Safety aspects -- Guidelines for their inclusion in standards

ISO/IEC Guide 51:2014 provides requirements and recommendations for the drafters of standards for the inclusion of safety aspects in standards. ISO/IEC Guide 51:2014 is applicable to any safety aspect related to people, property or the environment, or to a combination of these.

Aspects liés à la sécurité -- Principes directeurs pour les inclure dans les normes

Le Guide ISO/CEI 51:2014 fournit aux rédacteurs de normes des exigences et des recommandations pour l'inclusion dans les normes des aspects liés ŕ la sécurité. Le Guide ISO/CEI 51:2014 s'applique ŕ tous les aspects de la sécurité relatifs aux personnes, aux biens ou ŕ l'environnement, ou ŕ l'une de leurs combinaisons.

General Information

Status
Published
Publication Date
24-Mar-2014
Current Stage
6060 - International Standard published
Start Date
24-Feb-2014
Completion Date
25-Mar-2014
Ref Project

RELATIONS

Buy Standard

Guide
ISO/IEC Guide 51:2014 - Safety aspects -- Guidelines for their inclusion in standards
English language
15 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview
Guide
ISO/IEC Guide 51:2014 - Aspects liés a la sécurité -- Principes directeurs pour les inclure dans les normes
French language
16 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview

Standards Content (sample)

GUIDE 51
Third edition
2014-04-01
Safety aspects — Guidelines for their
inclusion in standards
Aspects liés à la sécurité — Principes directeurs pour les inclure dans
les normes
Reference number
ISO/IEC GUIDE 51:2014(E)
ISO/IEC 2014
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO/IEC GUIDE 51:2014(E)
COPYRIGHT PROTECTED DOCUMENT
© ISO/IEC 2014

All rights reserved. Unless otherwise specified, no part of this publication may be reproduced or utilized otherwise in any form

or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, or posting on the internet or an intranet, without prior

written permission. Permission can be requested from either ISO at the address below or ISO’s member body in the country of

the requester.
ISO copyright office
Case postale 56 • CH-1211 Geneva 20
Tel. + 41 22 749 01 11
Fax + 41 22 749 09 47
E-mail copyright@iso.org
Web www.iso.org
Published in Switzerland
ii © ISO/IEC 2014 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO/IEC GUIDE 51:2014(E)
Contents Page

Foreword ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................iv

Introduction ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................v

1 Scope ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 1

2 Normative references ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3 Terms and definitions ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

4 Use of the terms “safety” and “safe” .................................................................................................................................................. 3

5 Elements of risk ..................................................................................................................................................................................................... 3

6 Achieving tolerable risk ................................................................................................................................................................................ 4

6.1 Iterative process of risk assessment and risk reduction..................................................................................... 4

6.2 Tolerable risk ............................................................................................................................................................................................ 5

6.3 Risk reduction .......................................................................................................................................................................................... 6

6.4 Validation ..................................................................................................................................................................................................... 8

7 Safety aspects in standards ....................................................................................................................................................................... 8

7.1 Types of safety standard ................................................................................................................................................................. 8

7.2 Analysis of proposed new standards ................................................................................................................................... 9

7.3 Preparatory work ................................................................................................................................................................................. 9

7.4 Drafting .......................................................................................................................................................................................................10

Bibliography .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................14

© ISO/IEC 2014 – All rights reserved iii
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO/IEC GUIDE 51:2014(E)
Foreword

ISO (the International Organization for Standardization) and IEC (the International Electrotechnical

Commission) are worldwide federations of national standards bodies (ISO member bodies and IEC

national committees). The work of preparing International Standards is normally carried out through

ISO and IEC technical committees. Each member body interested in a subject for which a technical

committee has been established has the right to be represented on that committee. International

organizations, governmental and non-governmental, in liaison with ISO or IEC, also take part in the

work. ISO collaborates closely with IEC on all matters of electrotechnical standardization.

International Standards are drafted in accordance with the rules given in the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 2.

Draft Guides adopted by the responsible Committee or Group are circulated to the member bodies for

voting. Publication as a Guide requires approval by at least 75 % of the member bodies casting a vote.

Attention is drawn to the possibility that some of the elements of this document may be the subject of

patent rights. ISO and IEC shall not be held responsible for identifying any or all such patent rights.

ISO/IEC Guide 51 was prepared by a Joint Working Group of the ISO Committee on Consumer Policy

(COPOLCO) and the IEC Advisory Committee on Safety (ACOS). This third edition cancels and replaces

the second edition (ISO/IEC Guide 51:1999) which has been technically revised.
The main changes compared with the second edition are as follows:

— strengthened focus on risk reduction in the overall risk assessment process, including revised

Figure 2;
— replacement of the term “harmful event” with the term “hazardous event”;
— updating of terms used in the context of consumer safety;
— revision of Figure 3 to specify the risk reduction steps in greater detail;
— addition of a new Introduction providing more background information;

— addition of specific provisions and references relative to vulnerable consumers;

— revision of Clause 2 (Normative references) and the Bibliography;
— reorganization and consolidation of the content in Clauses 6 and 7.
iv © ISO/IEC 2014 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
ISO/IEC GUIDE 51:2014(E)
Introduction

Work on standards deals with safety aspects in many different forms across a wide range of technologies

and for most products, processes, services and systems (referred to as “products and systems” in this

Guide). The increasing complexity of products and systems entering the market makes it necessary to

place a high priority on consideration of safety aspects.

