refdocs).

Attention is drawn to the possibility that some of the elements of this document may be the subject

of patent rights. ISO and IEC shall not be held responsible for identifying any or all such patent

rights. Details of any patent rights identified during the development of the document will be in the

Introduction and/or on the ISO list of patent declarations received (see www .iso .org/ patents) or the IEC

list of patent declarations received (see patents.iec.ch).

Any trade name used in this document is information given for the convenience of users and does not

constitute an endorsement.

For an explanation of the voluntary nature of standards, the meaning of ISO specific terms and

expressions related to conformity assessment, as well as information about ISO's adherence to the

World Trade Organization (WTO) principles in the Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT), see www .iso .org/

iso/ foreword .html. In the IEC, see www .iec .ch/ understanding -standards.

This document was prepared by Joint Technical Committee ISO/IEC JTC 1, Information technology,

Subcommittee SC 39, Sustainability, IT and Data Centres.

A list of all parts in the ISO/IEC 30134 series can be found on the ISO and IEC websites.

Any feedback or questions on this document should be directed to the user’s national standards body. A

complete listing of these bodies can be found at www .iso .org/ members .html and www .iec .ch/ national

-committees.
iv © ISO/IEC 2021 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
ISO/IEC 30134-6:2021(E)
Introduction

The global economy is today reliant on information and communication technologies and the associated

generation, transmission, dissemination, computation and storage of digital data. All markets have

experienced exponential growth in that data for social, educational and business sectors and, while the

internet backbone carries the traffic, there are a wide variety of data centres at nodes and hubs within

both private enterprise and shared/collocation facilities.

The historical data generation growth rate exceeds the capacity growth rate of information and

communications technology hardware and, with less than half of the world’s population having

access to an internet connection (in 2014), that growth in data can only accelerate. In addition, with

many governments having “digital agendas” to provide both citizens and businesses with ever-faster

broadband access, the very increase in network speed and capacity will, by itself, generate ever more

usage (Jevons Paradox). Data generation and the consequential increase in data processing and storage

are directly linked to increasing power consumption.

With this background, data centre growth, and power consumption in particular, is an inevitable

consequence; this growth will demand increasing power consumption, despite the most stringent

energy efficiency strategies. This makes the need for key performance indicators (KPIs) that cover

the effective use of resources (including but not limited to energy) and the reduction of CO emissions

essential.

Within the ISO/IEC 30134 series, the term “resource usage effectiveness” is generally used for KPIs in

preference to “resource usage efficiency”, which is restricted to situations where the input and output

parameters used to define the KPI have the same units.

The energy reuse factor (ERF) provides the data centre practitioner with greater visibility into energy

efficiency in data centres that make beneficial use of any reused energy from the data centre.

In order to determine the overall resource efficiency of a data centre, a holistic suite of metrics is

required. This document is one of a series of standards for such KPIs and has been produced in

accordance with ISO/IEC 30134-1, which defines common requirements for a holistic suite of KPIs for

data centre resource efficiency. This document does not specify limits or targets for the KPI and does

not describe or imply, unless specifically stated, any form of aggregation of this KPI into a combination

with other KPIs for data centre resource efficiency. The document presents specific rules on ERF’s

use, along with its theoretical and mathematical development. The document concludes with several

examples of site concepts that can employ the ERF metric.
© ISO/IEC 2021 – All rights reserved v
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
INTERNATIONAL STANDARD ISO/IEC 30134-6:2021(E)
Information technology — Data centres key performance
indicators —
Part 6:
Energy Reuse Factor (ERF)
1 Scope

This document specifies the energy reuse factor (ERF) as a KPI to quantify the reuse of the energy

consumed in a data centre. ERF is defined as the ratio of energy being reused divided by the sum of all

energy consumed in a data centre. The ERF does reflect the efficiency of the reuse process; the reuse

process is not part of a data centre.
2 Normative references

The following documents are referred to in the text in such a way that some or all of their content

constitutes requirements of this document. For dated references, only the edition cited applies. For

undated references, the latest edition of the referenced document (including any amendments) applies.

ISO/IEC 30134-1:2016, Information technology — Data centres — Key performance indicators — Part 1:

Overview and general requirements

ISO 8601-1:2019, Date and time — Representations for information interchange — Part 1: Basic rules

3 Terms, definitions, abbreviated terms and symbols
3.1 Terms and definitions

For the purposes of this document, the terms and definitions given in ISO/IEC 30134-1 and the following

apply.

ISO and IEC maintain terminology databases for use in standardization at the following addresses:

— ISO Online browsing platform: available at https:// www .iso .org/ obp
— IEC Electropedia: available at https:// www .electropedia .org/
3.1.1
reused energy
reuse of energy

utilization of energy used in the data centre for an alternate purpose outside the data centre boundary

Note 1 to entry: Energy ejected to the environment does not constitute reused energy.

3.1.2
handoff point

point at the boundary of the data centre where energy is measured and is handed off to another party

Note 1 to entry: An example is an energy company which utilizes the energy outside the data centre boundary.

3.2 Abbreviated terms

For the purposes of this document the abbreviated terms of ISO/IEC 30134-1 and the following apply.

© ISO/IEC 2021 – All rights reserved 1
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
ISO/IEC 30134-6:2021(E)
AC alternating current
COP coefficient of performance
CRAC computer room air conditioner units
CRAH computer room air handler units
DX direct expansion
ERE energy reuse efficiency
ERF energy reuse factor
PUE power usage sffectiveness
IT information system
UPS uninterruptible power system
PDU power distribution unit
r.m.s root mean square
3.3 Symbols
For the purposes of this document the following symbols apply.

E energy used by the entire cooling system attributable to the data centre including support

COOLING
spaces (annual)
E total data centre energy consumption (annual)
E data centre excess energy (annual)
EXCESS
E IT equipment energy consumption (annual)
E energy used to light the data centre and support spaces (annual)
LIGHTING

E energy lost in the power distribution system through line-loss and other infrastructure

POWER
(e.g. UPS or PDU) inefficiencies (annual)

E energy from the data centre (annual) that is used outside of the data centre and which sub-

Reuse

stitutes partly or totally energy needed outside the data centre boundary (annual)

4 Applicable area of the data centre

For the determination of ERF, the data centre under consideration shall be viewed as a system bounded

by interfaces through which energy flows (see Figure 1). The calculation of ERF accounts for energy

crossing this boundary. The bounded areas are the same as those used in calculations for PUE (as

specified in ISO/IEC 30134-2) and other KPIs from the ISO/IEC 30134 series.

As shown in Figure 1, the data centre boundary is “drawn” around the data centre at the point of

handoff from the utility provider. This is a critical distinction when alternate energy types and mixed-

use buildings are analysed. It is equally important to ensure all energy types are included in ERF. All

energy carriers (such as fuel oil, natural gas, etc.) and energy generated elsewhere (such as electricity,

chilled water, etc.) that feed the data centre shall be included in the calculation.

Assuming there is no energy storage, conservation of energy requires that the energy into the data

centre must equals the energy out. In the simple schematic of Figure 1, that means A + B = F. This is

2 © ISO/IEC 2021 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
ISO/IEC 30134-6:2021(E)

oversimplified, as there are losses and heat generated at the cooling (A minus E), UPS, and Power

Distribution Unit (PDU) (B minus D) points as well, but this waste heat also has to leave the boundary.

Once a boundary is defined for a data centre, it can be used to properly understand the ERF concept.

Key
electrical energy
thermal energy
other energy
re-usable energy
Figure 1 — Simplistic data centre components and boundary

It is critical to include all energy carriers at the point of utility handoff. It is also critical to include

all of the data centre’s energy consumption in the calculations, which includes but is not limited to

generators, inside and outside lighting, fire detection and suppression, associated office/cubicle space

strictly intended for data centre personnel, receiving areas, storage areas, etc. For clarity, the diagrams

only show the large components to demonstrate the ERF concept.

ERF only considers energy being reused outside the boundary of a data centre. Energy reused inside

the data centre boundary shall not be counted towards ERF as it already is accounted for in a lower PUE

and including it in ERF is double counting. Examples of this are shown in Annex A.

NOTE Conversion of internal “reuse” (double/multi-use) into electrical energy for use in PUE calculation

leads to double counting and shall not be included in PUE.

In Figure 1, any portion of (F) that is reused outside the data centre boundary (such as in a mixed-use

building or a different building and not rejected to the atmosphere) is considered reused energy for

determining ERF.

To determine ERF, the practitioner will need to identify and account for all energy streams crossing the

data centre boundary coming in and any energy streams that will have beneficial use going out of the

data centre boundary.

The energy coming in would typically be electricity but can also be natural gas, diesel fuel, chilled

water, or conditioned air from another space.
© ISO/IEC 2021 – All rights reserved 3
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO/IEC 30134-6:2021(E)

The energy leaving the data centre boundary will most often take the form of heated water or heated

airflow; these are what this document considers to be potentially reused energy. However, any form of

energy that is reused outside of the data centre boundary shall be accounted for.

Processes that take advantage of the reused energy for other uses are outside the data centre boundary

and the benefits of that reused energy and the efficiency of the reuse process are not considered in the

ERF.

While reuse technologies are important to a data centre’s overall energy use, they are too complex to

try to define or measure by ERF.

NOTE The simplest example would be some form of chiller being driven by data centre waste heat. The

reused energy to be considered for ERF is the waste heat going into the chiller and not the cooling energy

delivered by the chiller to another space outside the data centre space.

A simple test of a specific technology employed in a data centre to determine if the energy reuse should

be considered in ERF is if the PUE of the data centre would be different with or without that technology.

If the technology causes a lower PUE, then it should not be considered as part of ERF. For example, if

warm air from the data centre is used to heat the UPS battery room in the winter, this will result in a

lower PUE; therefore, that double-/multi-use of energy shall not be included when calculating ERF. The

heat from the data centre, when transferred to the battery room, stays within the data centre boundary

and is therefore accounted for in lowering the PUE by reducing electricity demand for heating the

battery room. It has no effect on ERF. If it had been used to heat an adjacent, non-data centre space (e.g.

an adjacent cafeteria), then the heat crossed the data centre boundary and counts in ERF but not PUE.

Examples of ERF usage are described in Annex A.
5 Determination of ERF

ERF provides a way to determine the factor of energy reuse. Heat is the most common example, where

some of the heat produced by the data centre is utilized for beneficial purposes outside the data centre

boundary and is not regarded as waste heat.

ERF ranges from 0 to 1,0. An ERF of 0,0 means no energy is reused, while a value of 1,0 means that,

theoretically, all the energy brought into the data centre is reused. Any equipment outside of the data

centre boundary for increasing the temperature delivered, like heat pumps, shall not be included in the

calculation.
ERF is defined as:
Reuse
ERF =

Where the only energy source is from an electrical utility, E is determined by the energy measured

at the utility meter. ERF may be applied in mixed-use buildings when measurement of the difference

between the energy used for the data centre and that for other functions is possible.

E includes E plus all the energy that is consumed to support the following infrastructures:

DC IT

a) power delivery — including UPS systems, switchgear, generators, PDUs, batteries, and distribution

losses external to the IT equipment;

b) cooling system — including chillers, cooling towers, pumps, CRAHs, CRACs, and DX units;

c) others — including data centre lighting, elevator, security system, and fire suppression system;

d) all the infrastructure needed to transfer or to enhance the reused heat flow to the handoff point at

the data centre boundary.
4 © ISO/IEC 20
...

NORME ISO/IEC
INTERNATIONALE 30134-6
Première édition
2021-08
Technologies de l'information —
Indicateurs de performance clés des
centres de données —
Partie 6:
Indicateur de réutilisation de l'énergie
(ERF)
Information technology — Data centres key performance
indicators —
Part 6: Energy Reuse Factor (ERF)
Numéro de référence
ISO/IEC 30134-6:2021(F)
ISO/IEC 2021
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO/IEC 30134-6:2021(F)
DOCUMENT PROTÉGÉ PAR COPYRIGHT
© ISO/IEC 2021

Tous droits réservés. Sauf prescription différente ou nécessité dans le contexte de sa mise en œuvre, aucune partie de cette

publication ne peut être reproduite ni utilisée sous quelque forme que ce soit et par aucun procédé, électronique ou mécanique,

y compris la photocopie, ou la diffusion sur l’internet ou sur un intranet, sans autorisation écrite préalable. Une autorisation peut

être demandée à l’ISO à l’adresse ci-après ou au comité membre de l’ISO dans le pays du demandeur.

ISO copyright office
Case postale 401 • Ch. de Blandonnet 8
CH-1214 Vernier, Genève
Tél.: +41 22 749 01 11
E-mail: copyright@iso.org
Web: www.iso.org
Publié en Suisse
ii © ISO/IEC 2021 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO/IEC 30134-6:2021(F)
Sommaire Page

Avant-propos ..............................................................................................................................................................................................................................iv

Introduction ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................v

1 Domaine d'application ................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

2 Références normatives ................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3 Termes, définitions, abréviations et symboles ..................................................................................................................... 1

3.1 Termes et définitions ......................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3.2 Abréviations .............................................................................................................................................................................................. 2

3.3 Symboles ...................................................................................................................................................................................................... 2

4 Zone applicable du centre de données .......................................................................................................................................... 3

5 Détermination de l'ERF ................................................................................................................................................................................. 5

6 Mesure de E et de E ........................................................................................................................................................................... 5

Reuse DC

7 Application de l'ERF .......................................................................................................................................................................................... 6

8 Rédaction d'un rapport relatif à l'indicateur de réutilisation de l'énergie (ERF) ............................6

8.1 Exigences ..................................................................................................................................................................................................... 6

8.1.1 Formulaire normalisé de communication des données de l'ERF .......................................... 6

8.1.2 Données pour la publication de l'indicateur ERF ................................................................................ 6

8.2 Recommandations ............................................................................................................................................................................... 7

8.2.1 Données utiles pour suivre les évolutions ................................................................................................. 7

8.3 Dérivés de l'indicateur ERF, ERF intermédiaire ......................................................................................................... 8

Annexe A (informative) Exemples d'utilisation......................................................................................................................................... 9

Annexe B (informative) Facteurs de conversion énergétique .................................................................................................14

Bibliographie ...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................15

© ISO/IEC 2021 – Tous droits réservés iii
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO/IEC 30134-6:2021(F)
Avant-propos

L'ISO (Organisation internationale de normalisation) et l'IEC (Commission électrotechnique

internationale) forment le système spécialisé de la normalisation mondiale. Les organismes

nationaux membres de l'ISO ou de l'IEC participent au développement de Normes internationales

par l'intermédiaire des comités techniques créés par l'organisation concernée afin de s'occuper des

domaines particuliers de l'activité technique. Les comités techniques de l'ISO et de l'IEC collaborent

dans des domaines d'intérêt commun. D'autres organisations internationales, gouvernementales et non

gouvernementales, en liaison avec l'ISO et l'IEC participent également aux travaux.

Les procédures utilisées pour élaborer le présent document et celles destinées à sa mise à jour sont

décrites dans les Directives ISO/IEC, Partie 1. Il convient, en particulier de prendre note des différents

critères d'approbation requis pour les différents types de documents. Le présent document a été rédigé

conformément aux règles de rédaction données dans les Directives ISO/IEC, Partie 2 (voir www .iso

.org/ directives ou www .iec .ch/ members _experts/ refdocs).

L'attention est attirée sur le fait que certains des éléments du présent document peuvent faire l'objet

de droits de propriété intellectuelle ou de droits analogues. L'ISO et l'IEC ne sauraient être tenues pour

responsables de ne pas avoir identifié de tels droits de propriété et averti de leur existence. Les détails

concernant les références aux droits de propriété intellectuelle ou autres droits analogues identifiés

lors de l'élaboration du document sont indiqués dans l'Introduction et/ou dans la liste des déclarations

de brevets reçues par l'ISO (voir https:// www .iso .org/ brevets) ou dans la liste des déclarations de

brevets reçues par l'IEC (voir patents.iec.ch).

Les appellations commerciales éventuellement mentionnées dans le présent document sont données

pour information, par souci de commodité, à l’intention des utilisateurs et ne sauraient constituer un

engagement.

Pour une explication de la nature volontaire des normes, la signification des termes et expressions

spécifiques de l'ISO liés à l'évaluation de la conformité, ou pour toute information au sujet de l'adhésion

de l'ISO aux principes de l’Organisation mondiale du commerce (OMC) concernant les obstacles

techniques au commerce (OTC), voir www .iso .org/ iso/ avant -propos. Pour l'IEC, voir www .iec .ch/

understanding -standards.

Le présent document a été élaboré par le comité technique mixte ISO/IEC JTC 1, Technologies de

l'information, sous-comité SC 39, Impact environnemental des Technologies de l'information et des centres

de données.

Une liste de toutes les parties de la série ISO/IEC 30134 se trouve sur les sites Web de l’ISO et de l'IEC.

Il convient que l’utilisateur adresse tout retour d’information ou toute question concernant le présent

document à l’organisme national de normalisation de son pays. Une liste exhaustive desdits organismes

se trouve à l’adresse www .iso .org/ fr/ members .html et www .iec .ch/ national -committees.

iv © ISO/IEC 2021 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
ISO/IEC 30134-6:2021(F)
Introduction

L'économie mondiale repose aujourd'hui sur les technologies de l'information et de la communication,

en association avec la génération, la transmission, la diffusion, le calcul et le stockage de données

numériques. Tous les marchés connaissent une croissance exponentielle de ces données dans les

secteurs sociaux, éducatifs et commerciaux, et tandis que l'infrastructure Internet achemine le trafic, il

existe une grande variété de centres de données au niveau de nœuds et de hubs situés aussi bien dans

des entreprises privées que dans des installations partagées/colocalisées.

Le taux de croissance de la génération de données historiques dépasse le taux de croissance de la

capacité du matériel des technologies de l'information et de la communication, et avec presque la moitié

de la population mondiale ayant accès à une connexion Internet (en 2014), cette croissance de données

ne peut que s'accélérer. De plus, du fait que de nombreux gouvernements ont des «projets numériques»

visant à fournir aux citoyens et aux entreprises un accès toujours plus rapide, l'augmentation même de la

vitesse et de la capacité du réseau ne fait qu'inciter à en faire une utilisation sans cesse plus importante

(paradoxe de Jevons). La génération de données et l'augmentation du traitement et du stockage des

données qui en résulte impactent directement l'augmentation de la consommation électrique.

Dans ce contexte, il est clair que la croissance des centres de données et de leur consommation d'énergie

représente une tendance inévitable; cette croissance va s'accompagner d'une plus grande demande de

consommation électrique, malgré les stratégies d'efficacité énergétique les plus strictes. Cet état de fait

rend essentiel le besoin d'indicateurs clés de performance (KPI) qui couvrent l'utilisation efficace des

ressources (comprenant entre autres l'énergie électrique) et la réduction des émissions de CO .

Au sein de la série de normes ISO/IEC 30134, le terme «efficacité d'utilisation des ressources» pour les

KPI est préféré à «rendement d'utilisation des ressources», qui se limite aux situations où les paramètres

d'entrée et de sortie utilisés pour définir le KPI ont les mêmes unités.

L'indicateur de réutilisation de l'énergie (ERF) donne une plus grande visibilité à l'exploitant du centre

de données du point de vue du rendement énergétique des centres de données qui réutilisent à leur

profit l'énergie qui provient du centre de données.

Pour déterminer l'efficacité de l'ensemble des ressources d'un centre de données, il est nécessaire

de disposer d'une suite globale d'indicateurs. Le présent document fait partie d'une série de normes

relatives à ces KPI. Elle a été élaborée en lien avec l'ISO/IEC 30134-1, laquelle définit les exigences

communes applicables à une suite globale de KPI pour déterminer l'efficacité des ressources des centres

de données. Ce document ne spécifie pas les limites ou objectifs des KPI. Sauf mention spécifique, il ne

décrit pas non plus ni n'implique aucune forme d'agrégation de ces KPI dans une combinaison d'autres

KPI pour déterminer la rentabilité des ressources des centres de données. Il présente les règles propres

à l'utilisation de l'indicateur ERF, ainsi que les développements théoriques et mathématiques à ce

sujet. Il conclut par plusieurs exemples de concepts de sites susceptibles d'avoir recours à la mesure de

l'indicateur ERF.
© ISO/IEC 2021 – Tous droits réservés v
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
NORME INTERNATIONALE ISO/IEC 30134-6:2021(F)
Technologies de l'information — Indicateurs de
performance clés des centres de données —
Partie 6:
Indicateur de réutilisation de l'énergie (ERF)
1 Domaine d'application

Le présent document spécifie l'indicateur de réutilisation de l'énergie (ERF) en tant que KPI permettant

de quantifier la réutilisation de l'énergie consommée dans un centre de données. L'indicateur ERF est

défini comme étant le rapport de l'énergie réutilisée sur la somme de toutes les énergies consommées

dans un centre de données. L'indicateur ERF permet de rendre compte d'un processus de réutilisation,

qui se déroule hors du centre de données.
2 Références normatives

Les documents suivants sont cités dans le texte de sorte qu’ils constituent, pour tout ou partie de leur

contenu, des exigences du présent document. Pour les références datées, seule l'édition citée s'applique.

Pour les références non datées, la dernière édition du document de référence s'applique (y compris les

éventuels amendements).

ISO/IEC 30134-1:2016, Technologies de l’information — Centres de données — Indicateurs de performance

clés — Partie 1: Aperçu et exigences générales

ISO 8601-1:2019, Date et heure — Représentations pour l'échange d'information — Partie 1: Règles de base

3 Termes, définitions, abréviations et symboles
3.1 Termes et définitions

Pour les besoins du présent document, les termes et définitions de l'ISO/IEC 30134-1 ainsi que les

suivants, s'appliquent.

L'ISO et l'IEC tiennent à jour des bases de données terminologiques destinées à être utilisées en

normalisation, consultables aux adresses suivantes:

— ISO Online browsing platform: disponible à l'adresse https:// www .iso .org/ obp

— IEC Electropedia: disponible à l'adresse https:// www .electropedia .org/
3.1.1
énergie réutilisée
réutilisation d'énergie

utilisation d'énergie consommée dans le centre de données à une autre fin, à l'extérieur des limites du

centre de données

Note 1 à l'article: L'énergie rejetée dans l'environnement ne constitue pas une énergie réutilisée.

© ISO/IEC 2021 – Tous droits réservés 1
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
ISO/IEC 30134-6:2021(F)
3.1.2
point de transfert

point situé à la limite du centre de données, où l'énergie est mesurée et transférée vers une autre partie

Note 1 à l'article: Il peut, par exemple, s'agir d'une société de distribution d'énergie, qui utilise l'énergie à

l'extérieur des limites du centre de données.
3.2 Abréviations

Pour les besoins du présent document, les abréviations de l'ISO/IEC 30134-1 ainsi que les suivantes

s'appliquent.
CA courant alternatif
COP coefficient de performance

CRAC unités de climatisation pour salle informatique [computer room air conditioner units]

CRAH unités de traitement de l'air pour salle informatique [computer room air handler units]

DX détente directe [direct expansion]
ERE rendement de réutilisation de l'énergie [Energy Reuse Efficiency]
ERF indicateur de réutilisation de l'énergie [Energy Reuse Factor]
IT système d'information
PDU unité de distribution électrique
PUE efficacité d'utilisation de la puissance [Power Usage Effectiveness]
r.m.s valeur efficace (eff.) [root mean square]
UPS système d'alimentation sans interruption [uninterruptible power system]
3.3 Symboles
Pour les besoins du présent document, les symboles suivants s'appliquent.

