Respiratory protective devices -- Human factors

This document gives: — a description of the composition of the Earth's atmosphere; — a description of the physiology of human respiration; — a survey of the current biomedical literature on the effects of carbon dioxide and oxygen on human physiology; — examples of environmental circumstances where the partial pressure of oxygen or carbon dioxide can vary from that found at sea level. This document identifies oxygen and carbon dioxide concentration limit values and the length of time within which they would not be expected to impose physiological distress. To adequately illustrate the effects on human physiology, this document addresses both high altitude exposures where low partial pressures are encountered and underwater diving, which involves conditions with high partial pressures. The use of respirators and various work rates during which RPD can be worn are also included.

Appareils de protection respiratoire -- Facteurs humains

Le présent document présente: — une description de la composition de l'atmosphčre terrestre; — une description de la physiologie de la respiration humaine; — une étude de la littérature biomédicale actuellement disponible sur les effets du dioxyde de carbone et de l'oxygčne sur la physiologie humaine; — des exemples de circonstances environnementales dans lesquelles la pression partielle de l'oxygčne ou du dioxyde de carbone peut différer de celle observée au niveau de la mer. Le présent document identifie les valeurs limites de la concentration en oxygčne et en dioxyde de carbone et la durée pendant laquelle elles ne devraient pas causer de détresse physiologique. Pour illustrer de maničre adéquate les effets sur la physiologie humaine, le présent document traite ŕ la fois des expositions ŕ haute altitude, avec de faibles pressions partielles, et de la plongée sous-marine, qui implique des conditions de pressions partielles élevées. Le présent document aborde également l'utilisation d'appareils de protection respiratoire et les diverses intensités d'activité pouvant donner lieu au port d'un APR.

General Information

Status
Published
Publication Date
14-Mar-2019
Current Stage
9092 - International Standard to be revised
Start Date
03-Sep-2020
Ref Project

RELATIONS

Buy Standard

Technical specification
ISO/TS 16976-3:2019 - Respiratory protective devices -- Human factors
English language
24 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview
Technical specification
ISO/TS 16976-3:2019 - Appareils de protection respiratoire -- Facteurs humains
French language
25 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview

Standards Content (sample)

TECHNICAL ISO/TS
SPECIFICATION 16976-3
Second edition
2019-03
Respiratory protective devices —
Human factors —
Part 3:
Physiological responses and
limitations of oxygen and limitations
of carbon dioxide in the breathing
environment
Appareils de protection respiratoire — Facteurs humains —
Partie 3: Réponses physiologiques et limitations en oxygène et en gaz
carbonique dans l'environnement respiratoire
Reference number
ISO/TS 16976-3:2019(E)
ISO 2019
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-3:2019(E)
COPYRIGHT PROTECTED DOCUMENT
© ISO 2019

All rights reserved. Unless otherwise specified, or required in the context of its implementation, no part of this publication may

be reproduced or utilized otherwise in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, or posting

on the internet or an intranet, without prior written permission. Permission can be requested from either ISO at the address

below or ISO’s member body in the country of the requester.
ISO copyright office
CP 401 • Ch. de Blandonnet 8
CH-1214 Vernier, Geneva
Phone: +41 22 749 01 11
Fax: +41 22 749 09 47
Email: copyright@iso.org
Website: www.iso.org
Published in Switzerland
ii © ISO 2019 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-3:2019(E)
Contents Page

Foreword ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................iv

Introduction ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................v

1 Scope ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 1

2 Normative references ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3 Terms and definitions ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

4 Symbols and abbreviated terms ........................................................................................................................................................... 5

5 Oxygen and carbon dioxide in the breathing environment: Physiological responses

and limitations ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 5

5.1 General ........................................................................................................................................................................................................... 5

5.2 Oxygen and carbon dioxide gas exchange in the human lung ........................................................................ 6

5.3 Oxygen and carbon dioxide transport in the blood ................................................................................................. 6

5.4 Oxygen and carbon dioxide and the control of respiration .............................................................................. 8

5.5 Hyperoxia: physiological effects .............................................................................................................................................. 9

5.6 Hypoxia: physiological effects .................................................................................................................................................10

5.7 Hypercarbia: Physiological effects ......................................................................................................................................13

5.8 Relevance to the use of respiratory protective devices (RPD) ....................................................................16

5.9 Interpretation of results ..............................................................................................................................................................20

5.10 Significance of results ....................................................................................................................................................................21

Bibliography .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................22

© ISO 2019 – All rights reserved iii
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-3:2019(E)
Foreword

ISO (the International Organization for Standardization) is a worldwide federation of national standards

bodies (ISO member bodies). The work of preparing International Standards is normally carried out

through ISO technical committees. Each member body interested in a subject for which a technical

committee has been established has the right to be represented on that committee. International

organizations, governmental and non-governmental, in liaison with ISO, also take part in the work.

ISO collaborates closely with the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) on all matters of

electrotechnical standardization.

The procedures used to develop this document and those intended for its further maintenance are

described in the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 1. In particular, the different approval criteria needed for the

different types of ISO documents should be noted. This document was drafted in accordance with the

editorial rules of the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 2 (see www. iso. org/directives).

Attention is drawn to the possibility that some of the elements of this document may be the subject of

patent rights. ISO shall not be held responsible for identifying any or all such patent rights. Details of

any patent rights identified during the development of the document will be in the Introduction and/or

on the ISO list of patent declarations received (see www. iso.o rg/patents).

Any trade name used in this document is information given for the convenience of users and does not

constitute an endorsement.

For an explanation of the voluntary nature of standards, the meaning of ISO specific terms and

expressions related to conformity assessment, as well as information about ISO's adherence to the

World Trade Organization (WTO) principles in the Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT) see www. iso

.org/iso/foreword. html.

This document was prepared by Technical Committee ISO/TC 94, Personal safety — Personal protective

equipment, Subcommittee SC 15, Respiratory protective devices.

This second edition cancels and replaces the first edition (ISO/TS 16976-3:2011), which has been

technically revised. The main changes compared to the previous edition are as follows:

— adding a new Table 3 to give limits for CO when breathing against imposed breathing resistance;

— explanation of the new limits for CO derived from a study.
A list of all parts in the ISO/TS 16976 series can be found on the ISO website.

