Service activities relating to drinking water supply, wastewater and stormwater systems — Examples of good practices for stormwater management

This document provides examples of good practices in stormwater management related to ISO 24536 and information on standards and guidelines used in various countries.

Activités de service relatives aux réseaux d’alimentation en eau potable, aux réseaux d’assainissement et aux réseaux de gestion des eaux pluviales — Exemples de bonnes pratiques en matière de gestion des eaux pluviales

Le présent document fournit des exemples de bonnes pratiques en matière de gestion des eaux pluviales en lien avec l’ISO 24536 ainsi que des informations sur les normes et lignes directrices utilisées dans différents pays.

General Information

Status
Published
Publication Date
19-Apr-2021
Current Stage
6060 - International Standard published
Start Date
20-Apr-2021
Completion Date
20-Apr-2021
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TECHNICAL ISO/TR
REPORT 24539
First edition
2021-04
Service activities relating to drinking
water supply, wastewater and
stormwater systems — Examples
of good practices for stormwater
management
Reference number
ISO/TR 24539:2021(E)
ISO 2021
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO/TR 24539:2021(E)
COPYRIGHT PROTECTED DOCUMENT
© ISO 2021

All rights reserved. Unless otherwise specified, or required in the context of its implementation, no part of this publication may

be reproduced or utilized otherwise in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, or posting

on the internet or an intranet, without prior written permission. Permission can be requested from either ISO at the address

below or ISO’s member body in the country of the requester.
ISO copyright office
CP 401 • Ch. de Blandonnet 8
CH-1214 Vernier, Geneva
Phone: +41 22 749 01 11
Email: copyright@iso.org
Website: www.iso.org
Published in Switzerland
ii © ISO 2021 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO/TR 24539:2021(E)
Contents Page

Foreword ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................iv

Introduction ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................v

1 Scope ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 1

2 Normative references ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3 Terms and definitions ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

4 Format and content of the examples provided in this document ...................................................................... 1

Annex A (informative) Examples of stormwater management ................................................................................................. 2

Annex B (informative) Related documents .................................................................................................................................................74

Bibliography .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................80

© ISO 2021 – All rights reserved iii
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ISO/TR 24539:2021(E)
Foreword

ISO (the International Organization for Standardization) is a worldwide federation of national standards

bodies (ISO member bodies). The work of preparing International Standards is normally carried out

through ISO technical committees. Each member body interested in a subject for which a technical

committee has been established has the right to be represented on that committee. International

organizations, governmental and non-governmental, in liaison with ISO, also take part in the work.

ISO collaborates closely with the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) on all matters of

electrotechnical standardization.

The procedures used to develop this document and those intended for its further maintenance are

described in the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 1. In particular, the different approval criteria needed for the

different types of ISO documents should be noted. This document was drafted in accordance with the

editorial rules of the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 2 (see www .iso .org/ directives).

Attention is drawn to the possibility that some of the elements of this document may be the subject of

patent rights. ISO shall not be held responsible for identifying any or all such patent rights. Details of

any patent rights identified during the development of the document will be in the Introduction and/or

on the ISO list of patent declarations received (see www .iso .org/ patents).

Any trade name used in this document is information given for the convenience of users and does not

constitute an endorsement.

For an explanation of the voluntary nature of standards, the meaning of ISO specific terms and

expressions related to conformity assessment, as well as information about ISO's adherence to the

World Trade Organization (WTO) principles in the Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT), see www .iso .org/

iso/ foreword .html.

This document was prepared by Technical Committee ISO/TC 224, Service activities relating to drinking

water supply, wastewater and stormwater systems.

Any feedback or questions on this document should be directed to the user’s national standards body. A

complete listing of these bodies can be found at www .iso .org/ members .html.
iv © ISO 2021 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
ISO/TR 24539:2021(E)
Introduction

The objectives of stormwater management systems include effective control and management of

flows; protection of water quality; preservation of water quantity; protection of the built, public and

natural environments; water conservation and reuse; protection or enhancement of ecosystem health;

protection or enhancement of public health, safety and welfare; protection or enhancement of social

values; and facilitation of sustainable development and climate adaptation.

“Climate Change 2014: Synthesis Report: Summary for Policymakers, 2014, Intergovernmental Panel

on Climate Change” gives us the warning that many global risks of climate change are concentrated in

urban areas. It indicates that risks are amplified for those lacking essential infrastructure and services

or living in poor-quality housing and exposed areas. The key risks, all of which are identified with high

confidence, include those of severe ill-health and disrupted livelihoods for urban populations due to

flooding from a range of sources including pluvial, fluvial, storm surges and coastal flooding.

Pursuant to the “World Urbanization Prospects: The 2011 Revision, 2011, United Nations”, the world

urban population is expected to increase by 72 per cent by 2050, from 3,6 billion in 2011 to 6,3 billion

in 2050. i.e. the same size as the world’s total population was in 2002. Virtually all of the expected

growth in the world population will be concentrated in the urban areas of the less developed regions,

which are deemed to be vulnerable to flooding. The report states that flooding is the most frequent

and greatest hazard for the 633 largest cities or urban agglomerations analysed. Mud slides are often

associated with severe weather conditions and flooding, particularly in rural areas and commonly will

impact rural villages and small towns, or their associated transportation infrastructures.

Thus, climate change and urbanization with rapid growth in population in cities and surrounding

areas are most likely to increase flooding and the risks associated with stormwater worldwide.

Serious challenges for stormwater management are posed for an increasing number of stormwater

utilities, which are responsible for the control of pluvial flooding that is caused by rainwater entering

and surcharging stormwater systems or remaining on surfaces and flowing overland or into local

depressions and topographic lows to create temporary ponds.

The immediate impacts of urban flooding can include loss of human life, damage to property, disruption

of traffic and other services and deteriorations of limited freshwater resources, water ecosystems and

hygienic living conditions. Effective stormwater management systems can enhance the resilience of

communities by reducing the likelihood and severity of pluvial, fluvial and coastal flooding.

Planning methods for stormwater systems have been established in most developed countries but

they do not always apply directly to other countries with different conditions. In order to help deliver

the best solution to the targeted area, the framework and planning processes should be standardised,

within a local institutional and regulatory context.

Urban stormwater management is usually the responsibility of municipal water and wastewater service

providers. However, in some countries the urban stormwater system management is performed by

separate entities especially established for this purpose. Sometimes these services are not financially

supported from the municipal water and wastewater revenues but from stormwater levies applied to

flood vulnerable properties concerned and created for that purpose or a local governing authority.

While it is largely and historically true that urban stormwater management has been the responsibility

of municipal wastewater authorities, it is increasingly recognized that stormwater management may

be best or additionally served through collaboration with other relevant stakeholders such as Forestry

Commissions (for forested hill and mountain sides), Agricultural Commissions for upstream farming

properties, river authorities or Port Commissions for the management of tidal surges on both marine

and freshwater bodies or local governing authorities.
This document compiles examples of good practices in stormwater management.

These examples illustrate a wide range of measures including both asset and non-asset-related

measures for various objectives relating to stormwater management.
© ISO 2021 – All rights reserved v
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
TECHNICAL REPORT ISO/TR 24539:2021(E)
Service activities relating to drinking water supply,
wastewater and stormwater systems — Examples of good
practices for stormwater management
1 Scope

This document provides examples of good practices in stormwater management related to

ISO 24536 and information on standards and guidelines used in various countries.
2 Normative references
There are no normative references in this document.
3 Terms and definitions
No terms and definitions are listed in this document.

ISO and IEC maintain terminological databases for use in standardization at the following addresses:

— ISO Online browsing platform: available at https:// www .iso .org/ obp
— IEC Electropedia: available at http:// www .electropedia .org/
4 Format and content of the examples provided in this document

Examples of stormwater management introduced here are classified by country and are described in

Annex A. They are also classified according to the objectives in ISO 24536:2019, Table 1, and are shown

in Table A.1. The examples were provided by country representatives and adapted to the format of this

document. In addition, although various standards and guidelines are described in Annex B, Table B.1

and Table B.2, they are shown only as a name and a reference URL.
Table 1 illustrates the structure of the examples included in Annex A.
Table 1 — The structure of the examples
Section Content

Background Provides background information on the project, such as characteristics of

the watershed, social background, issues and tasks.

Purpose Provides a description of the project objectives, such as improvements to be

achieved.
Project outline Provides a description of the project.