E énergie utilisée (annuellement) par l'ensemble du système de refroidissement, impu-

COOLING
table au centre de données y compris les locaux auxiliaires
E consommation énergétique totale (annuelle) d'un centre de données
E énergie excédentaire (annuelle) d'un centre de données
EXCESS
E consommation énergétique (annuelle) des équipements informatiques

E énergie utilisée (annuellement) pour éclairer le centre de données et les locaux auxiliaires

LIGHTING

E énergie perdue (annuellement) dans le système de distribution d'électricité par perte en

POWER

ligne et du fait des autres inefficacités d'infrastructure (par exemple, ASI/UPS ou PDU)

E énergie provenant du centre de données (annuellement) et utilisée à l'extérieur de

Reuse

celui-ci, qui remplace tout ou partie de l'énergie nécessaire (annuellement) à l'extérieur

du centre de données
2 © ISO/IEC 2021 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
ISO/IEC 30134-6:2021(F)
4 Zone applicable du centre de données

Pour la détermination de l'indicateur ERF, le centre de données considéré doit être vu comme un

système délimité par des interfaces au travers desquelles l'énergie s'écoule (voir Figure 1). Le calcul de

l'indicateur ERF tient compte de l'énergie qui traverse ces limites. Les zones ainsi délimitées sont les

mêmes que celles qui sont utilisées dans les calculs du PUE (comme indiqué dans l'ISO/IEC 30134-2) et

des autres KPI de la série ISO/IEC 30134.

Comme le montre la Figure 1, la limite du centre de données est «dessinée» autour du centre de données

au point de transfert du fournisseur d'électricité. Il s'agit d'une délimitation fondamentale pour analyser

des énergies de différents types ou des bâtiments à usage mixte. Il est tout aussi important de s'assurer

que tous les types d'énergie sont comptabilisés dans l'indicateur ERF. Tous les vecteurs énergétiques

(tels que gazole, gaz naturel, etc.) et l'énergie générée par ailleurs (telle qu'électricité, eau réfrigérée,

etc.) qui alimentent le centre de données doivent être inclus dans le calcul.

En faisant l'hypothèse qu'il n'y a pas de stockage d'énergie, la conservation de l'énergie impose que

l'énergie qui entre dans le centre de données soit égale à l'énergie qui en sort. Dans le schéma simplifié

de la Figure 1, cela signifie que A + B = F. C'est là une simplification grossière, car il y a aussi des pertes

et de la chaleur générée aux points de refroidissement (À moins E), et dans l'ASI/UPS et l'unité de

distribution électrique (PDU) (B moins D), or cette déperdition de chaleur doit elle aussi quitter les

limites du centre de données. Dès lors qu'une limite a été définie pour un centre de données, elle peut

être utilisée pour comprendre correctement le concept de l'ERF.
Légende
énergie électrique
énergie thermique
autres énergies
énergie réutilisable
Figure 1 — Schéma simpliste des composants et limites d'un centre de données

Il est fondamental d'inclure tous les vecteurs énergétiques au point de transfert avec le fournisseur

d'énergie. Il est aussi fondamental d'inclure l'ensemble de la consommation énergétique du centre de

données dans les calculs, c'est-à-dire, entre autres, les groupes électrogènes, l'éclairage intérieur et

© ISO/IEC 2021 – Tous droits réservés 3
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO/IEC 30134-6:2021(F)

extérieur, les systèmes de détection d'incendie et les extincteurs, les bureaux associés et armoires

réservés à l'usage du personnel du centre de données, les zones de réception du matériel, les zones de

stockage, etc. Par souci de clarté, les schémas ne montrent que les gros composants afin d'illustrer le

concept d'indicateur ERF.

L'indicateur ERF prend en compte uniquement l'énergie réutilisée à l'extérieur des limites d'un centre de

données. L'énergie réutilisée à l'intérieur des limites du centre de données doit être exclue du comptage

servant à déterminer l'indicateur ERF, dans la mesure où elle est déjà comptée pour réduire le PUE et

où le fait de l'inclure dans l'indicateur ERF entraînerait un double comptage. Ce cas est montré dans les

exemples donnés à l'Annexe A.

NOTE La conversion de la «réutilisation» interne (double utilisation/multiple utilisation) en énergie

électrique dans le cadre du calcul du PUE conduit à un double comptage et ne doit donc pas être incluse dans le

PUE.

Dans la Figure 1, toute portion de (F) qui est réutilisée à l'extérieur des limites du centre de données

(comme dans le cas d'un bâtiment à usage mixte ou d'un bâtiment différent, mais qui n'est pas rejetée

dans l'atmosphère) est considérée comme de l'énergie réutilisée pour la détermination de l'indicateur

ERF.

Pour déterminer l'indicateur ERF, l'exploitant devra identifier et comptabiliser tous les flux d'énergie

qui traversent les limites du centre de données en entrée et tous les flux d'énergie qui en sortent et dont

l'utilisation présente un intérêt.

L'énergie qui entre est généralement de l'électricité, mais elle peut aussi bien être du gaz naturel, du

gazole, de l'eau réfrigérée ou de l'air conditionné venant d'ailleurs.

L'énergie qui quitte les limites du centre de données prend le plus souvent la forme d'eau chaude ou d'un

débit d'air chaud. C'est cela que le présent document considère comme de l'énergie susceptible d'être

réutilisée. Toutefois, n'importe quelle forme d'énergie réutilisée à l'extérieur des limites du centre de

données devra être prise en compte.

Les processus qui tirent parti de l'énergie réutilisée pour d'autres utilisations sont à l'extérieur des

limites du centre de données, et les avantages de cette énergie réutilisée de même que l'efficacité du

processus de réutilisation ne sont pas pris en compte dans l'indicateur ERF.

Bien que les technologies de réutilisation soient importantes pour l'utilisation énergétique globale d'un

centre de données, elles sont trop complexes pour que l'on tente de les définir ou de les mesurer à l'aide

de l'indicateur ERF.

NOTE L'exemple le plus simple est celui d'un refroidisseur alimenté par les déperditions de chaleur d'un

centre de données. L'énergie réutilisée à prendre en compte pour l'ERF est la chaleur perdue qui entre dans le

refroidisseur et non l'énergie de refroidissement fournie par le refroidisseur à un autre espace à l'extérieur des

locaux du centre de données.

Une façon simple d'évaluer une technologie spécifique employée dans un centre de données pour

savoir s'il convient de prendre en compte sa réutilisation de l'énergie dans la détermination de l'ERF

consiste à déterminer si le PUE du centre de données serait différent avec ou sans cette technologie.

Si la technologie a pour effet d'abaisser la valeur du PUE, c'est qu'il n'y a pas lieu de considérer cette

réutilisation dans la détermination de l'ERF. Par exemple, si de l'air chaud provenant du centre de

données sert à chauffer le local des batteries de l'ASI/UPS en hiver, il en résultera un PUE plus faible.

Par conséquent, cette double/multiple utilisation de l'énergie ne doit pas être prise en compte dans le

calcul de l'ERF. La chaleur qui provient du centre de données, au moment de son transfert au local des

batteries, reste à l'intérieur des limites du centre de données. Elle est donc comptabilisée et contribue

à abaisser la valeur du PUE, en réduisant la demande d'électricité nécessaire au chauffage du local des

batteries. Elle n'a aucun effet sur l'ERF. Si elle avait servi à chauffer un local adjacent autre que le centre

de données (par exemple, une cafétéria attenante), la chaleur aurait alors traversé les limites du centre

de données et aurait été prise en compte pour l'ERF, mais pas pour le PUE. Des exemples d'utilisation de

l'indicateur ERF sont donnés à l'Annexe A.
4 © ISO/IEC 2021 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
ISO/IEC 30134-6:2021(F)
5 Détermination de l'ERF

L'ERF permet de déterminer le taux de réutilisation de l'énergie. La chaleur est l'exemple le plus

courant, lorsqu'une partie de la chaleur produite par le centre de données est avantageusement utilisée

à l'extérieur des limites du centre de données et n'est pas considérée comme de la chaleur perdue.

L'ERF peut prendre des valeurs comprises entre 0 et 1,0. Un ERF de 0,0 signifie qu'aucune énergie n'est

réutilisée, alors qu'une valeur de 1,0 signifie que toute l'énergie absorbée par le centre de données est

réutilisée. Les équipements situés à l'extérieur des limites du centre de données afin d'augmenter la

température fournie, comme les pompes à chaleur par exemple, ne doivent pas être pris en compte dans

les calculs.
L'ERF est défini comme suit:
Reuse
ERF=

Lorsque la seule source d'énergie provient du réseau public de distribution électrique, E est

déterminée par l'énergie mesurée au compteur électrique. L'ERF peut s'appliquer à des bâtiments

à usage mixte lorsqu'il est possible de mesurer la différence entre l'énergie utilisée pour le centre de

données et celle qui sert à d'autres fonctions.

E comprend E , plus toute l'énergie consommée pour alimenter les infrastructures suivantes:

DC IT

a) la fourniture de l'alimentation électrique — y compris les systèmes ASI/UPS, les appareillages de

distribution, les groupes électrogènes, les PDU, les batteries et les pertes de distribution externes

aux équipements informatiques;

b) le système de refroidissement — y compris refroidisseurs, tours de refroidissement, pompes,

CRAH, CRAC et unités DX;

c) d'autres infrastructures — y compris l'éclairage du centre de données, l'ascenseur, le système de

sécurité et le système d'extinction des incendies;

d) toute l'infrastructure nécessaire pour transférer ou pour amplifier le flux de chaleur réutilisée au

point de transfert aux limites du centre de données.

E est l'énergie consommée (annuellement) par les équipements informatiques et utilisée pour saisir,

gérer, traiter, stocker ou transmettre les données au sein de l'espace informatique, ce qui comprend

entre autres:

1) les équipements informatiques (par exemple les équipements de calcul, de stockage et de réseau);

2) les équipements supplémentaires (par exemple les commutateurs clavier/vidéo/souris, les

moniteurs et les stations de travail/ordinateurs portables servant à surveiller, gérer et/ou contrôler

le centre de données).
6 Mesure de E et de E
Reuse DC

La mesure de E doit être réalisée aux limites du centre de données au point de transfert, là où

l'exploitant du centre de données mesure l'électricité achetée au fournisseur d'énergie. Si l'énergie est

produite à l'intérieur des limites physiques du centre de données, le point de mesure doit être sur la

limite logique.

La mesure de E doit être réalisée à la limite logique du centre de données au point de transfert,

Reuse

là où l'énergie livrée est transférée pour être utilisée par le tiers. Dans la plupart des cas, l'énergie

est transférée sous forme d'énergie thermique, mesurée par une augmentation de température et de

débit par rapport à l'approvisionnement en entrée (voir l'Annexe A à titre de référence). Les mesures

doivent être converties en unités équivalentes utilisées pour E , c'est-à-dire en kWh. La mesure et la

conversion doivent être effectuées au point de transfert des limites du centre de données.

© ISO/IEC 2021 – Tous droits réservés 5
---------------------- Page: 10 ----------------------
ISO/IEC 30134-6:2021(F)
La mesure de E doit être effectuée en utilisant:
a) des wattmètres ayant la capacité d'indiquer l'énergie utilisée, ou

b) des compteurs de kilowatts-heures (kWh) qui donnent l'énergie «vraie» (valeur efficace réelle), par

la mesure simultanée de la tension, du courant et de l'indicateur de puissance en fonction du temps.

La mesure de E est souvent effectuée à partir du débit liquide ou gazeux, lorsque l'énergie

Reuse

est transférée sous forme de chaleur, dans ce cas, la mesure doit être effectuée avec des compteurs

permettant de mesurer l'énergie apportée au flux provenant de la limite du centre de données.

NOTE Le produit de la tension et du courant, exprimé en kilovolts-ampères (kVA), n'est pas une mesure

acceptable. Bien que le produit des volts et des ampères donne mathématiquement des watts, l'énergie «vraie» est

déterminée en intégrant une valeur des volts et des ampères corrigée par l'indicateur de puissance. La fréquence,

la variance de phase et la réaction de charge entraînent une différence de calcul entre énergie apparente et

énergie «vraie». L'erreur est intrinsèquement significative si l'alimentation électrique est en CA. Les mesures en

kilovolts-ampères (kVA) peuvent être utilisées pour d'autres fonctions du centre de données, mais le kVA est une

unité insuffisante pour ces mesures.

L'indicateur ERF sans aucun indice doit être déterminé sous forme de valeur annualisée.

7 Application de l'ERF

L'indicateur ERF peut être utilisé par les gestionnaires des centres de données pour surveiller et

indiquer l'énergie réutilisée par rapport à la consommation d'énergie du centre de données.

Ce KPI peut être utilisé indépendamment, mais pour obtenir une image plus globale de l'efficacité des

ressources du centre de données, il convient de considérer les autres KPI de la série ISO/IEC 30134.

8 Rédaction d'un rapport relatif à l'indicateur de réutilisation de l'énergie (ERF)

8.1 Exigences
8.1.1 Formulaire normalisé de communication des données de l'ERF

Pour qu'un ERF publié soit significatif, l'entité chargée de la publication doit fournir les informations

suivantes:

a) le centre de données (y compris les limites de la structure) en cours d'examen;

b) la valeur de l'ERF;

c) la date de fin de la période de mesure en utilisant le format de l'ISO 8601-1 (par exemple, aaaa-mm-

jj);
d) le type d'énergie réutilisée (thermique, électrique, chimique, mécanique).

Les variations saisonnières étant susceptibles d'avoir une influence sur la quantité de l'énergie

réutilisée, la valeur indiquée doit être calculée sur une année.
8.1.2 Données pour la publication de l'indicateur ERF
8.1.2.1 Informations requises

Les données suivantes doivent être prévues en cas de publication des données de l'ERF:

a) les informations de contact;
NOTE 1 Il convient de n'affic
...

FINAL
INTERNATIONAL ISO/IEC
DRAFT
STANDARD FDIS
30134-6
ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 39
Information technology — Data
Secretariat: ANSI
centres key performance indicators —
Voting begins on:
2021-05-12
Part 6:
Voting terminates on:
Energy Reuse Factor (ERF)
2021-07-07
Technologies de l'information — Indicateurs de performance clés des
centres de données —
Partie 6: Indicateur de réutilisation de l'énergie (ERF)
RECIPIENTS OF THIS DRAFT ARE INVITED TO
SUBMIT, WITH THEIR COMMENTS, NOTIFICATION
OF ANY RELEVANT PATENT RIGHTS OF WHICH
THEY ARE AWARE AND TO PROVIDE SUPPOR TING
DOCUMENTATION.
IN ADDITION TO THEIR EVALUATION AS
Reference number
BEING ACCEPTABLE FOR INDUSTRIAL, TECHNO-
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)
LOGICAL, COMMERCIAL AND USER PURPOSES,
DRAFT INTERNATIONAL STANDARDS MAY ON
OCCASION HAVE TO BE CONSIDERED IN THE
LIGHT OF THEIR POTENTIAL TO BECOME STAN-
DARDS TO WHICH REFERENCE MAY BE MADE IN
NATIONAL REGULATIONS. ISO/IEC 2021
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)
COPYRIGHT PROTECTED DOCUMENT
© ISO/IEC 2021

All rights reserved. Unless otherwise specified, or required in the context of its implementation, no part of this publication may

be reproduced or utilized otherwise in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, or posting

on the internet or an intranet, without prior written permission. Permission can be requested from either ISO at the address

below or ISO’s member body in the country of the requester.
ISO copyright office
CP 401 • Ch. de Blandonnet 8
CH-1214 Vernier, Geneva
Phone: +41 22 749 01 11
Email: copyright@iso.org
Website: www.iso.org
Published in Switzerland
ii © ISO/IEC 2021 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)
Contents Page

Foreword ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................iv

Introduction ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................v

1 Scope ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 1

2 Normative references ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3 Terms, definitions, abbreviated terms and symbols ....................................................................................................... 1

3.1 Terms and definitions ....................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3.2 Abbreviated terms ............................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3.3 Symbols ......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 2

4 Applicable area of the data centre ..................................................................................................................................................... 2

5 Determination of ERF ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 4

6 Measurement of E and E .............................................................................................................................................................. 5

Reuse DC

7 Application of ERF ............................................................................................................................................................................................... 5

8 Reporting of ERF ................................................................................................................................................................................................... 5

8.1 Requirements ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 5

8.1.1 Standard construct for communicating ERF data ............................................................................... 5

8.1.2 Data for public reporting of ERF ........................................................................................................................ 6

8.2 Recommendations ............................................................................................................................................................................... 6

8.2.1 Trend tracking data ....................................................................................................................................................... 6

8.3 ERF derivatives, interim ERF ...................................................................................................................................................... 7

Annex A (informative) Examples of use ............................................................................................................................................................. 8

Annex B (informative) Energy conversion factors ...............................................................................................................................13

Bibliography .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................14

© ISO/IEC 2021 – All rights reserved iii
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)
Foreword

ISO (the International Organization for Standardization) and IEC (the International Electrotechnical

Commission) form the specialized system for worldwide standardization. National bodies that are

members of ISO or IEC participate in the development of International Standards through technical

committees established by the respective organization to deal with particular fields of technical

activity. ISO and IEC technical committees collaborate in fields of mutual interest. Other international

organizations, governmental and non-governmental, in liaison with ISO and IEC, also take part in the

work.

The procedures used to develop this document and those intended for its further maintenance are

described in the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 1. In particular, the different approval criteria needed for

the different types of document should be noted. This document was drafted in accordance with the

editorial rules of the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 2 (see www .iso .org/ directives).

Attention is drawn to the possibility that some of the elements of this document may be the subject

of patent rights. ISO and IEC shall not be held responsible for identifying any or all such patent

rights. Details of any patent rights identified during the development of the document will be in the

Introduction and/or on the ISO list of patent declarations received (see www .iso .org/ patents) or the IEC

list of patent declarations received (see patents.iec.ch).

Any trade name used in this document is information given for the convenience of users and does not

constitute an endorsement.

For an explanation of the voluntary nature of standards, the meaning of ISO specific terms and

expressions related to conformity assessment, as well as information about ISO's adherence to the

World Trade Organization (WTO) principles in the Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT), see www .iso .org/

iso/ foreword .html.

This document was prepared by Joint Technical Committee ISO/IEC JTC 1, Information technology,

Subcommittee SC 39, Sustainability, IT & Data Centres.
A list of all parts in the ISO/IEC 30134 series can be found on the ISO website.

Any feedback or questions on this document should be directed to the user’s national standards body. A

complete listing of these bodies can be found at www .iso .org/ members .html.
iv © ISO/IEC 2021 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)
Introduction

The global economy is today reliant on information and communication technologies and the associated

generation, transmission, dissemination, computation and storage of digital data. All markets have

experienced exponential growth in that data for social, educational and business sectors and, while the

internet backbone carries the traffic, there are a wide variety of data centres at nodes and hubs within

both private enterprise and shared/collocation facilities.

The historical data generation growth rate exceeds the capacity growth rate of information and

communications technology hardware and, with less than half of the world’s population having

access to an internet connection (in 2014), that growth in data can only accelerate. In addition, with

many governments having “digital agendas” to provide both citizens and businesses with ever-faster

broadband access, the very increase in network speed and capacity will, by itself, generate ever more

usage (Jevons Paradox). Data generation and the consequential increase in data processing and storage

are directly linked to increasing power consumption.

With this background, data centre growth, and power consumption in particular, is an inevitable

consequence; this growth will demand increasing power consumption, despite the most stringent

energy efficiency strategies. This makes the need for key performance indicators (KPIs) that cover

the effective use of resources (including but not limited to energy) and the reduction of CO emissions

essential.

Within the ISO/IEC 30134 series, the term “resource usage effectiveness” is generally used for KPIs in

preference to “resource usage efficiency”, which is restricted to situations where the input and output

parameters used to define the KPI have the same units.

The energy reuse factor (ERF) provides the data centre practitioner with greater visibility into energy

efficiency in data centres that make beneficial use of any reused energy from the data centre.

In order to determine the overall resource efficiency of a data centre, a holistic suite of metrics is

required. This document is one of a series of standards for such KPIs and has been produced in

accordance with ISO/IEC 30134-1, which defines common requirements for a holistic suite of KPIs for

data centre resource efficiency. This document does not specify limits or targets for the KPI and does

not describe or imply, unless specifically stated, any form of aggregation of this KPI into a combination

with other KPIs for data centre resource efficiency. The document presents specific rules on ERF’s

use, along with its theoretical and mathematical development. The document concludes with several

examples of site concepts that can employ the ERF metric.
© ISO/IEC 2021 – All rights reserved v
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
FINAL DRAFT INTERNATIONAL STANDARD ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)
Information technology — Data centres key performance
indicators —
Part 6:
Energy Reuse Factor (ERF)
1 Scope

This document specifies the energy reuse factor (ERF) as a KPI to quantify the reuse of the energy

consumed in a data centre. ERF is defined as the ratio of energy being reused divided by the sum of all

energy consumed in a data centre. The ERF does reflect the efficiency of the reuse process; the reuse

process is not part of a data centre.
2 Normative references

The following documents are referred to in the text in such a way that some or all of their content

constitutes requirements of this document. For dated references, only the edition cited applies. For

undated references, the latest edition of the referenced document (including any amendments) applies.

ISO/IEC 30134-1:2015, Information technology — Data centres — Key performance indicators — Part 1:

Overview and general requirements

ISO 8601-1:2019, Date and time — Representations for information interchange — Part 1: Basic rules

3 Terms, definitions, abbreviated terms and symbols
3.1 Terms and definitions

For the purposes of this document, the terms and definitions given in ISO/IEC 30134-1 and the following

apply.

ISO and IEC maintain terminological databases for use in standardization at the following addresses:

— ISO Online browsing platform: available at https:// www .iso .org/ obp
— IEC Electropedia: available at https:// www .electropedia .org/
3.1.1
reused energy
reuse of energy

utilization of energy used in the data centre for an alternate purpose outside the data centre boundary

Note 1 to entry: Energy ejected to the environment does not constitute reused energy.

3.1.2
handoff point

point at the boundary of the data centre where energy is measured and is handed off to another party

Note 1 to entry: An example is an energy company which utilizes the energy outside the data centre boundary.

3.2 Abbreviated terms

For the purposes of this document the abbreviated terms of ISO/IEC 30134-1 and the following apply.

© ISO/IEC 2021 – All rights reserved 1
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)
AC alternating current
COP coefficient of performance
CRAC computer room air conditioner units
CRAH computer room air handler units
DX direct expansion
ERE energy reuse efficiency
ERF energy reuse factor
PUE power usage sffectiveness
IT information system
UPS uninterruptible power system
PDU power distribution unit
r.m.s root mean square
3.3 Symbols
For the purposes of this document the following symbols apply.

E energy used by the entire cooling system attributable to the data centre including support

COOLING
spaces (annual)
E total data centre energy consumption (annual)
E data centre excess energy (annual)
EXCESS
E IT equipment energy consumption (annual)
E energy used to light the data centre and support spaces (annual)
LIGHTING

E energy lost in the power distribution system through line-loss and other infrastructure (e.g.

POWER
UPS or PDU) inefficiencies (annual)

E energy from the data centre (annual) that is used outside of the data centre and which sub-

Reuse

stitutes partly or totally energy needed outside the data centre boundary (annual)

4 Applicable area of the data centre

For the determination of ERF, the data centre under consideration shall be viewed as a system bounded

by interfaces through which energy flows (see Figure 1). The calculation of ERF accounts for energy

crossing this boundary. The bounded areas are the same as those used in calculations for PUE (as

specified in ISO/IEC 30134-2) and other KPIs from the ISO/IEC 30134 series.

As shown in Figure 1, the data centre boundary is “drawn” around the data centre at the point of

handoff from the utility provider. This is a critical distinction when alternate energy types and mixed-

use buildings are analysed. It is equally important to ensure all energy types are included in ERF. All

energy carriers (such as fuel oil, natural gas, etc.) and energy generated elsewhere (such as electricity,

chilled water, etc.) that feed the data centre shall be included in the calculation.

Assuming there is no energy storage, conservation of energy requires that the energy into the data

centre must equals the energy out. In the simple schematic of Figure 1, that means A + B = F. This is

2 © ISO/IEC 2021 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)

oversimplified, as there are losses and heat generated at the cooling (A minus E), UPS, and Power

Distribution Unit (PDU) (B minus D) points as well, but this waste heat also has to leave the boundary.