Any feedback or questions on this document should be directed to the user’s national standards body. A

complete listing of these bodies can be found at www. iso. org/members. html.
iv © ISO 2019 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-3:2019(E)
Introduction

Due to the nature of their occupations, millions of workers worldwide should wear respiratory

protective devices (RPD). RPD vary considerably, from filtering devices, supplied breathable gas

devices, and underwater breathing apparatus (UBA), to escape respirators used in emergency situations

(self-contained self-rescuer or SCSR). Many of these devices protect against airborne contaminants

without supplying air or other breathing gas mixtures to the user. Therefore, the user might be

protected from particulates or other airborne toxins but still be exposed to an ambient gas mixture

that differs significantly from that which is normally found at sea level. RPD that supply breathing air

to the user, such as an SCBA or UBA, can malfunction or not adequately remove carbon dioxide from the

breathing space, thus exposing the user to an altered breathing gas environment. In special cases, RPD

intentionally expose the wearer to breathing gas mixtures that significantly differ from the normal

atmospheric gas mixture of approximately 79 % nitrogen and 21 % oxygen with additional trace gases.

These special circumstances occur in aviation, commercial and military diving, and in clinical settings.

Breathing gas mixtures that differ from normal atmospheric can have significant effects on most

physiological systems. Many of the physiological responses to exposure to high or low levels of either

oxygen or carbon dioxide can have a profound effect on the ability to work safely, to escape from a

dangerous situation, and to make clear judgements about the environmental dangers. In addition,

alteration of the breathing gas environment can, if severe enough, be dangerous or even fatal. Therefore,

monitoring and controlling the breathing gas, and limiting user exposure to variations in the concentration

or partial pressure of oxygen and carbon dioxide, is crucial to the safety and health of the worker.

This document discusses the gas composition of the Earth's atmosphere; the basic physiology of

metabolism as the origin of carbon dioxide in the body, respiratory physiology and the transport of

oxygen to the cells and tissues of the body; and the subsequent transport of carbon dioxide from the

tissues to the lungs for removal from the body. Following the basic physiology of respiration, this

document addresses the physiological responses to altered breathing environments (hyperoxia,

hypoxia) and to the effects of excess carbon dioxide in the blood (hypercarbia). Examples are given

from the relevant biomedical literature.

Finally, it deals with the impact of altered partial pressures/concentrations of oxygen and carbon

dioxide on respirator use. The content of this Document is intended to serve as the basis for advancing

research and development of RPD with the aim of minimizing the changes in the breathing environment,

thus minimizing the physiological impact of RPD use on the wearer. If this can be accomplished, the

health and safety of all workers recommended by their occupation to wear RPD will be enhanced.

© ISO 2019 – All rights reserved v
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
TECHNICAL SPECIFICATION ISO/TS 16976-3:2019(E)
Respiratory protective devices — Human factors —
Part 3:
Physiological responses and limitations of oxygen and
limitations of carbon dioxide in the breathing environment
1 Scope
This document gives:
— a description of the composition of the Earth's atmosphere;
— a description of the physiology of human respiration;

— a survey of the current biomedical literature on the effects of carbon dioxide and oxygen on human

physiology;

— examples of environmental circumstances where the partial pressure of oxygen or carbon dioxide

can vary from that found at sea level.

This document identifies oxygen and carbon dioxide concentration limit values and the length of time

within which they would not be expected to impose physiological distress. To adequately illustrate

the effects on human physiology, this document addresses both high altitude exposures where low

partial pressures are encountered and underwater diving, which involves conditions with high partial

pressures. The use of respirators and various work rates during which RPD can be worn are also

included.
2 Normative references
There are no normative references in this document.
3 Terms and definitions
For the purposes of this document, the following terms and definitions apply.

ISO and IEC maintain terminological databases for use in standardization at the following addresses:

— ISO Online browsing platform: available at https: //www .iso .org/obp
— IEC Electropedia: available at http: //www .electropedia .org/
3.1
alveoli
s. alveolus

terminal air sacs of the lungs in which respiratory gas exchange occurs between the alveolar air and

the pulmonary capillary

Note 1 to entry: The alveoli are the anatomical and functional unit of the lungs.

© ISO 2019 – All rights reserved 1
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-3:2019(E)
3.2
ambient temperature pressure saturated
ATPS

standard condition for the expression of ventilation parameters related to expired air

Note 1 to entry: Actual ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure; saturated water pressure.

3.3
body temperature pressure saturated
BTPS
standard condition for the expression of ventilation parameters

Note 1 to entry: Body temperature (37 °C), atmospheric pressure 101,3 kPa (760 mmHg) and water vapour

pressure (6,27 kPa) in saturated air.
3.4
carbaminohaemoglobin
HbCO

haemoglobin that has bound carbon dioxide at the tissue site for transport to the lungs

3.5
dead space

conducting regions of the pulmonary airways that do not contain alveoli and, therefore,

where no gas exchange occurs

Note 1 to entry: These areas include the nose, mouth, trachea, large bronchia, and the lower branching airways.

This volume is typically 150 ml in a male of average size.
3.6
dead space

sum of all anatomical dead space as well as under-perfused (reduced blood flow) alveoli

which are not participating in gas exchange

Note 1 to entry: The volume of the physiological dead space can vary with the degree of ventilation. Thus, the

physiological dead space is the fraction of the tidal volume that does not participate in gas exchange in the lungs.

3.7
dyspnoea

sense of air hunger, difficult or laboured breathing, or a sense of breathlessness

3.8
end-tidal carbon dioxide
ET CO

volume fraction of carbon dioxide in the breath at the mouth at the end of exhalation

Note 1 to entry: End-tidal carbon dioxide corresponds closely to alveolar carbon dioxide.

3.9
haemoglobin

specific molecules contained within all red blood cells that bind oxygen or carbon dioxide under normal

physiological states and transport either oxygen or carbon dioxide to or from the tissues of the body

3.10
hypercarbia
hypercapnia
excess amount of carbon dioxide in the blood
2 © ISO 2019 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-3:2019(E)
3.11
hyperoxia

volume fraction or partial pressure of oxygen in the breathing environment greater than that which is

found in the Earth's atmosphere at sea level, which contributes to an excess of oxygen in the body

Note 1 to entry: This can occur when a person is under hyperbaric conditions (i.e. diving), subjected to breathing

gas mixtures with an elevated oxygen fraction, or during certain medical procedures

3.12
hypoxia

volume fraction or partial pressure of oxygen in the breathing environment below that which is found

in the Earth's atmosphere at sea level

Note 1 to entry: Anaemic hypoxia is due to a reduction of the oxygen carrying capacity of the blood as a result of

a decrease in the total haemoglobin or an alteration in the haemoglobin constituents.