This Guide provides practical guidance to drafters of standards to assist them in including safety aspects

in standards. The underlying principles of this Guide can also be used wherever safety aspects require

consideration, and as a useful reference for other stakeholders such as designers, manufacturers, service

providers, policy makers and regulators.

The approach described in this Guide aims at reducing risk that can arise in the use of products or

systems, including use by vulnerable consumers. This Guide aims to reduce the risk arising from the

design, production, distribution, use (including maintenance) and destruction or disposal of products

or systems. The complete life cycle of a product or system (including both the intended use and the

reasonably foreseeable misuse) is considered, whether the product or system is intended to be used in the

workplace, in the household environment, or for recreational activities. The goal is to achieve tolerable

risk for people, property and the environment, and to minimize adverse effects on the environment.

Hazards can pose different safety problems and can vary significantly depending on the end user of

a product or system, including the integrity of control mechanisms, and the environment in which a

product or system is used. Whereas it is possible to control risks to a greater extent in the workplace,

this might not be the situation in the home environment or when vulnerable consumers use the product

or system. Consequently, this Guide might need to be supplemented by other publications for particular

fields of interest or users. An indicative list of such publications appears in the Bibliography.

This Guide is intended to be applicable to the drafting of all new standards and to existing standards at

their next revision.

It is important to distinguish the respective roles of quality and of safety. However, it might be necessary

to consider quality requirements in standards to ensure that the safety requirements are consistently

met.

NOTE 1 The term “standard” used throughout this Guide includes international standards, technical

specifications, publicly available specifications, technical reports and guides.

NOTE 2 Standards can deal exclusively with safety aspects or can include clauses specific to safety.

NOTE 3 Unless otherwise stated, when the term “committee” is used in this Guide, it refers to technical

committees, subcommittees or working groups of both ISO and IEC.
© ISO/IEC 2014 – All rights reserved v
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
GUIDE ISO/IEC GUIDE 51:2014(E)
Safety aspects — Guidelines for their inclusion in
standards
1 Scope

This Guide provides requirements and recommendations for the drafters of standards for the inclusion

of safety aspects in standards. It is applicable to any safety aspect related to people, property or the

environment, or to a combination of these.

NOTE 1 For example, it can be applicable to people only, or to people and property, or to people, property and

the environment.

NOTE 2 The term “products and systems” used throughout this Guide includes products, processes, services

and systems.
NOTE 3 Safety aspects can also be applicable to long-term health consequences.
2 Normative references
There are no normative references.
3 Terms and definitions
For the purposes of this document, the following terms and definitions apply.
3.1
harm

injury or damage to the health of people, or damage to property or the environment

3.2
hazard
potential source of harm (3.1)
3.3
hazardous event
event that can cause harm (3.1)
3.4
hazardous situation

circumstance in which people, property or the environment is/are exposed to one or more hazards (3.2)

3.5
inherently safe design

measures taken to eliminate hazards (3.2) and/or to reduce risks (3.9) by changing the design or

operating characteristics of the product or system
3.6
intended use

use in accordance with information provided with a product or system, or, in the absence of such

information, by generally understood patterns of usage
© ISO/IEC 2014 – All rights reserved 1
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
ISO/IEC GUIDE 51:2014(E)
3.7
reasonably foreseeable misuse

use of a product or system in a way not intended by the supplier, but which can result from readily

predictable human behaviour

Note 1 to entry: Readily predictable human behaviour includes the behaviour of all types of users, e.g. the elderly,

children and persons with disabilities. For more information, see ISO 10377.

Note 2 to entry: In the context of consumer safety, the term “reasonably foreseeable use” is increasingly used as a

synonym for both “intended use (3.6)” and “reasonably foreseeable misuse.”
3.8
residual risk
risk (3.9) remaining after risk reduction measures (3.13) have been implemented
3.9
risk

combination of the probability of occurrence of harm (3.1) and the severity of that harm

Note 1 to entry: The probability of occurrence includes the exposure to a hazardous situation (3.4), the occurrence

of a hazardous event (3.3) and the possibility to avoid or limit the harm.
3.10
risk analysis

systematic use of available information to identify hazards (3.2) and to estimate the risk (3.9)

3.11
risk assessment
overall process comprising a risk analysis (3.10) and a risk evaluation (3.11)
3.12
risk evaluation

procedure based on the risk analysis (3.10) to determine whether tolerable risk (3.15) has been exceeded

3.13
risk reduction measure
protective measure
action or means to eliminate hazards (3.2) or reduce risks (3.9)

EXAMPLE Inherently safe design (3.5); protective devices; personal protective equipment; information for

use and installation; organization of work; training; application of equipment; supervision.

3.14
safety
freedom from risk (3.9) which is not tolerable
3.15
tolerable risk

level of risk (3.9) that is accepted in a given context based on the current values of society

Note 1 to entry: For the purposes of this Guide, the terms “acceptable risk” and “tolerable risk” are considered to

be synonymous.
3.16
vulnerable consumer

consumer at greater risk (3.9) of harm (3.1) from products or systems, due to age, level of literacy,

physical or mental condition or limitations, or inability to access product safety (3.14) information

2 © ISO/IEC 2014 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
ISO/IEC GUIDE 51:2014(E)
4 Use of the terms “safety” and “safe”

4.1 The term “safe” is often understood by the general public as the state of being protected from

all hazards. However, this is a misunderstanding: “safe” is rather the state of being protected from

recognized hazards that are likely to cause harm. Some level of risk is inherent in products or systems

(see 3.14).