Organization Provides simply the identity of the organization offering its experience.

© ISO 2021 – All rights reserved 1
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ISO/TR 24539:2021(E)
Annex A
(informative)
Examples of stormwater management
A.1 Introduction

There are many examples of good stormwater management practices that follow the procedures set by

the ISO 24536. The examples have been classified according to the stormwater management objectives

they were answering to.

Table A.1 — List of examples and their key objectives for stormwater management related to

ISO 24536
Objectives according to ISO 24536
Protection
Protec- Facilita-
of the built, Wa
Protec- tion or Protec- tion of
Effec- public ter
tion or en- tion or sustain-
tive con- and con
Protec- Preser- en- hance- en- able
Sub-
trol and natural ser
Title
tion of vation hance- ment of hance- devel-
clause
man- environ- vat
water of water ment of public ment of opment
agement ments: ion
quality quantity eco- health, public and
of flow infrastruc- and
system safety social climate
volumes ture, prop- reu
health and wel- values adapta-
erty and se
fare tion
resources
Creation of a wetland in Mount
A.2.1 X X X X X
Barker
Stormwater harvesting and
A.2.2 X X
reuse in Murray Bridge
Austria — Increasing storage
A.3 capacity and implementing X X X X
dynamic control in Vienna
Improving sediment control
A.4.1 through the implementation of a X X X X
wetland in Hamilton
Planning effective stormwa-
A.4.2 ter management measures in X X X X X X
Ottawa
Denmark — Dynamic control in
A.5 X X X X X
Kolding
Disconnecting stormwater
from the combined network in
A.6.1 X X X X X X
Killingworth and Longbenton,
North Tyneside, England
River diversion and stormwater
A.6.2 storage in Brunton Park, Gos- X X X X X
forth, Newcastle, England
France — Real-time control of
sewer systems for the reduction
A.7 X X X
of combined sewer overflows in
Biarritz
Implementation of a real-time
supervision for stormwater fa-
A.8.1 X X
cilities operation and flood risk
management in Nagoya
Implementation of the storm-
A.8.2 water management strategy of X
Niigata City
2 © ISO 2021 – All rights reserved
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ISO/TR 24539:2021(E)
Table A.1 (continued)
Objectives according to ISO 24536
Protection
Protec- Facilita-
of the built, Wa
Protec- tion or Protec- tion of
Effec- public ter
tion or en- tion or sustain-
tive con- and con
Protec- Preser- en- hance- en- able
Sub-
trol and natural ser
Title
tion of vation hance- ment of hance- devel-
clause
man- environ- vat
water of water ment of public ment of opment
agement ments: ion
quality quantity eco- health, public and
of flow infrastruc- and
system safety social climate
volumes ture, prop- reu
health and wel- values adapta-
erty and se
fare tion
resources
X-band radar observation and
forecast for stormwater and
A.8.3 X X
flood risk management in Osaka
City
Implementation of a flood risk
A.8.4 X X X
protection strategy in Tokyo
Source infiltration promotion in
A.8.5 X X X
Yokohama
Implementation of the storm-
A.8.6 water management strategy in X X
Kitakyushu City
Implementation of an early
A.8.7 flood warning system in Toyama X X
City
Stormwater storage tank and
A.8.8 reuse in Hiroshima City’s new X X X
stadium
Flood risk protection scheme in
A.8.9 X X
Fukuoka
CSO reduction and flood preven-
A.8.10 X X X X X
tion in Kyoto
A.2 Australia
A.2.1 Creation of a wetland in Mt Barker
A.2.1.1 Background

A new Environmental Services Centre is planned for Mt Barker adjacent to a wastewater treatment

plant, Mt Barker Creek and a high school.

The area has a long history of disturbance being a former abattoir, tannery and now informal council

works storage area. Despite this disturbance, Lathan's snipe (an endangered migratory bird from

Siberia) and many other bird species have been sighted along the flood plain area.

A.2.1.2 Purpose

As part of planning for the Environmental Services Centre, a wetland and surrounding landscape was

built to achieve multiple objectives, including:
— creating habitat for the Lathan's snipe and other birds species;

— becoming a recreational asset with high amenity, providing links to a linear trail along Mt Barker

Creek and connecting to the school and depot;

— rehabilitating vegetation and creating a seed bank for local provenance plants in a range of

ecosystems;

— providing stormwater treatment for runoff generated by the new depot and car park;

© ISO 2021 – All rights reserved 3
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ISO/TR 24539:2021(E)

— providing opportunities for education and awareness programs, both for the school and for a

planned community environmental centre servicing community groups, schools and the general

public.

A design response was developed that addressed these criteria and was thoroughly tested during

consultation with Birds SA, council, community groups and specialist ecologists.

The design also provides a range of ecological habitats for vegetation and bird species, encourages

visitors yet provides secluded areas where birds will not be disturbed.
A.2.1.3 Outline

This project was developed to rehabilitate a degraded area on the banks of Mt Barker Creek as part of

a planned council depot construction. The central component of the project is a constructed wetland

which will protect the creek from increased pollutants, provide habitat for rare and endangered bird

species and become a recreational node along the Mt Barker Creek linear path.

A broader objective of the project is to rehabilitate a range of ecological habitats surrounding the

wetlands, including grasslands, wet and dry woodlands and riparian areas. Much of the impetus for

the initiative is to improve habitat for a range of rare and endangered birds and therefore the design

involved close consultation with Birds SA.

The design provides a range of ecological habitats for vegetation and bird species yet provides secluded

areas where birds will not be disturbed.

Walking paths, viewing decks and a boardwalk encourage people to enjoy the wetland but manage

their access and allow a variety of habitats to be created (riparian inundation, open grassland, tussock

grassland and wet woodlands).

The 6 000 m wetland was constructed in 2014 and an extensive search was performed to source local

provenance plant species to use in the wetlands. A thorough mapping exercise was undertaken during

planting to enable the wetland to serve as a seedbank for these rare local species into the future.

The wetland also provides best practice stormwater treatment for runoff from the (future) depot thus

helping to protect Mt Barker Creek and ultimately the Bremer River from urban stormwater pollutants

(see Figure A.1).
Figure A.1 — Future plan of Mt Barker Environment Services Centre wetlands
4 © ISO 2021 – All rights reserved
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ISO/TR 24539:2021(E)
A.2.1.4 Organization
Mount Barker District Council
A.2.2 Stormwater harvesting and reuse in Murray Bridge
A.2.2.1 Background

Murray Bridge, South Australia, is situated on the banks of the River Murray and is one of the larger

regional centres at the lower end of the Murray Darling Basin and an important hub for regional

industries in the Lower Murrayland and Mallee Regions. Residential and industrial developments are a

sign of the city’s growing urban populations. Sustaining the city’s many open spaces – parks, reserves

and sporting facilities – is vital to the region and its local community.

In addition, major subdivisions are planned at the Newbridge (Old Racecourse) site and Gifford Hill,

which are proposed to include in excess of 3 000 dwellings, and will constitute a major proportion of the

proposed expansion of Murray Bridge over the next 20 years. A challenge for Council is the provision of

infrastructure that can appropriately manage the increases in stormwater runoff associated with infill

and greenfield developments.
A.2.2.2 Purpose

The Murray Bridge stormwater management and reuse scheme was built to provide an alternative,

secure and sustainable source of non-drinking water supply to the Rural City of Murray Bridge. The

Scheme harvests stormwater from eight basins and wetlands across Murray Bridge and transports it

to a lined lagoon at Gifford Hill for long-term storage. When needed for irrigation, raw stormwater is

pumped from the lagoon to the new treatment plant on Old Swanport Road, from which the treated

stormwater is transported via distribution pumps and pipelines to the city’s irrigation system.

The scheme was delivered by the Rural City of Murray Bridge, in partnership with the Australian

Government and two private contributors. The total budget of $14,23 million was supported through

$7,115 million of funding from the Australian Government’s National Urban Water and Desalination

Plan, to match the co-contribution from Council and in-kind works from the Gifford Hill Joint Venture.

The scheme was completed on time and within budget, and with an impeccable safety record.

The Australian Government funding agreement required the scheme to decrease reliance on the River

Murray and reduce potable water demand by up to 172 ML annually.
A.2.2.3 Outline
A.2.2.3.1 Scheme overview

The Rural City of Murray Bridge (Council) has a current water allocation of 250 million litres/year from

the River Murray, and this allocation is subject to restrictions depending on flow conditions in the river.