Once a boundary is defined for a data centre, it can be used to properly understand the ERF concept.

Key
electrical energy
thermal energy
other energy
re-usable energy
Figure 1 — Simplistic data centre components and boundary

It is critical to include all energy carriers at the point of utility handoff. It is also critical to include

all of the data centre’s energy consumption in the calculations, which includes but is not limited to

generators, inside and outside lighting, fire detection and suppression, associated office/cubicle space

strictly intended for data centre personnel, receiving areas, storage areas, etc. For clarity, the diagrams

only show the large components to demonstrate the ERF concept.

ERF only considers energy being reused outside the boundary of a data centre. Energy reused inside

the data centre boundary shall not be counted towards ERF as it already is accounted for in a lower PUE

and including it in ERF is double counting. Examples of this are shown in Annex A.

NOTE Conversion of internal “reuse” (double/multi-use) into electrical energy for use in PUE calculation

leads to double counting and shall not be included in PUE.

In Figure 1, any portion of (F) that is reused outside the data centre boundary (such as in a mixed-use

building or a different building and not rejected to the atmosphere) is considered reused energy for

determining ERF.

To determine ERF, the practitioner will need to identify and account for all energy streams crossing the

data centre boundary coming in and any energy streams that will have beneficial use going out of the

data centre boundary.

The energy coming in would typically be electricity but can also be natural gas, diesel fuel, chilled

water, or conditioned air from another space.
© ISO/IEC 2021 – All rights reserved 3
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)

The energy leaving the data centre boundary will most often take the form of heated water or heated

airflow; these are what this document considers to be potentially reused energy. However, any form of

energy that is reused outside of the data centre boundary shall be accounted for.

Processes that take advantage of the reused energy for other uses are outside the data centre boundary

and the benefits of that reused energy and the efficiency of the reuse process are not considered in the

ERF.

While reuse technologies are important to a data centre’s overall energy use, they are too complex to

try to define or measure by ERF.

NOTE The simplest example would be some form of chiller being driven by data centre waste heat. The

reused energy to be considered for ERF is the waste heat going into the chiller and not the cooling energy

delivered by the chiller to another space outside the data centre space.

A simple test of a specific technology employed in a data centre to determine if the energy reuse should

be considered in ERF is if the PUE of the data centre would be different with or without that technology.

If the technology causes a lower PUE, then it should not be considered as part of ERF. For example, if

warm air from the data centre is used to heat the UPS battery room in the winter, this will result in a

lower PUE; therefore, that double-/multi-use of energy shall not be included when calculating ERF. The

heat from the data centre, when transferred to the battery room, stays within the data centre boundary

and is therefore accounted for in lowering the PUE by reducing electricity demand for heating the

battery room. It has no effect on ERF. If it had been used to heat an adjacent, non-data centre space (e.g.

an adjacent cafeteria), then the heat crossed the data centre boundary and counts in ERF but not PUE.

Examples of ERF usage are described in Annex A.
5 Determination of ERF

ERF provides a way to determine the factor of energy reuse. Heat is the most common example, where

some of the heat produced by the data centre is utilized for beneficial purposes outside the data centre

boundary and is not regarded as waste heat.

ERF ranges from 0 to 1,0. An ERF of 0,0 means no energy is reused, while a value of 1,0 means that,

theoretically, all the energy brought into the data centre is reused. Any equipment outside of the data

centre boundary for increasing the temperature delivered, like heat pumps, shall not be included in the

calculation.
ERF is defined as:
Reuse
ERF =

Where the only energy source is from an electrical utility, E is determined by the energy measured

at the utility meter. ERF may be applied in mixed-use buildings when measurement of the difference

between the energy used for the data centre and that for other functions is possible.

E includes E plus all the energy that is consumed to support the following infrastructures:

DC IT

a) power delivery — including UPS systems, switchgear, generators, PDUs, batteries, and distribution

losses external to the IT equipment;

b) cooling system — including chillers, cooling towers, pumps, CRAHs, CRACs, and DX units;

c) others — including data centre l
...

FINAL
INTERNATIONAL ISO/IEC
DRAFT
STANDARD FDIS
30134-6
ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 39
Information technology — Data
Secretariat: ANSI
centres key performance indicators —
Voting begins on:
2020-12-18
Part 6:
Voting terminates on:
Energy Reuse Factor (ERF)
2021-02-12
Partie 6: Facteur d'énergie renouvelable (ERF)
RECIPIENTS OF THIS DRAFT ARE INVITED TO
SUBMIT, WITH THEIR COMMENTS, NOTIFICATION
OF ANY RELEVANT PATENT RIGHTS OF WHICH
THEY ARE AWARE AND TO PROVIDE SUPPOR TING
DOCUMENTATION.
IN ADDITION TO THEIR EVALUATION AS
Reference number
BEING ACCEPTABLE FOR INDUSTRIAL, TECHNO-
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2020(E)
LOGICAL, COMMERCIAL AND USER PURPOSES,
DRAFT INTERNATIONAL STANDARDS MAY ON
OCCASION HAVE TO BE CONSIDERED IN THE
LIGHT OF THEIR POTENTIAL TO BECOME STAN-
DARDS TO WHICH REFERENCE MAY BE MADE IN
NATIONAL REGULATIONS. ISO/IEC 2020
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2020(E)
COPYRIGHT PROTECTED DOCUMENT
© ISO/IEC 2020

All rights reserved. Unless otherwise specified, or required in the context of its implementation, no part of this publication may

be reproduced or utilized otherwise in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, or posting

on the internet or an intranet, without prior written permission. Permission can be requested from either ISO at the address

below or ISO’s member body in the country of the requester.
ISO copyright office
CP 401 • Ch. de Blandonnet 8
CH-1214 Vernier, Geneva
Phone: +41 22 749 01 11
Email: copyright@iso.org
Website: www.iso.org
Published in Switzerland
ii © ISO/IEC 2020 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2020(E)
Contents Page

Foreword ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................iv

Introduction ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................v

1 Scope ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 1

2 Normative references ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3 Terms, definitions, abbreviated terms and symbols ....................................................................................................... 1

3.1 Terms and definitions ....................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3.2 Abbreviated terms ............................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3.3 Symbols ......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 2

4 Applicable area of the data centre ..................................................................................................................................................... 2

5 Determination of ERF ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 4

6 Measurement of E and E .............................................................................................................................................................. 5

Reuse DC

7 Application of ERF ............................................................................................................................................................................................... 5

8 Reporting of ERF ................................................................................................................................................................................................... 5

8.1 Requirements ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 5

8.1.1 Standard construct for communicating ERF data ............................................................................... 5

8.1.2 Data for public reporting of ERF ........................................................................................................................ 6

8.2 Recommendations ............................................................................................................................................................................... 6

8.2.1 Trend tracking data ....................................................................................................................................................... 6

8.3 ERF derivatives, interim ERF ...................................................................................................................................................... 7

Annex A (informative) Examples of Use ............................................................................................................................................................ 8

Annex B (informative) Energy conversion factors ...............................................................................................................................13

Bibliography .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................14

© ISO/IEC 2020 – All rights reserved iii
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2020(E)
Foreword

ISO (the International Organization for Standardization) and IEC (the International Electrotechnical

Commission) form the specialized system for worldwide standardization. National bodies that

are members of ISO or IEC participate in the development of International Standards through

technical committees established by the respective organization to deal with particular fields of

technical activity. ISO and IEC technical committees collaborate in fields of mutual interest. Other

international organizations, governmental and non-governmental, in liaison with ISO and IEC, also

take part in the work.

The procedures used to develop this document and those intended for its further maintenance are

described in the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 1. In particular, the different approval criteria needed for

the different types of document should be noted. This document was drafted in accordance with the

editorial rules of the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 2 (see www .iso .org/ directives).

Attention is drawn to the possibility that some of the elements of this document may be the subject

of patent rights. ISO and IEC shall not be held responsible for identifying any or all such patent

rights. Details of any patent rights identified during the development of the document will be in the

Introduction and/or on the ISO list of patent declarations received (see www .iso .org/ patents) or the IEC

list of patent declarations received (see patents.iec.ch).

Any trade name used in this document is information given for the convenience of users and does not

constitute an endorsement.

For an explanation of the voluntary nature of standards, the meaning of ISO specific terms and

expressions related to conformity assessment, as well as information about ISO's adherence to the

World Trade Organization (WTO) principles in the Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT), see www .iso .org/

iso/ foreword .html.

This document was prepared by Joint Technical Committee ISO/IEC JTC 1, Information technology,

Subcommittee SC 39, Sustainability, IT & Data Centres.
A list of all parts in the ISO/IEC 30134 series can be found on the ISO website.

Any feedback or questions on this document should be directed to the user’s national standards body. A

complete listing of these bodies can be found at www .iso .org/ members .html.
iv © ISO/IEC 2020 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2020(E)
Introduction

The global economy is today reliant on information and communication technologies and the associated

generation, transmission, dissemination, computation and storage of digital data. All markets have

experienced exponential growth in that data for social, educational and business sectors and, while the

internet backbone carries the traffic, there are a wide variety of data centres at nodes and hubs within

both private enterprise and shared/collocation facilities.

The historical data generation growth rate exceeds the capacity growth rate of information and

communications technology hardware and, with less than half of the world’s population having

access to an internet connection (in 2014), that growth in data can only accelerate. In addition, with

many governments having “digital agendas” to provide both citizens and businesses with ever-faster

broadband access, the very increase in network speed and capacity will, by itself, generate ever more

usage (Jevons Paradox). Data generation and the consequential increase in data processing and storage

are directly linked to increasing power consumption.

With this background, data centre growth, and power consumption in particular, is an inevitable

consequence; this growth will demand increasing power consumption, despite the most stringent

energy efficiency strategies. This makes the need for key performance indicators (KPIs) that cover

the effective use of resources (including but not limited to energy) and the reduction of CO emissions

essential.

Within the ISO/IEC 30134 series, the term “resource usage effectiveness” is generally used for KPIs in

preference to “resource usage efficiency”, which is restricted to situations where the input and output

parameters used to define the KPI have the same units.

The energy reuse factor (ERF) provides the data centre practitioner with greater visibility into energy

efficiency in data centres that make beneficial use of any reused energy from the data centre.

In order to determine the overall resource efficiency of a data centre, a holistic suite of metrics is

required. This document is one of a series of standards for such KPIs and has been produced in

accordance with ISO/IEC 30134-1, which defines common requirements for a holistic suite of KPIs for

data centre resource efficiency. This document does not specify limits or targets for the KPI and does

not describe or imply, unless specifically stated, any form of aggregation of this KPI into a combination

with other KPIs for data centre resource efficiency. The document presents specific rules on ERF’s

use, along with its theoretical and mathematical development. The document concludes with several

examples of site concepts that can employ the ERF metric.
© ISO/IEC 2020 – All rights reserved v
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
FINAL DRAFT INTERNATIONAL STANDARD ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2020(E)
Information technology — Data centres key performance
indicators —
Part 6:
Energy Reuse Factor (ERF)
1 Scope

This document specifies the energy reuse factor (ERF) as a KPI to quantify the reuse of the energy

consumed in a data centre. ERF is defined as the ratio of energy being reused divided by the sum of all

energy consumed in a data centre. The ERF does reflect the efficiency of the reuse process; the reuse

process is not part of a data centre.
2 Normative references

The following documents are referred to in the text in such a way that some or all of their content

constitutes requirements of this document. For dated references, only the edition cited applies. For

undated references, the latest edition of the referenced document (including any amendments) applies.

ISO/IEC 30134-1, Information technology — Data centres — Key performance indicators — Part 1:

Overview and general requirements
3 Terms, definitions, abbreviated terms and symbols
3.1 Terms and definitions

For the purposes of this document, the terms and definitions given in ISO/IEC 30134-1 and the

following apply.

ISO and IEC maintain terminological databases for use in standardization at the following addresses:

— ISO Online browsing platform: available at https:// www .iso .org/ obp
— IEC Electropedia: available at http:// www .electropedia .org/
3.1.1
reused energy
reuse of energy

utilization of energy used in the data centre for an alternate purpose outside the data centre boundary

Note 1 to entry: Energy ejected to the environment does not constitute reused energy.

3.1.2
handoff point

point at the boundary of the data centre where energy is measured and is handed off to another party

Note 1 to entry: An example is an energy company which utilizes the energy outside the data centre boundary.

3.2 Abbreviated terms

For the purposes of this document the abbreviated terms of ISO/IEC 30134-1 and the following apply.

© ISO/IEC 2020 – All rights reserved 1
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2020(E)
AC alternating current
COP coefficient of performance
CRAC computer room air conditioner units
CRAH computer room air handler units
DX direct expansion
ERE energy reuse efficiency
ERF energy reuse factor
PUE power usage sffectiveness
IT information system
UPS uninterruptible power system
PDU power distribution unit
r.m.s root mean square
3.3 Symbols
For the purposes of this document the following symbols apply.

E energy used by the entire cooling system attributable to the data centre including support

COOLING
spaces (annual)
E total data centre energy consumption (annual)
E data centre excess energy (annual)
EXCESS
E IT equipment energy consumption (annual)
E energy used to light the data centre and support spaces (annual)
LIGHTING

E energy lost in the power distribution system through line-loss and other infrastructure (e.g.

POWER
UPS or PDU) inefficiencies (annual)

E energy from the data centre (annual) that is used outside of the data centre and which sub-

Reuse

stitutes partly or totally energy needed outside the data centre boundary (annual)

4 Applicable area of the data centre

With ERF, the data centre under consideration shall be viewed as a system bounded by interfaces

through which energy flows (see Figure 1). The calculation of ERF accounts for energy crossing this

boundary. The bounded areas are the same as those used in calculations for PUE and other KPIs from

the ISO/IEC 30134 series.

As shown in Figure 1, the data centre boundary is “drawn” around the data centre at the point of

handoff from the utility provider. This is a critical distinction when alternate energy types and mixed-

use buildings are analysed. It is equally important to ensure all energy types are included in ERF. All

energy carriers (such as fuel oil, natural gas, etc.) and energy generated elsewhere (such as electricity,

chilled water, etc.) that feed the data centre shall be included in the calculation.

Assuming there is no energy storage, conservation of energy requires that the energy into the

data centre equals the energy out. In the simple schematic of Figure 1, that means A + B = F. This is

2 © ISO/IEC 2020 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2020(E)

oversimplified, as there are losses and heat generated at the cooling (A minus E), UPS, and PDU (B

minus D) points as well, but this waste heat also has to leave the boundary. Once a boundary is defined

for a data centre, it can be used to properly understand the ERF concept.
Key
electrical energy
thermal energy
other energy
reusable energy
Figure 1 — Simplistic data centre components and boundary

It is critical to include all energy carriers at the point of utility handoff. It is also critical to include

all of the data centre’s energy consumption in the calculations, which includes but is not limited to

generators, inside and outside lighting, fire detection and suppression, associated office/cubicle space

strictly intended for data centre personnel, receiving areas, storage areas, etc. For clarity, the diagrams

only show the large components to demonstrate the ERF concept.

Only energy being reused outside the boundary of a data centre is considered for ERF as reuse of

energy. Any energy reused inside the data centre boundary shall not be counted towards ERF, as it

already is accounted for in a lower PUE. Using it to also calculate ERF is essentially double counting and

not permitted, as its benefit is already realized in a lower PUE. Examples of this are shown in Annex A.

NOTE The PUE in this subclause is as specified in ISO/IEC 30134-2.

In Figure 1, any portion of (F) that is reused outside the data centre boundary, such as in a mixed-use

building or a different building, and not rejected to the atmosphere, is considered reused energy for

determining ERF. However, the benefits of that reused energy and the efficiency of that reused energy

are outside the scope of ERF. While reuse technologies are important to a data centre’s overall energy

use, they are too complex to try to define or measure in the context of what ERF is attempting to do,

which is primarily based on the energy use and efficiencies of the data centre itself. To determine ERF,

the practitioner needs to identify and account for all energy streams crossing the data centre boundary

coming in and any energy streams that can have beneficial use going out of the data centre boundary.

The energy coming in is typically electricity, but can also be natural gas, diesel fuel, chilled water or

© ISO/IEC 2020 – All rights reserved 3
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2020(E)

conditioned air from another space. The energy leaving the data centre boundary most often takes

the form of heated water or heated airflow; these are what this document considers to be potentially

reused energy. However, any form of energy that is reused outside of the data centre boundary (such

as heated water, heated airflow etc.) shall be accounted for. Whatever the form of the energy, the math

and method hold. Annex B provides conversion factor sources and methods, including where regional

standards or agreements do not exist. Processes that take advantage of the reused energy for other

uses are outside the data centre boundary. The simplest example is some form of chiller being driven

by data centre waste heat. The reused energy to be considered for ERF is the waste heat going into

the chiller and not the cooling energy delivered by the chiller to another space outside the data centre

space. Again, that process is outside of the data centre boundary as it is not a part of the required data

centre infrastructure.

A simple test of a specific technology employed in a data centre to determine if the energy reuse should

be considered in ERF is if the PUE of the data centre would be different with or without that technology.

If the technology causes a lower PUE, then it should not be considered as part of ERF. For example, if

warm air from the data centre is used to heat the UPS battery room in the winter, this will result in a

lower PUE; therefore, that double-/multi-use of energy shall not be included when calculating ERF. The

heat from the data centre, when transferred to the battery room, stays within the data centre boundary

and is therefore accounted for in lowering the PUE by reducing electricity demand for heating the

battery room. It has no effect on ERF. If it had been used to heat an adjacent, non-data centre space (e.g.

an adjacent cafeteria), then the heat crossed the data centre boundary and counts in ERF but not PUE.

Examples of ERF usage are described in Annex A.
5 Determination of ERF

ERF provides a way to determine the factor of energy reuse. Heat is the most common example, where

some of the heat produced by the data centre is utilized for beneficial purposes outside the data centre

boundary and is not regarded as waste heat.

ERF ranges from 0 to 1,0. An ERF of 0,0 means no energy is reused, while a value of 1,0 means that,

theoretically, all the energy brought into the data centre is reused. Any equipment outside of the data

centre boundary for increasing the temperature delivered, like heat pumps, shall not be included in the

calculation.
ERF is defined as:
Reuse
ERF =

Where the only energy source is from an electrical utility, E is determined by the energy measured

at the utility meter. ERF may be applied in mixed-use buildings when measurement of the difference

between the energy used for the data centre and that for other functions is possible.

E includes E plus all the energy that is consumed to support the following in
...

FINAL
INTERNATIONAL ISO/IEC
DRAFT
STANDARD FDIS
30134-6
ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 39
Information technology — Data
Secretariat: ANSI
centres key performance indicators —
Voting begins on:
2021-05-12
Part 6:
Voting terminates on:
Energy Reuse Factor (ERF)
2021-07-07
Technologies de l'information — Indicateurs de performance clés des
centres de données —
Partie 6: Indicateur de réutilisation de l'énergie (ERF)
RECIPIENTS OF THIS DRAFT ARE INVITED TO
SUBMIT, WITH THEIR COMMENTS, NOTIFICATION
OF ANY RELEVANT PATENT RIGHTS OF WHICH
THEY ARE AWARE AND TO PROVIDE SUPPOR TING
DOCUMENTATION.
IN ADDITION TO THEIR EVALUATION AS
Reference number
BEING ACCEPTABLE FOR INDUSTRIAL, TECHNO-
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)
LOGICAL, COMMERCIAL AND USER PURPOSES,
DRAFT INTERNATIONAL STANDARDS MAY ON
OCCASION HAVE TO BE CONSIDERED IN THE
LIGHT OF THEIR POTENTIAL TO BECOME STAN-
DARDS TO WHICH REFERENCE MAY BE MADE IN
NATIONAL REGULATIONS. ISO/IEC 2021
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)
COPYRIGHT PROTECTED DOCUMENT
© ISO/IEC 2021

All rights reserved. Unless otherwise specified, or required in the context of its implementation, no part of this publication may

be reproduced or utilized otherwise in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, or posting

on the internet or an intranet, without prior written permission. Permission can be requested from either ISO at the address

below or ISO’s member body in the country of the requester.
ISO copyright office
CP 401 • Ch. de Blandonnet 8
CH-1214 Vernier, Geneva
Phone: +41 22 749 01 11
Email: copyright@iso.org
Website: www.iso.org
Published in Switzerland
ii © ISO/IEC 2021 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)
Contents Page

Foreword ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................iv

Introduction ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................v

1 Scope ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 1

2 Normative references ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3 Terms, definitions, abbreviated terms and symbols ....................................................................................................... 1

3.1 Terms and definitions ....................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3.2 Abbreviated terms ............................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3.3 Symbols ......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 2

4 Applicable area of the data centre ..................................................................................................................................................... 2

5 Determination of ERF ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 4

6 Measurement of E and E .............................................................................................................................................................. 5

Reuse DC

7 Application of ERF ............................................................................................................................................................................................... 5

8 Reporting of ERF ................................................................................................................................................................................................... 5

8.1 Requirements ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 5

8.1.1 Standard construct for communicating ERF data ............................................................................... 5

8.1.2 Data for public reporting of ERF ........................................................................................................................ 6

8.2 Recommendations ............................................................................................................................................................................... 6

8.2.1 Trend tracking data ....................................................................................................................................................... 6

8.3 ERF derivatives, interim ERF ...................................................................................................................................................... 7

Annex A (informative) Examples of use ............................................................................................................................................................. 8

Annex B (informative) Energy conversion factors ...............................................................................................................................13

Bibliography .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................14

© ISO/IEC 2021 – All rights reserved iii
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)
Foreword

ISO (the International Organization for Standardization) and IEC (the International Electrotechnical

Commission) form the specialized system for worldwide standardization. National bodies that are

members of ISO or IEC participate in the development of International Standards through technical

committees established by the respective organization to deal with particular fields of technical

activity. ISO and IEC technical committees collaborate in fields of mutual interest. Other international

organizations, governmental and non-governmental, in liaison with ISO and IEC, also take part in the

work.

The procedures used to develop this document and those intended for its further maintenance are

described in the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 1. In particular, the different approval criteria needed for

the different types of document should be noted. This document was drafted in accordance with the

editorial rules of the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 2 (see www .iso .org/ directives).

Attention is drawn to the possibility that some of the elements of this document may be the subject

of patent rights. ISO and IEC shall not be held responsible for identifying any or all such patent

rights. Details of any patent rights identified during the development of the document will be in the

Introduction and/or on the ISO list of patent declarations received (see www .iso .org/ patents) or the IEC

list of patent declarations received (see patents.iec.ch).

Any trade name used in this document is information given for the convenience of users and does not

constitute an endorsement.

For an explanation of the voluntary nature of standards, the meaning of ISO specific terms and

expressions related to conformity assessment, as well as information about ISO's adherence to the

World Trade Organization (WTO) principles in the Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT), see www .iso .org/

iso/ foreword .html.

This document was prepared by Joint Technical Committee ISO/IEC JTC 1, Information technology,

Subcommittee SC 39, Sustainability, IT & Data Centres.
A list of all parts in the ISO/IEC 30134 series can be found on the ISO website.

Any feedback or questions on this document should be directed to the user’s national standards body. A

complete listing of these bodies can be found at www .iso .org/ members .html.
iv © ISO/IEC 2021 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)
Introduction

The global economy is today reliant on information and communication technologies and the associated

generation, transmission, dissemination, computation and storage of digital data. All markets have

experienced exponential growth in that data for social, educational and business sectors and, while the

internet backbone carries the traffic, there are a wide variety of data centres at nodes and hubs within

both private enterprise and shared/collocation facilities.

The historical data generation growth rate exceeds the capacity growth rate of information and

communications technology hardware and, with less than half of the world’s population having

access to an internet connection (in 2014), that growth in data can only accelerate. In addition, with

many governments having “digital agendas” to provide both citizens and businesses with ever-faster

broadband access, the very increase in network speed and capacity will, by itself, generate ever more

usage (Jevons Paradox). Data generation and the consequential increase in data processing and storage

are directly linked to increasing power consumption.