4.2 The use of the terms “safety” and “safe” as descriptive adjectives should be avoided when they

convey no useful extra information. In addition, they are likely to be misinterpreted as an assurance of

freedom from risk.

The recommended approach is to replace, wherever possible, the terms “safety” and “safe” with an

indication of the objective.

EXAMPLES “Protective helmet” instead of “safety helmet”; “protective impedance device” instead of “safety

impedance”; “slip resistant floor-covering” instead of “safe floor-covering”.
5 Elements of risk

The risk associated with a particular hazardous situation depends on the following elements:

a) the severity of harm that can result from the considered hazard;
b) the probability of occurrence of that harm, which is a function of:
— the exposure to the hazard;
— the occurrence of a hazardous event;
— the possibilities of avoiding or limiting the harm.
The elements of risk are shown in Figure 1.
Figure 1 — Elements of risk
© ISO/IEC 2014 – All rights reserved 3
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO/IEC GUIDE 51:2014(E)
6 Achieving tolerable risk
6.1 Iterative process of risk assessment and risk reduction

The iterative process of risk assessment and risk reduction for each hazard is essential in achieving

tolerable risk. The critical issue for drafters of standards to address, as a product or system goes through

the supply chain from development to disposal, is to determine whether the iterative process of risk

assessment is assumed by:

— the standards drafting committee, to perform the risk assessment for specific and known hazards

(e.g. a product-specific standard that is used to demonstrate regulatory compliance); or

— the standard readers/users, to perform the risk assessment (e.g. manufacturer/supplier of the

product or system) for hazards that they identify (e.g. based on ISO 12100 or ISO 14971).

The following procedure should be used to reduce risks to a tolerable level (see Figure 2):

a) identify the likely users for the product or system, including vulnerable consumers and others

affected by the product;

b) identify the intended use, and assess the reasonably foreseeable misuse, of the product or system;

c) identify each hazard (including reasonably foreseeable hazardous situations and events) arising

in the stages and conditions for the use of the product or system, including installation, operation,

maintenance, repair and destruction/disposal;

d) estimate and evaluate the risk to the affected user group arising from the hazard(s) identified:

consideration should be given to products or systems used by different user groups; evaluation can

also be made by comparison with similar products or systems;
e) if the risk is not tolerable, reduce the risk until it becomes tolerable.
Figure 2 shows the iterative process of risk assessment and risk reduction.
4 © ISO/IEC 2014 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
ISO/IEC GUIDE 51:2014(E)
Figure 2 — Iterative process of risk assessment and risk reduction
6.2 Tolerable risk

6.2.1 All products and systems include hazards and, therefore, some level of residual risk. However, the

risk associated with those hazards should be reduced to a tolerable level. Safety (as defined in 3.14) is

achieved by reducing risk to a tolerable level, which is defined in this Guide as tolerable risk. The purpose

© ISO/IEC 2014 – All rights reserved 5
---------------------- Page: 10 ----------------------
ISO/IEC GUIDE 51:2014(E)

of determining the tolerable risk for a specific hazardous event is to state what is deemed acceptable with

respect to both components of risk (see Figure 1).
Tolerable risk can be determined by:
— the current values of society;

— the search for an optimal balance between the ideal of absolute safety and what is achievable;

— the demands to be met by a product or system;
— factors such as suitability for purpose and cost effectiveness.

6.2.2 It follows that there is a need to review the tolerable level, in particular when developments, both

in technology and in knowledge, can lead to economically feasible improvements to attain the minimum

risk related to the use of a product or system.

NOTE The factors involved in reducing the overall risk to a level below the tolerable risk vary significantly

depending on whether the product or system is used in the workplace, in a public environment or by a consumer

in and around the home. In many cases, it is possible to control risks to a greater extent in the workplace through

occupational training, protective procedures and equipment that workers are required to use. In contrast, this

might not occur in a home or public environment.

6.2.3 Drafters of standards shall consider safety aspects for the intended use and the reasonably

foreseeable misuse of products and systems, and apply risk reduction measures to achieve a tolerable

risk level.

6.2.4 Drafters of standards shall also consider reasonably foreseeable uses of the product which, even

if they are not intended uses, are readily predictable based on the collective experience of the end user

population. In particular, when determining the risk posed by consumer products, consideration should

be given for products that are intended for, or are used by, vulnerable consumers who are often unable

to understand the hazard or the associated risk.

6.2.5 To many suppliers, it might seem that the end user does not use the product for its intended

purpose or in the manner i
...