Council’s allocation was significantly restricted during the drought years of 2006 through to 2010,

dropping as low as 45 million litres/year (18 %) in 2008/09. These restrictions resulted in significant

“browning off” and degradation of Council’s reserves and sporting fields.

In response to the drought, Council identified stormwater as a valuable, untapped resource that can

provide a secure, sustainable and diverse water supply to meet the future needs of the community. A

strategy was soon developed for how stormwater can be harvested and reused across Murray Bridge to

prevent a repeat of the devastating impacts of the drought, reduce reliance on mains and River Murray

water, improve amenity of the many parks and reserves, improve drainage performance and flood

protection, and improve water quality.
A.2.2.3.2 Design

In 2014 the Rural City of Murray Bridge entered into an Early Contractor Involvement (ECI) process

with construction and design partners to optimize the previous concept design of the scheme. The

© ISO 2021 – All rights reserved 5
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ISO/TR 24539:2021(E)

ECI process was facilitated by the scheme’s project manager, with input from the scheme’s Technical

Advisor.

Due to a delay in the planned housing developments at the Old Racecourse (Newbridge) and Gifford

Hill development sites, which were originally proposed to be the source of a significant portion of the

harvestable volume of stormwater in the previous concept design, a comprehensive optioneering phase

was undertaken to identify alternative harvesting sites that can meet or exceed the yield targets.

Through careful planning, design and management the yield (irrigation demand met) from the eight

harvesting sites currently connected to the scheme is expected to be approximately 230 ML annually,

based on average rainfall in Murray Bridge. The scheme has also made provision for the connection of

future pump stations at the Newbridge (Old Racecourse) and Gifford Hill development sites. Once these

pump stations are installed and the developments are completed, the total harvestable volume for the

scheme may exceed 700 ML annually.

The ECI process also identified a parcel of vacant land on Old Swanport Rd that was ideally located to

become the hub of the scheme (Figure A.2). Located between the existing and Rural Avenue Wetland

and the Gifford Hill Lagoon, with existing power supply available from Old Swanport Rd and only a

short drive to the Council Depot, the site was ideal for the construction of the new treatment plant.

Figure A.2 — The ‘hub’ of the scheme; Rural Avenue Wetland, the treatment plant and Gifford

Hill Lagoon

A route for the new pipelines along Rural Avenue, Prosperity Grove and Maurice Road was selected to

provide a link between the treatment plant and the existing Council irrigation network on Adelaide

Road. This route also enabled stormwater to be harvested from the existing Council wetlands and

basins using parallel pipelines to reduce construction cost (i.e. one set of pipelines for harvesting, and

another set of pipelines for distribution, within the same road reserve).

The planning and design of the scheme included consideration of opportunities for future expansion to

include additional harvesting sites, increased demand for treated stormwater, and a possible link to a

regional water diversification scheme that links Murray Bridge to the District Council of Mount Barker.

Examples of the “future-proofing” measures that were incorporated into the design include:

— The siting of the 110 ML storage lagoon on land that acts as a buffer to the SE Freeway at Gifford Hill,

with surrounding land available for additional storage lagoons in the future (an ultimate storage of

440 ML is envisaged).

— The inclusion of a UV disinfection unit in the Old Swanport Road treatment plant to provide treated

stormwater that is fit for purpose under an “unrestricted” irrigation regime. This provides flexibility

for Council and third party water users to irrigate public open spaces 24 h a day. Provision was also

made in the treatment plant for a second UV disinfection unit to be retrofitted in the future, should

higher treatment flow rates be desirable.
6 © ISO 2021 – All rights reserved
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ISO/TR 24539:2021(E)

— The treatment plant and treated water storage tank have been sized to accommodate Council’s peak

irrigation demand (night time, typically from 10 pm to 8 am) while also filling the tank shared by

two other local organizations. There is further opportunity to operate the treatment plant during

non-peak times (day time, 8 am to 10 pm) to service additional Council sites and other water users.

— The harvesting and distribution pipelines were sized to accommodate stormwater flows from the

planned housing developments at the Old Racecourse (Newbridge) and Gifford Hill development

sites, to enable simultaneous pumping from these sites together with the current harvesting sites.

In particular the pipe crossings of the SE Freeway, which were installed using horizontal directional

drilling (HDD) techniques, have significant redundancy to accommodate increase flows.

With the Council’s unique stormwater drainage system consisting of a series of stormwater basins

in localized depressions, it was also important that the harvesting and reuse strategy was able to

improve the performance of the drainage system and level of flood protection to public and private

infrastructure.

The basins do not naturally drain to the River Murray, but rather they rely on infiltration or pumps to

dispose of stormwater. In the past, these basins have not always been able to cope during large rainfall

events, resulting in flooding of roadways and in some instances, private property, as represented in

Figure A.3. Floodplain modelling was therefore used to inform the selection of pump rates and to

inform the scheme’s control philosophy, to ensure that the improvements to drainage performance and

flood protection were maximized.

Figure A.3 — Before and after floodplain maps for golf course basin, 5-year average recurrence

interval

The planning and design of the scheme also placed strong emphasis on the future operation and

maintenance by Council staff. The scheme has a central Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition

(SCADA) system located at the Old Swanport Road treatment plant that is connected to all sites via

fibre optic cable or mobile phone-based telemetry systems. The SCADA system enables Council staff to

remotely monitor the harvesting and distribution infrastructure for the purpose of automated control,

using their personal computers and/or tablet devices. In addition, critical alarms are alerted to the

operators via an SMS service.

Many of the new pumps utilize variable speed drive functionality to provide operational flexibility,

reduce wear on the mechanical components of the system, and to maintain system pressure as required.

Under standard operating conditions all harvesting sites will pump simultaneously to the Gifford Hill

Lagoon at pre-determined flowrates, in order to maximize the harvestable volume that is generated by

small and frequent rainfall events.
© ISO 2021 – All rights reserved 7
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ISO/TR 24539:2021(E)

In anticipation of and during large rainfall events, Council staff can use the new control system to

remotely monitor the water levels in the basins and adjust pump rates and sequencing to manage

flood risk in real time. For example, Council will have the flexibility to reduce the pump rate at one site,

to enable a higher pump rate to be achieved at another site that is considered to be at greater risk of

flooding.

While the scheme has been designed to operate automatically with minimal operator intervention,

manual and local modes have also been provided on all equipment to facilitate testing and operation in

unusual circumstances
Other notable operation and maintenance provisions include:

— Lifting mechanisms in the treatment plant to enable the safe and practical maintenance of pump

sets and filters.

— Two solar powered pump stations that can easily be converted to mains power supply if higher

flowrates are required in the future (i.e. after the ultimate development scenario is reached).

— Control manholes with isolation valves at each of the harvesting sites, to provide safe inspection

and access of submersible pumps.
— The selection of submersible pumps stations with pumps capable of be
...

RAPPORT ISO/TR
TECHNIQUE 24539
Première édition
2021-04
Activités de service relatives aux
réseaux d’alimentation en eau
potable, aux réseaux d’assainissement
et aux réseaux de gestion des eaux
pluviales — Exemples de bonnes
pratiques en matière de gestion des
eaux pluviales
Service activities relating to drinking water supply, wastewater and
stormwater systems — Examples of good practices for stormwater
management
Numéro de référence
ISO/TR 24539:2021(F)
© ISO 2021
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO/TR 24539:2021(F)
DOCUMENT PROTÉGÉ PAR COPYRIGHT
© ISO 2021

Droits de reproduction réservés. Sauf indication contraire, aucune partie de cette publication ne peut être reproduite ni utilisée

sous quelque forme que ce soit et par aucun procédé, électronique ou mécanique, y compris la photocopie, l’affichage sur l’internet

ou sur un Intranet, sans autorisation écrite préalable. Les demandes d’autorisation peuvent être adressées à l’ISO à l’adresse ci-

après ou au comité membre de l’ISO dans le pays du demandeur.
ISO copyright office
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Publié en Suisse
© ISO 2021 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO/TR 24539:2021(F)
Sommaire Page

Avant-propos .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................iv

Introduction .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................v

1 Domaine d’application ................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

2 Références normatives ..................................................................................................................................................................................1

3 Termes et définitions ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

4 Format et contenu des exemples fournis dans le présent document ...........................................................1

Annexe A (informative) Exemples de gestion des eaux pluviales ......................................................................................... 2

Annexe B (informative) Documents connexes .......................................................................................................................................79

Bibliographie ...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................86

iii
© ISO 2021 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO/TR 24539:2021(F)
Avant-propos

L'ISO (Organisation internationale de normalisation) est une fédération mondiale d'organismes

nationaux de normalisation (comités membres de l'ISO). L'élaboration des Normes internationales est

en général confiée aux comités techniques de l'ISO. Chaque comité membre intéressé par une étude

a le droit de faire partie du comité technique créé à cet effet. Les organisations internationales,

gouvernementales et non gouvernementales, en liaison avec l'ISO participent également aux travaux.