3.13
hypocapnia

volume fraction or partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the breathing environment or in the body that

is lower than that which is found in the Earth's atmosphere at sea level

Note 1 to entry: This usually occurs under hyperventilation conditions (i.e. diving) or in medical settings that

contribute to a reduction of carbon dioxide in the body.
3.14
inotropic
affecting the force of muscle contraction

Note 1 to entry: A negative inotropic effect reduces and a positive inotropic effect increases the force of muscular

contraction (e.g. both skeletal and heart muscle).
3.15
medulla oblongata, pons
areas of the brain where the respiratory control centre is located
3.16
oxyhaemoglobin
HbO

haemoglobin that has bound oxygen from the lungs for transport to the body tissues

3.17
partial pressure

pressure exerted by each of the components of a gas mixture to form a total pressure

EXAMPLE Air is a mixture of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, inert gases (argon, neon), and water

vapour. The volume fraction of oxygen in air is about 20,9 %. At sea level, total atmospheric pressure is

101,3 kPa (760 mmHg). Water vapour pressure is 6,26 kPa (47 mmHg) (fully saturated in the lungs at a body

temperature of approximately 37 °C). To find partial pressure of oxygen, subtract vapour pressure from total

atmospheric pressure and then multiply the oxygen volume fraction by the dry atmospheric pressure. Thus,

101,3 − 6,3 = 95,1 kPa (760 mmHg − 47 mmHg = 713 mmHg); 0,21 × 95,1 kPa = 19,9 kPa (= 149 mmHg). If the

ambient pressure increases (as in diving), the partial pressure of each component gas increases. Thus, at 2 atm

absolute, the partial pressure of oxygen in dry gas is 101,3 × 2 = 202,6 kPa (760 mmHg × 2 = 1 520 mmHg);

0,21 × 202,6 = 42,6 kPa (0,21 × 1 520 mmHg = 319 mmHg) oxygen.

Note 1 to entry: Partial pressure is dependent on the volume fraction of the component gas.

Note 2 to entry: The partial pressure of a gas can increase or decrease while its relative volume fraction remains

the same. Partial pressure drives the diffusion of gas across cell membranes and is, therefore, more important

than relative volume fraction of the gas.
© ISO 2019 – All rights reserved 3
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-3:2019(E)
3.18
respiratory quotient
ratio of volume of carbon dioxide exhaled to the volume of oxygen consumed
Note 1 to entry: R will be calculated as follows:
VCO
R =
where
VCO is the volume of carbon dioxide exhaled;
VO is the volume of oxygen consumed.

Note 2 to entry: R gives an estimate of the content of substrate utilization during steady-state respiration and

metabolism. At rest, R = 0,82 reflecting a substrate utilization of a combination of carbohydrates and fats as the

primary energy source.
3.19
respiratory system

tubular and cavernous organs (mouth, trachea, bronchi, lungs, alveoli, etc.) and structures which bring

about pulmonary ventilation and gas exchange between ambient air and blood
3.20
standard temperature pressure dry
STPD
standard conditions for expression of oxygen consumption

Note 1 to entry: Standard temperature (0 °C) and pressure (101,3 kPa, 760 mmHg), dry air (0 % relative

humidity).
3.21
ventilation (general)
process of exchange of air between the lungs and the ambient environment
4 © ISO 2019 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-3:2019(E)
4 Symbols and abbreviated terms
APR air purifying respirator
BSA body surface area, expressed in m
PAPR powered air purifying respirator
SAR supplied air respirator
SCBA self-contained breathing apparatus
UBA underwater breathing apparatus
pCO partial pressure of carbon dioxide
p CO alveolar partial pressure of carbon dioxide
A 2
p CO arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide
a 2
p CO venous partial pressure of carbon dioxide
v 2
pO partial pressure of oxygen
p O alveolar partial pressure of oxygen
A 2
p O arterial partial pressure of oxygen
a 2
p O partial pressure of inspired oxygen
i 2
p O venous partial pressure of oxygen
v 2
V minute ventilation (expired)
total volume expired from the lungs in 1 min, in l/min (BTPS)
V minute ventilation (inspired)
total volume of air inspired into the lungs in 1 min, in l/min (BTPS)
VO oxygen consumption
volume of oxygen consumed by the human tissues, in l/min, derived from
the difference between the minute volume of inhaled oxygen and the minute
volume of exhaled oxygen.
VCO carbon dioxide elimination rate
volume of carbon dioxide produced per minute, derived from the product of
minute ventilation and the difference between the fractional concentrations
of exhaled and inhaled carbon dioxide
5 Oxygen and carbon dioxide in the breathing environment: Physiological
responses and limitations
5.1 General

The Earth's atmosphere is composed primarily of nitrogen and oxygen along with some trace gases.

Atmospheric carbon dioxide occurs in very low concentrations (approximately 0,03 %). Humans

require oxygen as a primary element in the production of energy during aerobic cellular metabolism.

Low atmospheric oxygen concentrations or partial pressures (such as occur at high altitude) can

© ISO 2019 – All rights reserved 5
---------------------- Page: 10 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-3:2019(E)

limit production of metabolic energy, leading to a compromise in physiological function. On the other

hand, low concentrations of carbon dioxide in the breathing atmosphere do not appear to have any

physiological consequence. Carbon dioxide is produced as a by-product of cellular metabolism and it is

this source of carbon dioxide, not the normal atmospheric concentration, which carries a physiological

consequence. However, increased environmental levels of carbon dioxide, as in the breathing space of

respirators or in confined areas, can also have a profound effect on the respiratory system.

High concentrations of either oxygen or carbon dioxide can have dramatic physiological consequences.

Hyperoxia, especially under ambient pressures greater than one atmosphere (atm), such as occur in

diving, can be toxic and even fatal to humans. High concentrations of carbon dioxide can also have a

profound effect on respiration and metabolism. This overview will address several issues:

— oxygen and carbon dioxide in normal human physiology;
— effects of hypoxia and hyperoxia on physiology;
— effects of hypercarbia on physiology;
— relevance to respiratory protective devices.
5.2 Oxygen and carbon dioxide gas exchange in the human lung

Normal minute ventilation takes place as a result of neural activity in the respiratory centres in areas

of the brainstem known as the medulla oblongata and the pons. The movement of air in and out of the

lungs facilitates the gas exchange necessary for normal metabolic function.

Gas exchange does not occur in all regions of the pulmonary system. Anatomical dead space (regions

where gas diffusion to the blood does not occur) comprises about 150 ml volume within the pulmonary

system. However, the physiological dead space can add a much larger volume depending on activity

level. Inhaled gas passes through the regions of dead space to the pulmonary alveoli. Gas exchange

occurs in the alveoli, which are in contact with blood capillaries.

The exchange of oxygen into the blood stream and carbon dioxide out of the blood stream into the

alveoli is driven by simple diffusion down a partial pressure gradient. The partial pressure of oxygen

in the alveoli (p O ) is approximately 13,3 kPa (100 mmHg) whereas the partial pressure of oxygen

A 2

in the venous blood (p O ) is approximately 5,3 kPa (40 mmHg). Therefore, oxygen will move from

v 2

the area of higher concentration of oxygen in the alveoli to the area of lower concentration of oxygen

in the venous blood. Oxygen will also be transported into the red blood cells along a similar partial

pressure gradient to be bound to haemoglobin. Conversely, the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the

venous blood (p CO ) is roughly 6,1 kPa (46 mmHg) and is only approximately 5,3 kPa (40 mmHg) in

v 2

the alveoli. Therefore, carbon dioxide will move from the venous blood to the alveoli to be exhaled to

the atmosphere.