GUIDE 51
Troisième édition
2014-04-01
Aspects liés à la sécurité — Principes
directeurs pour les inclure dans les
normes
Safety aspects — Guidelines for their inclusion in standards
Numéro de référence
ISO/IEC GUIDE 51:2014(F)
ISO/IEC 2014
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO/IEC GUIDE 51:2014(F)
DOCUMENT PROTÉGÉ PAR COPYRIGHT
© ISO/IEC 2014

Droits de reproduction réservés. Sauf indication contraire, aucune partie de cette publication ne peut être reproduite ni utilisée

sous quelque forme que ce soit et par aucun procédé, électronique ou mécanique, y compris la photocopie, l’affichage sur

l’internet ou sur un Intranet, sans autorisation écrite préalable. Les demandes d’autorisation peuvent être adressées à l’ISO à

l’adresse ci-après ou au comité membre de l’ISO dans le pays du demandeur.
ISO copyright office
Case postale 56 • CH-1211 Geneva 20
Tel. + 41 22 749 01 11
Fax + 41 22 749 09 47
E-mail copyright@iso.org
Web www.iso.org
Publié en Suisse
ii © ISO/IEC 2014 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO/IEC GUIDE 51:2014(F)
Sommaire Page

Avant-propos ..............................................................................................................................................................................................................................iv

Introduction ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................v

1 Domaine d’application ................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

2 Références normatives ................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3 Termes et définitions ....................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

4 Utilisation des expressions «de sécurité» et «de sûreté» .......................................................................................... 3

5 Éléments de risque ............................................................................................................................................................................................. 3

6 Obtenir un risque tolérable ...................................................................................................................................................................... 4

6.1 Processus itératif d’appréciation et de réduction du risque ........................................................................... 4

6.2 Risque tolérable ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 6

6.3 Réduction du risque ........................................................................................................................................................................... 6

6.4 Validation ..................................................................................................................................................................................................... 9

7 Aspects liés à la sécurité dans les normes ................................................................................................................................. 9

7.1 Types de normes de sécurité ...................................................................................................................................................... 9

7.2 Analyse des propositions de normes nouvelles ......................................................................................................10

7.3 Travaux préparatoires ...................................................................................................................................................................10

7.4 Rédaction ..................................................................................................................................................................................................12

Bibliographie ...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................15

© ISO/IEC 2014 – Tous droits réservés iii
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO/IEC GUIDE 51:2014(F)
Avant-propos

L’ISO (Organisation internationale de normalisation) et l’IEC (Commission électrotechnique

internationale) sont des fédérations mondiales d’organismes nationaux de normalisation (comités

membres de l’ISO et comités nationaux de l’IEC). L’élaboration des Normes internationales est en

général confiée aux comités techniques de l’ISO et de l’IEC. Chaque comité membre intéressé par une

étude a le droit de faire partie du comité technique créé à cet effet. Les organisations internationales,

gouvernementales et non gouvernementales, en liaison avec l’ISO ou l’IEC, participent également aux

travaux. L’ISO collabore étroitement avec la Commission électrotechnique internationale (IEC) en ce qui

concerne la normalisation électrotechnique.

Les Normes internationales sont rédigées conformément aux règles données dans les Directives ISO/IEC,

Partie 2.

Les projets de Guides adoptés par le comité ou le groupe responsable sont soumis aux comités membres

pour vote. Leur publication comme Guides requiert l’approbation de 75 % au moins des comités membres

votants.

L’attention est appelée sur le fait que certains des éléments du présent document peuvent faire l’objet

de droits de propriété intellectuelle ou de droits analogues. L’ISO et l’IEC ne sauraient être tenues pour

responsables de ne pas avoir identifié de tels droits de propriété et averti de leur existence.

Le Guide ISO/IEC 51 a été élaboré par un groupe de travail mixte ISO/IEC spécifiquement constitué à cet

effet.

Cette troisième édition annule et remplace la deuxième édition (Guide ISO/IEC 51:1999), qui a fait l’objet

d’une révision technique.

Les principales modifications par rapport à la deuxième édition sont les suivantes:

— accent mis sur la réduction du risque dans le cadre du processus global d’appréciation du risque, y

compris une révision de la Figure 2;

— dans la version anglaise, remplacement du terme «harmful event» par le terme «hazardous event»;

ces deux termes sont traduits identiquement par «événement dangereux» dans la version française;

— mise à jour des termes utilisés dans le contexte de la sécurité des consommateurs;

— révision de la Figure 3 afin de spécifier les étapes de réduction du risque de façon plus détaillée;

— ajout d’une nouvelle Introduction fournissant des informations générales supplémentaires;

— ajout de dispositions et de références spécifiques relatives aux consommateurs vulnérables;

— révision de l’Article 2 (Références normatives) et de la Bibliographie;
— réorganisation et consolidation du contenu des Articles 6 et 7.
iv © ISO/IEC 2014 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
ISO/IEC GUIDE 51:2014(F)
Introduction

Les travaux de normalisation traitent des aspects liés à la sécurité sous des formes très différentes, dans

une gamme étendue de technologies et pour la plupart des produits, des procédés, des services et des

systèmes (désignés en tant que «produits et systèmes» dans le présent Guide). La complexité croissante

des produits et des systèmes mis sur le marché exige d’accorder un haut degré de priorité à l’examen des

aspects liés à la sécurité.

Le présent Guide met à la disposition des rédacteurs de normes des recommandations pratiques pour les

aider à inclure dans les normes des aspects liés à la sécurité. Les principes sous-jacents du présent Guide

peuvent également être utilisés chaque fois que des aspects liés à la sécurité sont abordés et peuvent

constituer une référence utile pour d’autres parties prenantes telles que les concepteurs, les fabricants,

les prestataires de services, les décideurs et les organismes de réglementation.