L'ISO collabore étroitement avec la Commission électrotechnique internationale (IEC) en ce qui

concerne la normalisation électrotechnique.

Les procédures utilisées pour élaborer le présent document et celles destinées à sa mise à jour sont

décrites dans les Directives ISO/IEC, Partie 1. Il convient, en particulier, de prendre note des différents

critères d'approbation requis pour les différents types de documents ISO. Le présent document a

été rédigé conformément aux règles de rédaction données dans les Directives ISO/IEC, Partie 2 (voir

www.iso.org/directives).

L'attention est attirée sur le fait que certains des éléments du présent document peuvent faire l'objet de

droits de propriété intellectuelle ou de droits analogues. L'ISO ne saurait être tenue pour responsable

de ne pas avoir identifié de tels droits de propriété et averti de leur existence. Les détails concernant

les références aux droits de propriété intellectuelle ou autres droits analogues identifiés lors de

l'élaboration du document sont indiqués dans l'Introduction et/ou dans la liste des déclarations de

brevets reçues par l'ISO (voir www.iso.org/brevets).

Les appellations commerciales éventuellement mentionnées dans le présent document sont données

pour information, par souci de commodité, à l’intention des utilisateurs et ne sauraient constituer un

engagement.

Pour une explication de la nature volontaire des normes, la signification des termes et expressions

spécifiques de l'ISO liés à l'évaluation de la conformité, ou pour toute information au sujet de l'adhésion

de l'ISO aux principes de l’Organisation mondiale du commerce (OMC) concernant les obstacles

techniques au commerce (OTC), voir www.iso.org/avant-propos.

Le présent document a été élaboré par le comité technique ISO/TC 224, Activités de service relatives aux

systèmes d'alimentation en eau potable, aux systèmes d'assainissement et aux systèmes de gestion des eaux

pluviales.

Il convient que l’utilisateur adresse tout retour d’information ou toute question concernant le présent

document à l’organisme national de normalisation de son pays. Une liste exhaustive desdits organismes

se trouve à l’adresse www.iso.org/fr/members.html.
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ISO/TR 24539:2021(F)
Introduction

Les objectifs des réseaux de gestion des eaux pluviales incluent la régulation et la maîtrise efficaces

des débits; la protection de la qualité de l’eau; la préservation de la quantité d’eau; la protection des

biens, des personnes et des milieux naturels; la conservation et la réutilisation de l’eau; la préservation

ou l’amélioration de la santé des écosystèmes; la protection ou l’amélioration de la santé, de la sécurité

et de la protection des personnes; la protection ou l’amélioration des valeurs sociales; et le soutien du

développement durable et de l’adaptation au climat.

Le rapport «Changements climatiques 2014 – Rapport de synthèse – Résumé à l’intention des décideurs,

2014, Groupe d’experts intergouvernemental sur l’évolution du climat» avertit que de nombreux risques

liés aux changements climatiques à l’échelle planétaire sont concentrés dans les zones urbaines. Il

indique que les risques sont amplifiés pour les personnes dépourvues des infrastructures et services

essentiels, ou vivant dans des logements de mauvaise qualité et dans des zones exposées. Les risques

majeurs, tous identifiés avec un degré de confiance élevé, comprennent une dégradation de l’état de

santé et la mise en péril des moyens de subsistance des populations urbaines dues aux inondations

d’origines diverses (inondations pluviales, fluviales et côtières, tempêtes).

D’après le rapport intitulé «World Urbanization Prospects: The 2011 Revision, 2011, United Nations»

(Perspectives de l’urbanisation mondiale 2011), la population urbaine mondiale devrait augmenter

de 72 pour cent d’ici 2050, pour passer de 3,6 milliards en 2011 à 6,3 milliards en 2050, c’est-à-dire une

augmentation équivalente à la taille de la population mondiale totale de 2002. La quasi-totalité de la

croissance attendue de la population mondiale sera concentrée dans les zones urbaines des régions les

moins développées, qui sont considérées comme vulnérables aux inondations. Le rapport indique que les

inondations constituent le danger le plus fréquent et le plus important pour les 633 plus grandes villes

ou agglomérations urbaines analysées. Les coulées de boue sont souvent associées à des phénomènes

météorologiques extrêmes et à de graves inondations, en particulier dans les zones rurales, et auront

typiquement un impact sur les villages ruraux et les petites villes, ou leurs infrastructures de transport

associées.

Par conséquent, les changements climatiques, l’urbanisation et la croissance rapide de la population des

villes et des zones périphériques vont probablement accroître les inondations et les risques associés

aux eaux pluviales à l’échelle planétaire. De sérieux défis en matière de gestion des eaux pluviales sont

posés à un nombre grandissant de services publics de gestion des eaux pluviales, qui sont responsables

de la maîtrise des inondations causées par les eaux de pluie qui pénètrent et mettent en charge les

systèmes de gestion des eaux pluviales, ou qui subsistent en surface et ruissellent, ou qui s’écoulent vers

les points bas locaux et les dépressions topographiques pour créer des zones inondées temporaires.

Les impacts immédiats des inondations urbaines peuvent inclure les pertes de vies humaines, les dégâts

matériels, la perturbation du trafic et des autres services, ainsi que la détérioration des ressources

limitées en eau douce, des écosystèmes aquatiques et des conditions de vie et d’hygiène. Des systèmes

efficaces en matière de gestion des eaux pluviales peuvent accroître la résilience des collectivités en

réduisant la probabilité et la gravité des inondations pluviales, fluviales et côtières.

Des méthodes d’élaboration de plan d’action pour des réseaux de gestion des eaux pluviales ont été

établies dans la plupart des pays développés, mais elles ne s’appliquent pas toujours directement

aux autres pays où les conditions diffèrent. Afin de contribuer à fournir la meilleure solution pour

la zone ciblée, il convient de normaliser le cadre et les processus de planification, dans un contexte

institutionnel et réglementaire local.

La gestion des eaux pluviales urbaines relève généralement de la responsabilité des prestataires de

services municipaux d’assainissement et d’approvisionnement en eau. Cependant, dans certains pays,

le management du système de gestion des eaux pluviales urbaines est assuré par des entités distinctes

spécialement créées à cet effet. Parfois, le financement de ces services provient non pas des redevances

municipales perçues au titre de l’approvisionnement en eau et du traitement des eaux usées, mais des

taxations sur les eaux pluviales appliquées aux biens vulnérables aux inondations et créées dans ce but

ou par une autorité locale.
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ISO/TR 24539:2021(F)

Bien qu’il soit majoritairement et historiquement vrai que la gestion des eaux pluviales urbaines ait

été de la responsabilité des autorités municipales en charge de l’assainissement, il est de plus en plus

reconnu que la gestion des eaux pluviales peut être optimisée ou complétée par une collaboration avec

d’autres parties intéressées telles que l’Office National des Forêts (pour les collines et les montagnes

boisées), les Chambres d’agriculture pour les propriétés agricoles en amont, les Agences de l’Eau ou les

autorités portuaires pour la gestion des tempêtes sur les masses d’eau marine et d’eau douce, ou les

autorités locales.

Le présent document rassemble des exemples de bonnes pratiques en matière de gestion des eaux

pluviales.

Ces exemples illustrent un large éventail de mesures, notamment des mesures structurelles et non

structurelles, pour remplir divers objectifs liés à la gestion des eaux pluviales.

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RAPPORT TECHNIQUE ISO/TR 24539:2021(F)
Activités de service relatives aux réseaux d’alimentation en
eau potable, aux réseaux d’assainissement et aux réseaux
de gestion des eaux pluviales — Exemples de bonnes
pratiques en matière de gestion des eaux pluviales
1 Domaine d’application

Le présent document fournit des exemples de bonnes pratiques en matière de gestion des eaux pluviales

en lien avec l’ISO 24536 ainsi que des informations sur les normes et lignes directrices utilisées dans

différents pays.
2 Références normatives
Le présent document ne contient aucune référence normative.
3 Termes et définitions
Aucun terme n’est défini dans le présent document.