With this background, data centre growth, and power consumption in particular, is an inevitable

consequence; this growth will demand increasing power consumption, despite the most stringent

energy efficiency strategies. This makes the need for key performance indicators (KPIs) that cover

the effective use of resources (including but not limited to energy) and the reduction of CO emissions

essential.

Within the ISO/IEC 30134 series, the term “resource usage effectiveness” is generally used for KPIs in

preference to “resource usage efficiency”, which is restricted to situations where the input and output

parameters used to define the KPI have the same units.

The energy reuse factor (ERF) provides the data centre practitioner with greater visibility into energy

efficiency in data centres that make beneficial use of any reused energy from the data centre.

In order to determine the overall resource efficiency of a data centre, a holistic suite of metrics is

required. This document is one of a series of standards for such KPIs and has been produced in

accordance with ISO/IEC 30134-1, which defines common requirements for a holistic suite of KPIs for

data centre resource efficiency. This document does not specify limits or targets for the KPI and does

not describe or imply, unless specifically stated, any form of aggregation of this KPI into a combination

with other KPIs for data centre resource efficiency. The document presents specific rules on ERF’s

use, along with its theoretical and mathematical development. The document concludes with several

examples of site concepts that can employ the ERF metric.
© ISO/IEC 2021 – All rights reserved v
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
FINAL DRAFT INTERNATIONAL STANDARD ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)
Information technology — Data centres key performance
indicators —
Part 6:
Energy Reuse Factor (ERF)
1 Scope

This document specifies the energy reuse factor (ERF) as a KPI to quantify the reuse of the energy

consumed in a data centre. ERF is defined as the ratio of energy being reused divided by the sum of all

energy consumed in a data centre. The ERF does reflect the efficiency of the reuse process; the reuse

process is not part of a data centre.
2 Normative references

The following documents are referred to in the text in such a way that some or all of their content

constitutes requirements of this document. For dated references, only the edition cited applies. For

undated references, the latest edition of the referenced document (including any amendments) applies.

ISO/IEC 30134-1:2015, Information technology — Data centres — Key performance indicators — Part 1:

Overview and general requirements

ISO 8601-1:2019, Date and time — Representations for information interchange — Part 1: Basic rules

3 Terms, definitions, abbreviated terms and symbols
3.1 Terms and definitions

For the purposes of this document, the terms and definitions given in ISO/IEC 30134-1 and the following

apply.

ISO and IEC maintain terminological databases for use in standardization at the following addresses:

— ISO Online browsing platform: available at https:// www .iso .org/ obp
— IEC Electropedia: available at https:// www .electropedia .org/
3.1.1
reused energy
reuse of energy

utilization of energy used in the data centre for an alternate purpose outside the data centre boundary

Note 1 to entry: Energy ejected to the environment does not constitute reused energy.

3.1.2
handoff point

point at the boundary of the data centre where energy is measured and is handed off to another party

Note 1 to entry: An example is an energy company which utilizes the energy outside the data centre boundary.

3.2 Abbreviated terms

For the purposes of this document the abbreviated terms of ISO/IEC 30134-1 and the following apply.

© ISO/IEC 2021 – All rights reserved 1
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)
AC alternating current
COP coefficient of performance
CRAC computer room air conditioner units
CRAH computer room air handler units
DX direct expansion
ERE energy reuse efficiency
ERF energy reuse factor
PUE power usage sffectiveness
IT information system
UPS uninterruptible power system
PDU power distribution unit
r.m.s root mean square
3.3 Symbols
For the purposes of this document the following symbols apply.

E energy used by the entire cooling system attributable to the data centre including support

COOLING
spaces (annual)
E total data centre energy consumption (annual)
E data centre excess energy (annual)
EXCESS
E IT equipment energy consumption (annual)
E energy used to light the data centre and support spaces (annual)
LIGHTING

E energy lost in the power distribution system through line-loss and other infrastructure (e.g.

POWER
UPS or PDU) inefficiencies (annual)

E energy from the data centre (annual) that is used outside of the data centre and which sub-

Reuse

stitutes partly or totally energy needed outside the data centre boundary (annual)

4 Applicable area of the data centre

For the determination of ERF, the data centre under consideration shall be viewed as a system bounded

by interfaces through which energy flows (see Figure 1). The calculation of ERF accounts for energy

crossing this boundary. The bounded areas are the same as those used in calculations for PUE (as

specified in ISO/IEC 30134-2) and other KPIs from the ISO/IEC 30134 series.

As shown in Figure 1, the data centre boundary is “drawn” around the data centre at the point of

handoff from the utility provider. This is a critical distinction when alternate energy types and mixed-

use buildings are analysed. It is equally important to ensure all energy types are included in ERF. All

energy carriers (such as fuel oil, natural gas, etc.) and energy generated elsewhere (such as electricity,

chilled water, etc.) that feed the data centre shall be included in the calculation.

Assuming there is no energy storage, conservation of energy requires that the energy into the data

centre must equals the energy out. In the simple schematic of Figure 1, that means A + B = F. This is

2 © ISO/IEC 2021 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)

oversimplified, as there are losses and heat generated at the cooling (A minus E), UPS, and Power

Distribution Unit (PDU) (B minus D) points as well, but this waste heat also has to leave the boundary.

Once a boundary is defined for a data centre, it can be used to properly understand the ERF concept.

Key
electrical energy
thermal energy
other energy
re-usable energy
Figure 1 — Simplistic data centre components and boundary

It is critical to include all energy carriers at the point of utility handoff. It is also critical to include

all of the data centre’s energy consumption in the calculations, which includes but is not limited to

generators, inside and outside lighting, fire detection and suppression, associated office/cubicle space

strictly intended for data centre personnel, receiving areas, storage areas, etc. For clarity, the diagrams

only show the large components to demonstrate the ERF concept.

ERF only considers energy being reused outside the boundary of a data centre. Energy reused inside

the data centre boundary shall not be counted towards ERF as it already is accounted for in a lower PUE

and including it in ERF is double counting. Examples of this are shown in Annex A.

NOTE Conversion of internal “reuse” (double/multi-use) into electrical energy for use in PUE calculation

leads to double counting and shall not be included in PUE.

In Figure 1, any portion of (F) that is reused outside the data centre boundary (such as in a mixed-use

building or a different building and not rejected to the atmosphere) is considered reused energy for

determining ERF.

To determine ERF, the practitioner will need to identify and account for all energy streams crossing the

data centre boundary coming in and any energy streams that will have beneficial use going out of the

data centre boundary.

The energy coming in would typically be electricity but can also be natural gas, diesel fuel, chilled

water, or conditioned air from another space.
© ISO/IEC 2021 – All rights reserved 3
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)

The energy leaving the data centre boundary will most often take the form of heated water or heated

airflow; these are what this document considers to be potentially reused energy. However, any form of

energy that is reused outside of the data centre boundary shall be accounted for.

Processes that take advantage of the reused energy for other uses are outside the data centre boundary

and the benefits of that reused energy and the efficiency of the reuse process are not considered in the

ERF.

While reuse technologies are important to a data centre’s overall energy use, they are too complex to

try to define or measure by ERF.

NOTE The simplest example would be some form of chiller being driven by data centre waste heat. The

reused energy to be considered for ERF is the waste heat going into the chiller and not the cooling energy

delivered by the chiller to another space outside the data centre space.

A simple test of a specific technology employed in a data centre to determine if the energy reuse should

be considered in ERF is if the PUE of the data centre would be different with or without that technology.

If the technology causes a lower PUE, then it should not be considered as part of ERF. For example, if

warm air from the data centre is used to heat the UPS battery room in the winter, this will result in a

lower PUE; therefore, that double-/multi-use of energy shall not be included when calculating ERF. The

heat from the data centre, when transferred to the battery room, stays within the data centre boundary

and is therefore accounted for in lowering the PUE by reducing electricity demand for heating the

battery room. It has no effect on ERF. If it had been used to heat an adjacent, non-data centre space (e.g.

an adjacent cafeteria), then the heat crossed the data centre boundary and counts in ERF but not PUE.

Examples of ERF usage are described in Annex A.
5 Determination of ERF

ERF provides a way to determine the factor of energy reuse. Heat is the most common example, where

some of the heat produced by the data centre is utilized for beneficial purposes outside the data centre

boundary and is not regarded as waste heat.

ERF ranges from 0 to 1,0. An ERF of 0,0 means no energy is reused, while a value of 1,0 means that,

theoretically, all the energy brought into the data centre is reused. Any equipment outside of the data

centre boundary for increasing the temperature delivered, like heat pumps, shall not be included in the

calculation.
ERF is defined as:
Reuse
ERF =

Where the only energy source is from an electrical utility, E is determined by the energy measured

at the utility meter. ERF may be applied in mixed-use buildings when measurement of the difference

between the energy used for the data centre and that for other functions is possible.

E includes E plus all the energy that is consumed to support the following infrastructures:

DC IT

a) power delivery — including UPS systems, switchgear, generators, PDUs, batteries, and distribution

losses external to the IT equipment;

b) cooling system — including chillers, cooling towers, pumps, CRAHs, CRACs, and DX units;

c) others — including data centre l
...

FINAL
INTERNATIONAL ISO/IEC
DRAFT
STANDARD FDIS
30134-6
ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 39
Information technology — Data
Secretariat: ANSI
centres key performance indicators —
Voting begins on:
2021-05-12
Part 6:
Voting terminates on:
Energy Reuse Factor (ERF)
2021-07-07
Technologies de l'information — Indicateurs de performance clés des
centres de données —
Partie 6: Indicateur de réutilisation de l'énergie (ERF)
RECIPIENTS OF THIS DRAFT ARE INVITED TO
SUBMIT, WITH THEIR COMMENTS, NOTIFICATION
OF ANY RELEVANT PATENT RIGHTS OF WHICH
THEY ARE AWARE AND TO PROVIDE SUPPOR TING
DOCUMENTATION.
IN ADDITION TO THEIR EVALUATION AS
Reference number
BEING ACCEPTABLE FOR INDUSTRIAL, TECHNO-
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)
LOGICAL, COMMERCIAL AND USER PURPOSES,
DRAFT INTERNATIONAL STANDARDS MAY ON
OCCASION HAVE TO BE CONSIDERED IN THE
LIGHT OF THEIR POTENTIAL TO BECOME STAN-
DARDS TO WHICH REFERENCE MAY BE MADE IN
NATIONAL REGULATIONS. ISO/IEC 2021
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)
COPYRIGHT PROTECTED DOCUMENT
© ISO/IEC 2021

All rights reserved. Unless otherwise specified, or required in the context of its implementation, no part of this publication may

be reproduced or utilized otherwise in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, or posting

on the internet or an intranet, without prior written permission. Permission can be requested from either ISO at the address

below or ISO’s member body in the country of the requester.
ISO copyright office
CP 401 • Ch. de Blandonnet 8
CH-1214 Vernier, Geneva
Phone: +41 22 749 01 11
Email: copyright@iso.org
Website: www.iso.org
Published in Switzerland
ii © ISO/IEC 2021 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)
Contents Page

Foreword ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................iv

Introduction ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................v

1 Scope ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 1

2 Normative references ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3 Terms, definitions, abbreviated terms and symbols ....................................................................................................... 1

3.1 Terms and definitions ....................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3.2 Abbreviated terms ............................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3.3 Symbols ......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 2

4 Applicable area of the data centre ..................................................................................................................................................... 2

5 Determination of ERF ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 4

6 Measurement of E and E .............................................................................................................................................................. 5

Reuse DC

7 Application of ERF ............................................................................................................................................................................................... 5

8 Reporting of ERF ................................................................................................................................................................................................... 5

8.1 Requirements ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 5

8.1.1 Standard construct for communicating ERF data ............................................................................... 5

8.1.2 Data for public reporting of ERF ........................................................................................................................ 6

8.2 Recommendations ............................................................................................................................................................................... 6

8.2.1 Trend tracking data ....................................................................................................................................................... 6

8.3 ERF derivatives, interim ERF ...................................................................................................................................................... 7

Annex A (informative) Examples of use ............................................................................................................................................................. 8

Annex B (informative) Energy conversion factors ...............................................................................................................................13

Bibliography .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................14

© ISO/IEC 2021 – All rights reserved iii
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)
Foreword

ISO (the International Organization for Standardization) and IEC (the International Electrotechnical

Commission) form the specialized system for worldwide standardization. National bodies that are

members of ISO or IEC participate in the development of International Standards through technical

committees established by the respective organization to deal with particular fields of technical

activity. ISO and IEC technical committees collaborate in fields of mutual interest. Other international

organizations, governmental and non-governmental, in liaison with ISO and IEC, also take part in the

work.

The procedures used to develop this document and those intended for its further maintenance are

described in the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 1. In particular, the different approval criteria needed for

the different types of document should be noted. This document was drafted in accordance with the

editorial rules of the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 2 (see www .iso .org/ directives).

Attention is drawn to the possibility that some of the elements of this document may be the subject

of patent rights. ISO and IEC shall not be held responsible for identifying any or all such patent

rights. Details of any patent rights identified during the development of the document will be in the

Introduction and/or on the ISO list of patent declarations received (see www .iso .org/ patents) or the IEC

list of patent declarations received (see patents.iec.ch).

Any trade name used in this document is information given for the convenience of users and does not

constitute an endorsement.

For an explanation of the voluntary nature of standards, the meaning of ISO specific terms and

expressions related to conformity assessment, as well as information about ISO's adherence to the

World Trade Organization (WTO) principles in the Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT), see www .iso .org/

iso/ foreword .html.

This document was prepared by Joint Technical Committee ISO/IEC JTC 1, Information technology,

Subcommittee SC 39, Sustainability, IT & Data Centres.
A list of all parts in the ISO/IEC 30134 series can be found on the ISO website.

Any feedback or questions on this document should be directed to the user’s national standards body. A

complete listing of these bodies can be found at www .iso .org/ members .html.
iv © ISO/IEC 2021 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)
Introduction

The global economy is today reliant on information and communication technologies and the associated

generation, transmission, dissemination, computation and storage of digital data. All markets have

experienced exponential growth in that data for social, educational and business sectors and, while the

internet backbone carries the traffic, there are a wide variety of data centres at nodes and hubs within

both private enterprise and shared/collocation facilities.

The historical data generation growth rate exceeds the capacity growth rate of information and

communications technology hardware and, with less than half of the world’s population having

access to an internet connection (in 2014), that growth in data can only accelerate. In addition, with

many governments having “digital agendas” to provide both citizens and businesses with ever-faster

broadband access, the very increase in network speed and capacity will, by itself, generate ever more

usage (Jevons Paradox). Data generation and the consequential increase in data processing and storage

are directly linked to increasing power consumption.

With this background, data centre growth, and power consumption in particular, is an inevitable

consequence; this growth will demand increasing power consumption, despite the most stringent

energy efficiency strategies. This makes the need for key performance indicators (KPIs) that cover

the effective use of resources (including but not limited to energy) and the reduction of CO emissions

essential.

Within the ISO/IEC 30134 series, the term “resource usage effectiveness” is generally used for KPIs in

preference to “resource usage efficiency”, which is restricted to situations where the input and output

parameters used to define the KPI have the same units.

The energy reuse factor (ERF) provides the data centre practitioner with greater visibility into energy

efficiency in data centres that make beneficial use of any reused energy from the data centre.

In order to determine the overall resource efficiency of a data centre, a holistic suite of metrics is

required. This document is one of a series of standards for such KPIs and has been produced in

accordance with ISO/IEC 30134-1, which defines common requirements for a holistic suite of KPIs for

data centre resource efficiency. This document does not specify limits or targets for the KPI and does

not describe or imply, unless specifically stated, any form of aggregation of this KPI into a combination

with other KPIs for data centre resource efficiency. The document presents specific rules on ERF’s

use, along with its theoretical and mathematical development. The document concludes with several

examples of site concepts that can employ the ERF metric.
© ISO/IEC 2021 – All rights reserved v
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
FINAL DRAFT INTERNATIONAL STANDARD ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)
Information technology — Data centres key performance
indicators —
Part 6:
Energy Reuse Factor (ERF)
1 Scope

This document specifies the energy reuse factor (ERF) as a KPI to quantify the reuse of the energy

consumed in a data centre. ERF is defined as the ratio of energy being reused divided by the sum of all

energy consumed in a data centre. The ERF does reflect the efficiency of the reuse process; the reuse

process is not part of a data centre.
2 Normative references

The following documents are referred to in the text in such a way that some or all of their content

constitutes requirements of this document. For dated references, only the edition cited applies. For

undated references, the latest edition of the referenced document (including any amendments) applies.

ISO/IEC 30134-1:2015, Information technology — Data centres — Key performance indicators — Part 1:

Overview and general requirements

ISO 8601-1:2019, Date and time — Representations for information interchange — Part 1: Basic rules

3 Terms, definitions, abbreviated terms and symbols
3.1 Terms and definitions

For the purposes of this document, the terms and definitions given in ISO/IEC 30134-1 and the following

apply.

ISO and IEC maintain terminological databases for use in standardization at the following addresses:

— ISO Online browsing platform: available at https:// www .iso .org/ obp
— IEC Electropedia: available at https:// www .electropedia .org/
3.1.1
reused energy
reuse of energy

utilization of energy used in the data centre for an alternate purpose outside the data centre boundary

Note 1 to entry: Energy ejected to the environment does not constitute reused energy.

3.1.2
handoff point

point at the boundary of the data centre where energy is measured and is handed off to another party

Note 1 to entry: An example is an energy company which utilizes the energy outside the data centre boundary.

3.2 Abbreviated terms

For the purposes of this document the abbreviated terms of ISO/IEC 30134-1 and the following apply.

© ISO/IEC 2021 – All rights reserved 1
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)
AC alternating current
COP coefficient of performance
CRAC computer room air conditioner units
CRAH computer room air handler units
DX direct expansion
ERE energy reuse efficiency
ERF energy reuse factor
PUE power usage sffectiveness
IT information system
UPS uninterruptible power system
PDU power distribution unit
r.m.s root mean square
3.3 Symbols
For the purposes of this document the following symbols apply.

E energy used by the entire cooling system attributable to the data centre including support

COOLING
spaces (annual)
E total data centre energy consumption (annual)
E data centre excess energy (annual)
EXCESS
E IT equipment energy consumption (annual)
E energy used to light the data centre and support spaces (annual)
LIGHTING

E energy lost in the power distribution system through line-loss and other infrastructure (e.g.

POWER
UPS or PDU) inefficiencies (annual)

E energy from the data centre (annual) that is used outside of the data centre and which sub-

Reuse

stitutes partly or totally energy needed outside the data centre boundary (annual)

4 Applicable area of the data centre

For the determination of ERF, the data centre under consideration shall be viewed as a system bounded

by interfaces through which energy flows (see Figure 1). The calculation of ERF accounts for energy

crossing this boundary. The bounded areas are the same as those used in calculations for PUE (as

specified in ISO/IEC 30134-2) and other KPIs from the ISO/IEC 30134 series.

As shown in Figure 1, the data centre boundary is “drawn” around the data centre at the point of

handoff from the utility provider. This is a critical distinction when alternate energy types and mixed-

use buildings are analysed. It is equally important to ensure all energy types are included in ERF. All

energy carriers (such as fuel oil, natural gas, etc.) and energy generated elsewhere (such as electricity,

chilled water, etc.) that feed the data centre shall be included in the calculation.

Assuming there is no energy storage, conservation of energy requires that the energy into the data

centre must equals the energy out. In the simple schematic of Figure 1, that means A + B = F. This is

2 © ISO/IEC 2021 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)

oversimplified, as there are losses and heat generated at the cooling (A minus E), UPS, and Power

Distribution Unit (PDU) (B minus D) points as well, but this waste heat also has to leave the boundary.

Once a boundary is defined for a data centre, it can be used to properly understand the ERF concept.

Key
electrical energy
thermal energy
other energy
re-usable energy
Figure 1 — Simplistic data centre components and boundary

It is critical to include all energy carriers at the point of utility handoff. It is also critical to include

all of the data centre’s energy consumption in the calculations, which includes but is not limited to

generators, inside and outside lighting, fire detection and suppression, associated office/cubicle space

strictly intended for data centre personnel, receiving areas, storage areas, etc. For clarity, the diagrams

only show the large components to demonstrate the ERF concept.

ERF only considers energy being reused outside the boundary of a data centre. Energy reused inside

the data centre boundary shall not be counted towards ERF as it already is accounted for in a lower PUE

and including it in ERF is double counting. Examples of this are shown in Annex A.

NOTE Conversion of internal “reuse” (double/multi-use) into electrical energy for use in PUE calculation

leads to double counting and shall not be included in PUE.

In Figure 1, any portion of (F) that is reused outside the data centre boundary (such as in a mixed-use

building or a different building and not rejected to the atmosphere) is considered reused energy for

determining ERF.

To determine ERF, the practitioner will need to identify and account for all energy streams crossing the

data centre boundary coming in and any energy streams that will have beneficial use going out of the

data centre boundary.

The energy coming in would typically be electricity but can also be natural gas, diesel fuel, chilled

water, or conditioned air from another space.
© ISO/IEC 2021 – All rights reserved 3
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)

The energy leaving the data centre boundary will most often take the form of heated water or heated

airflow; these are what this document considers to be potentially reused energy. However, any form of

energy that is reused outside of the data centre boundary shall be accounted for.

Processes that take advantage of the reused energy for other uses are outside the data centre boundary

and the benefits of that reused energy and the efficiency of the reuse process are not considered in the

ERF.

While reuse technologies are important to a data centre’s overall energy use, they are too complex to

try to define or measure by ERF.

NOTE The simplest example would be some form of chiller being driven by data centre waste heat. The

reused energy to be considered for ERF is the waste heat going into the chiller and not the cooling energy

delivered by the chiller to another space outside the data centre space.

A simple test of a specific technology employed in a data centre to determine if the energy reuse should

be considered in ERF is if the PUE of the data centre would be different with or without that technology.

If the technology causes a lower PUE, then it should not be considered as part of ERF. For example, if

warm air from the data centre is used to heat the UPS battery room in the winter, this will result in a

lower PUE; therefore, that double-/multi-use of energy shall not be included when calculating ERF. The

heat from the data centre, when transferred to the battery room, stays within the data centre boundary

and is therefore accounted for in lowering the PUE by reducing electricity demand for heating the

battery room. It has no effect on ERF. If it had been used to heat an adjacent, non-data centre space (e.g.

an adjacent cafeteria), then the heat crossed the data centre boundary and counts in ERF but not PUE.

Examples of ERF usage are described in Annex A.
5 Determination of ERF

ERF provides a way to determine the factor of energy reuse. Heat is the most common example, where

some of the heat produced by the data centre is utilized for beneficial purposes outside the data centre

boundary and is not regarded as waste heat.

ERF ranges from 0 to 1,0. An ERF of 0,0 means no energy is reused, while a value of 1,0 means that,

theoretically, all the energy brought into the data centre is reused. Any equipment outside of the data

centre boundary for increasing the temperature delivered, like heat pumps, shall not be included in the

calculation.
ERF is defined as:
Reuse
ERF =

Where the only energy source is from an electrical utility, E is determined by the energy measured

at the utility meter. ERF may be applied in mixed-use buildings when measurement of the difference

between the energy used for the data centre and that for other functions is possible.

E includes E plus all the energy that is consumed to support the following infrastructures:

DC IT

a) power delivery — including UPS systems, switchgear, generators, PDUs, batteries, and distribution

losses external to the IT equipment;

b) cooling system — including chillers, cooling towers, pumps, CRAHs, CRACs, and DX units;

c) others — including data centre l
...