La démarche décrite dans le présent Guide vise à réduire le risque pouvant être engendré par l’utilisation

de produits ou de systèmes, y compris l’utilisation par des consommateurs vulnérables. Le présent Guide

vise à réduire le risque engendré par la conception, la production, la distribution, l’utilisation (y compris

la maintenance) et la destruction ou la mise au rebut de produits ou de systèmes. Il tient compte du cycle

de vie complet du produit ou du système (incluant aussi bien l’utilisation prévue que les mauvais usages

raisonnablement prévisibles), que le produit ou le système soit destiné à être utilisé sur le lieu de travail,

dans l’environnement domestique ou dans le cadre d’activités de loisirs. L’objectif est d’obtenir un risque

tolérable pour les personnes, les biens et l’environnement, et de réduire au minimum les effets négatifs

sur l’environnement.

Les dangers peuvent soulever différents problèmes de sécurité et peuvent varier de manière significative

selon l’utilisateur final d’un produit ou d’un système, y compris l’intégrité des mécanismes de

commande, et l’environnement dans lequel est utilisé un produit ou un système. Alors qu’il est possible

de maîtriser les risques dans une large mesure sur le lieu de travail, la situation peut être différente

dans l’environnement domestique ou lorsque des consommateurs vulnérables utilisent le produit ou le

système. Par conséquent, il peut être nécessaire de compléter le présent Guide par d’autres publications

pour des secteurs ou des utilisateurs particuliers. Une liste indicative de ces publications figure dans la

Bibliographie.

Le présent Guide est destiné à s’appliquer à l’élaboration de toutes les nouvelles normes ainsi qu’aux

révisions futures de normes existantes.

Il est important de faire la distinction entre les rôles respectifs de la qualité et de la sécurité. Par contre,

il peut être nécessaire de prendre en considération des prescriptions de qualité dans une norme pour

que les prescriptions de sécurité soient respectées de façon cohérente.

NOTE 1 Le terme «norme» — utilisé tout au long du présent Guide — englobe les Normes internationales, les

Spécifications techniques, les Spécifications publiquement disponibles, les Rapports techniques et les Guides.

NOTE 2 De telles normes peuvent traiter exclusivement d’aspects liés à la sécurité ou inclure certains articles

traitant spécifiquement de sécurité.

NOTE 3 Sauf indication contraire, lorsque le terme «comité» est utilisé dans le présent Guide, il se rapporte à

tout comité technique, sous-comité ou groupe de travail aussi bien de l’ISO que de l’IEC.

© ISO/IEC 2014 – Tous droits réservés v
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
GUIDE ISO/IEC GUIDE 51:2014(F)
Aspects liés à la sécurité — Principes directeurs pour les
inclure dans les normes
1 Domaine d’application

Le présent Guide fournit aux rédacteurs de normes des exigences et des recommandations pour

l’inclusion dans les normes des aspects liés à la sécurité. Il s’applique à tous les aspects de la sécurité

relatifs aux personnes, aux biens ou à l’environnement, ou à l’une de leurs combinaisons.

NOTE 1 Par exemple, il peut s’appliquer aux personnes seulement, aux personnes et aux biens ou aux personnes,

aux biens et à l’environnement.

NOTE 2 Le terme «produits et systèmes» utilisé tout au long de ce Guide englobe les produits, les procédés, les

services et les systèmes.

NOTE 3 Les aspects liés à la sécurité peuvent également s’appliquer aux conséquences à long terme pour la

santé.
2 Références normatives
Il n’y a pas de références normatives.
3 Termes et définitions

Pour les besoins du présent document, les termes et définitions suivants s’appliquent.

3.1
dommage

blessure physique ou atteinte à la santé des personnes, ou atteinte aux biens ou à l’environnement

3.2
danger
source potentielle de dommage (3.1)
3.3
événement dangereux
événement qui provoque un dommage (3.1)
3.4
situation dangereuse

situation dans laquelle des personnes, des biens ou l’environnement sont exposés à un ou plusieurs

dangers (3.2)
3.5
prévention intrinsèque

mesures prises pour éliminer des dangers (3.2) et/ou réduire des risques (3.9) par une modification de

la conception ou des caractéristiques de fonctionnement du produit ou du système
3.6
utilisation prévue

utilisation conforme aux informations fournies avec un produit ou un système ou, en l’absence de telles

informations, conforme aux profils d’utilisation généralement entendus
© ISO/IEC 2014 – Tous droits réservés 1
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
ISO/IEC GUIDE 51:2014(F)
3.7
mauvais usage raisonnablement prévisible

utilisation d’un produit ou d’un système dans des conditions ou à des fins non prévues par le fournisseur,

mais qui peut provenir d’un comportement humain envisageable

Note 1 à l’article: Le comportement humain envisageable inclut le comportement de tous les types d’utilisateurs,

par exemple les personnes âgées, les enfants et les personnes présentant des incapacités. Pour de plus amples

informations, voir l’ISO 10377.