L’ISO et l’IEC tiennent à jour des bases de données terminologiques destinées à être utilisées en

normalisation, consultables aux adresses suivantes:

— ISO Online browsing platform: disponible à l'adresse https:// www .iso .org/ obp

— IEC Electropedia: disponible à l'adresse https:// www .electropedia .org/
4 Format et contenu des exemples fournis dans le présent document

Les exemples de gestion des eaux pluviales décrits dans le présent document sont classés par pays et

sont décrits dans l’Annexe A. Ils sont également classés en fonction des objectifs de l’ISO 24536:2019,

Tableau 1, tel qu’indiqué dans le Tableau A.1. Les exemples ont été fournis par des représentants

des pays et adaptés au format du présent document. En outre, bien que les diverses normes et lignes

directrices soient décrites dans l’Annexe B, Tableau B.1 et Tableau B.2, elles ne sont indiquées que par

leur titre et une URL de référence.
Le Tableau 1 illustre la structure des exemples décrits à l’Annexe A.
Tableau 1 — Structure des exemples
Section Contenu

Contexte Fournit des informations générales sur le projet, telles que les caractéristiques

du bassin versant, le contexte social, les problématiques et les tâches.

Objectif Fournit une description des objectifs du projet, tels que les améliorations à

apporter.
Descriptif du projet Fournit une description du projet.

Organisme Indique simplement l’identité de l’organisme présentant son expérience.

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ISO/TR 24539:2021(F)
Annexe A
(informative)
Exemples de gestion des eaux pluviales
A.1 Introduction

Il existe de nombreux exemples de bonnes pratiques de gestion des eaux pluviales qui suivent les modes

opératoires définis par l’ISO 24536. Les exemples ont été classés en fonction des objectifs de gestion des

eaux pluviales auxquels ils répondaient.

Tableau A.1 — Liste d’exemples et leurs principaux objectifs en matière de gestion des eaux

pluviales en lien avec l’ISO 24536
Objectifs selon l’ISO 24536
Protec-
tion ou
Protec-
amélio- Pro-
tion des
Préser- ration tection
Régula- biens, des Sou-
vation de la ou
tion et Préser- per- tien du
Pro- Conser- ou amé- santé, amé-
maî- vation sonnes et dévelop-
Article/
tection vation liora- de la liora-
Titre
trise de la du milieu pement
Paragraphe
de la et réuti- tion de sécu- tion
effi- quan- naturel durable et
qualité lisation la santé rité et des
caces tité (infras- de l’adap-
de l’eau de l’eau des de la va-
des d’eau tructure, tation au
écosys- pro- leurs
débits proprié- climat
tèmes tection so-
tés et res-
des ciales
sources)
per-
sonnes
Création d’une zone humide à
A.2.1 X X X X X
Mount Barker
Collecte et réutilisation des
A.2.2 eaux pluviales à Murray X X
Bridge
Autriche — Augmentation
de la capacité de stockage et
A.3 X X X X
mise en œuvre d’une régula-
tion dynamique à Vienne
Amélioration du contrôle
des sédiments par la mise en
A.4.1 X X X X
place d’une zone humide à
Hamilton
Planification de mesures
A.4.2 efficaces de gestion des eaux X X X X X X
pluviales à Ottawa
Danemark — Régulation
A.5 X X X X X
dynamique à Kolding
Déconnexion des eaux plu-
viales du réseau unitaire à
A.6.1 X X X X X X
Killingworth et Longbenton,
North Tyneside, Angleterre
Détournement d’une rivière
et stockage des eaux pluviales
A.6.2 X X X X X
à Brunton Park, Gosforth,
Newcastle, Angleterre
France — Régulation en
temps réel des réseaux d’as-
A.7 sainissement pour la réduc- X X X
tion des rejets des déversoirs
d’orage à Biarritz
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ISO/TR 24539:2021(F)
Tableau A.1 (suite)
Objectifs selon l’ISO 24536
Protec-
tion ou
Protec-
amélio- Pro-
tion des
Préser- ration tection
Régula- biens, des Sou-
vation de la ou
tion et Préser- per- tien du
Pro- Conser- ou amé- santé, amé-
maî- vation sonnes et dévelop-
Article/
tection vation liora- de la liora-
Titre
trise de la du milieu pement
Paragraphe
de la et réuti- tion de sécu- tion
effi- quan- naturel durable et
qualité lisation la santé rité et des
caces tité (infras- de l’adap-
de l’eau de l’eau des de la va-
des d’eau tructure, tation au
écosys- pro- leurs
débits proprié- climat
tèmes tection so-
tés et res-
des ciales
sources)
per-
sonnes
Mise en place d’une supervi-
sion en temps réel du fonc-
tionnement des structures
A.8.1 X X
de gestion des eaux pluviales
et de la gestion des risques
d’inondation à Nagoya
Mise en œuvre de la stratégie
A.8.2 de gestion des eaux pluviales X
de la ville de Niigata
Observation et prévisions
par radar en bande X pour la
A.8.3 gestion des eaux pluviales et X X
des risques d’inondation dans
la ville d’Osaka
Mise en œuvre d’une stratégie
A.8.4 de protection contre les X X X
risques d’inondation à Tokyo
Promotion de l’infiltration à
A.8.5 X X X
la source à Yokohama
Mise en œuvre de la stratégie
A.8.6 de gestion des eaux pluviales X X
dans la ville de Kitakyushu
Mise en place d’un système
A.8.7 d’alerte inondation précoce X X
dans la ville de Toyama
Bassin de stockage et réutili-
sation des eaux pluviales dans
A.8.8 X X X
le nouveau stade de la ville
d’Hiroshima
Système de protection contre
A.8.9 les risques d’inondation à X X
Fukuoka
Réduction des rejets des dé-
A.8.10 versoirs d’orage et prévention X X X X X
des inondations à Kyoto
A.2 Australie
A.2.1 Création d’une zone humide à Mount Barker
A.2.1.1 Contexte

Un nouveau centre de services environnementaux est prévu pour la ville de Mt Barker, sur une zone

située à côté d’une station de traitement, du ruisseau Mt Barker Creek et d’une école d’enseignement

secondaire.

La zone est depuis longtemps une zone perturbée, elle a servi d’abattoir, de tannerie et maintenant

de zone de stockage informelle pour les travaux du conseil du district. Malgré ces perturbations, la

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ISO/TR 24539:2021(F)

bécassine du Japon (un oiseau migrateur de Sibérie menacé d’extinction) et de nombreuses autres

espèces d’oiseaux ont été observées le long de la plaine inondable.
A.2.1.2 Objectif

L’aménagement d’une zone humide et du paysage environnant a été réalisé dans le cadre de la

planification du centre de services environnementaux afin d’atteindre plusieurs objectifs, notamment:

— créer un habitat pour la bécassine du Japon et d’autres espèces d’oiseaux;

— devenir un espace récréatif avec un haut degré d’aménité, assurer des connexions avec un sentier

linéaire le long du ruisseau Mt Barker Creek et vers l’école et le dépôt;

— réhabiliter la végétation et créer une banque de semences de plantes locales dans divers écosystèmes;

— assurer le traitement des eaux pluviales pour le ruissellement généré par le nouveau dépôt et le parc

de stationnement;

— offrir des opportunités en matière de programmes d’éducation et de sensibilisation, à la fois pour

l’école et pour un centre environnemental communautaire prévu pour les groupes communautaires,

les écoles et le grand public.

Un concept a été élaboré pour répondre à ces critères et a été examiné de manière approfondie lors de

la consultation avec l’association Birds SA, le conseil du district, des groupes communautaires et des

écologistes spécialisés.

Le concept prévoit également divers habitats écologiques pour la végétation et les espèces d’oiseaux,

encourage la venue de visiteurs tout en fournissant des zones isolées où les oiseaux ne seront pas

dérangés.
A.2.1.3 Descriptif

Ce projet a été élaboré pour réhabiliter une zone dégradée sur les rives de Mt Barker Creek dans le

cadre de la construction prévue du dépôt de la municipalité. L’élément central du projet est une zone

humide artificielle qui protégera le ruisseau de l’augmentation des polluants, fournira un habitat aux

espèces d’oiseaux rares et menacées et deviendra un espace de loisirs le long du sentier linéaire de Mt

Barker Creek.