FINAL
INTERNATIONAL ISO/IEC
DRAFT
STANDARD FDIS
30134-6
ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 39
Information technology — Data
Secretariat: ANSI
centres key performance indicators —
Voting begins on:
2021-05-12
Part 6:
Voting terminates on:
Energy Reuse Factor (ERF)
2021-07-07
Technologies de l'information — Indicateurs de performance clés des
centres de données —
Partie 6: Indicateur de réutilisation de l'énergie (ERF)
RECIPIENTS OF THIS DRAFT ARE INVITED TO
SUBMIT, WITH THEIR COMMENTS, NOTIFICATION
OF ANY RELEVANT PATENT RIGHTS OF WHICH
THEY ARE AWARE AND TO PROVIDE SUPPOR TING
DOCUMENTATION.
IN ADDITION TO THEIR EVALUATION AS
Reference number
BEING ACCEPTABLE FOR INDUSTRIAL, TECHNO-
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)
LOGICAL, COMMERCIAL AND USER PURPOSES,
DRAFT INTERNATIONAL STANDARDS MAY ON
OCCASION HAVE TO BE CONSIDERED IN THE
LIGHT OF THEIR POTENTIAL TO BECOME STAN-
DARDS TO WHICH REFERENCE MAY BE MADE IN
NATIONAL REGULATIONS. ISO/IEC 2021
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)
COPYRIGHT PROTECTED DOCUMENT
© ISO/IEC 2021

All rights reserved. Unless otherwise specified, or required in the context of its implementation, no part of this publication may

be reproduced or utilized otherwise in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, or posting

on the internet or an intranet, without prior written permission. Permission can be requested from either ISO at the address

below or ISO’s member body in the country of the requester.
ISO copyright office
CP 401 • Ch. de Blandonnet 8
CH-1214 Vernier, Geneva
Phone: +41 22 749 01 11
Email: copyright@iso.org
Website: www.iso.org
Published in Switzerland
ii © ISO/IEC 2021 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)
Contents Page

Foreword ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................iv

Introduction ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................v

1 Scope ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 1

2 Normative references ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3 Terms, definitions, abbreviated terms and symbols ....................................................................................................... 1

3.1 Terms and definitions ....................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3.2 Abbreviated terms ............................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3.3 Symbols ......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 2

4 Applicable area of the data centre ..................................................................................................................................................... 2

5 Determination of ERF ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 4

6 Measurement of E and E .............................................................................................................................................................. 5

Reuse DC

7 Application of ERF ............................................................................................................................................................................................... 5

8 Reporting of ERF ................................................................................................................................................................................................... 5

8.1 Requirements ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 5

8.1.1 Standard construct for communicating ERF data ............................................................................... 5

8.1.2 Data for public reporting of ERF ........................................................................................................................ 6

8.2 Recommendations ............................................................................................................................................................................... 6

8.2.1 Trend tracking data ....................................................................................................................................................... 6

8.3 ERF derivatives, interim ERF ...................................................................................................................................................... 7

Annex A (informative) Examples of use ............................................................................................................................................................. 8

Annex B (informative) Energy conversion factors ...............................................................................................................................13

Bibliography .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................14

© ISO/IEC 2021 – All rights reserved iii
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)
Foreword

ISO (the International Organization for Standardization) and IEC (the International Electrotechnical

Commission) form the specialized system for worldwide standardization. National bodies that are

members of ISO or IEC participate in the development of International Standards through technical

committees established by the respective organization to deal with particular fields of technical

activity. ISO and IEC technical committees collaborate in fields of mutual interest. Other international

organizations, governmental and non-governmental, in liaison with ISO and IEC, also take part in the

work.

The procedures used to develop this document and those intended for its further maintenance are

described in the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 1. In particular, the different approval criteria needed for

the different types of document should be noted. This document was drafted in accordance with the

editorial rules of the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 2 (see www .iso .org/ directives).

Attention is drawn to the possibility that some of the elements of this document may be the subject

of patent rights. ISO and IEC shall not be held responsible for identifying any or all such patent

rights. Details of any patent rights identified during the development of the document will be in the

Introduction and/or on the ISO list of patent declarations received (see www .iso .org/ patents) or the IEC

list of patent declarations received (see patents.iec.ch).

Any trade name used in this document is information given for the convenience of users and does not

constitute an endorsement.

For an explanation of the voluntary nature of standards, the meaning of ISO specific terms and

expressions related to conformity assessment, as well as information about ISO's adherence to the

World Trade Organization (WTO) principles in the Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT), see www .iso .org/

iso/ foreword .html.

This document was prepared by Joint Technical Committee ISO/IEC JTC 1, Information technology,

Subcommittee SC 39, Sustainability, IT & Data Centres.
A list of all parts in the ISO/IEC 30134 series can be found on the ISO website.

Any feedback or questions on this document should be directed to the user’s national standards body. A

complete listing of these bodies can be found at www .iso .org/ members .html.
iv © ISO/IEC 2021 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)
Introduction

The global economy is today reliant on information and communication technologies and the associated

generation, transmission, dissemination, computation and storage of digital data. All markets have

experienced exponential growth in that data for social, educational and business sectors and, while the

internet backbone carries the traffic, there are a wide variety of data centres at nodes and hubs within

both private enterprise and shared/collocation facilities.

The historical data generation growth rate exceeds the capacity growth rate of information and

communications technology hardware and, with less than half of the world’s population having

access to an internet connection (in 2014), that growth in data can only accelerate. In addition, with

many governments having “digital agendas” to provide both citizens and businesses with ever-faster

broadband access, the very increase in network speed and capacity will, by itself, generate ever more

usage (Jevons Paradox). Data generation and the consequential increase in data processing and storage

are directly linked to increasing power consumption.

With this background, data centre growth, and power consumption in particular, is an inevitable

consequence; this growth will demand increasing power consumption, despite the most stringent

energy efficiency strategies. This makes the need for key performance indicators (KPIs) that cover

the effective use of resources (including but not limited to energy) and the reduction of CO emissions

essential.

Within the ISO/IEC 30134 series, the term “resource usage effectiveness” is generally used for KPIs in

preference to “resource usage efficiency”, which is restricted to situations where the input and output

parameters used to define the KPI have the same units.

The energy reuse factor (ERF) provides the data centre practitioner with greater visibility into energy

efficiency in data centres that make beneficial use of any reused energy from the data centre.

In order to determine the overall resource efficiency of a data centre, a holistic suite of metrics is

required. This document is one of a series of standards for such KPIs and has been produced in

accordance with ISO/IEC 30134-1, which defines common requirements for a holistic suite of KPIs for

data centre resource efficiency. This document does not specify limits or targets for the KPI and does

not describe or imply, unless specifically stated, any form of aggregation of this KPI into a combination

with other KPIs for data centre resource efficiency. The document presents specific rules on ERF’s

use, along with its theoretical and mathematical development. The document concludes with several

examples of site concepts that can employ the ERF metric.
© ISO/IEC 2021 – All rights reserved v
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
FINAL DRAFT INTERNATIONAL STANDARD ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)
Information technology — Data centres key performance
indicators —
Part 6:
Energy Reuse Factor (ERF)
1 Scope

This document specifies the energy reuse factor (ERF) as a KPI to quantify the reuse of the energy

consumed in a data centre. ERF is defined as the ratio of energy being reused divided by the sum of all

energy consumed in a data centre. The ERF does reflect the efficiency of the reuse process; the reuse

process is not part of a data centre.
2 Normative references

The following documents are referred to in the text in such a way that some or all of their content

constitutes requirements of this document. For dated references, only the edition cited applies. For

undated references, the latest edition of the referenced document (including any amendments) applies.

ISO/IEC 30134-1:2015, Information technology — Data centres — Key performance indicators — Part 1:

Overview and general requirements

ISO 8601-1:2019, Date and time — Representations for information interchange — Part 1: Basic rules

3 Terms, definitions, abbreviated terms and symbols
3.1 Terms and definitions

For the purposes of this document, the terms and definitions given in ISO/IEC 30134-1 and the following

apply.

ISO and IEC maintain terminological databases for use in standardization at the following addresses:

— ISO Online browsing platform: available at https:// www .iso .org/ obp
— IEC Electropedia: available at https:// www .electropedia .org/
3.1.1
reused energy
reuse of energy

utilization of energy used in the data centre for an alternate purpose outside the data centre boundary

Note 1 to entry: Energy ejected to the environment does not constitute reused energy.

3.1.2
handoff point

point at the boundary of the data centre where energy is measured and is handed off to another party

Note 1 to entry: An example is an energy company which utilizes the energy outside the data centre boundary.

3.2 Abbreviated terms

For the purposes of this document the abbreviated terms of ISO/IEC 30134-1 and the following apply.

© ISO/IEC 2021 – All rights reserved 1
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)
AC alternating current
COP coefficient of performance
CRAC computer room air conditioner units
CRAH computer room air handler units
DX direct expansion
ERE energy reuse efficiency
ERF energy reuse factor
PUE power usage sffectiveness
IT information system
UPS uninterruptible power system
PDU power distribution unit
r.m.s root mean square
3.3 Symbols
For the purposes of this document the following symbols apply.

E energy used by the entire cooling system attributable to the data centre including support

COOLING
spaces (annual)
E total data centre energy consumption (annual)
E data centre excess energy (annual)
EXCESS
E IT equipment energy consumption (annual)
E energy used to light the data centre and support spaces (annual)
LIGHTING

E energy lost in the power distribution system through line-loss and other infrastructure (e.g.

POWER
UPS or PDU) inefficiencies (annual)

E energy from the data centre (annual) that is used outside of the data centre and which sub-

Reuse

stitutes partly or totally energy needed outside the data centre boundary (annual)

4 Applicable area of the data centre

For the determination of ERF, the data centre under consideration shall be viewed as a system bounded

by interfaces through which energy flows (see Figure 1). The calculation of ERF accounts for energy

crossing this boundary. The bounded areas are the same as those used in calculations for PUE (as

specified in ISO/IEC 30134-2) and other KPIs from the ISO/IEC 30134 series.

As shown in Figure 1, the data centre boundary is “drawn” around the data centre at the point of

handoff from the utility provider. This is a critical distinction when alternate energy types and mixed-

use buildings are analysed. It is equally important to ensure all energy types are included in ERF. All

energy carriers (such as fuel oil, natural gas, etc.) and energy generated elsewhere (such as electricity,

chilled water, etc.) that feed the data centre shall be included in the calculation.

Assuming there is no energy storage, conservation of energy requires that the energy into the data

centre must equals the energy out. In the simple schematic of Figure 1, that means A + B = F. This is

2 © ISO/IEC 2021 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)

oversimplified, as there are losses and heat generated at the cooling (A minus E), UPS, and Power

Distribution Unit (PDU) (B minus D) points as well, but this waste heat also has to leave the boundary.

Once a boundary is defined for a data centre, it can be used to properly understand the ERF concept.

Key
electrical energy
thermal energy
other energy
re-usable energy
Figure 1 — Simplistic data centre components and boundary

It is critical to include all energy carriers at the point of utility handoff. It is also critical to include

all of the data centre’s energy consumption in the calculations, which includes but is not limited to

generators, inside and outside lighting, fire detection and suppression, associated office/cubicle space

strictly intended for data centre personnel, receiving areas, storage areas, etc. For clarity, the diagrams

only show the large components to demonstrate the ERF concept.

ERF only considers energy being reused outside the boundary of a data centre. Energy reused inside

the data centre boundary shall not be counted towards ERF as it already is accounted for in a lower PUE

and including it in ERF is double counting. Examples of this are shown in Annex A.

NOTE Conversion of internal “reuse” (double/multi-use) into electrical energy for use in PUE calculation

leads to double counting and shall not be included in PUE.

In Figure 1, any portion of (F) that is reused outside the data centre boundary (such as in a mixed-use

building or a different building and not rejected to the atmosphere) is considered reused energy for

determining ERF.

To determine ERF, the practitioner will need to identify and account for all energy streams crossing the

data centre boundary coming in and any energy streams that will have beneficial use going out of the

data centre boundary.

The energy coming in would typically be electricity but can also be natural gas, diesel fuel, chilled

water, or conditioned air from another space.
© ISO/IEC 2021 – All rights reserved 3
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)

The energy leaving the data centre boundary will most often take the form of heated water or heated

airflow; these are what this document considers to be potentially reused energy. However, any form of

energy that is reused outside of the data centre boundary shall be accounted for.

Processes that take advantage of the reused energy for other uses are outside the data centre boundary

and the benefits of that reused energy and the efficiency of the reuse process are not considered in the

ERF.

While reuse technologies are important to a data centre’s overall energy use, they are too complex to

try to define or measure by ERF.

NOTE The simplest example would be some form of chiller being driven by data centre waste heat. The

reused energy to be considered for ERF is the waste heat going into the chiller and not the cooling energy

delivered by the chiller to another space outside the data centre space.

A simple test of a specific technology employed in a data centre to determine if the energy reuse should

be considered in ERF is if the PUE of the data centre would be different with or without that technology.

If the technology causes a lower PUE, then it should not be considered as part of ERF. For example, if

warm air from the data centre is used to heat the UPS battery room in the winter, this will result in a

lower PUE; therefore, that double-/multi-use of energy shall not be included when calculating ERF. The

heat from the data centre, when transferred to the battery room, stays within the data centre boundary

and is therefore accounted for in lowering the PUE by reducing electricity demand for heating the

battery room. It has no effect on ERF. If it had been used to heat an adjacent, non-data centre space (e.g.

an adjacent cafeteria), then the heat crossed the data centre boundary and counts in ERF but not PUE.

Examples of ERF usage are described in Annex A.
5 Determination of ERF

ERF provides a way to determine the factor of energy reuse. Heat is the most common example, where

some of the heat produced by the data centre is utilized for beneficial purposes outside the data centre

boundary and is not regarded as waste heat.

ERF ranges from 0 to 1,0. An ERF of 0,0 means no energy is reused, while a value of 1,0 means that,

theoretically, all the energy brought into the data centre is reused. Any equipment outside of the data

centre boundary for increasing the temperature delivered, like heat pumps, shall not be included in the

calculation.
ERF is defined as:
Reuse
ERF =

Where the only energy source is from an electrical utility, E is determined by the energy measured

at the utility meter. ERF may be applied in mixed-use buildings when measurement of the difference

between the energy used for the data centre and that for other functions is possible.

E includes E plus all the energy that is consumed to support the following infrastructures:

DC IT

a) power delivery — including UPS systems, switchgear, generators, PDUs, batteries, and distribution

losses external to the IT equipment;

b) cooling system — including chillers, cooling towers, pumps, CRAHs, CRACs, and DX units;

c) others — including data centre l
...

FINAL
INTERNATIONAL ISO/IEC
DRAFT
STANDARD FDIS
30134-6
ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 39
Information technology — Data
Secretariat: ANSI
centres key performance indicators —
Voting begins on:
2021-05-12
Part 6:
Voting terminates on:
Energy Reuse Factor (ERF)
2021-07-07
Technologies de l'information — Indicateurs de performance clés des
centres de données —
Partie 6: Indicateur de réutilisation de l'énergie (ERF)
RECIPIENTS OF THIS DRAFT ARE INVITED TO
SUBMIT, WITH THEIR COMMENTS, NOTIFICATION
OF ANY RELEVANT PATENT RIGHTS OF WHICH
THEY ARE AWARE AND TO PROVIDE SUPPOR TING
DOCUMENTATION.
IN ADDITION TO THEIR EVALUATION AS
Reference number
BEING ACCEPTABLE FOR INDUSTRIAL, TECHNO-
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)
LOGICAL, COMMERCIAL AND USER PURPOSES,
DRAFT INTERNATIONAL STANDARDS MAY ON
OCCASION HAVE TO BE CONSIDERED IN THE
LIGHT OF THEIR POTENTIAL TO BECOME STAN-
DARDS TO WHICH REFERENCE MAY BE MADE IN
NATIONAL REGULATIONS. ISO/IEC 2021
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)
COPYRIGHT PROTECTED DOCUMENT
© ISO/IEC 2021

All rights reserved. Unless otherwise specified, or required in the context of its implementation, no part of this publication may

be reproduced or utilized otherwise in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, or posting

on the internet or an intranet, without prior written permission. Permission can be requested from either ISO at the address

below or ISO’s member body in the country of the requester.
ISO copyright office
CP 401 • Ch. de Blandonnet 8
CH-1214 Vernier, Geneva
Phone: +41 22 749 01 11
Email: copyright@iso.org
Website: www.iso.org
Published in Switzerland
ii © ISO/IEC 2021 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)
Contents Page

Foreword ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................iv

Introduction ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................v

1 Scope ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 1

2 Normative references ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3 Terms, definitions, abbreviated terms and symbols ....................................................................................................... 1

3.1 Terms and definitions ....................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3.2 Abbreviated terms ............................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3.3 Symbols ......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 2

4 Applicable area of the data centre ..................................................................................................................................................... 2

5 Determination of ERF ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 4

6 Measurement of E and E .............................................................................................................................................................. 5

Reuse DC

7 Application of ERF ............................................................................................................................................................................................... 5

8 Reporting of ERF ................................................................................................................................................................................................... 5

8.1 Requirements ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 5

8.1.1 Standard construct for communicating ERF data ............................................................................... 5

8.1.2 Data for public reporting of ERF ........................................................................................................................ 6

8.2 Recommendations ............................................................................................................................................................................... 6

8.2.1 Trend tracking data ....................................................................................................................................................... 6

8.3 ERF derivatives, interim ERF ...................................................................................................................................................... 7

Annex A (informative) Examples of use ............................................................................................................................................................. 8

Annex B (informative) Energy conversion factors ...............................................................................................................................13

Bibliography .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................14

© ISO/IEC 2021 – All rights reserved iii
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)
Foreword

ISO (the International Organization for Standardization) and IEC (the International Electrotechnical

Commission) form the specialized system for worldwide standardization. National bodies that are

members of ISO or IEC participate in the development of International Standards through technical

committees established by the respective organization to deal with particular fields of technical

activity. ISO and IEC technical committees collaborate in fields of mutual interest. Other international

organizations, governmental and non-governmental, in liaison with ISO and IEC, also take part in the

work.

The procedures used to develop this document and those intended for its further maintenance are

described in the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 1. In particular, the different approval criteria needed for

the different types of document should be noted. This document was drafted in accordance with the

editorial rules of the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 2 (see www .iso .org/ directives).

Attention is drawn to the possibility that some of the elements of this document may be the subject

of patent rights. ISO and IEC shall not be held responsible for identifying any or all such patent

rights. Details of any patent rights identified during the development of the document will be in the

Introduction and/or on the ISO list of patent declarations received (see www .iso .org/ patents) or the IEC

list of patent declarations received (see patents.iec.ch).

Any trade name used in this document is information given for the convenience of users and does not

constitute an endorsement.

For an explanation of the voluntary nature of standards, the meaning of ISO specific terms and

expressions related to conformity assessment, as well as information about ISO's adherence to the

World Trade Organization (WTO) principles in the Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT), see www .iso .org/

iso/ foreword .html.

This document was prepared by Joint Technical Committee ISO/IEC JTC 1, Information technology,

Subcommittee SC 39, Sustainability, IT & Data Centres.
A list of all parts in the ISO/IEC 30134 series can be found on the ISO website.

Any feedback or questions on this document should be directed to the user’s national standards body. A

complete listing of these bodies can be found at www .iso .org/ members .html.
iv © ISO/IEC 2021 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)
Introduction

The global economy is today reliant on information and communication technologies and the associated

generation, transmission, dissemination, computation and storage of digital data. All markets have

experienced exponential growth in that data for social, educational and business sectors and, while the

internet backbone carries the traffic, there are a wide variety of data centres at nodes and hubs within

both private enterprise and shared/collocation facilities.

The historical data generation growth rate exceeds the capacity growth rate of information and

communications technology hardware and, with less than half of the world’s population having

access to an internet connection (in 2014), that growth in data can only accelerate. In addition, with

many governments having “digital agendas” to provide both citizens and businesses with ever-faster

broadband access, the very increase in network speed and capacity will, by itself, generate ever more

usage (Jevons Paradox). Data generation and the consequential increase in data processing and storage

are directly linked to increasing power consumption.

With this background, data centre growth, and power consumption in particular, is an inevitable

consequence; this growth will demand increasing power consumption, despite the most stringent

energy efficiency strategies. This makes the need for key performance indicators (KPIs) that cover

the effective use of resources (including but not limited to energy) and the reduction of CO emissions

essential.

Within the ISO/IEC 30134 series, the term “resource usage effectiveness” is generally used for KPIs in

preference to “resource usage efficiency”, which is restricted to situations where the input and output

parameters used to define the KPI have the same units.

The energy reuse factor (ERF) provides the data centre practitioner with greater visibility into energy

efficiency in data centres that make beneficial use of any reused energy from the data centre.

In order to determine the overall resource efficiency of a data centre, a holistic suite of metrics is

required. This document is one of a series of standards for such KPIs and has been produced in

accordance with ISO/IEC 30134-1, which defines common requirements for a holistic suite of KPIs for

data centre resource efficiency. This document does not specify limits or targets for the KPI and does

not describe or imply, unless specifically stated, any form of aggregation of this KPI into a combination

with other KPIs for data centre resource efficiency. The document presents specific rules on ERF’s

use, along with its theoretical and mathematical development. The document concludes with several

examples of site concepts that can employ the ERF metric.
© ISO/IEC 2021 – All rights reserved v
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
FINAL DRAFT INTERNATIONAL STANDARD ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)
Information technology — Data centres key performance
indicators —
Part 6:
Energy Reuse Factor (ERF)
1 Scope

This document specifies the energy reuse factor (ERF) as a KPI to quantify the reuse of the energy

consumed in a data centre. ERF is defined as the ratio of energy being reused divided by the sum of all

energy consumed in a data centre. The ERF does reflect the efficiency of the reuse process; the reuse

process is not part of a data centre.
2 Normative references

The following documents are referred to in the text in such a way that some or all of their content

constitutes requirements of this document. For dated references, only the edition cited applies. For

undated references, the latest edition of the referenced document (including any amendments) applies.

ISO/IEC 30134-1:2015, Information technology — Data centres — Key performance indicators — Part 1:

Overview and general requirements

ISO 8601-1:2019, Date and time — Representations for information interchange — Part 1: Basic rules

3 Terms, definitions, abbreviated terms and symbols
3.1 Terms and definitions

For the purposes of this document, the terms and definitions given in ISO/IEC 30134-1 and the following

apply.

ISO and IEC maintain terminological databases for use in standardization at the following addresses:

— ISO Online browsing platform: available at https:// www .iso .org/ obp
— IEC Electropedia: available at https:// www .electropedia .org/
3.1.1
reused energy
reuse of energy

utilization of energy used in the data centre for an alternate purpose outside the data centre boundary

Note 1 to entry: Energy ejected to the environment does not constitute reused energy.

3.1.2
handoff point

point at the boundary of the data centre where energy is measured and is handed off to another party

Note 1 to entry: An example is an energy company which utilizes the energy outside the data centre boundary.

3.2 Abbreviated terms

For the purposes of this document the abbreviated terms of ISO/IEC 30134-1 and the following apply.

© ISO/IEC 2021 – All rights reserved 1
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)
AC alternating current
COP coefficient of performance
CRAC computer room air conditioner units
CRAH computer room air handler units
DX direct expansion
ERE energy reuse efficiency
ERF energy reuse factor
PUE power usage sffectiveness
IT information system
UPS uninterruptible power system
PDU power distribution unit
r.m.s root mean square
3.3 Symbols
For the purposes of this document the following symbols apply.

E energy used by the entire cooling system attributable to the data centre including support

COOLING
spaces (annual)
E total data centre energy consumption (annual)
E data centre excess energy (annual)
EXCESS
E IT equipment energy consumption (annual)
E energy used to light the data centre and support spaces (annual)
LIGHTING

E energy lost in the power distribution system through line-loss and other infrastructure (e.g.