After this gas exchange has taken place, arterial blood contains a p O of approximately 12,6 kPa

a 2

(95 mmHg) and a p CO of approximately 5,3 kPa (40 mmHg). The arterial blood arriving at the

a 2

cells will release oxygen and take up carbon dioxide based on a similar process of moving along a

partial pressure gradient. After oxygen delivery to the cells has taken place, the blood has a pO of

approximately 5,3 kPa (40 mmHg) and a pCO of approximately 6,1 kPa (46 mmHg). Upon return to the

lungs for another round of gas exchange, each gas again moves along its partial pressure gradient to

repeat the process. Proper oxygen delivery to the cells and carbon dioxide removal from the body will

occur as long as a match exists between ventilation of the lungs and blood perfusion driven by a healthy

circulatory system.
5.3 Oxygen and carbon dioxide transport in the blood

Oxygen has a very low solubility in the blood. Therefore, oxygen is transported to the vital organs,

working muscles, and brain by a special transport mechanism in the blood. When oxygen from the

atmosphere diffuses from the alveoli to the circulation, about 25 % of the oxygen present in the alveoli

is rapidly transported into the red blood cells and binds to haemoglobin to form oxyhaemoglobin.

Oxyhaemoglobin in the red blood cells is carried through the arterial circulation to the capillaries

6 © ISO 2019 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 11 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-3:2019(E)

where the oxygen diffuses from the red blood cells to the cells of the target tissues. The oxygen is then

utilized in the aerobic metabolic processes in the cell mitochondria.

Several factors affect the affinity of oxygen for haemoglobin. For any given ambient pO , an increase in

body temperature, blood lactic acid (↓ pH), increased p CO , or an increase in 2,3-diphosphoglycerate

a 2

(DPG, a product of anaerobic metabolism in red blood cells), can decrease the affinity of oxygen for

[4]

haemoglobin ). This phenomenon is known as the Bohr Shift (see also Reference [5]), see Figure 1.

Key
X oxygen partial pressure (Torr)
Y haemoglobin saturation (%)
1 decreased p (increased affinity)
2 increased p (decreased affinity)
T temperature
pCO partial pressure of carbon dioxide
2,3-DPG 2,3-diphosphoglycerate
pH measure of the acidity or basicity of a solution
NOTE 1 1 torr = 133 Pa.
NOTE 2 See Reference [4].

Figure 1 — Shift of the oxyhaemoglobin dissociation curve by pH, carbon dioxide, temperature,

and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG)

By contrast, carbon dioxide is about 20 to 25 times more soluble in blood than oxygen. Carbon

dioxide produced as a by-product of metabolically active tissues diffuses from the cells of the tissue

to the red blood cells in the circulation along a concentration gradient. Some of the carbon dioxide

© ISO 2019 – All rights reserved 7
---------------------- Page: 12 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-3:2019(E)

(approximately 5 % to 10 %) is carried to the lungs in solution in the blood plasma. A portion of the

carbon dioxide combines with water to form carbonic acid according to Formula (1):

CO +HOHCO (1)
22 23

This reaction occurs slowly in the plasma and most of the carbon dioxide remains in solution in the

plasma. However, a small amount of carbonic acid in the plasma dissociates to bicarbonate following

Formula (2):
HCOH +HCO (2)
23 3

Whereas the reaction in Formula (2) occurs in very small amounts in the plasma, it occurs to a very

large extent in red blood cells. Red blood cells contain the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA), which

catalyzes the reversible reaction between carbon dioxide and H O extremely rapidly (approximately

6 [3]
10 reactions per second) in the following manner Formula (3):
CO ++HOHCOH HCO (3)
22 23 3

Approximately 70 % of the carbon dioxide is transported to the lungs in the form of bicarbonate. In

addition, carbon dioxide combines with haemoglobin to form carbaminohaemoglobin. The affinity of

haemoglobin for carbon dioxide increases as oxygen dissociates from haemoglobin during delivery of

[5]

oxygen to the tissues (see also the Haldane effect ). Approximately 15 % of the carbon dioxide in the

blood is transported to the lungs in the form of carbaminohaemoglobin.
5.4 Oxygen and carbon dioxide and the control of respiration

Human life is strongly dependent on an adequate supply of oxygen to support the metabolic processes

that produce energy. As a result, the ability to sense changes in ambient pO has evolved. In addition,

although atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations are almost negligible, carbon dioxide is produced

as a product of metabolism and has a profound effect on the respiratory system. Thus, mechanisms for

sensing pCO in the blood have also evolved. Indeed, changes in pCO are more powerful stimulators

2 2

of respiration than changes in ambient pO . A detailed discussion of the physiological mechanisms

involved in sensing changes in oxygen and carbon dioxide in the atmosphere or the blood is beyond the

scope of this document. However, a brief overview of the process is given below.

Chemical sensors (chemoreceptors) are present in both the central nervous system (medulla oblongata

in the brain stem) and the peripheral nervous system integrated with the vascular system (i.e. carotid

bodies in the carotid artery in the neck and chemoreceptors in the aorta) that are capable of sensing

changes in p O p CO and pH in the arterial blood. When these areas sense changes in p O and p CO ,

a 2, a 2 a 2 a 2

neural signals are integrated into a respiratory response that usually results in a normalization of the

p O and/or p CO . Under conditions of hypoxia, the decreased p O is sensed primarily by peripheral

a 2 a 2 a 2

chemoreceptors in the carotid bodies and the aortic bodies. The respiratory response is an increase in

ventilation in order to increase the oxygen uptake to maintain metabolic energy p

...

SPÉCIFICATION ISO/TS
TECHNIQUE 16976-3
Deuxième édition
2019-03
Appareils de protection
respiratoire — Facteurs humains —
Partie 3:
Réponses physiologiques et
limitations en oxygène et en dioxyde
de carbone dans l’environnement
respiratoire
Respiratory protective devices — Human factors —
Part 3: Physiological responses and limitations of oxygen and
limitations of carbon dioxide in the breathing environment
Numéro de référence
ISO/TS 16976-3:2019(F)
ISO 2019
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-3:2019(F)
DOCUMENT PROTÉGÉ PAR COPYRIGHT
© ISO 2019

Tous droits réservés. Sauf prescription différente ou nécessité dans le contexte de sa mise en œuvre, aucune partie de cette

publication ne peut être reproduite ni utilisée sous quelque forme que ce soit et par aucun procédé, électronique ou mécanique,

y compris la photocopie, ou la diffusion sur l’internet ou sur un intranet, sans autorisation écrite préalable. Une autorisation peut

être demandée à l’ISO à l’adresse ci-après ou au comité membre de l’ISO dans le pays du demandeur.