Un objectif plus large du projet est de réhabiliter divers habitats écologiques entourant les zones

humides, notamment des prairies, des bois secs et humides et des zones ripariennes. L’initiative a en

grande partie pour but d’améliorer l’habitat de plusieurs oiseaux rares et menacés et la conception a

donc impliqué une consultation étroite avec l’association d’ornithologie Birds SA.

Le concept prévoit divers habitats écologiques pour la végétation et les espèces d’oiseaux, tout en

fournissant des zones isolées où les oiseaux ne seront pas dérangés.

Des sentiers pédestres, des plateformes d’observation et une promenade en bois encouragent les

visiteurs à profiter de la zone humide, tout en gérant leur accès, et permettent la création d’une variété

d’habitats (inondation riparienne, prairie ouverte, prairie touffue et bois humides).

La zone humide de 6 000 m a été aménagée en 2014 et des recherches approfondies ont été effectuées

pour s’approvisionner en espèces végétales locales à utiliser dans les zones humides. Une cartographie

complète a été établie pendant leur plantation afin de permettre à la zone humide de servir de banque

de semences pour ces espèces locales rares à l’avenir.

La zone humide permet également de traiter selon les meilleures pratiques les eaux pluviales liées au

ruissellement du (futur) dépôt, contribuant ainsi à protéger Mt Barker Creek et, en fin de compte, la

rivière Bremer des polluants des eaux pluviales urbaines (voir Figure A.1).
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ISO/TR 24539:2021(F)

Figure A.1 — Plan des futures zones humides du centre de services environnementaux

de Mt Barker
A.2.1.4 Organisme
Conseil du district de Mount Barker.
A.2.2 Collecte et réutilisation des eaux pluviales à Murray Bridge
A.2.2.1 Contexte

La ville de Murray Bridge, en Australie-Méridionale, est située au bord du fleuve Murray. Il s’agit de l’un

des plus grands centres régionaux à l’extrémité inférieure du bassin Murray-Darling et d’une plaque

tournante importante pour les industries des régions Lower Murray et Mallee. Les aménagements

résidentiels et industriels témoignent de la croissance de la population urbaine de Murray Bridge. La

préservation des nombreux espaces ouverts de la ville (parcs, réserves et installations sportives) est

vitale pour la région et sa communauté locale.

En outre, d’importants lotissements sont prévus sur le site de Newbridge (ancien hippodrome) et à

Gifford Hill. Ils devraient comprendre plus de 3 000 logements et constitueront une part importante

de l’expansion proposée pour Murray Bridge au cours des 20 prochaines années. L’un des défis que doit

relever la municipalité est la mise en place d’une infrastructure pouvant gérer de manière appropriée

l’augmentation du ruissellement des eaux pluviales associée aux réhabilitations et aménagements de

terrains vierges.
A.2.2.2 Objectif

Le système de gestion et de réutilisation des eaux pluviales de Murray Bridge a été construit pour fournir

une source alternative, sûre et durable d’eau non potable à la ville de Murray Bridge. Le système collecte

les eaux pluviales de huit bassins et zones humides à travers Murray Bridge et les transporte vers une

lagune à parois étanches à Gifford Hill pour leur stockage à long terme. Lorsqu’elles sont nécessaires à

l’irrigation, les eaux pluviales brutes sont pompées de la lagune vers la nouvelle station de traitement

située sur Old Swanport Road, à partir de laquelle les eaux pluviales traitées sont transportées par des

pompes et des canalisations de distribution vers le système d’irrigation de la ville.

Le système est une réalisation de la ville de Murray Bridge, en partenariat avec le gouvernement

australien et deux contributeurs privés. Le budget total de 14,23 millions de dollars a été pris en

charge par un financement de 7,115 millions de dollars provenant du Plan national pour l’eau urbaine

et le dessalement du gouvernement australien, à hauteur de la co-contribution de la municipalité et des

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ISO/TR 24539:2021(F)

travaux en nature de la coentreprise de Gifford Hill. Le système a été achevé dans les délais et le budget

impartis, avec un bilan irréprochable en matière de sécurité.

L’accord de financement du gouvernement australien exigeait que le système diminue la dépendance à

l’égard du fleuve Murray et réduise la demande en eau potable de 172 millions de litres par an.

A.2.2.3 Descriptif
A.2.2.3.1 Présentation du système

La ville de Murray Bridge (la municipalité) dispose actuellement d’une allocation d’eau de 250 millions

de litres/an provenant du fleuve Murray, cette allocation étant soumise à des restrictions en fonction

des conditions de débit du fleuve. L’allocation de la municipalité a été considérablement réduite pendant

les années de sécheresse de 2006 à 2010, chutant jusqu’à 45 millions de litres/an (18 %) en 2008/09. Ces

restrictions ont eu pour effet de «brunir» et de dégrader considérablement les réserves et les terrains

de sport de la municipalité.

En réponse à la sécheresse, la municipalité a identifié les eaux pluviales comme une ressource précieuse

et inexploitée pouvant assurer un approvisionnement en eau sûr, durable et diversifié pour répondre

aux futurs besoins de la communauté. Une stratégie a rapidement été élaborée sur la manière dont

les eaux pluviales peuvent être collectées et réutilisées à Murray Bridge pour éviter que les effets

dévastateurs de la sécheresse ne se répètent, réduire la dépendance à l’égard du réseau d’alimentation

en eau et du fleuve Murray et améliorer l’agrément des nombreux parcs et réserves, les performances

d’assainissement et la protection contre les inondations, ainsi que la qualité de l’eau.

A.2.2.3.2 Conception

En 2014, la ville de Murray Bridge s’est engagée dans un processus d’ECI (Early Contractor Involvement,

implication anticipée de l’entrepreneur) avec les partenaires en charge de la construction et de la

conception afin d’optimiser l’étude de conception précédente du système. Le processus d’ECI a été

facilité par le gestionnaire de projet du système, avec la contribution du conseiller technique du système.

En raison d’un retard dans les aménagements résidentiels prévus sur les sites de l’ancien hippodrome

(Newbridge) et de Gifford Hill, qui ont été initialement proposés comme source d’une partie importante

du volume d’eaux pluviales pouvant être collecté dans la précédente étude de conception, une phase

complète d’étude des options a été entreprise pour identifier des sites de collecte alternatifs qui peuvent

atteindre ou dépasser les valeurs cibles de collecte.

Grâce à une planification, une conception et une gestion minutieuses, le volume (demande d’irrigation

satisfaite) des huit sites de collecte actuellement raccordés au système devrait être d’environ

230 millions de litres par an, sur la base de la pluviométrie moyenne à Murray Bridge. Le système prévoit

également le raccordement de futures stations de pompage sur les sites d’aménagement de Newbridge

(ancien hippodrome) et de Gifford Hill. Une fois ces stations de pompage installées et les aménagements

achevés, le volume total pouvant être collecté par le système pourrait dépasser 700 millions de litres

par an.

Le processus d’ECI a également permis d’identifier un terrain vacant sur Old Swanport Rd, idéalement

situé pour devenir l’élément central du système (Figure A.2). Se trouvant entre la zone humide existante

de Rural Avenue et la lagune de Gifford Hill, avec une alimentation électrique disponible depuis Old

Swanport Rd, et à une courte distance en voiture du dépôt de la municipalité, le site était idéal pour la

construction de la nouvelle station de traitement.
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ISO/TR 24539:2021(F)

Figure A.2 — L’«élément central» du système; zone humide de Rural Avenue, station

de traitement et lagune de Gifford Hill

Le tracé des nouvelles canalisations le long de Rural Avenue, Prosperity Grove et Maurice Road a été

choisi pour établir une connexion entre la station de traitement et le réseau d’irrigation existant de la

municipalité sur Adelaide Road. Ce tracé a également permis de collecter les eaux pluviales des zones

humides et des bassins existants de la municipalité en utilisant des canalisations parallèles afin de

réduire les coûts de construction (c’est-à-dire un ensemble de canalisations pour la collecte et un autre

ensemble de canalisations pour la distribution, dans la même réserve routière).

La planification et la conception du système ont pris en compte les possibilités d’extension future pour

inclure des sites de collecte supplémentaires, une demande accrue d’eaux pluviales traitées et une

connexion possible avec un système régional de diversification de l’approvisionnement en eau qui relie

Murray Bridge au conseil de district de Mount Barker.