POWER
UPS or PDU) inefficiencies (annual)

E energy from the data centre (annual) that is used outside of the data centre and which sub-

Reuse

stitutes partly or totally energy needed outside the data centre boundary (annual)

4 Applicable area of the data centre

For the determination of ERF, the data centre under consideration shall be viewed as a system bounded

by interfaces through which energy flows (see Figure 1). The calculation of ERF accounts for energy

crossing this boundary. The bounded areas are the same as those used in calculations for PUE (as

specified in ISO/IEC 30134-2) and other KPIs from the ISO/IEC 30134 series.

As shown in Figure 1, the data centre boundary is “drawn” around the data centre at the point of

handoff from the utility provider. This is a critical distinction when alternate energy types and mixed-

use buildings are analysed. It is equally important to ensure all energy types are included in ERF. All

energy carriers (such as fuel oil, natural gas, etc.) and energy generated elsewhere (such as electricity,

chilled water, etc.) that feed the data centre shall be included in the calculation.

Assuming there is no energy storage, conservation of energy requires that the energy into the data

centre must equals the energy out. In the simple schematic of Figure 1, that means A + B = F. This is

2 © ISO/IEC 2021 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)

oversimplified, as there are losses and heat generated at the cooling (A minus E), UPS, and Power

Distribution Unit (PDU) (B minus D) points as well, but this waste heat also has to leave the boundary.

Once a boundary is defined for a data centre, it can be used to properly understand the ERF concept.

Key
electrical energy
thermal energy
other energy
re-usable energy
Figure 1 — Simplistic data centre components and boundary

It is critical to include all energy carriers at the point of utility handoff. It is also critical to include

all of the data centre’s energy consumption in the calculations, which includes but is not limited to

generators, inside and outside lighting, fire detection and suppression, associated office/cubicle space

strictly intended for data centre personnel, receiving areas, storage areas, etc. For clarity, the diagrams

only show the large components to demonstrate the ERF concept.

ERF only considers energy being reused outside the boundary of a data centre. Energy reused inside

the data centre boundary shall not be counted towards ERF as it already is accounted for in a lower PUE

and including it in ERF is double counting. Examples of this are shown in Annex A.

NOTE Conversion of internal “reuse” (double/multi-use) into electrical energy for use in PUE calculation

leads to double counting and shall not be included in PUE.

In Figure 1, any portion of (F) that is reused outside the data centre boundary (such as in a mixed-use

building or a different building and not rejected to the atmosphere) is considered reused energy for

determining ERF.

To determine ERF, the practitioner will need to identify and account for all energy streams crossing the

data centre boundary coming in and any energy streams that will have beneficial use going out of the

data centre boundary.

The energy coming in would typically be electricity but can also be natural gas, diesel fuel, chilled

water, or conditioned air from another space.
© ISO/IEC 2021 – All rights reserved 3
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)

The energy leaving the data centre boundary will most often take the form of heated water or heated

airflow; these are what this document considers to be potentially reused energy. However, any form of

energy that is reused outside of the data centre boundary shall be accounted for.

Processes that take advantage of the reused energy for other uses are outside the data centre boundary

and the benefits of that reused energy and the efficiency of the reuse process are not considered in the

ERF.

While reuse technologies are important to a data centre’s overall energy use, they are too complex to

try to define or measure by ERF.

NOTE The simplest example would be some form of chiller being driven by data centre waste heat. The

reused energy to be considered for ERF is the waste heat going into the chiller and not the cooling energy

delivered by the chiller to another space outside the data centre space.

A simple test of a specific technology employed in a data centre to determine if the energy reuse should

be considered in ERF is if the PUE of the data centre would be different with or without that technology.

If the technology causes a lower PUE, then it should not be considered as part of ERF. For example, if

warm air from the data centre is used to heat the UPS battery room in the winter, this will result in a

lower PUE; therefore, that double-/multi-use of energy shall not be included when calculating ERF. The

heat from the data centre, when transferred to the battery room, stays within the data centre boundary

and is therefore accounted for in lowering the PUE by reducing electricity demand for heating the

battery room. It has no effect on ERF. If it had been used to heat an adjacent, non-data centre space (e.g.

an adjacent cafeteria), then the heat crossed the data centre boundary and counts in ERF but not PUE.

Examples of ERF usage are described in Annex A.
5 Determination of ERF

ERF provides a way to determine the factor of energy reuse. Heat is the most common example, where

some of the heat produced by the data centre is utilized for beneficial purposes outside the data centre

boundary and is not regarded as waste heat.

ERF ranges from 0 to 1,0. An ERF of 0,0 means no energy is reused, while a value of 1,0 means that,

theoretically, all the energy brought into the data centre is reused. Any equipment outside of the data

centre boundary for increasing the temperature delivered, like heat pumps, shall not be included in the

calculation.
ERF is defined as:
Reuse
ERF =

Where the only energy source is from an electrical utility, E is determined by the energy measured

at the utility meter. ERF may be applied in mixed-use buildings when measurement of the difference

between the energy used for the data centre and that for other functions is possible.

E includes E plus all the energy that is consumed to support the following infrastructures:

DC IT

a) power delivery — including UPS systems, switchgear, generators, PDUs, batteries, and distribution

losses external to the IT equipment;

b) cooling system — including chillers, cooling towers, pumps, CRAHs, CRACs, and DX units;

c) others — including data centre l
...

FINAL
INTERNATIONAL ISO/IEC
DRAFT
STANDARD FDIS
30134-6
ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 39
Information technology — Data
Secretariat: ANSI
centres key performance indicators —
Voting begins on:
2021-05-12
Part 6:
Voting terminates on:
Energy Reuse Factor (ERF)
2021-07-07
Technologies de l'information — Indicateurs de performance clés des
centres de données —
Partie 6: Indicateur de réutilisation de l'énergie (ERF)
RECIPIENTS OF THIS DRAFT ARE INVITED TO
SUBMIT, WITH THEIR COMMENTS, NOTIFICATION
OF ANY RELEVANT PATENT RIGHTS OF WHICH
THEY ARE AWARE AND TO PROVIDE SUPPOR TING
DOCUMENTATION.
IN ADDITION TO THEIR EVALUATION AS
Reference number
BEING ACCEPTABLE FOR INDUSTRIAL, TECHNO-
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)
LOGICAL, COMMERCIAL AND USER PURPOSES,
DRAFT INTERNATIONAL STANDARDS MAY ON
OCCASION HAVE TO BE CONSIDERED IN THE
LIGHT OF THEIR POTENTIAL TO BECOME STAN-
DARDS TO WHICH REFERENCE MAY BE MADE IN
NATIONAL REGULATIONS. ISO/IEC 2021
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)
COPYRIGHT PROTECTED DOCUMENT
© ISO/IEC 2021

All rights reserved. Unless otherwise specified, or required in the context of its implementation, no part of this publication may

be reproduced or utilized otherwise in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, or posting

on the internet or an intranet, without prior written permission. Permission can be requested from either ISO at the address

below or ISO’s member body in the country of the requester.
ISO copyright office
CP 401 • Ch. de Blandonnet 8
CH-1214 Vernier, Geneva
Phone: +41 22 749 01 11
Email: copyright@iso.org
Website: www.iso.org
Published in Switzerland
ii © ISO/IEC 2021 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)
Contents Page

Foreword ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................iv

Introduction ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................v

1 Scope ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 1

2 Normative references ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3 Terms, definitions, abbreviated terms and symbols ....................................................................................................... 1

3.1 Terms and definitions ....................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3.2 Abbreviated terms ............................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3.3 Symbols ......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 2

4 Applicable area of the data centre ..................................................................................................................................................... 2

5 Determination of ERF ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 4

6 Measurement of E and E .............................................................................................................................................................. 5

Reuse DC

7 Application of ERF ............................................................................................................................................................................................... 5

8 Reporting of ERF ................................................................................................................................................................................................... 5

8.1 Requirements ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 5

8.1.1 Standard construct for communicating ERF data ............................................................................... 5

8.1.2 Data for public reporting of ERF ........................................................................................................................ 6

8.2 Recommendations ............................................................................................................................................................................... 6

8.2.1 Trend tracking data ....................................................................................................................................................... 6

8.3 ERF derivatives, interim ERF ...................................................................................................................................................... 7

Annex A (informative) Examples of use ............................................................................................................................................................. 8

Annex B (informative) Energy conversion factors ...............................................................................................................................13

Bibliography .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................14

© ISO/IEC 2021 – All rights reserved iii
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)
Foreword

ISO (the International Organization for Standardization) and IEC (the International Electrotechnical

Commission) form the specialized system for worldwide standardization. National bodies that are

members of ISO or IEC participate in the development of International Standards through technical

committees established by the respective organization to deal with particular fields of technical

activity. ISO and IEC technical committees collaborate in fields of mutual interest. Other international

organizations, governmental and non-governmental, in liaison with ISO and IEC, also take part in the

work.

The procedures used to develop this document and those intended for its further maintenance are

described in the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 1. In particular, the different approval criteria needed for

the different types of document should be noted. This document was drafted in accordance with the

editorial rules of the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 2 (see www .iso .org/ directives).

Attention is drawn to the possibility that some of the elements of this document may be the subject

of patent rights. ISO and IEC shall not be held responsible for identifying any or all such patent

rights. Details of any patent rights identified during the development of the document will be in the

Introduction and/or on the ISO list of patent declarations received (see www .iso .org/ patents) or the IEC

list of patent declarations received (see patents.iec.ch).

Any trade name used in this document is information given for the convenience of users and does not

constitute an endorsement.

For an explanation of the voluntary nature of standards, the meaning of ISO specific terms and

expressions related to conformity assessment, as well as information about ISO's adherence to the

World Trade Organization (WTO) principles in the Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT), see www .iso .org/

iso/ foreword .html.

This document was prepared by Joint Technical Committee ISO/IEC JTC 1, Information technology,

Subcommittee SC 39, Sustainability, IT & Data Centres.
A list of all parts in the ISO/IEC 30134 series can be found on the ISO website.

Any feedback or questions on this document should be directed to the user’s national standards body. A

complete listing of these bodies can be found at www .iso .org/ members .html.
iv © ISO/IEC 2021 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)
Introduction

The global economy is today reliant on information and communication technologies and the associated

generation, transmission, dissemination, computation and storage of digital data. All markets have

experienced exponential growth in that data for social, educational and business sectors and, while the

internet backbone carries the traffic, there are a wide variety of data centres at nodes and hubs within

both private enterprise and shared/collocation facilities.

The historical data generation growth rate exceeds the capacity growth rate of information and

communications technology hardware and, with less than half of the world’s population having

access to an internet connection (in 2014), that growth in data can only accelerate. In addition, with

many governments having “digital agendas” to provide both citizens and businesses with ever-faster

broadband access, the very increase in network speed and capacity will, by itself, generate ever more

usage (Jevons Paradox). Data generation and the consequential increase in data processing and storage

are directly linked to increasing power consumption.

With this background, data centre growth, and power consumption in particular, is an inevitable

consequence; this growth will demand increasing power consumption, despite the most stringent

energy efficiency strategies. This makes the need for key performance indicators (KPIs) that cover

the effective use of resources (including but not limited to energy) and the reduction of CO emissions

essential.

Within the ISO/IEC 30134 series, the term “resource usage effectiveness” is generally used for KPIs in

preference to “resource usage efficiency”, which is restricted to situations where the input and output

parameters used to define the KPI have the same units.

The energy reuse factor (ERF) provides the data centre practitioner with greater visibility into energy

efficiency in data centres that make beneficial use of any reused energy from the data centre.

In order to determine the overall resource efficiency of a data centre, a holistic suite of metrics is

required. This document is one of a series of standards for such KPIs and has been produced in

accordance with ISO/IEC 30134-1, which defines common requirements for a holistic suite of KPIs for

data centre resource efficiency. This document does not specify limits or targets for the KPI and does

not describe or imply, unless specifically stated, any form of aggregation of this KPI into a combination

with other KPIs for data centre resource efficiency. The document presents specific rules on ERF’s

use, along with its theoretical and mathematical development. The document concludes with several

examples of site concepts that can employ the ERF metric.
© ISO/IEC 2021 – All rights reserved v
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
FINAL DRAFT INTERNATIONAL STANDARD ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)
Information technology — Data centres key performance
indicators —
Part 6:
Energy Reuse Factor (ERF)
1 Scope

This document specifies the energy reuse factor (ERF) as a KPI to quantify the reuse of the energy

consumed in a data centre. ERF is defined as the ratio of energy being reused divided by the sum of all

energy consumed in a data centre. The ERF does reflect the efficiency of the reuse process; the reuse

process is not part of a data centre.
2 Normative references

The following documents are referred to in the text in such a way that some or all of their content

constitutes requirements of this document. For dated references, only the edition cited applies. For

undated references, the latest edition of the referenced document (including any amendments) applies.

ISO/IEC 30134-1:2015, Information technology — Data centres — Key performance indicators — Part 1:

Overview and general requirements

ISO 8601-1:2019, Date and time — Representations for information interchange — Part 1: Basic rules

3 Terms, definitions, abbreviated terms and symbols
3.1 Terms and definitions

For the purposes of this document, the terms and definitions given in ISO/IEC 30134-1 and the following

apply.

ISO and IEC maintain terminological databases for use in standardization at the following addresses:

— ISO Online browsing platform: available at https:// www .iso .org/ obp
— IEC Electropedia: available at https:// www .electropedia .org/
3.1.1
reused energy
reuse of energy

utilization of energy used in the data centre for an alternate purpose outside the data centre boundary

Note 1 to entry: Energy ejected to the environment does not constitute reused energy.

3.1.2
handoff point

point at the boundary of the data centre where energy is measured and is handed off to another party

Note 1 to entry: An example is an energy company which utilizes the energy outside the data centre boundary.

3.2 Abbreviated terms

For the purposes of this document the abbreviated terms of ISO/IEC 30134-1 and the following apply.

© ISO/IEC 2021 – All rights reserved 1
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)
AC alternating current
COP coefficient of performance
CRAC computer room air conditioner units
CRAH computer room air handler units
DX direct expansion
ERE energy reuse efficiency
ERF energy reuse factor
PUE power usage sffectiveness
IT information system
UPS uninterruptible power system
PDU power distribution unit
r.m.s root mean square
3.3 Symbols
For the purposes of this document the following symbols apply.

E energy used by the entire cooling system attributable to the data centre including support

COOLING
spaces (annual)
E total data centre energy consumption (annual)
E data centre excess energy (annual)
EXCESS
E IT equipment energy consumption (annual)
E energy used to light the data centre and support spaces (annual)
LIGHTING

E energy lost in the power distribution system through line-loss and other infrastructure (e.g.

POWER
UPS or PDU) inefficiencies (annual)

E energy from the data centre (annual) that is used outside of the data centre and which sub-

Reuse

stitutes partly or totally energy needed outside the data centre boundary (annual)

4 Applicable area of the data centre

For the determination of ERF, the data centre under consideration shall be viewed as a system bounded

by interfaces through which energy flows (see Figure 1). The calculation of ERF accounts for energy

crossing this boundary. The bounded areas are the same as those used in calculations for PUE (as

specified in ISO/IEC 30134-2) and other KPIs from the ISO/IEC 30134 series.

As shown in Figure 1, the data centre boundary is “drawn” around the data centre at the point of

handoff from the utility provider. This is a critical distinction when alternate energy types and mixed-

use buildings are analysed. It is equally important to ensure all energy types are included in ERF. All

energy carriers (such as fuel oil, natural gas, etc.) and energy generated elsewhere (such as electricity,

chilled water, etc.) that feed the data centre shall be included in the calculation.

Assuming there is no energy storage, conservation of energy requires that the energy into the data

centre must equals the energy out. In the simple schematic of Figure 1, that means A + B = F. This is

2 © ISO/IEC 2021 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)

oversimplified, as there are losses and heat generated at the cooling (A minus E), UPS, and Power

Distribution Unit (PDU) (B minus D) points as well, but this waste heat also has to leave the boundary.

Once a boundary is defined for a data centre, it can be used to properly understand the ERF concept.

Key
electrical energy
thermal energy
other energy
re-usable energy
Figure 1 — Simplistic data centre components and boundary

It is critical to include all energy carriers at the point of utility handoff. It is also critical to include

all of the data centre’s energy consumption in the calculations, which includes but is not limited to

generators, inside and outside lighting, fire detection and suppression, associated office/cubicle space

strictly intended for data centre personnel, receiving areas, storage areas, etc. For clarity, the diagrams

only show the large components to demonstrate the ERF concept.

ERF only considers energy being reused outside the boundary of a data centre. Energy reused inside

the data centre boundary shall not be counted towards ERF as it already is accounted for in a lower PUE

and including it in ERF is double counting. Examples of this are shown in Annex A.

NOTE Conversion of internal “reuse” (double/multi-use) into electrical energy for use in PUE calculation

leads to double counting and shall not be included in PUE.

In Figure 1, any portion of (F) that is reused outside the data centre boundary (such as in a mixed-use

building or a different building and not rejected to the atmosphere) is considered reused energy for

determining ERF.

To determine ERF, the practitioner will need to identify and account for all energy streams crossing the

data centre boundary coming in and any energy streams that will have beneficial use going out of the

data centre boundary.

The energy coming in would typically be electricity but can also be natural gas, diesel fuel, chilled

water, or conditioned air from another space.
© ISO/IEC 2021 – All rights reserved 3
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(E)

The energy leaving the data centre boundary will most often take the form of heated water or heated

airflow; these are what this document considers to be potentially reused energy. However, any form of

energy that is reused outside of the data centre boundary shall be accounted for.

Processes that take advantage of the reused energy for other uses are outside the data centre boundary

and the benefits of that reused energy and the efficiency of the reuse process are not considered in the

ERF.

While reuse technologies are important to a data centre’s overall energy use, they are too complex to

try to define or measure by ERF.

NOTE The simplest example would be some form of chiller being driven by data centre waste heat. The

reused energy to be considered for ERF is the waste heat going into the chiller and not the cooling energy

delivered by the chiller to another space outside the data centre space.

A simple test of a specific technology employed in a data centre to determine if the energy reuse should

be considered in ERF is if the PUE of the data centre would be different with or without that technology.

If the technology causes a lower PUE, then it should not be considered as part of ERF. For example, if

warm air from the data centre is used to heat the UPS battery room in the winter, this will result in a

lower PUE; therefore, that double-/multi-use of energy shall not be included when calculating ERF. The

heat from the data centre, when transferred to the battery room, stays within the data centre boundary

and is therefore accounted for in lowering the PUE by reducing electricity demand for heating the

battery room. It has no effect on ERF. If it had been used to heat an adjacent, non-data centre space (e.g.

an adjacent cafeteria), then the heat crossed the data centre boundary and counts in ERF but not PUE.

Examples of ERF usage are described in Annex A.
5 Determination of ERF

ERF provides a way to determine the factor of energy reuse. Heat is the most common example, where

some of the heat produced by the data centre is utilized for beneficial purposes outside the data centre

boundary and is not regarded as waste heat.

ERF ranges from 0 to 1,0. An ERF of 0,0 means no energy is reused, while a value of 1,0 means that,

theoretically, all the energy brought into the data centre is reused. Any equipment outside of the data

centre boundary for increasing the temperature delivered, like heat pumps, shall not be included in the

calculation.
ERF is defined as:
Reuse
ERF =

Where the only energy source is from an electrical utility, E is determined by the energy measured

at the utility meter. ERF may be applied in mixed-use buildings when measurement of the difference

between the energy used for the data centre and that for other functions is possible.

E includes E plus all the energy that is consumed to support the following infrastructures:

DC IT

a) power delivery — including UPS systems, switchgear, generators, PDUs, batteries, and distribution

losses external to the IT equipment;

b) cooling system — including chillers, cooling towers, pumps, CRAHs, CRACs, and DX units;

c) others — including data centre l
...

PROJET
NORME ISO/IEC
FINAL
INTERNATIONALE FDIS
30134-6
ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 39
Technologies de l'information —
Secrétariat: ANSI
Indicateurs de performance clés des
Début de vote:
2021-05-12 centres de données —
Vote clos le:
Partie 6:
2021-07-07
Indicateur de réutilisation de l'énergie
(ERF)
Information technology — Data centres key performance
indicators —
Part 6: Energy Reuse Factor (ERF)
LES DESTINATAIRES DU PRÉSENT PROJET SONT
INVITÉS À PRÉSENTER, AVEC LEURS OBSER-
VATIONS, NOTIFICATION DES DROITS DE PRO-
PRIÉTÉ DONT ILS AURAIENT ÉVENTUELLEMENT
CONNAISSANCE ET À FOURNIR UNE DOCUMEN-
TATION EXPLICATIVE.
OUTRE LE FAIT D’ÊTRE EXAMINÉS POUR
ÉTABLIR S’ILS SONT ACCEPTABLES À DES FINS
INDUSTRIELLES, TECHNOLOGIQUES ET COM-
Numéro de référence
MERCIALES, AINSI QUE DU POINT DE VUE
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(F)
DES UTILISATEURS, LES PROJETS DE NORMES
INTERNATIONALES DOIVENT PARFOIS ÊTRE
CONSIDÉRÉS DU POINT DE VUE DE LEUR POSSI-
BILITÉ DE DEVENIR DES NORMES POUVANT
SERVIR DE RÉFÉRENCE DANS LA RÉGLEMENTA-
TION NATIONALE. ISO/IEC 2021
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(F)
DOCUMENT PROTÉGÉ PAR COPYRIGHT
© ISO/IEC 2021

Tous droits réservés. Sauf prescription différente ou nécessité dans le contexte de sa mise en œuvre, aucune partie de cette

publication ne peut être reproduite ni utilisée sous quelque forme que ce soit et par aucun procédé, électronique ou mécanique,

y compris la photocopie, ou la diffusion sur l’internet ou sur un intranet, sans autorisation écrite préalable. Une autorisation peut

être demandée à l’ISO à l’adresse ci-après ou au comité membre de l’ISO dans le pays du demandeur.

ISO copyright office
Case postale 401 • Ch. de Blandonnet 8
CH-1214 Vernier, Genève
Tél.: +41 22 749 01 11
E-mail: copyright@iso.org
Web: www.iso.org
Publié en Suisse
ii © ISO/IEC 2021 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(F)
Sommaire Page

Avant-propos ..............................................................................................................................................................................................................................iv

Introduction ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................v

1 Domaine d'application ................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

2 Références normatives ................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3 Termes, définitions, abréviations et symboles ..................................................................................................................... 1

3.1 Termes et définitions ......................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3.2 Abréviations .............................................................................................................................................................................................. 2

3.3 Symboles ...................................................................................................................................................................................................... 2

4 Zone applicable du centre de données .......................................................................................................................................... 3

5 Détermination de l'ERF ................................................................................................................................................................................. 5

6 Mesure de E et de E ........................................................................................................................................................................... 5

Reuse DC

7 Application de l'ERF .......................................................................................................................................................................................... 6

8 Rédaction d'un rapport relatif à l'indicateur de réutilisation de l'énergie (ERF) ............................6

8.1 Exigences ..................................................................................................................................................................................................... 6

8.1.1 Formulaire normalisé de communication des données de l'ERF .......................................... 6

8.1.2 Données pour la publication de l'indicateur ERF ................................................................................ 6

8.2 Recommandations ............................................................................................................................................................................... 7

8.2.1 Données utiles pour suivre les évolutions ................................................................................................. 7

8.3 Dérivés de l'indicateur ERF, ERF intermédiaire ......................................................................................................... 8

Annexe A (informative) Exemples d'utilisation......................................................................................................................................... 9

Annexe B (informative) Facteurs de conversion énergétique .................................................................................................14

Bibliographie ...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................15

© ISO/IEC 2021 – Tous droits réservés iii
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(F)
Avant-propos

L'ISO (Organisation internationale de normalisation) et l'IEC (Commission électrotechnique

internationale) forment le système spécialisé de la normalisation mondiale. Les organismes

nationaux membres de l'ISO ou de l'IEC participent au développement de Normes internationales

par l'intermédiaire des comités techniques créés par l'organisation concernée afin de s'occuper des

domaines particuliers de l'activité technique. Les comités techniques de l'ISO et de l'IEC collaborent

dans des domaines d'intérêt commun. D'autres organisations internationales, gouvernementales et non

gouvernementales, en liaison avec l'ISO et l'IEC participent également aux travaux.