ISO copyright office
Case postale 401 • Ch. de Blandonnet 8
CH-1214 Vernier, Genève
Tél.: +41 22 749 01 11
Fax: +41 22 749 09 47
E-mail: copyright@iso.org
Web: www.iso.org
Publié en Suisse
ii © ISO 2019 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-3:2019(F)
Sommaire Page

Avant-propos ..............................................................................................................................................................................................................................iv

Introduction ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................v

1 Domaine d’application ................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

2 Références normatives ................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3 Termes et définitions ....................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

4 Symboles et abréviations ............................................................................................................................................................................. 4

5 Oxygène et dioxyde de carbone dans l’environnement respiratoire: réponses

physiologiques et limitations .................................................................................................................................................................. 5

5.1 Généralités .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 5

5.2 Échange d’oxygène et de dioxyde de carbone gazeux dans les poumons chez l’homme ........ 6

5.3 Transport de l’oxygène et de dioxyde de carbone dans le sang .................................................................... 6

5.4 Oxygène, dioxyde de carbone et contrôle de la respiration ............................................................................. 8

5.5 Effets physiologiques de l’hyperoxie .................................................................................................................................... 9

5.6 Effets physiologiques de l’hypoxie ......................................................................................................................................10

5.7 Effets physiologiques de l’hypercapnie ..........................................................................................................................13

5.8 Pertinence pour l’utilisation d’appareils de protection respiratoire (APR) ....................................16

5.9 Interprétation des résultats ......................................................................................................................................................21

5.10 Importance des résultats ............................................................................................................................................................21

Bibliographie ...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................23

© ISO 2019 – Tous droits réservés iii
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-3:2019(F)
Avant-propos

L’ISO (Organisation internationale de normalisation) est une fédération mondiale d’organismes

nationaux de normalisation (comités membres de l’ISO). L’élaboration des Normes internationales est

en général confiée aux comités techniques de l’ISO. Chaque comité membre intéressé par une étude

a le droit de faire partie du comité technique créé à cet effet. Les organisations internationales,

gouvernementales et non gouvernementales, en liaison avec l’ISO participent également aux travaux.

L’ISO collabore étroitement avec la Commission électrotechnique internationale (IEC) en ce qui

concerne la normalisation électrotechnique.

Les procédures utilisées pour élaborer le présent document et celles destinées à sa mise à jour sont

décrites dans les Directives ISO/IEC, Partie 1. Il convient, en particulier de prendre note des différents

critères d’approbation requis pour les différents types de documents ISO. Le présent document a été

rédigé conformément aux règles de rédaction données dans les Directives ISO/IEC, Partie 2 (voir www

.iso .org/directives).

L’attention est attirée sur le fait que certains des éléments du présent document peuvent faire l’objet de

droits de propriété intellectuelle ou de droits analogues. L’ISO ne saurait être tenue pour responsable

de ne pas avoir identifié de tels droits de propriété et averti de leur existence. Les détails concernant

les références aux droits de propriété intellectuelle ou autres droits analogues identifiés lors de

l’élaboration du document sont indiqués dans l’Introduction et/ou dans la liste des déclarations de

brevets reçues par l’ISO (voir www .iso .org/brevets).

Les appellations commerciales éventuellement mentionnées dans le présent document sont données

pour information, par souci de commodité, à l’intention des utilisateurs et ne sauraient constituer un

engagement.

Pour une explication de la nature volontaire des normes, la signification des termes et expressions

spécifiques de l’ISO liés à l’évaluation de la conformité, ou pour toute information au sujet de l’adhésion

de l’ISO aux principes de l’Organisation mondiale du commerce (OMC) concernant les obstacles

techniques au commerce (OTC), voir le lien suivant: www .iso .org/iso/fr/avant -propos . ht m l .

Le présent document a été élaboré par le comité technique ISO/TC 94/SC 15, Appareils de protection

respiratoire.

Cette deuxième édition annule et remplace la première édition (ISO/TS 16976-3:2011), qui a fait l’objet

d’une révision technique. Les principales modifications par rapport à l’édition précédente sont les

suivantes:

— ajout d’un nouveau Tableau 3 fournissant des limites de CO en cas de respiration dans un

environnement présentant une résistance respiratoire imposée;
— explication des nouvelles limites de CO tirées d’une étude.

Une liste de toutes les parties de la série ISO/TS 16976 se trouve sur le site web de l’ISO.

Il convient que l’utilisateur adresse tout retour d’information ou toute question concernant le présent

document à l’organisme national de normalisation de son pays. Une liste exhaustive desdits organismes

se trouve à l’adresse www .iso .org/fr/members .html.
iv © ISO 2019 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-3:2019(F)
Introduction

Il est recommandé à des millions de travailleurs à travers le monde de porter un appareil de protection

respiratoire (APR), en raison de la nature de leurs activités. Il existe un nombre considérable d’APR

différents, allant des appareils filtrants aux appareils avec alimentation en gaz respirable, en passant

par les appareils de protection respiratoire de plongée (UBA, «underwater breathing apparatus»)

ainsi que les appareils de protection respiratoire pour l’évacuation permettant de s’échapper en cas

d’urgence (appareil isolant autonome d’évacuation ou SCSR [«self-contained self-rescuer»]). Beaucoup

de ces appareils assurent une protection contre les contaminants en suspension dans l’air sans fournir

d’air ou d’autres mélanges de gaz respirables à l’utilisateur. L’utilisateur est donc potentiellement

protégé contre les particules ou autres toxines en suspension dans l’air, mais reste exposé à un mélange

de gaz ambiant très différent de celui normalement présent au niveau de la mer. Un APR qui fournit

de l’air respirable à l’utilisateur, par exemple un appareil de protection respiratoire isolant autonome

(SCBA) ou un UBA, peut ne pas fonctionner correctement ou mal éliminer le dioxyde de carbone présent

dans la zone de respiration, exposant ainsi l’utilisateur à un environnement de gaz respirable altéré.

Dans certains cas particuliers, l’APR expose intentionnellement le porteur du masque à des mélanges

de gaz respiratoires très différents du mélange de gaz atmosphérique normal contenant environ 79 %

d’azote et 21 % d’oxygène ainsi que des traces d’autres gaz. Ces circonstances particulières concernent

l’aviation, la plongée à titre professionnel ou militaire, et le milieu hospitalier.