Note 2 à l’article: Dans le contexte de la sécurité des consommateurs, le terme «usage raisonnablement prévisible»

est de plus en plus souvent utilisé comme un synonyme commun pour «utilisation prévue» (3.6) et «mauvais

usage raisonnablement prévisible».
3.8
risque résiduel

risque (3.9) subsistant après la mise en œuvre de mesures de réduction du risque (3.13)

3.9
risque
combinaison de la probabilité de la survenue d’un dommage (3.1) et de sa gravité

Note 1 à l’article: La probabilité de survenue inclut l’exposition à une situation dangereuse (3.4), la survenue d’un

événement dangereux (3.3) et la possibilité d’éviter ou de limiter le dommage.
3.10
analyse du risque

utilisation systématique des informations disponibles pour identifier les dangers (3.2) et estimer le

risque (3.9)
3.11
appréciation du risque

processus englobant une analyse du risque (3.10) et une évaluation du risque (3.11)

3.12
évaluation du risque

procédure fondée sur l’analyse du risque (3.10) pour déterminer si le risque tolérable (3.15) a été dépassé

3.13
mesure de réduction du risque
mesure de prévention

action ou moyens permettant d’éliminer les dangers (3.2) ou de réduire les risques (3.9)

EXEMPLE Prévention intrinsèque (3.5), dispositifs de protection, équipement de protection individuelle,

informations pour l’utilisation et l’installation, organisation du travail, formation, mise en œuvre d’un équipement,

supervision.
3.14
sécurité
absence de risque (3.9) intolérable
3.15
risque tolérable

niveau de risque (3.9) accepté dans un contexte donné et fondé sur les valeurs admises par la société

Note 1 à l’article: Pour les besoins du présent Guide, les termes «risque acceptable» et «risque tolérable» sont

considérés comme des synonymes.
3.16
consommateur vulnérable

consommateur exposé à un plus grand risque (3.9) de dommage (3.1) par des produits ou des systèmes,

en raison de son âge, de son niveau d’alphabétisation, de son état ou de ses limites physiques ou mentales,

ou de son inaptitude à accéder aux informations relatives à la sécurité (3.14) du produit

2 © ISO/IEC 2014 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
ISO/IEC GUIDE 51:2014(F)
4 Utilisation des expressions «de sécurité» et «de sûreté»

4.1 L’expression «de sûreté» est souvent interprétée par le public comme étant un état de protection

contre tous les dangers. Il s’agit néanmoins d’une mauvaise interprétation: «de sûreté» est plutôt l’état

de protection contre des dangers reconnus susceptibles de provoquer un dommage. Un certain niveau de

risque est inhérent aux produits ou aux systèmes (voir 3.14).

4.2 Il convient d’éviter l’usage des expressions «de sécurité» et «de sûreté» lorsque celles-ci ne

transmettent aucune information supplémentaire utile. De plus, elles sont susceptibles d’être mal

interprétées comme une garantie d’absence de risque.

L’approche recommandée consiste, chaque fois que possible, à remplacer les expressions «de sécurité»

ou «de sûreté» par une indication du but poursuivi.

EXEMPLES «Casque de protection» au lieu de «casque de sécurité»; «dispositif de protection à impédance» au

lieu d’«impédance de sécurité»; «revêtement de sol antidérapant» au lieu de «revêtement de sol de sécurité».

5 Éléments de risque

Le risque associé à une situation dangereuse particulière dépend des éléments suivants:

a) la gravité du dommage pouvant résulter du danger considéré;
b) la probabilité de survenue de ce dommage, qui est une fonction:
— de l’exposition au danger;
— de la survenue d’un événement dangereux;
— des possibilités d’éviter ou de limiter le dommage.
Les éléments de risque sont indiqués à la Figure 1.
Figure 1 — Éléments de risque
© ISO/IEC 2014 – Tous droits réservés 3
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO/IEC GUIDE 51:2014(F)
6 Obtenir un risque tolérable
6.1 Processus itératif d’appréciation et de réduction du risque

Le processus itératif d’appréciation et de réduction du risque pour chaque danger est essentiel à

l’obtention d’un risque tolérable. Tout au long de la chaîne d’approvisionnement d’un produit ou d’un

système, de son développement jusqu’à sa mise au rebut, la préoccupation essentielle des rédacteurs de

normes est de déterminer si le processus itératif d’appréciation du risque est pris en compte par:

— le comité de rédaction des normes pour réaliser l’appréciation du risque pour des dangers spécifiques

et connus (par exemple une norme spécifique à un produit utilisée pour démontrer la conformité à

la réglementation); ou

— le lecteur/utilisateur de la norme pour réaliser l’appréciation du risque (par exemple le

fabricant/fournisseur du produit ou du système) pour les dangers qu’il identifie (en se fondant, par

exemple, sur l’ISO 12100 ou l’ISO 14971).

Il convient d’appliquer la stratégie suivante pour réduire le risque à un niveau tolérable (voir Figure 2):

a) identifier les utilisateurs probables du produit ou du système, y compris les consommateurs

vulnérables et autres personnes concernées par le produit;

b) identifier l’utilisation prévue et évaluer les mauvais usages raisonnablement prévisibles du produit

ou du système;

c) identifier chaque danger (y compris les situations dangereuses et les événements dangereux

raisonnablement prévisibles) survenant à toutes les étapes et dans toutes les conditions d’utilisation

du produit ou du système, y compris l’installation, le fonctionnement, l’entretien, la réparation et la

destruction/mise au rebut;

d) estimer et évaluer le risque pour chaque groupe d’utilisateurs concernés, découlant du (des) danger(s)

identifié(s): il convient de prêter une attention particulière aux produits ou systèmes utilisés par

différents groupes d’utilisateurs; l’évaluation peut également être effectuée par comparaison avec

des produits ou systèmes similaires;

e) si le risque n’est pas tolérable, le réduire jusqu’à ce qu’il devienne tolérable.