Les procédures utilisées pour élaborer le présent document et celles destinées à sa mise à jour sont

décrites dans les Directives ISO/IEC, Partie 1. Il convient, en particulier de prendre note des différents

critères d'approbation requis pour les différents types de documents ISO. Le présent document a été

rédigé conformément aux règles de rédaction données dans les Directives ISO/IEC, Partie 2 (voir www

.iso .org/ directives).

L'attention est attirée sur le fait que certains des éléments du présent document peuvent faire l'objet

de droits de propriété intellectuelle ou de droits analogues. L'ISO et l'IEC ne sauraient être tenues pour

responsables de ne pas avoir identifié de tels droits de propriété et averti de leur existence. Les détails

concernant les références aux droits de propriété intellectuelle ou autres droits analogues identifiés

lors de l'élaboration du document sont indiqués dans l'Introduction et/ou dans la liste des déclarations

de brevets reçues par l'ISO (voir https:// www .iso .org/ brevets) ou dans la liste des déclarations de

brevets reçues par l'IEC (voir patents.iec.ch).

Les appellations commerciales éventuellement mentionnées dans le présent document sont données

pour information, par souci de commodité, à l’intention des utilisateurs et ne sauraient constituer un

engagement.

Pour une explication de la nature volontaire des normes, la signification des termes et expressions

spécifiques de l'ISO liés à l'évaluation de la conformité, ou pour toute information au sujet de l'adhésion

de l'ISO aux principes de l’Organisation mondiale du commerce (OMC) concernant les obstacles

techniques au commerce (OTC), voir le lien suivant: www .iso .org/ iso/ fr/ avant -propos.

Le présent document a été élaboré par le comité technique mixte ISO/IEC JTC 1, Technologies de

l'information, sous-comité SC 39, Impact environnemental des Technologies de l'information et des centres

de données.

Une liste de toutes les parties de la série ISO/IEC 30134 peut être consultée sur le site web de l'ISO.

Il convient que l’utilisateur adresse tout retour d’information ou toute question concernant le présent

document à l’organisme national de normalisation de son pays. Une liste exhaustive desdits organismes

se trouve à l’adresse www .iso .org/ fr/ members .html.
iv © ISO/IEC 2021 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(F)
Introduction

L'économie mondiale repose aujourd'hui sur les technologies de l'information et de la communication,

en association avec la génération, la transmission, la diffusion, le calcul et le stockage de données

numériques. Tous les marchés connaissent une croissance exponentielle de ces données dans les

secteurs sociaux, éducatifs et commerciaux, et tandis que l'infrastructure Internet achemine le trafic, il

existe une grande variété de centres de données au niveau de nœuds et de hubs situés aussi bien dans

des entreprises privées que dans des installations partagées/colocalisées.

Le taux de croissance de la génération de données historiques dépasse le taux de croissance de la

capacité du matériel des technologies de l'information et de la communication, et avec presque la moitié

de la population mondiale ayant accès à une connexion Internet (en 2014), cette croissance de données

ne peut que s'accélérer. De plus, du fait que de nombreux gouvernements ont des «projets numériques»

visant à fournir aux citoyens et aux entreprises un accès toujours plus rapide, l'augmentation même de la

vitesse et de la capacité du réseau ne fait qu'inciter à en faire une utilisation sans cesse plus importante

(paradoxe de Jevons). La génération de données et l'augmentation du traitement et du stockage des

données qui en résulte impactent directement l'augmentation de la consommation électrique.

Dans ce contexte, il est clair que la croissance des centres de données et de leur consommation d'énergie

représente une tendance inévitable; cette croissance va s'accompagner d'une plus grande demande de

consommation électrique, malgré les stratégies d'efficacité énergétique les plus strictes. Cet état de fait

rend essentiel le besoin d'indicateurs clés de performance (KPI) qui couvrent l'utilisation efficace des

ressources (comprenant entre autres l'énergie électrique) et la réduction des émissions de CO .

Au sein de la série de normes ISO/IEC 30134, le terme «efficacité d'utilisation des ressources» pour les

KPI est préféré à «rendement d'utilisation des ressources», qui se limite aux situations où les paramètres

d'entrée et de sortie utilisés pour définir le KPI ont les mêmes unités.

L'indicateur de réutilisation de l'énergie (ERF) donne une plus grande visibilité à l'exploitant du centre

de données du point de vue du rendement énergétique des centres de données qui réutilisent à leur

profit l'énergie qui provient du centre de données.

Pour déterminer l'efficacité de l'ensemble des ressources d'un centre de données, il est nécessaire

de disposer d'une suite globale d'indicateurs. Le présent document fait partie d'une série de normes

relatives à ces KPI. Elle a été élaborée en lien avec l'ISO/IEC 30134-1, laquelle définit les exigences

communes applicables à une suite globale de KPI pour déterminer l'efficacité des ressources des centres

de données. Ce document ne spécifie pas les limites ou objectifs des KPI. Sauf mention spécifique, il ne

décrit pas non plus ni n'implique aucune forme d'agrégation de ces KPI dans une combinaison d'autres

KPI pour déterminer la rentabilité des ressources des centres de données. Il présente les règles propres

à l'utilisation de l'indicateur ERF, ainsi que les développements théoriques et mathématiques à ce

sujet. Il conclut par plusieurs exemples de concepts de sites susceptibles d'avoir recours à la mesure de

l'indicateur ERF.
© ISO/IEC 2021 – Tous droits réservés v
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
PROJET FINAL DE NORME INTERNATIONALE ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(F)
Technologies de l'information — Indicateurs de
performance clés des centres de données —
Partie 6:
Indicateur de réutilisation de l'énergie (ERF)
1 Domaine d'application

Le présent document spécifie l'indicateur de réutilisation de l'énergie (ERF) en tant que KPI permettant

de quantifier la réutilisation de l'énergie consommée dans un centre de données. L'indicateur ERF est

défini comme étant le rapport de l'énergie réutilisée sur la somme de toutes les énergies consommées

dans un centre de données. L'indicateur ERF permet de rendre compte d'un processus de réutilisation,

qui se déroule hors du centre de données.
2 Références normatives

Les documents suivants sont cités dans le texte de sorte qu’ils constituent, pour tout ou partie de leur

contenu, des exigences du présent document. Pour les références datées, seule l'édition citée s'applique.

Pour les références non datées, la dernière édition du document de référence s'applique (y compris les

éventuels amendements).

ISO/IEC 30134-1:2015, Technologies de l’information — Centres de données — Indicateurs de performance

clés — Partie 1: Aperçu et exigences générales

ISO 8601-1:2019, Date et heure — Représentations pour l'échange d'information — Partie 1: Règles de base

3 Termes, définitions, abréviations et symboles
3.1 Termes et définitions

Pour les besoins du présent document, les termes et définitions de l'ISO/IEC 30134-1 ainsi que les

suivants, s'appliquent.

L'ISO et l'IEC tiennent à jour des bases de données terminologiques destinées à être utilisées en

normalisation, consultables aux adresses suivantes:

— ISO Online browsing platform: disponible à l'adresse https:// www .iso .org/ obp

— IEC Electropedia: disponible à l'adresse https:// www .electropedia .org/ .
3.1.1
énergie réutilisée
réutilisation d'énergie

utilisation d'énergie consommée dans le centre de données à une autre fin, à l'extérieur des limites du

centre de données

Note 1 à l'article: L'énergie rejetée dans l'environnement ne constitue pas une énergie réutilisée.

© ISO/IEC 2021 – Tous droits réservés 1
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(F)
3.1.2
point de transfert

point situé à la limite du centre de données, où l'énergie est mesurée et transférée vers une autre partie

Note 1 à l'article: Il peut, par exemple, s'agir d'une société de distribution d'énergie, qui utilise l'énergie à

l'extérieur des limites du centre de données.
3.2 Abréviations

Pour les besoins du présent document, les abréviations de l'ISO/IEC 30134-1 ainsi que les suivantes

s'appliquent.
CA courant alternatif
COP coefficient de performance

CRAC unités de climatisation pour salle informatique [computer room air conditioner units]

CRAH unités de traitement de l'air pour salle informatique [computer room air handler units]

DX détente directe [direct expansion]
ERE rendement de réutilisation de l'énergie [Energy Reuse Efficiency]
ERF indicateur de réutilisation de l'énergie [Energy Reuse Factor]
IT système d'information
PDU unité de distribution électrique
PUE efficacité d'utilisation de la puissance [Power Usage Effectiveness]
r.m.s valeur efficace (eff.) [root mean square]
UPS système d'alimentation sans interruption [uninterruptible power system]
3.3 Symboles
Pour les besoins du présent document, les symboles suivants s'appliquent.

E énergie utilisée (annuellement) par l'ensemble du système de refroidissement, impu-

COOLING
table au centre de données y compris les locaux auxiliaires
E consommation énergétique totale (annuelle) d'un centre de données
E énergie excédentaire (annuelle) d'un centre de données
EXCESS
E consommation énergétique (annuelle) des équipements informatiques

E énergie utilisée (annuellement) pour éclairer le centre de données et les locaux auxiliaires

LIGHTING

E énergie perdue (annuellement) dans le système de distribution d'électricité par perte en

POWER

ligne et du fait des autres inefficacités d'infrastructure (par exemple, ASI/UPS ou PDU)

E énergie provenant du centre de données (annuellement) et utilisée à l'extérieur de

Reuse

celui-ci, qui remplace tout ou partie de l'énergie nécessaire (annuellement) à l'extérieur

du centre de données
2 © ISO/IEC 2021 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(F)
4 Zone applicable du centre de données

Pour la détermination de l'indicateur ERF, le centre de données considéré doit être vu comme un

système délimité par des interfaces au travers desquelles l'énergie s'écoule (voir Figure 1). Le calcul de

l'indicateur ERF tient compte de l'énergie qui traverse ces limites. Les zones ainsi délimitées sont les

mêmes que celles qui sont utilisées dans les calculs du PUE (comme indiqué dans l'ISO/IEC 30134-2) et

des autres KPI de la série ISO/IEC 30134.

Comme le montre la Figure 1, la limite du centre de données est «dessinée» autour du centre de données

au point de transfert du fournisseur d'électricité. Il s'agit d'une délimitation fondamentale pour analyser

des énergies de différents types ou des bâtiments à usage mixte. Il est tout aussi important de s'assurer

que tous les types d'énergie sont comptabilisés dans l'indicateur ERF. Tous les vecteurs énergétiques

(tels que gazole, gaz naturel, etc.) et l'énergie générée par ailleurs (telle qu'électricité, eau réfrigérée,

etc.) qui alimentent le centre de données doivent être inclus dans le calcul.

En faisant l'hypothèse qu'il n'y a pas de stockage d'énergie, la conservation de l'énergie impose que

l'énergie qui entre dans le centre de données soit égale à l'énergie qui en sort. Dans le schéma simplifié

de la Figure 1, cela signifie que A + B = F. C'est là une simplification grossière, car il y a aussi des pertes

et de la chaleur générée aux points de refroidissement (À moins E), et dans l'ASI/UPS et l'unité de

distribution électrique (PDU) (B moins D), or cette déperdition de chaleur doit elle aussi quitter les

limites du centre de données. Dès lors qu'une limite a été définie pour un centre de données, elle peut

être utilisée pour comprendre correctement le concept de l'ERF.
Légende
énergie électrique
énergie thermique
autres énergies
énergie réutilisable
Figure 1 — Schéma simpliste des composants et limites d'un centre de données

Il est fondamental d'inclure tous les vecteurs énergétiques au point de transfert avec le fournisseur

d'énergie. Il est aussi fondamental d'inclure l'ensemble de la consommation énergétique du centre de

données dans les calculs, c'est-à-dire, entre autres, les groupes électrogènes, l'éclairage intérieur et

© ISO/IEC 2021 – Tous droits réservés 3
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(F)

extérieur, les systèmes de détection d'incendie et les extincteurs, les bureaux associés et armoires

réservés à l'usage du personnel du centre de données, les zones de réception du matériel, les zones de

stockage, etc. Par souci de clarté, les schémas ne montrent que les gros composants afin d'illustrer le

concept d'indicateur ERF.

L'indicateur ERF prend en compte uniquement l'énergie réutilisée à l'extérieur des limites d'un centre de

données. L'énergie réutilisée à l'intérieur des limites du centre de données doit être exclue du comptage

servant à déterminer l'indicateur ERF, dans la mesure où elle est déjà comptée pour réduire le PUE et

où le fait de l'inclure dans l'indicateur ERF entraînerait un double comptage. Ce cas est montré dans les

exemples donnés à l'Annexe A.

NOTE La conversion de la «réutilisation» interne (double utilisation/multiple utilisation) en énergie

électrique dans le cadre du calcul du PUE conduit à un double comptage et ne doit donc pas être incluse dans le

PUE.

Dans la Figure 1, toute portion de (F) qui est réutilisée à l'extérieur des limites du centre de données

(comme dans le cas d'un bâtiment à usage mixte ou d'un bâtiment différent, mais qui n'est pas rejetée

dans l'atmosphère) est considérée comme de l'énergie réutilisée pour la détermination de l'indicateur

ERF.

Pour déterminer l'indicateur ERF, l'exploitant devra identifier et comptabiliser tous les flux d'énergie

qui traversent les limites du centre de données en entrée et tous les flux d'énergie qui en sortent et dont

l'utilisation présente un intérêt.

L'énergie qui entre est généralement de l'électricité, mais elle peut aussi bien être du gaz naturel, du

gazole, de l'eau réfrigérée ou de l'air conditionné venant d'ailleurs.

L'énergie qui quitte les limites du centre de données prend le plus souvent la forme d'eau chaude ou d'un

débit d'air chaud. C'est cela que le présent document considère comme de l'énergie susceptible d'être

réutilisée. Toutefois, n'importe quelle forme d'énergie réutilisée à l'extérieur des limites du centre de

données devra être prise en compte.

Les processus qui tirent parti de l'énergie réutilisée pour d'autres utilisations sont à l'extérieur des

limites du centre de données, et les avantages de cette énergie réutilisée de même que l'efficacité du

processus de réutilisation ne sont pas pris en compte dans l'indicateur ERF.

Bien que les technologies de réutilisation soient importantes pour l'utilisation énergétique globale d'un

centre de données, elles sont trop complexes pour que l'on tente de les définir ou de les mesurer à l'aide

de l'indicateur ERF.

NOTE L'exemple le plus simple est celui d'un refroidisseur alimenté par les déperditions de chaleur d'un

centre de données. L'énergie réutilisée à prendre en compte pour l'ERF est la chaleur perdue qui entre dans le

refroidisseur et non l'énergie de refroidissement fournie par le refroidisseur à un autre espace à l'extérieur des

locaux du centre de données.

Une façon simple d'évaluer une technologie spécifique employée dans un centre de données pour

savoir s'il convient de prendre en compte sa réutilisation de l'énergie dans la détermination de l'ERF

consiste à déterminer si le PUE du centre de données serait différent avec ou sans cette technologie.

Si la technologie a pour effet d'abaisser la valeur du PUE, c'est qu'il n'y a pas lieu de considérer cette

réutilisation dans la détermination de l'ERF. Par exemple, si de l'air chaud provenant du centre de

données sert à chauffer le local des batteries de l'ASI/UPS en hiver, il en résultera un PUE plus faible.

Par conséquent, cette double/multiple utilisation de l'énergie ne doit pas être prise en compte dans le

calcul de l'ERF. La chaleur qui provient du centre de données, au moment de son transfert au local des

batteries, reste à l'intérieur des limites du centre de données. Elle est donc comptabilisée et contribue

à abaisser la valeur du PUE, en réduisant la demande d'électricité nécessaire au chauffage du local des

batteries. Elle n'a aucun effet sur l'ERF. Si elle avait servi à chauffer un local adjacent autre que le centre

de données (par exemple, une cafétéria attenante), la chaleur aurait alors traversé les limites du centre

de données et aurait été prise en compte pour l'ERF, mais pas pour le PUE. Des exemples d'utilisation de

l'indicateur ERF sont donnés à l'Annexe A.
4 © ISO/IEC 2021 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(F)
5 Détermination de l'ERF

L'ERF permet de déterminer le taux de réutilisation de l'énergie. La chaleur est l'exemple le plus

courant, lorsqu'une partie de la chaleur produite par le centre de données est avantageusement utilisée

à l'extérieur des limites du centre de données et n'est pas considérée comme de la chaleur perdue.

L'ERF peut prendre des valeurs comprises entre 0 et 1,0. Un ERF de 0,0 signifie qu'aucune énergie n'est

réutilisée, alors qu'une valeur de 1,0 signifie que toute l'énergie absorbée par le centre de données est

réutilisée. Les équipements situés à l'extérieur des limites du centre de données afin d'augmenter la

température fournie, comme les pompes à chaleur par exemple, ne doivent pas être pris en compte dans

les calculs.
L'ERF est défini comme suit:
Reuse
ERF=

rsque la seule source d'énergie provient du réseau public de distribution électrique, E est déterminée

par l'énergie mesurée au compteur électrique. L'ERF peut s'appliquer à des bâtiments à usage mixte

lorsqu'il est possible de mesurer la différence entre l'énergie utilisée pour le centre de données et celle

qui sert à d'autres fonctions.

E comprend E , plus toute l'énergie consommée pour alimenter les infrastructures suivantes:

DC IT

a) la fourniture de l'alimentation électrique — y compris les systèmes ASI/UPS, les appareillages de

distribution, les groupes électrogènes, les PDU, les batteries et les pertes de distribution externes

aux équipements informatiques;

b) le système de refroidissement — y compris refroidisseurs, tours de refroidissement, pompes,

CRAH, CRAC et unités DX;

c) d'autres infrastructures — y compris l'éclairage du centre de données, l'ascenseur, le système de

sécurité et le système d'extinction des incendies;

d) toute l'infrastructure nécessaire pour transférer ou pour amplifier le flux de chaleur réutilisée au

point de transfert aux limites du centre de données.

E est l'énergie consommée (annuellement) par les équipements informatiques et utilisée pour saisir,

gérer, traiter, stocker ou transmettre les données au sein de l'espace informatique, ce qui comprend

entre autres:

1) les équipements informatiques (par exemple les équipements de calcul, de stockage et de réseau);

2) les équipements supplémentaires (par exemple les commutateurs clavier/vidéo/souris, les

moniteurs et les stations de travail/ordinateurs portables servant à surveiller, gérer et/ou contrôler

le centre de données).
6 Mesure de E et de E
Reuse DC

La mesure de E doit être réalisée aux limites du centre de données au point de transfert, là où

l'exploitant du centre de données mesure l'électricité achetée au fournisseur d'énergie. Si l'énergie est

produite à l'intérieur des limites physiques du centre de données, le point de mesure doit être sur la

limite logique.

La mesure de E doit être réalisée à la limite logique du centre de données au point de transfert,

Reuse

là où l'énergie livrée est transférée pour être utilisée par le tiers. Dans la plupart des cas, l'énergie

est transférée sous forme d'énergie thermique, mesurée par une augmentation de température et de

débit par rapport à l'approvisionnement en entrée (voir l'Annexe A à titre de référence). Les mesures

doivent être converties en unités équivalentes utilisées pour E , c'est-à-dire en kWh. La mesure et la

conversion doivent être effectuées au point de transfert des limites du centre de données.

© ISO/IEC 2021 – Tous droits réservés 5
---------------------- Page: 10 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2021(F)
La mesure de E doit être effectuée en utilisant:
a) des wattmètres ayant la capacité d'indiquer l'énergie utilisée, ou

b) des compteurs de kilowatts-heures (kWh) qui donnent l'énergie «vraie» (valeur efficace réelle), par

la mesure simultanée de la tension, du courant et de l'indicateur de puissance en fonction du temps.

La mesure de E est souvent effectuée à partir du débit liquide ou gazeux, lorsque l'énergie

Reuse

est transférée sous forme de chaleur, dans ce cas, la mesure doit être effectuée avec des compteurs

permettant de mesurer l'énergie apportée au flux provenant de la limite du centre de données.

NOTE Le produit de la tension et du courant, exprimé en kilovolts-ampères (kVA), n'est pas une mesure

acceptable. Bien que le produit des volts et des ampères donne mathématiquement des watts, l'énergie «vraie» est

déterminée en intégrant une valeur des volts et des ampères corrigée par l'indicateur de puissance. La fréquence,

la variance de phase et la réaction de charge entraînent une différence de calcul entre énergie apparente et

énergie «vraie». L'erreur est intrinsèquement significative si l'alimentation électrique est en CA. Les mesures en

kilovolts-ampères (kVA) peuvent être utilisées pour d'autres fonctions du centre de données, mais le kVA est une

unité insuffisante pour ces mesures.

L'indicateur ERF sans aucun indice doit être déterminé sous forme de valeur annualisée.

7 Application de l'ERF

L'indicateur ERF peut être utilisé par les gestionnaires des centres de données pour surveiller et

indiquer l'énergie réutilisée par rapport à la consommation d'énergie du centre de données.

Ce KPI peut être utilisé indépendamment, mais pour obtenir une image plus globale de l'efficacité des

ressources du centre de données, il convient de considérer les autres KPI de la série ISO/IEC 30134.

8 Rédaction d'un rapport relatif à l'indicateur de réutilisation de l'énergie (ERF)

8.1 Exigences
8.1.1 Formulaire normalisé de communication des données de l'ERF

Pour qu'un ERF publié soit significatif, l'entité chargée de la publication doit fournir les informations

suivantes:
a) le centre de données (y compris les limites de la structu
...

PROJET
NORME ISO/IEC
FINAL
INTERNATIONALE FDIS
30134-6
ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 39
Technologies de l'information —
Secrétariat: ANSI
Indicateurs de performance clés des
Début de vote:
2020-12-18 centres de données —
Vote clos le:
Partie 6:
2021-02-12
Indicateur de réutilisation de
l'énergie (ERF)
Information technology — Data centres key performance
indicators —
Part 6: Energy Reuse Factor (ERF)
LES DESTINATAIRES DU PRÉSENT PROJET SONT
INVITÉS À PRÉSENTER, AVEC LEURS OBSER-
VATIONS, NOTIFICATION DES DROITS DE PRO-
PRIÉTÉ DONT ILS AURAIENT ÉVENTUELLEMENT
CONNAISSANCE ET À FOURNIR UNE DOCUMEN-
TATION EXPLICATIVE.
OUTRE LE FAIT D’ÊTRE EXAMINÉS POUR
ÉTABLIR S’ILS SONT ACCEPTABLES À DES FINS
INDUSTRIELLES, TECHNOLOGIQUES ET COM-
Numéro de référence
MERCIALES, AINSI QUE DU POINT DE VUE
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2020(F)
DES UTILISATEURS, LES PROJETS DE NORMES
INTERNATIONALES DOIVENT PARFOIS ÊTRE
CONSIDÉRÉS DU POINT DE VUE DE LEUR POSSI-
BILITÉ DE DEVENIR DES NORMES POUVANT
SERVIR DE RÉFÉRENCE DANS LA RÉGLEMENTA-
TION NATIONALE. ISO/IEC 2020
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2020(F)
DOCUMENT PROTÉGÉ PAR COPYRIGHT
© ISO/IEC 2020

Tous droits réservés. Sauf prescription différente ou nécessité dans le contexte de sa mise en œuvre, aucune partie de cette

publication ne peut être reproduite ni utilisée sous quelque forme que ce soit et par aucun procédé, électronique ou mécanique,

y compris la photocopie, ou la diffusion sur l’internet ou sur un intranet, sans autorisation écrite préalable. Une autorisation peut

être demandée à l’ISO à l’adresse ci-après ou au comité membre de l’ISO dans le pays du demandeur.