Les mélanges de gaz respirables différant de l’atmosphère normale peuvent avoir des effets importants

sur la plupart des systèmes physiologiques. De nombreuses réactions physiologiques faisant suite

à une exposition à des niveaux faibles ou élevés d’oxygène ou de dioxyde de carbone peuvent influer

lourdement sur la capacité à travailler en sécurité, à s’échapper d’une situation dangereuse et à

estimer correctement les dangers présents dans un environnement. En outre, si elle est suffisamment

importante, une modification de l’environnement en gaz respirables peut s’avérer dangereuse, voire

mortelle. Il est donc crucial pour la sécurité et la santé du travailleur de surveiller et de contrôler le

gaz respirable, et de limiter l’exposition de l’utilisateur à des variations de la concentration ou de la

pression partielle de l’oxygène et du dioxyde de carbone.

Le présent document traite de la composition gazeuse de l’atmosphère terrestre; de la physiologie

fondamentale du métabolisme à l’origine du dioxyde de carbone dans l’organisme, de la physiologie

respiratoire et du transport de l’oxygène vers les cellules et les tissus de l’organisme; et du transport

subséquent du dioxyde de carbone des tissus jusqu’aux poumons, en vue de son élimination hors du

corps. Après la physiologie fondamentale de la respiration, le présent document aborde les réponses

physiologiques face aux atmosphères respirables altérées (hyperoxie, hypoxie) et aux effets d’un excès

de dioxyde de carbone dans le sang (hypercapnie). Des exemples sont tirés de la littérature biomédicale

correspondante.

Enfin, il traite de l’effet d’une modification des concentrations/pressions partielles de l’oxygène et du

dioxyde de carbone sur l’utilisation des appareils de protection respiratoire. Le contenu du présent

document est destiné à servir de base pour faire progresser la recherche et le développement des APR,

dans le but de réduire au minimum les variations de l’environnement respiratoire, et de minimiser ainsi

l’impact physiologique de leur emploi sur l’utilisateur. Si cela est possible, tous les travailleurs pour

lesquels il est recommandé, en fonction de leur profession, de porter un APR verront leur santé et leur

sécurité améliorées.
© ISO 2019 – Tous droits réservés v
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
SPÉCIFICATION TECHNIQUE ISO/TS 16976-3:2019(F)
Appareils de protection respiratoire — Facteurs
humains —
Partie 3:
Réponses physiologiques et limitations en oxygène et en
dioxyde de carbone dans l’environnement respiratoire
1 Domaine d’application
Le présent document présente:
— une description de la composition de l’atmosphère terrestre;
— une description de la physiologie de la respiration humaine;

— une étude de la littérature biomédicale actuellement disponible sur les effets du dioxyde de carbone

et de l’oxygène sur la physiologie humaine;

— des exemples de circonstances environnementales dans lesquelles la pression partielle de l’oxygène

ou du dioxyde de carbone peut différer de celle observée au niveau de la mer.

Le présent document identifie les valeurs limites de la concentration en oxygène et en dioxyde de

carbone et la durée pendant laquelle elles ne devraient pas causer de détresse physiologique. Pour

illustrer de manière adéquate les effets sur la physiologie humaine, le présent document traite à la

fois des expositions à haute altitude, avec de faibles pressions partielles, et de la plongée sous-marine,

qui implique des conditions de pressions partielles élevées. Le présent document aborde également

l’utilisation d’appareils de protection respiratoire et les diverses intensités d’activité pouvant donner

lieu au port d’un APR.
2 Références normatives
Le présent document ne contient aucune référence normative.
3 Termes et définitions

Pour les besoins du présent document, les termes et définitions suivants s’appliquent.

L’ISO et l’IEC tiennent à jour des bases de données terminologiques destinées à être utilisées en

normalisation, consultables aux adresses suivantes:

— ISO Online browsing platform: disponible à l’adresse https: //www .iso .org/obp;

— IEC Electropedia: disponible à l’adresse http: //www .electropedia .org/.
3.1
alvéoles
alvéole (singulier)

sacs alvéolaires terminaux des poumons dans lesquels a lieu un échange de gaz respirable entre l’air

alvéolaire et le capillaire pulmonaire

Note 1 à l'article: Les alvéoles constituent l’unité anatomique et fonctionnelle des poumons.

© ISO 2019 – Tous droits réservés 1
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-3:2019(F)
3.2
température et pression ambiantes saturantes
ATPS

conditions normales pour l’expression des paramètres de ventilation liés à l’air expiré

Note 1 à l'article: Température ambiante et pression atmosphérique réelles; pression de vapeur saturante.

3.3
température et pression corporelles saturantes
BTPS
conditions normales pour l’expression des paramètres de ventilation

Note 1 à l'article: Température corporelle (37 °C), pression atmosphérique 101,3 kPa (760 mmHg) et pression de

vapeur d’eau saturante (6,27 kPa).
3.4
carbaminohémoglobine
HbCO

hémoglobine ayant fixé du dioxyde de carbone sur un site tissulaire en vue de son transport vers

les poumons
3.5
espace mort

régions conductrices des voies respiratoires ne contenant pas d’alvéoles et, par conséquent,

ne donnant lieu à aucun échange gazeux

Note 1 à l'article: Ces zones incluent le nez, la bouche, la trachée, les bronches et les voies respiratoires inférieures.

Ce volume est généralement de 150 ml chez un homme de taille moyenne.
3.6
espace mort

somme de tous les espaces morts anatomiques et de toutes les alvéoles sous-irriguées

(avec débit sanguin réduit) ne contribuant pas aux échanges gazeux

Note 1 à l'article: Le volume de l’espace mort physiologique peut varier en fonction du degré de ventilation.

Ainsi, l’espace mort physiologique correspond à la fraction du volume courant qui ne contribue pas aux échanges

gazeux dans les poumons.
3.7
dyspnée

sensation de manque d’air, de respiration difficile ou pénible, ou sensation d’essoufflement

3.8
dioxyde de carbone en fin d’expiration
ET CO

fraction volumique du dioxyde de carbone dans l’haleine au niveau de la bouche à la fin de l’expiration

Note 1 à l'article: Le taux de dioxyde de carbone en fin d’expiration est très proche de celui du dioxyde de carbone

alvéolaire.
3.9
hémoglobine

molécules particulières contenues dans tous les globules rouges qui fixent l’oxygène ou le dioxyde de

carbone en conditions physiologiques normales et qui transportent l’oxygène ou le dioxyde de carbone

en direction ou en provenance des tissus de l’organisme
3.10
hypercapnie
hypercarbie
quantité excessive de dioxyde de carbone dans le sang
2 © ISO 2019 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-3:2019(F)
3.11
hyperoxie

fraction volumique ou pression partielle de l’oxygène dans l’environnement respiratoire supérieure à

celle de l’atmosphère terrestre au niveau de la mer, entraînant un excès d’oxygène dans l’organisme

Note 1 à l'article: Ceci peut se produire lorsqu’une personne se trouve dans des conditions hyperbares (plongée),

est soumise à des mélanges de gaz respiratoires contenant une fraction élevée en oxygène, ou lors de certaines

procédures médicales.
3.12
hypoxie

fraction volumique ou pression partielle de l’oxygène dans l’environnement respiratoire inférieure à

celle de l’atmosphère terrestre au niveau de la mer

Note 1 à l'article: L’hypoxie anémique est due à une réduction de la capacité de transport de l’oxygène par le sang

suite à une diminution de l’hémoglobine totale ou une altération des constituants de l’hémoglobine.