La Figure 2 représente le processus itératif d’appréciation et de réduction du risque.

4 © ISO/IEC 2014 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
ISO/IEC GUIDE 51:2014(F)
Figure 2 — Processus itératif d’appréciation et de réduction du risque
© ISO/IEC 2014 – Tous droits réservés 5
---------------------- Page: 10 ----------------------
ISO/IEC GUIDE 51:2014(F)
6.2 Risque tolérable

6.2.1 Tous les produits et systèmes présentent des dangers et donc un certain niveau de risque résiduel.

Il convient toutefois que le risque associé à ces dangers soit réduit à un niveau tolérable. La sécurité

(telle que définie en 3.14) est obtenue en réduisant le risque à un niveau tolérable, qui est défini dans le

présent Guide comme risque tolérable. Le but de la détermination du risque tolérable pour un événement

dangereux spécifique est de déclarer ce qui est considéré acceptable par rapport aux deux éléments de

risque (voir Figure 1).
Le risque tolérable peut être déterminé par:
— les valeurs admises par la société;

— la recherche d’un équilibre optimal entre une sécurité absolue idéale et ce qu’il est possible d’obtenir;

— les exigences auxquelles doit satisfaire le produit ou le système;
— des facteurs tels que l’aptitude à l’emploi et le rapport qualité/prix.

6.2.2 Il s’ensuit la nécessité d’abaisser le niveau de tolérance, en particulier lorsque les développements

— qu’ils concernent la technologie ou les connaissances — peuvent conduire à des améliorations

économiquement réalisables pour parvenir au risque minimum lié à l’utilisation d’un produit ou d’un

système.

NOTE Les facteurs impliqués dans la réduction du risque global à un niveau inférieur au risque tolérable

varient de façon significative selon que le produit ou le système est utilisé sur le lieu de travail, dans un

environnement public ou par un consommateur à son domicile ou aux alentours de celui-ci. Dans la plupart des

cas, il est possible de maîtriser les risques dans une large mesure sur le lieu de travail, par le biais d’une formation

professionnelle, de procédures de prévention et de l’utilisation obligatoire d’un équipement par les travailleurs.

En revanche, la situation peut être différente dans l’environnement domestique ou public.

6.2.3 Les rédacteurs de normes doivent prendre en considération les aspects liés à la sécurité pour

l’utilisation prévue et le mauvais usage raisonnablement prévisible des produits et des systèmes et

appliquer des mesures de réduction du risque pour obtenir un niveau de risque tolérable.

6.2.4 Les rédacteurs de normes doivent également prendre en considération les usages raisonnablement

prévisibles du produit qui, même s’ils ne constituent pas des utilisations prévues, sont prévisibles sur la

base de l’expérience collective de la population d’utilisateurs finaux. En particulier, lors de la détermination

du risque présenté par des produits de consommation, il convient de prêter une attention particulière aux

produits destinés à, ou utilisés par, des consommateurs vulnérables qui sont souvent dans l’incapacité de

comprendre le danger ou le risque associé.

6.2.5 De nombreux fournisseurs peuvent s’apercevoir que l’utilisateur final n’emploie pas le produit

pour l’utilisation prévue ni de la manière prévue. Toutefois, il convient de prendre en considération le

comportement humain connu envisageable lors du processus de conception.
6.3 Réduction du risque

6.3.1 Il convient que les rédacteurs de normes spécifient les mesures de réduction du risque permettant

d’obtenir un niveau de risque tolérable pour les produits ou systèmes concernés.

Il convient que les normes incorporant des aspects liés à la sécurité fournissent des lignes directrices

pour obtenir un risque tolérable.

NOTE 1 Lors de la conception préliminaire d’un produit ou d’un système, des mesures de prévention intrinsèque

sont généralement appliquées de façon intuitive. Par conséquent, l’évaluation du risque associé à certains dangers

peut conduire à un résultat positif à la première itération de sorte qu’une réduction supplémentaire du risque

n’est pas requise.
6 © ISO/IEC 2014 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 11 ----------------------
ISO/IEC GUIDE 51:2014(F)

NOTE 2 Le Guide ISO/IEC 50 donne des principes directeurs concernant les besoins des enfants et le

Guide ISO/IEC 71 traite des besoins d’autres consommateurs vulnérables tels que les personnes âgées ou les

personnes présentant des incapacités.

6.3.2 Lorsque des dangers ou des situations dangereuses associés à des risques multiples ont été

identifiés, il convient de s’assurer que les mesures de réduction du risque choisies pour réduire un risque

n’engendrent pas un autre risque intolérable.

6.3.3 Lorsqu’une norme de sécurité offre plusieurs options de réduction du risque, il convient que la

norme indique clairement comment déterminer la méthode la plus appropriée pour réduire le risque à

un niveau tolérable en appliquant les principes d’une appréciation du risque.

6.3.4 La Figure 3 illustre le principe de réduction du risque par l’application de la «méthode en trois

étapes» lors de la phase de conception et de mesures supplémentaires lors de la phase d’utilisation.