ISO copyright office
Case postale 401 • Ch. de Blandonnet 8
CH-1214 Vernier, Genève
Tél.: +41 22 749 01 11
E-mail: copyright@iso.org
Web: www.iso.org
Publié en Suisse
ii © ISO/IEC 2020 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2020(F)
Sommaire Page

Avant-propos ..............................................................................................................................................................................................................................iv

Introduction ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................v

1 Domaine d'application ................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

2 Références normatives ................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3 Termes, définitions, abréviations et symboles ..................................................................................................................... 1

3.1 Termes et définitions ......................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3.2 Abréviations .............................................................................................................................................................................................. 2

3.3 Symboles ...................................................................................................................................................................................................... 2

4 Zone applicable du centre de données .......................................................................................................................................... 2

5 Détermination de l'ERF ................................................................................................................................................................................. 4

6 Mesure de E et de E ............................................................................................................................................................ 5

Réutilisation DC

7 Application de l'ERF .......................................................................................................................................................................................... 6

8 Rédaction d'un rapport relatif à l'indicateur de réutilisation de l’énergie (ERF) ............................6

8.1 Exigences ..................................................................................................................................................................................................... 6

8.1.1 Concept normalisé de communication des données de l'ERF .................................................. 6

8.1.2 Données pour la publication de l'indicateur ERF ................................................................................ 6

8.2 Recommandations ............................................................................................................................................................................... 7

8.2.1 Données utiles pour suivre les évolutions ................................................................................................. 7

8.3 Dérivés de l'indicateur ERF, ERF intermédiaire ......................................................................................................... 8

Annexe A (informative) Exemples d'utilisation......................................................................................................................................... 9

Annexe B (informative) Facteurs de conversion énergétique .................................................................................................14

Bibliographie ...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................15

© ISO/IEC 2020 – Tous droits réservés iii
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2020(F)
Avant-propos

L'ISO (Organisation internationale de normalisation) et l'IEC (Commission électrotechnique

internationale) forment le système spécialisé de la normalisation mondiale. Les organismes

nationaux membres de l'ISO ou de l'IEC participent au développement de Normes internationales

par l'intermédiaire des comités techniques créés par l'organisation concernée afin de s'occuper des

domaines particuliers de l'activité technique. Les comités techniques de l'ISO et de l'IEC collaborent

dans des domaines d'intérêt commun. D'autres organisations internationales, gouvernementales et non

gouvernementales, en liaison avec l'ISO et l'IEC participent également aux travaux.

Les procédures utilisées pour élaborer le présent document et celles destinées à sa mise à jour sont

décrites dans les Directives ISO/IEC, Partie 1. Il convient, en particulier, de prendre note des différents

critères d'approbation requis pour les différents types de document. Le présent document a été rédigé

conformément aux règles de rédaction données dans les Directives ISO/IEC, Partie 2 (voir www .iso

.org/ directives).

L'attention est attirée sur le fait que certains des éléments du présent document peuvent faire l'objet

de droits de propriété intellectuelle ou de droits analogues. L'ISO et l'IEC ne sauraient être tenues pour

responsables de ne pas avoir identifié de tels droits de propriété et averti de leur existence. Les détails

concernant les références aux droits de propriété intellectuelle ou autres droits analogues identifiés

lors de l'élaboration du document sont indiqués dans l'Introduction et/ou dans la liste des déclarations

de brevets reçues par l'ISO (voir www .iso .org/ brevets) ou dans la liste des déclarations de brevets

reçues par l'IEC (voir patents.iec.ch).

Les appellations commerciales éventuellement mentionnées dans le présent document sont données

pour information, par souci de commodité, à l'intention des utilisateurs et ne sauraient constituer un

engagement.

Pour une explication de la nature volontaire des normes, la signification des termes et expressions

spécifiques de l'ISO liés à l'évaluation de la conformité, ou pour toute information au sujet de l'adhésion

de l'ISO aux principes de l'Organisation mondiale du commerce (OMC) concernant les obstacles

techniques au commerce (OTC), voir le lien suivant: www .iso .org/ iso/ fr/ avant -propos .html.

Le présent document a été élaboré par le comité technique mixte ISO/IEC JTC 1, Technologies de

l'information, sous-comité SC 39, Impact environnemental des Technologies de l'information et des centres

de données.

Une liste de toutes les parties de la série ISO/IEC 30134 peut être consultée sur le site web de l'ISO.

Il convient que l’utilisateur adresse tout retour d’information ou toute question concernant le présent

document à l’organisme national de normalisation de son pays. Une liste exhaustive desdits organismes

se trouve à l’adresse www .iso .org/ fr/ members .html.
iv © ISO/IEC 2020 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2020(F)
Introduction

L'économie mondiale repose aujourd'hui sur les technologies de l'information et de la communication,

en association avec la génération, la transmission, la diffusion, le calcul et le stockage de données

numériques. Tous les marchés connaissent une croissance exponentielle de ces données dans les

secteurs sociaux, éducatifs et commerciaux, et tandis que l'infrastructure Internet achemine le trafic, il

existe une grande variété de centres de données au niveau de nœuds et de hubs situés aussi bien dans

des entreprises privées que dans des installations partagées/colocalisées.

Le taux de croissance de la génération de données historiques dépasse le taux de croissance de la

capacité du matériel des technologies de l'information et de la communication, et avec presque la moitié

de la population mondiale ayant accès à une connexion Internet (en 2014), cette croissance de données

ne peut que s'accélérer. De plus, du fait que de nombreux gouvernements ont des «projets numériques»

visant à fournir aux citoyens et aux entreprises un accès toujours plus rapide, l'augmentation même de la

vitesse et de la capacité du réseau ne fait qu'inciter à en faire une utilisation sans cesse plus importante

(paradoxe de Jevons). La génération de données et l'augmentation du traitement et du stockage des

données qui en résulte impactent directement l'augmentation de la consommation électrique.

Dans ce contexte, il est clair que la croissance des centres de données et de leur consommation d'énergie

représente une tendance inévitable; cette croissance va s'accompagner d'une plus grande demande de

consommation électrique, malgré les stratégies d'efficacité énergétique les plus strictes. Cet état de fait

rend essentiel le besoin d'indicateurs clés de performance (KPI) qui couvrent l'utilisation efficace des

ressources (comprenant entre autres l'énergie électrique) et la réduction des émissions de CO .

Au sein de la série de normes ISO/IEC 30134, le terme «efficacité d'utilisation des ressources» pour les

KPI est préféré à «rendement d'utilisation des ressources», qui se limite aux situations où les paramètres

d'entrée et de sortie utilisés pour définir le KPI ont les mêmes unités.

L'indicateur de réutilisation de l'énergie (ERF) donne une plus grande visibilité à l'exploitant du centre

de données du point de vue du rendement énergétique des centres de données qui réutilisent à leur

profit l'énergie qui provient du centre de données.

Pour déterminer l'efficacité de l'ensemble des ressources d'un centre de données, il est nécessaire

de disposer d'une suite globale d'indicateurs. Le présent document fait partie d'une série de normes

relatives à ces KPI. Elle a été élaborée en lien avec l'ISO/IEC 30134-1, laquelle définit les exigences

communes applicables à une suite globale de KPI pour déterminer l'efficacité des ressources des centres

de données. Ce document ne spécifie pas les limites ou objectifs des KPI. Sauf mention spécifique, il ne

décrit pas non plus ni n'implique aucune forme d'agrégation de ces KPI dans une combinaison d'autres

KPI pour déterminer la rentabilité des ressources des centres de données. Il présente les règles propres

à l'utilisation de l'indicateur ERF, ainsi que les développements théoriques et mathématiques à ce

sujet. Il conclut par plusieurs exemples de concepts de sites susceptibles d'avoir recours à la mesure de

l'indicateur ERF.
© ISO/IEC 2020 – Tous droits réservés v
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
PROJET FINAL DE NORME INTERNATIONALE ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2020(F)
Technologies de l'information — Indicateurs de
performance clés des centres de données —
Partie 6:
Indicateur de réutilisation de l'énergie (ERF)
1 Domaine d'application

Le présent document spécifie l'indicateur de réutilisation de l'énergie (ERF) en tant que KPI permettant

de quantifier la réutilisation de l'énergie consommée dans un centre de données. L'indicateur ERF est

défini comme étant le rapport de l'énergie réutilisée sur la somme de toutes les énergies consommées

dans un centre de données. L'indicateur ERF permet de rendre compte d'un processus de réutilisation,

qui se déroule hors du centre de données.
2 Références normatives

Les documents suivants sont cités dans le texte de sorte qu’ils constituent, pour tout ou partie de leur

contenu, des exigences du présent document. Pour les références datées, seule l'édition citée s'applique.

Pour les références non datées, la dernière édition du document de référence s'applique (y compris les

éventuels amendements).

ISO/IEC 30134-1, Technologies de l'information — Centres de données — Indicateurs de performance

clés — Partie 1: Aperçu et exigences générales
3 Termes, définitions, abréviations et symboles
3.1 Termes et définitions

Pour les besoins du présent document, les termes et définitions de l'ISO/IEC 30134-1 ainsi que les

suivants, s'appliquent.

L'ISO et l'IEC tiennent à jour des bases de données terminologiques destinées à être utilisées en

normalisation, consultables aux adresses suivantes:

— ISO Online browsing platform: disponible à l'adresse https:// www .iso .org/ obp

— IEC Electropedia: disponible à l'adresse http:// www .electropedia .org/ .
3.1.1
énergie réutilisée
réutilisation d'énergie

utilisation d'énergie consommée dans le centre de données à une autre fin, à l'extérieur des limites du

centre de données

Note 1 à l'article: L'énergie rejetée dans l'environnement ne constitue pas une énergie réutilisée.

3.1.2
point de transfert

point situé à la limite du centre de données, où l'énergie est mesurée et transférée vers une autre partie

Note 1 à l'article: Il peut, par exemple, s'agir d'une société de distribution d'énergie, qui utilise l'énergie à

l'extérieur des limites du centre de données.
© ISO/IEC 2020 – Tous droits réservés 1
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2020(F)
3.2 Abréviations

Pour les besoins du présent document, les abréviations de l'ISO/IEC 30134-1 ainsi que les suivantes

s'appliquent.
CA courant alternatif
COP coefficient de performance

CRAC unités de climatisation pour salle informatique [computer room air conditioner units]

CRAH unités de traitement de l'air pour salle informatique [computer room air handler units]

DX détente directe [direct expansion]
ERE rendement de réutilisation de l'énergie [Energy Reuse Efficiency]
ERF indicateur de réutilisation de l'énergie [Energy Reuse Factor]
IT système d'information
PDU unité de distribution électrique
PUE efficacité d'utilisation de la puissance [Power Usage Effectiveness]
r.m.s valeur efficace (eff.) [root mean square]
UPS système d'alimentation sans interruption [uninterruptible power system]
3.3 Symboles
Pour les besoins du présent document, les symboles suivants s'appliquent.

E énergie utilisée (annuellement) par l'ensemble du système de refroidissement, impu-

REFROIDISSEMENT
table au centre de données y compris les locaux auxiliaires
E consommation énergétique totale (annuelle) d'un centre de données
E énergie excédentaire (annuelle) d'un centre de données
EXCÉDENTAIRE
E consommation énergétique (annuelle) des équipements informatiques

E énergie utilisée (annuellement) pour éclairer le centre de données et les locaux auxiliaires

ÉCLAIRAGE

E énergie perdue (annuellement) dans le système de distribution d'électricité par perte en

ÉLECTRICITÉ

ligne et du fait des autres inefficacités d'infrastructure (par exemple, ASI/UPS ou PDU)

E énergie provenant du centre de données (annuellement) et utilisée à l'extérieur de

Réutilisation

celui-ci, qui remplace tout ou partie de l'énergie nécessaire (annuellement) à l'extérieur

du centre de données
4 Zone applicable du centre de données

En ce qui concerne l'indicateur ERF, le centre de données considéré doit être vu comme un système

délimité par des interfaces au travers desquelles l'énergie s'écoule (voir Figure 1). Le calcul de

l'indicateur ERF tient compte de l'énergie qui traverse ces limites. Les zones ainsi délimitées sont les

mêmes que celles qui sont utilisées dans les calculs du PUE et des autres KPI de la série ISO/IEC 30134.

Comme le montre la Figure 1, la limite du centre de données est «dessinée» autour du centre de données

au point de transfert du fournisseur d'électricité. Il s'agit d'une délimitation fondamentale pour analyser

2 © ISO/IEC 2020 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2020(F)

des énergies de différents types ou des bâtiments à usage mixte. Il est tout aussi important de s'assurer

que tous les types d'énergie sont comptabilisés dans l'indicateur ERF. Tous les vecteurs énergétiques

(tels que gazole, gaz naturel, etc.) et l'énergie générée par ailleurs (telle qu'électricité, eau réfrigérée,

etc.) qui alimentent le centre de données doivent être inclus dans le calcul.

En partant de l'hypothèse qu'il n'y a pas de stockage d'énergie, la conservation de l'énergie impose que

l'énergie qui entre dans le centre de données soit égale à l'énergie qui en sort. Dans le schéma simplifié

de la Figure 1, cela signifie que A + B = F. C'est là une simplification grossière, car il y a aussi des pertes

et de la chaleur générée aux points de refroidissement (À moins E), et dans l'ASI/UPS et le PDU (B moins

D), or cette déperdition de chaleur doit elle aussi quitter les limites du centre de données. Dès lors qu'une

limite a été définie pour un centre de données, elle peut être utilisée pour comprendre correctement le

concept de l'ERF.
Légende
énergie électrique
énergie thermique
autres énergies
énergie réutilisable
Figure 1 — Schéma simpliste des composants et limites d'un centre de données

Il est fondamental d'inclure tous les vecteurs énergétiques au point de transfert avec le fournisseur

d'énergie. Il est aussi fondamental d'inclure l'ensemble de la consommation énergétique du centre de

données dans les calculs, c'est-à-dire, entre autres, les groupes électrogènes, l'éclairage intérieur et

extérieur, les systèmes de détection d'incendie et les extincteurs, les bureaux associés et armoires

réservés à l'usage du personnel du centre de données, les zones de réception du matériel, les zones de

stockage, etc. Par souci de clarté, les schémas ne montrent que les gros composants afin d'illustrer le

concept d'indicateur ERF.

Seule l'énergie réutilisée à l'extérieur des limites d'un centre de données est considérée comme une

réutilisation d'énergie au sens de l'indicateur ERF. Toute énergie réutilisée à l'intérieur des limites du

centre de données doit être exclue du comptage servant à déterminer l'indicateur ERF, dans la mesure

où elle est déjà comptée pour réduire le PUE. Le fait de la prendre également en compte pour calculer

© ISO/IEC 2020 – Tous droits réservés 3
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2020(F)

l'ERF reviendrait en effet à un double comptage et n'est pas permis, puisque l'avantage que cette énergie

se traduit déjà par un PUE réduit. Ce cas est montré dans les exemples donnés à l'Annexe A.

NOTE Le PUE cité dans ce paragraphe est celui qui est spécifié dans l'ISO/IEC 30134-2.

Dans la Figure 1, toute portion de (F) qui est réutilisée à l'extérieur des limites du centre de données

comme dans le cas d'un bâtiment à usage mixte ou d'un bâtiment différent, mais qui n'est pas rejetée

dans l'atmosphère, est considérée comme de l'énergie réutilisée pour la détermination de l'indicateur

ERF. Cependant, l'évaluation des avantages de cette énergie réutilisée et son efficacité ne relèvent pas

du domaine d'application de l'ERF. Bien que les technologies de réutilisation soient importantes pour

l'utilisation énergétique globale d'un centre de données, elles sont trop complexes pour que l'on tente de

les définir ou de les mesurer dans le cadre de ce que l'indicateur ERF a pour vocation d'exprimer, à savoir

principalement l'utilisation de l'énergie et les rendements énergétiques du centre de données lui-même.

Pour déterminer l'indicateur ERF, l'exploitant doit identifier et comptabiliser tous les flux d'énergie qui

traversent les limites du centre de données en entrée et tous les flux d'énergie qui en sortent et dont

l'utilisation présente un intérêt. L'énergie qui entre est généralement de l'électricité, mais il peut aussi

bien s'agir de gaz naturel, de gazole, d'eau réfrigérée ou d'air conditionné venant d'ailleurs. L'énergie qui

quitte les limites du centre de données prend le plus souvent la forme d'eau chaude ou d'un débit d'air

chaud. C'est cela que le présent document considère comme de l'énergie susceptible d'être réutilisée.

Toutefois, n'importe quelle forme d'énergie réutilisée à l'extérieur des limites du centre de données

(telle que de l'eau chaude, un débit d'air chaud, etc.) doit être prise en compte. Quelle que soit la forme

de l'énergie, les mathématiques et la méthode conviennent. L'Annexe B fournit les sources et méthodes

des facteurs de conversion, y compris dans les cas où il n'existe ni normes ni accords régionaux. Les

processus qui tirent parti de l'énergie réutilisée pour d'autres utilisations sont à l'extérieur des limites

du centre de données. L'exemple le plus simple est celui d'un refroidisseur alimenté par les déperditions

de chaleur d'un centre de données. L'énergie réutilisée à prendre en compte pour l'ERF est la chaleur

perdue qui entre dans le refroidisseur et non l'énergie de refroidissement fournie par le refroidisseur à

un autre espace à l'extérieur des locaux du centre de données. De nouveau, ce processus est extérieur

aux limites du centre de données et ne fait pas partie de l'infrastructure de centre de données requise.

Une façon simple d'évaluer une technologie spécifique utilisée dans un centre de données pour

savoir s'il convient de prendre en compte sa réutilisation de l'énergie dans la détermination de l'ERF

consiste à déterminer si le PUE du centre de données serait différent avec ou sans cette technologie.

Si la technologie a pour effet d'abaisser la valeur du PUE, c'est qu'il n'y a pas lieu de considérer cette

réutilisation dans la détermination de l'ERF. Par exemple, si de l'air chaud provenant du centre de

données sert à chauffer le local des batteries de l'ASI/UPS en hiver, il en résultera un PUE plus faible.

Par conséquent, cette double/multiple utilisation de l'énergie ne doit pas être prise en compte dans le

calcul de l'ERF. La chaleur qui provient du centre de données, au moment de son transfert au local des

batteries, reste à l'intérieur des limites du centre de données. Elle est donc comptabilisée et contribue

à abaisser la valeur du PUE, en réduisant la demande d'électricité nécessaire au chauffage du local des

batteries. Elle n'a aucun effet sur l'ERF. Si elle avait servi à chauffer un local adjacent autre que le centre

de données (par exemple, une cafétéria attenante), la chaleur aurait alors traversé les limites du centre

de données et aurait été prise en compte pour l'ERF, mais pas pour le PUE. Des exemples d'utilisation de

l'indicateur ERF sont donnés à l'Annexe A.
5 Détermination de l'ERF

L'ERF permet de déterminer le taux de réutilisation de l'énergie. La chaleur est l'exemple le plus

courant, lorsqu'une partie de la chaleur produite par le centre de données est avantageusement utilisée

à l'extérieur des limites du centre de données et n'est pas considérée comme de la chaleur perdue.

L'ERF peut prendre des valeurs comprises entre 0 et 1,0. Un ERF de 0,0 signifie qu'aucune énergie n'est

réutilisée, alors qu'une valeur de 1,0 signifie que toute l'énergie absorbée par le centre de données est

réutilisée. Les équipements situés à l'extérieur des limites du centre de données afin d'augmenter la

température fournie, comme les pompes à chaleur par exemple, ne doivent pas être pris en compte dans

les calculs.
4 © ISO/IEC 2020 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2020(F)
L'ERF est défini comme suit:
Réutilisation
ERF=

Lorsque la seule source d'énergie provient du réseau public de distribution électrique, E est

déterminée par l'énergie mesurée au compteur électrique. L'ERF peut s'appliquer à des bâtiments

à usage mixte lorsqu'il est possible de mesurer la différence entre l'énergie utilisée pour le centre de

données et celle qui sert à d'autres fonctions.

E comprend E , plus toute l'énergie consommée pour alimenter les infrastructures suivantes:

DC IT

a) la fourniture de l'alimentation électrique — y compris les systèmes ASI/UPS, les appareillages de

distribution, les groupes électrogènes, les PDU, les batteries et les pertes de distribution externes

aux équipements informatiques;

b) le système de refroidissement — y compris refroidisseurs, tours de refroidissement, pompes,

CRAH, CRAC et unités DX;

c) d'autres infrastructures — y compris l'éclairage du centre de données, l'ascenseur, le système de

sécurité et le système d'extinction des incendies;

d) toute l'infrastructure nécessaire pour transférer ou pour amplifier le flux de chaleur réutilisée au

point de transfert aux limites du centre de données.

E est l'énergie consommée (annuellement) par les équipements informatiques et utilisée pour saisir,

gérer, traiter, stocker ou transmettre les données au sein de l'espace informatique, ce qui comprend

entre autres:

1) les équipements informatiques (par exemple les équipements de calcul, de stockage et de réseau);

2) les équipements supplémentaires (par exemple les commutateurs clavier/vidéo/souris, les

moniteurs et les stations de travail/ordinateurs portables servant à surveiller, gérer et/ou contrôler

le centre de données).
6 Mesure de E et de E
Réutilisation DC

La mesure de E doit être réalisée aux limites du centre de données au point de transfert, là où

l'exploitant du centre de données mesure l'électricité achetée au fournisseur d'énergie. Si l'énergie est

produite à l'intérieur des limites physiques du centre de données, le point de mesure doit être sur la

limite logique.

La mesure de E doit être réalisée à la limite logique du centre de données au point de transfert,

Réutilisation

là où l'énergie livrée est transférée pour être utilisée par le tiers. Dans la plupart des cas, l'énergie

est transférée sous forme d'énergie thermique, mesurée par une augmentation de température et de

débit par rapport à l'approvisionnement en entrée (voir l'Annexe A à titre de référence). Les mesures

doivent être converties en unités équivalentes utilisées pour E , c'est-à-dire en kWh. La mesure et la

conversion doivent être effectuées au point de transfert des limites du centre de données.

La mesure de E doit être effectuée en utilisant:
a) des wattmètres ayant la capacité d'indiquer l'énergie utilisée; ou

b) des compteurs de kilowatts-heures (kWh) qui donnent l'énergie «vraie» (valeur efficace réelle), par

la mesure simultanée de la tension, du courant et de l'indicateur de puissance en fonction du temps.

© ISO/IEC 2020 – Tous droits réservés 5
---------------------- Page: 10 ----------------------
ISO/IEC FDIS 30134-6:2020(F)

La mesure de E est souvent effectuée à partir du débit liquide ou gazeux, lorsque l'énergie

Réutilisation

est transférée sous forme de chaleur, dans ce cas, la mesure doit être effectuée avec des compteurs

permettant de mesurer l'énergie apportée au flux provenant de la limite du centre de données.

NOTE Le produit de la tension et du courant, exprimé en kilovolts-ampères (kVA), n'est pas une mesure

acceptable. Bien que le produit des volts et des ampères donne mathématiquement des watts, l'énergie «vraie» est

déterminée en intégrant une valeur des volts et des ampères corrigée par l'indicateur de puissance. La fréquence,

la variance de phase et la réaction de charge entraînent une différence de calcul entre énergie apparente et

énergie «vraie». L'erreur est intrinsèquement significative si l'alimentation électrique est en CA. Les mesures en

kilovolts-ampères (kVA) peuvent être utilisées pour d'autres fonctions du centre de données, mais le kVA est une

unité insuffisante pour ces mesures.

L'indicateur ERF sans aucun indice doit être déterminé sous forme de valeur annualisée.

7 Application de l'ERF

L'indicateur ERF peut être utilisé par les gestionnaires des centres de données pour surveiller et

indiquer l'énergie réutilisée par rapport à la consommation d'énergie du centre de données.

Ce KPI peut être utilisé indépendamment, mais pour obtenir une image plus globale de l'efficaci

...

Questions, Comments and Discussion

Ask us and Technical Secretary will try to provide an answer. You can facilitate discussion about the standard in here.