3.13
hypocapnie

fraction volumique ou pression partielle du dioxyde de carbone dans l’environnement respiratoire ou

dans l’organisme inférieure à celle de l’atmosphère terrestre au niveau de la mer

Note 1 à l'article: Ceci se produit généralement dans les conditions d’hyperventilation (plongée) ou dans les

situations médicales entraînant une réduction du dioxyde de carbone dans l’organisme.

3.14
inotrope
affectant la force de contraction musculaire

Note 1 à l'article: Un effet inotrope négatif (respectivement positif) réduit (respectivement augmente) la force de

contraction musculaire (muscle squelettique ou muscle cardiaque par exemple).
3.15
medulla oblongata, pons
zones du cerveau où se situe le centre du contrôle respiratoire
3.16
oxyhémoglobine
HbO

hémoglobine ayant fixé de l’oxygène dans les poumons en vue de son transport vers les tissus de

l’organisme
3.17
pression partielle

pression exercée par chacun des constituants d’un mélange gazeux pour former une pression totale

EXEMPLE L’air est un mélange d’oxygène, d’azote, de dioxyde de carbone, de gaz inertes (argon, néon)

et de vapeur d’eau. La fraction volumique d’oxygène dans l’air est d’environ 20,9 %. Au niveau de la mer, la

pression atmosphérique totale est de 101,3 kPa (760 mmHg). La pression de vapeur d’eau est de 6,26 kPa

(47 mmHg) (saturation totale dans les poumons à une température corporelle d’environ 37 °C). La pression

partielle de l’oxygène est obtenue en soustrayant la pression de vapeur de la pression atmosphérique totale

puis en multipliant la fraction volumique de l’oxygène par la pression atmosphérique en conditions sèches.

Ainsi, 101,3 − 6,3 = 95,1 kPa (760 mmHg − 47 mmHg = 713 mmHg); 0,21 × 95,1 kPa = 19,9 kPa (= 149 mmHg). Si la

pression ambiante augmente (comme en plongée), la pression partielle de chaque constituant gazeux augmente.

Ainsi, à 2 atm en valeur absolue, la pression partielle de l’oxygène dans un gaz sec est de 101,3 × 2 = 202,6 kPa

(760 mmHg × 2 = 1 520 mmHg); 0,21 × 202,6 = 42,6 kPa (0,21 × 1 520 mmHg = 319 mmHg).

Note 1 à l'article: La pression partielle dépend de la fraction volumique du constituant gazeux.

Note 2 à l'article: La pression partielle d’un gaz peut augmenter ou diminuer même lorsque sa fraction volumique

relative reste inchangée. La pression partielle entraîne la diffusion du gaz à travers les membranes cellulaires et

est donc plus importante que la fraction volumique relative du gaz.
© ISO 2019 – Tous droits réservés 3
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-3:2019(F)
3.18
quotient respiratoire

rapport entre le volume de dioxyde de carbone expiré et le volume d’oxygène consommé

Note 1 à l'article: R est calculé comme suit:
VCO
R =
VCO est le volume de dioxyde de carbone expiré;
VO est le volume d’oxygène consommé.

Note 2 à l'article: R donne une estimation de la composition des substrats utilisés dans des conditions de

respiration et de métabolisme à l’équilibre. Au repos, R = 0,82, ce qui reflète l’utilisation de substrats dont la

source d’énergie principale est constituée de glucides et de graisses.
3.19
système respiratoire

organes tubulaires et caverneux (bouche, trachée, bronches, poumons, alvéoles, etc.) et structures

assurant la ventilation pulmonaire et les échanges gazeux entre l’air ambiant et le sang

3.20
température et pression normales, à sec
STPD
conditions normales pour l’expression de la consommation d’oxygène

Note 1 à l'article: Température normale (0 °C) et pression normale (101,3 kPa, 760 mmHg), air sec (humidité

relative de 0 %).
3.21
ventilation (générale)
processus d’échange d’air entre les poumons et l’environnement ambiant
4 Symboles et abréviations
APFR appareil de protection respiratoire filtrant («air purifying respirator»)
SC surface corporelle, exprimée en m

PAPR appareil de protection respiratoire filtrant à ventilation assistée («powered air purifying res-

pirator»)

SAR appareil de protection respiratoire alimenté en gaz respirable («supplied air respirator»)

SCBA appareil de protection respiratoire isolant autonome («self-contained breathing apparatus»)

UBA appareil de protection respiratoire de plongée («underwater breathing apparatus»)

pCO pression partielle du dioxyde de carbone
p CO pression partielle alvéolaire du dioxyde de carbone
A 2
p CO pression partielle artérielle du dioxyde de carbone
a 2
p CO pression partielle veineuse du dioxyde de carbone
v 2
4 © ISO 2019 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-3:2019(F)
pO pression partielle de l’oxygène
p O pression partielle alvéolaire de l’oxygène
A 2
p O pression partielle artérielle de l’oxygène
a 2
p O pression partielle de l’oxygène inspiré
i 2
p O pression partielle veineuse de l’oxygène
v 2
V ventilation minute (expiration)
volume total expiré par les poumons en 1 min, en l/min (BTPS)
V ventilation minute (inspiration)
volume total d’air inspiré dans les poumons en 1 min, en l/min (BTPS)
VO consommation d’oxygène

volume d’oxygène consommé par les tissus humains, en l/min, dérivé de la différence entre le

volume minute de l’oxygène inhalé et le volume minute de l’oxygène expiré.
VCO vitesse d’élimination du dioxyde de carbone

volume de dioxyde de carbone produit par minute, dérivé du produit de la ventilation minute et

de la différence entre les concentrations en pourcentage du dioxyde de carbone expiré et inhalé

5 Oxygène et dioxyde de carbone dans l’environnement respiratoire: réponses
physiologiques et limitations
5.1 Généralités

L’atmosphère terrestre est composée principalement d’azote et d’oxygène, plus quelques gaz à l’état de

traces. La concentration du dioxyde de carbone dans l’air est très faible (environ 0,03 %). Les humains

requièrent de l’oxygène comme élément principal dans la production d’énergie au cours du métabolisme

cellulaire aérobie. De faibles concentrations ou de faibles pressions partielles atmosphériques d’oxygène

(telles que celles rencontrées à haute altitude) peuvent limiter la production d’énergie métabolique, ce

qui peut compromettre le fonctionnement physiologique. En revanche, les faibles concentrations de

dioxyde de carbone dans l’atmosphère respiratoire ne semblent pas avoir de conséquence physiologique.