© ISO/IEC 2014 – Tous droits réservés 7
---------------------- Page: 12 ----------------------
ISO/IEC GUIDE 51:2014(F)
Légende
Voir aussi 7.4.2.

Exemple: risque persistant sur un produit ou un système lorsqu’il est fourni à un client ou dans un élément de

structure après son installation.

Figure 3 — Réduction du risque: combinaison d’efforts durant les phases de conception et

d’utilisation
8 © ISO/IEC 2014 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 13 ----------------------
ISO/IEC GUIDE 51:2014(F)
6.3.5 Lorsque l’on réduit les risques, l’ordre de priorité doit être le suivant:
a) prévention intrinsèque;
b) protecteurs et dispositifs de protection;
c) informations pour les utilisateurs finaux (voir 7.4.2).

La prévention intrinsèque constitue la première et la plus importante étape du processus de réduction

du risque, car les mesures de prévention inhérentes aux caractéristiques du produit ou du système

ont de bonnes chances de rester efficaces en permanence. En revanche, l’expérience montre que des

protecteurs et des dispositifs de protection, même bien conçus, peuvent présenter une défaillance ou

être contournés, et que l’information pour l’utilisation peut ne pas être suivie.

Des protecteurs et des dispositifs de protection doivent être utilisés chaque fois que l’application de

mesures de prévention intrinsèque ne permet raisonnablement ni d’éliminer les dangers, ni de réduire

suffisamment les risques associés. Des mesures de prévention complémentaires mettant en œuvre

d’autres équipements (équipement d’arrêt d’urgence, par exemple) peuvent être nécessaires.

L’utilisateur final a un rôle à jouer dans la procédure de réduction du risque en se conformant à

l’information mise à sa disposition par le concepteur/fournisseur. Toutefois, les informations pour

l’utilisation ne doivent pas être substituées à la mise en œuvre correcte de mesures de prévention

intrinsèque, de protecteurs ou de mesures de prévention complémentaires.
6.4 Validation

Il convient que les normes contiennent des principes directeurs pour valider les mesures de réduction

du risque mises en œuvre, y compris:
— leur efficacité, par exemple méthodes d’essai;
— la procédure d’appréciation du risque qui a été suivie;
— la documentation relative au résultat de l’appréciation du risque.
7 Aspects liés à la sécurité dans les normes
7.1 Types de normes de sécurité

Une étroite collaboration au sein des comités et entre les comités responsables de l’élaboration des normes

sur différents produits et systèmes est nécessaire pour créer une approche cohérente de la réduction

du risque. L’utilisation d’une approche structurée lors de l’écriture des normes est recommandée afin

de garantir que chaque norme spécialisée se limite à des aspects spécifiques et procède par référence à

des normes d’application plus générale pour tout autre aspect pertinent. Une telle structure repose sur

les types de normes suivants:

— norme fondamentale de sécurité, traitant des concepts fondamentaux, des principes et des

prescriptions concernant les aspects généraux de sécurité applicables à un très large éventail de

produits ou de systèmes;

— norme générique de sécurité, traitant des aspects de sécurité applicables à plusieurs produits ou

systèmes, ou à une famille de produits ou systèmes similaires, traités par plus d’un comité technique

et faisant référence, dans toute la mesure du possible, aux normes fondamentales de sécurité;

— norme de sécurité de produit, traitant des aspects de sécurité nécessaires pour un produit ou

système donné, ou pour une famille de produits ou systèmes appartenant au domaine d’un seul

comité et faisant référence, dans toute la mesure du possible, aux normes fondamentales de sécurité

et aux normes génériques de sécurité;
© ISO/IEC 2014 – Tous droits réservés 9
---------------------- Page: 14 ----------------------
ISO/IEC GUIDE 51:2014(F)

— normes intégrant des aspects liés à la sécurité, mais qui ne traitent pas exclusivement des aspects

liés à la sécurité et faisant référence, dans toute la mesure du possible, aux normes fondamentales

de sécurité et aux normes génériques de sécurité.

NOTE 1 Voir le Guide IEC 104 pour une approche sectorielle structurée dans les domaines de l’ingénierie

électrique et électronique.

NOTE 2 Voir le Guide ISO 78 pour une approche sectorielle structurée dans le domaine des machines.

NOTE 3 Voir le Guide ISO/IEC 50 et le Guide ISO/IEC 71 pour une approche structurée de la sécurité des enfants

et des consommateurs vulnérables.
7.2 Analyse des propositions de normes nouvelles

Il convient que chaque proposition pour l’élaboration ou la révision d’une norme concernant des aspects

liés à la sécurité identifie ce qui doit être inclus dans la norme et précise pour qui elle est écrite. Cet

objectif est habituellement atteint en répondant aux questions ci-après:
a) À qui la norme s’adresse-t-elle?
— Qui appliquera la norme et de quelle manière ?
— Qui et/ou quoi sera affecté par la norme ?
— Qu’exigent ceux qui appliquent et/ou sont affectés par la norme ?

— Qui sera affecté par la norme, y compris un éventuel impact sur l’environnement ?

— Qu’exi
...

Questions, Comments and Discussion

Ask us and Technical Secretary will try to provide an answer. You can facilitate discussion about the standard in here.