Exemples de mesures «adaptées aux évolutions futures» qui ont été intégrées dans le concept:

— emplacement de la lagune de stockage de 110 millions de litres sur un terrain qui sert de zone

tampon à l’autoroute SE à Gifford Hill, les terrains environnants étant disp
...

TECHNICAL ISO/TR
REPORT 24539
First edition
Service activities relating to drinking
water supply, wastewater and
stormwater systems — Examples
of good practices for stormwater
management
PROOF/ÉPREUVE
Reference number
ISO/TR 24539:2021(E)
ISO 2021
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ISO/TR 24539:2021(E)
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© ISO 2021

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ISO/TR 24539:2021(E)
Contents Page

Foreword ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................iv

Introduction ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................v

1 Scope ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 1

2 Normative references ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3 Terms and definitions ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

4 Format and content of the examples provided in this document ...................................................................... 1

Annex A (informative) Examples of stormwater management ................................................................................................. 2

Annex B (informative) Related documents .................................................................................................................................................74

Bibliography .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................80

© ISO 2021 – All rights reserved PROOF/ÉPREUVE iii
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ISO/TR 24539:2021(E)
Foreword

ISO (the International Organization for Standardization) is a worldwide federation of national standards

bodies (ISO member bodies). The work of preparing International Standards is normally carried out

through ISO technical committees. Each member body interested in a subject for which a technical

committee has been established has the right to be represented on that committee. International

organizations, governmental and non-governmental, in liaison with ISO, also take part in the work.

ISO collaborates closely with the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) on all matters of

electrotechnical standardization.

The procedures used to develop this document and those intended for its further maintenance are

described in the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 1. In particular, the different approval criteria needed for the

different types of ISO documents should be noted. This document was drafted in accordance with the

editorial rules of the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 2 (see www .iso .org/ directives).

Attention is drawn to the possibility that some of the elements of this document may be the subject of

patent rights. ISO shall not be held responsible for identifying any or all such patent rights. Details of

any patent rights identified during the development of the document will be in the Introduction and/or

on the ISO list of patent declarations received (see www .iso .org/ patents).

Any trade name used in this document is information given for the convenience of users and does not

constitute an endorsement.

For an explanation of the voluntary nature of standards, the meaning of ISO specific terms and

expressions related to conformity assessment, as well as information about ISO's adherence to the

World Trade Organization (WTO) principles in the Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT), see www .iso .org/

iso/ foreword .html.

This document was prepared by Technical Committee ISO/TC 224, Service activities relating to drinking

water supply, wastewater and stormwater systems.

Any feedback or questions on this document should be directed to the user’s national standards body. A

complete listing of these bodies can be found at www .iso .org/ members .html.
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ISO/TR 24539:2021(E)
Introduction

The objectives of stormwater management systems include effective control and management of

flows; protection of water quality; preservation of water quantity; protection of the built, public and

natural environments; water conservation and reuse; protection or enhancement of ecosystem health;

protection or enhancement of public health, safety and welfare; protection or enhancement of social

values; and facilitation of sustainable development and climate adaptation.

“Climate Change 2014: Synthesis Report: Summary for Policymakers, 2014, Intergovernmental Panel

on Climate Change” gives us the warning that many global risks of climate change are concentrated in

urban areas. It indicates that risks are amplified for those lacking essential infrastructure and services

or living in poor-quality housing and exposed areas. The key risks, all of which are identified with high

confidence, include those of severe ill-health and disrupted livelihoods for urban populations due to

flooding from a range of sources including pluvial, fluvial, storm surges and coastal flooding.

Pursuant to the “World Urbanization Prospects: The 2011 Revision, 2011, United Nations”, the world

urban population is expected to increase by 72 per cent by 2050, from 3,6 billion in 2011 to 6,3 billion

in 2050. i.e. the same size as the world’s total population was in 2002. Virtually all of the expected

growth in the world population will be concentrated in the urban areas of the less developed regions,

which are deemed to be vulnerable to flooding. The report states that flooding is the most frequent

and greatest hazard for the 633 largest cities or urban agglomerations analysed. Mud slides are often

associated with severe weather conditions and flooding, particularly in rural areas and commonly will

impact rural villages and small towns, or their associated transportation infrastructures.

Thus, climate change and urbanization with rapid growth in population in cities and surrounding

areas are most likely to increase flooding and the risks associated with stormwater worldwide.

Serious challenges for stormwater management are posed for an increasing number of stormwater

utilities, which are responsible for the control of pluvial flooding that is caused by rainwater entering

and surcharging stormwater systems or remaining on surfaces and flowing overland or into local

depressions and topographic lows to create temporary ponds.

The immediate impacts of urban flooding can include loss of human life, damage to property, disruption

of traffic and other services and deteriorations of limited freshwater resources, water ecosystems and

hygienic living conditions. Effective stormwater management systems can enhance the resilience of

communities by reducing the likelihood and severity of pluvial, fluvial and coastal flooding.

Planning methods for stormwater systems have been established in most developed countries but

they do not always apply directly to other countries with different conditions. In order to help deliver

the best solution to the targeted area, the framework and planning processes should be standardised,

within a local institutional and regulatory context.

Urban stormwater management is usually the responsibility of municipal water and wastewater service

providers. However, in some countries the urban stormwater system management is performed by

separate entities especially established for this purpose. Sometimes these services are not financially

supported from the municipal water and wastewater revenues but from stormwater levies applied to

flood vulnerable properties concerned and created for that purpose or a local governing authority.

While it is largely and historically true that urban stormwater management has been the responsibility

of municipal wastewater authorities, it is increasingly recognized that stormwater management may

be best or additionally served through collaboration with other relevant stakeholders such as Forestry

Commissions (for forested hill and mountain sides), Agricultural Commissions for upstream farming

properties, river authorities or Port Commissions for the management of tidal surges on both marine

and freshwater bodies or local governing authorities.
This document compiles examples of good practices in stormwater management.

These examples illustrate a wide range of measures including both asset and non-asset-related

measures for various objectives relating to stormwater management.
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TECHNICAL REPORT ISO/TR 24539:2021(E)
Service activities relating to drinking water supply,
wastewater and stormwater systems — Examples of good
practices for stormwater management
1 Scope

This document provides examples of good practices in stormwater management related to

ISO 24536 and information on standards and guidelines used in various countries.
2 Normative references
There are no normative references in this document.
3 Terms and definitions
No terms and definitions are listed in this document.

ISO and IEC maintain terminological databases for use in standardization at the following addresses:

— ISO Online browsing platform: available at https:// www .iso .org/ obp
— IEC Electropedia: available at http:// www .electropedia .org/
4 Format and content of the examples provided in this document

Examples of stormwater management introduced here are classified by country and are described in

Annex A. They are also classified according to the objectives in ISO 24536:2019, Table 1, and are shown

in Table A.1. The examples were provided by country representatives and adapted to the format of this

document. In addition, although various standards and guidelines are described in Annex B, Table B.1

and Table B.2, they are shown only as a name and a reference URL.
Table 1 illustrates the structure of the examples included in Annex A.
Table 1 — The structure of the examples
Section Content

Background Provides background information on the project, such as characteristics of

the watershed, social background, issues and tasks.

Purpose Provides a description of the project objectives, such as improvements to be

achieved.
Project outline Provides a description of the project.

Organization Provides simply the identity of the organization offering its experience.

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ISO/TR 24539:2021(E)
Annex A
(informative)
Examples of stormwater management
A.1 Introduction

There are many examples of good stormwater management practices that follow the procedures set by

the ISO 24536. The examples have been classified according to the stormwater management objectives

they were answering to.