Le dioxyde de carbone est un sous-produit du métabolisme cellulaire et c’est cette source de dioxyde

de carbone, et non la concentration atmosphérique normale, qui provoque des effets physiologiques.

Cependant, une augmentation du niveau de dioxyde de carbone dans l’environnement, comme dans la

zone de respiration des appareils respiratoires ou dans les espaces confinés, peut également avoir de

lourdes conséquences sur le système respiratoire.

Des concentrations élevées en oxygène ou en dioxyde de carbone peuvent avoir des répercussions

physiologiques dramatiques. L’hyperoxie, en particulier sous des pressions ambiantes supérieures à

une atmosphère (atm), telles que celles rencontrées en plongée, peut être toxique et même mortelle

pour l’homme. Des concentrations élevées en dioxyde de carbone peuvent également lourdement influer

sur la respiration et le métabolisme. Cette revue aborde plusieurs points:

— l’oxygène et le dioxyde de carbone dans le cadre de la physiologie humaine normale;

— les effets physiologiques de l’hypoxie et de l’hyperoxie;
— les effets physiologiques de l’hypercapnie;
— la pertinence pour les appareils de protection respiratoire.
© ISO 2019 – Tous droits réservés 5
---------------------- Page: 10 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-3:2019(F)

5.2 Échange d’oxygène et de dioxyde de carbone gazeux dans les poumons chez l’homme

Une ventilation minute normale résulte d’une activité neuronale dans les centres respiratoires situés

dans les zones du tronc cérébral connues sous le nom de medulla oblongata et de pons. Les mouvements

d’air dans les poumons lors de l’inspiration et de l’expiration facilitent les échanges gazeux nécessaires

au fonctionnement métabolique normal.

Toutes les zones du système pulmonaire ne donnent pas lieu à un échange gazeux. L’espace mort

anatomique (régions dépourvues de diffusion gazeuse dans le sang) correspond à un volume

d’environ 150 ml du système pulmonaire. L’espace mort physiologique peut toutefois fortement

accroître ce volume en fonction du niveau d’activité. Le gaz inhalé traverse les zones de l’espace mort

avant de parvenir aux alvéoles pulmonaires. Les échanges gazeux se produisent dans les alvéoles, qui

sont en contact avec les capillaires sanguins.

Les échanges amenant l’oxygène dans la circulation sanguine et les échanges éliminant le dioxyde

de carbone de la circulation sanguine et l’envoyant dans les alvéoles se font par simple diffusion

selon un gradient de pression partiel. La pression partielle de l’oxygène dans les alvéoles (p O )

A 2

est d’environ 13,3 kPa (100 mmHg), alors qu’elle est d’environ 5,3 kPa (40 mmHg) dans le sang

veineux (p O ). L’oxygène se déplace donc de la zone à forte concentration en oxygène dans les alvéoles

v 2

vers la zone à faible concentration en oxygène dans le sang veineux. L’oxygène est également transporté

dans les globules rouges via un gradient de pression partielle similaire afin de se fixer à l’hémoglobine. À

l’inverse, la pression partielle du dioxyde de carbone dans le sang veineux (p CO ) est d’environ 6,1 kPa

v 2

(46 mmHg) et seulement d’environ 5,3 kPa (40 mmHg) dans les alvéoles. Le dioxyde de carbone va donc

du sang veineux vers les alvéoles puis est expiré dans l’atmosphère.

Après ces échanges gazeux, la pression p O est d’environ 12,6 kPa (95 mmHg) et la pression p CO est

a 2 a 2

d’environ 5,3 kPa (40 mmHg) dans le sang artériel. Le sang artériel arrivant aux cellules libère l’oxygène

et absorbe le dioxyde de carbone selon un processus similaire de déplacement par gradient de pression

partielle. Après libération de l’oxygène dans les cellules, la pression pO est d’environ 5,3 kPa (40 mmHg)

et la pression pCO est d’environ 6,1 kPa (46 mmHg) dans le sang. De retour dans les poumons pour un

nouveau cycle d’échanges gazeux, chaque gaz se déplace à nouveau via le gradient de pression partielle

correspondant et répète le processus. L’alimentation des cellules en oxygène et l’élimination du dioxyde

de carbone hors du corps se déroulent correctement aussi longtemps que la ventilation des poumons et

l’irrigation du sang, assurée par un système circulatoire sain, travaillent de concert.

5.3 Transport de l’oxygène et de dioxyde de carbone dans le sang

L’oxygène est très peu soluble dans le sang. Il est donc transporté vers les organes vitaux, les muscles

en activité et le cerveau par un mécanisme de transport particulier du sang. Lorsque l’oxygène de

l’atmosphère diffuse des alvéoles jusque dans la circulation, environ 25 % de l’oxygène présent dans les

alvéoles est rapidement transporté dans les globules rouges et se fixe sur l’hémoglobine pour former

de l’oxyhémoglobine. L’oxyhémoglobine des globules rouges est acheminée par la circulation artérielle

jusqu’aux capillaires, où l’oxygène diffuse des globules rouges vers les cellules des tissus cibles. L’oxygène

est ensuite utilisé dans les processus métaboliques aérobies se déroulant dans les mitochondries des

cellules.

Plusieurs facteurs affectent l’affinité de l’oxygène pour l’hémoglobine. Pour une pression pO ambiante

donnée, l’augmentation de la température corporelle, de l’acide lactique dans le sang (↓ pH), une hausse

de la pression p CO , ou un accroissement de 2,3-diphosphoglycérate (DPG, un produit du métabolisme

a 2
[4]

anaérobie des globules rouges) peut réduire l’affinité. d’oxygène pour l’hémoglobine ). Ce phénomène

est connu sous le nom d’«effet Bohr» (voir également la Référence [5]), voir la Figure 1.

6 © ISO 2019 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 11 ----------------------
ISO/TS 16976-3:2019(F)
Légende
X pression partielle de l’oxygène (Torr)
Y saturation de l’hémoglobine (%)
1 baisse de p (affinité accrue)
2 hausse de p (affinité réduite)
T température
pCO pression partielle du dioxyde de carbone
2,3-DPG 2,3-diphosphoglycérate
pH mesure de l’ac
...

Questions, Comments and Discussion

Ask us and Technical Secretary will try to provide an answer. You can facilitate discussion about the standard in here.