Table A.1 — List of examples and their key objectives for stormwater management related to

ISO 24536
Objectives according to ISO 24536
Protection
Protec- Facilita-
of the built, Wa
Protec- tion or Protec- tion of
Effec- public ter
tion or en- tion or sustain-
tive con- and con
Protec- Preser- en- hance- en- able
Sub-
trol and natural ser
Title
tion of vation hance- ment of hance- devel-
clause
man- environ- vat
water of water ment of public ment of opment
agement ments: ion
quality quantity eco- health, public and
of flow infrastruc- and
system safety social climate
volumes ture, prop- reu
health and wel- values adapta-
erty and se
fare tion
resources
Creation of a wetland in Mount
A.2.1 X X X X X
Barker
Stormwater harvesting and
A.2.2 X X
reuse in Murray Bridge
Austria — Increasing storage
A.3 capacity and implementing X X X X
dynamic control in Vienna
Improving sediment control
A.4.1 through the implementation of a X X X X
wetland in Hamilton
Planning effective stormwa-
A.4.2 ter management measures in X X X X X X
Ottawa
Denmark — Dynamic control
A.5 X X X X X
in Kolding
Disconnecting stormwater
from the combined network in
A.6.1 X X X X X X
Killingworth and Longbenton,
North Tyneside, England
River diversion and stormwater
A.6.2 storage in Brunton Park, Gos- X X X X X
forth, Newcastle, England
France — Real-time control of
sewer systems for the reduction
A.7 X X X
of combined sewer overflows in
Biarritz
Implementation of a real-time
supervision for stormwater fa-
A.8.1 X X
cilities operation and flood risk
management in Nagoya
Implementation of the storm-
A.8.2 water management strategy of X
Niigata City
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ISO/TR 24539:2021(E)
Table A.1 (continued)
Objectives according to ISO 24536
Protection
Protec- Facilita-
of the built, Wa
Protec- tion or Protec- tion of
Effec- public ter
tion or en- tion or sustain-
tive con- and con
Protec- Preser- en- hance- en- able
Sub-
trol and natural ser
Title
tion of vation hance- ment of hance- devel-
clause
man- environ- vat
water of water ment of public ment of opment
agement ments: ion
quality quantity eco- health, public and
of flow infrastruc- and
system safety social climate
volumes ture, prop- reu
health and wel- values adapta-
erty and se
fare tion
resources
X-band radar observation
and forecast for stormwater
A.8.3 X X
and flood risk management in
Osaka City
Implementation of a flood risk
A.8.4 X X X
protection strategy in Tokyo
Source infiltration promotion in
A.8.5 X X X
Yokohama
Implementation of the storm-
A.8.6 water management strategy in X X
Kitakyushu City
Implementation of an early flood
A.8.7 X X
warning system in Toyama City
Stormwater storage tank and
A.8.8 reuse in Hiroshima City’s new X X X
stadium
Flood risk protection scheme
A.8.9 X X
in Fukuoka
CSO reduction and flood preven-
A.8.10 X X X X X
tion in Kyoto
A.2 Australia
A.2.1 Creation of a wetland in Mt Barker
A.2.1.1 Background

A new Environmental Services Centre is planned for Mt Barker adjacent to a wastewater treatment

plant, Mt Barker Creek and a high school.

The area has a long history of disturbance being a former abattoir, tannery and now informal council

works storage area. Despite this disturbance, Lathan's snipe (an endangered migratory bird from

Siberia) and many other bird species have been sighted along the flood plain area.

A.2.1.2 Purpose

As part of planning for the Environmental Services Centre, a wetland and surrounding landscape was

built to achieve multiple objectives, including:
— creating habitat for the Lathan's snipe and other birds species;

— becoming a recreational asset with high amenity, providing links to a linear trail along Mt Barker

Creek and connecting to the school and depot;

— rehabilitating vegetation and creating a seed bank for local provenance plants in a range of

ecosystems;

— providing stormwater treatment for runoff generated by the new depot and car park;

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ISO/TR 24539:2021(E)

— providing opportunities for education and awareness programs, both for the school and for a planned

community environmental centre servicing community groups, schools and the general public.

A design response was developed that addressed these criteria and was thoroughly tested during

consultation with Birds SA, council, community groups and specialist ecologists.

The design also provides a range of ecological habitats for vegetation and bird species, encourages

visitors yet provides secluded areas where birds will not be disturbed.
A.2.1.3 Outline

This project was developed to rehabilitate a degraded area on the banks of Mt Barker Creek as part of

a planned council depot construction. The central component of the project is a constructed wetland

which will protect the creek from increased pollutants, provide habitat for rare and endangered bird

species and become a recreational node along the Mt Barker Creek linear path.

A broader objective of the project is to rehabilitate a range of ecological habitats surrounding the

wetlands, including grasslands, wet and dry woodlands and riparian areas. Much of the impetus for

the initiative is to improve habitat for a range of rare and endangered birds and therefore the design

involved close consultation with Birds SA.

The design provides a range of ecological habitats for vegetation and bird species yet provides secluded

areas where birds will not be disturbed.

Walking paths, viewing decks and a boardwalk encourage people to enjoy the wetland but manage

their access and allow a variety of habitats to be created (riparian inundation, open grassland, tussock

grassland and wet woodlands).

The 6 000 m wetland was constructed in 2014 and an extensive search was performed to source local

provenance plant species to use in the wetlands. A thorough mapping exercise was undertaken during

planting to enable the wetland to serve as a seedbank for these rare local species into the future.

The wetland also provides best practice stormwater treatment for runoff from the (future) depot thus

helping to protect Mt Barker Creek and ultimately the Bremer River from urban stormwater pollutants

(see Figure A.1).
Figure A.1 — Future plan of Mt Barker Environment Services Centre wetlands
A.2.1.4 Organization
Mount Barker District Council
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ISO/TR 24539:2021(E)
A.2.2 Stormwater harvesting and reuse in Murray Bridge
A.2.2.1 Background

Murray Bridge, South Australia, is situated on the banks of the River Murray and is one of the larger

regional centres at the lower end of the Murray Darling Basin and an important hub for regional

industries in the Lower Murrayland and Mallee Regions. Residential and industrial developments are a

sign of the city’s growing urban populations. Sustaining the city’s many open spaces – parks, reserves

and sporting facilities – is vital to the region and its local community.

In addition, major subdivisions are planned at the Newbridge (Old Racecourse) site and Gifford Hill,

which are proposed to include in excess of 3 000 dwellings, and will constitute a major proportion of the

proposed expansion of Murray Bridge over the next 20 years. A challenge for Council is the provision of

infrastructure that can appropriately manage the increases in stormwater runoff associated with infill

and greenfield developments.
A.2.2.2 Purpose

The Murray Bridge stormwater management and reuse scheme was built to provide an alternative,

secure and sustainable source of non-drinking water supply to the Rural City of Murray Bridge. The

Scheme harvests stormwater from eight basins and wetlands across Murray Bridge and transports it

to a lined lagoon at Gifford Hill for long-term storage. When needed for irrigation, raw stormwater is

pumped from the lagoon to the new treatment plant on Old Swanport Road, from which the treated

stormwater is transported via distribution pumps and pipelines to the city’s irrigation system.

The scheme was delivered by the Rural City of Murray Bridge, in partnership with the Australian

Government and two private contributors. The total budget of $14,23 million was supported through

$7,115 million of funding from the Australian Government’s National Urban Water and Desalination

Plan, to match the co-contribution from Council and in-kind works from the Gifford Hill Joint Venture.

The scheme was completed on time and within budget, and with an impeccable safety record.

The Australian Government funding agreement required the scheme to decrease reliance on the River

Murray and reduce potable water demand by up to 172 ML annually.
A.2.2.3 Outline
A.2.2.3.1 Scheme overview

The Rural City of Murray Bridge (Council) has a current water allocation of 250 million litres/year from

the River Murray, and this allocation is subject to restrictions depending on flow conditions in the river.

Council’s allocation was significantly restricted during the drought years of 2006 through to 2010,

dropping as low as 45 million litres/year (18 %) in 2008/09. These restrictions resulted in significant

“browning off” and degradation of Council’s reserves and sporting fields.

In response to the drought, Council identified stormwater as a valuable, untapped resource that can

provide a secure, sustainable and diverse water supply to meet the future needs of the community. A

strategy was soon developed for how stormwater can be harvested and reused across Murray Bridge to

prevent a repeat of the devastating impacts of the drought, reduce reliance on mains and River Murray

water, improve amenity of the many parks and reserves, improve drainage performance and flood

protection, and improve water quality.
A.2.2.3.2 Design

In 2014 the Rural City of Murray Bridge entered into an Early Contractor Involvement (ECI) process

with construction and design partners to optimize the previous concept design of the scheme. The

ECI process was facilitated by the scheme’s project manager, with input from the scheme’s Technical

Advisor.
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ISO/TR 24539:2021(E)

Due to a delay in the planned housing developments at the Old Racecourse (Newbridge) and Gifford

Hill development sites, which were originally proposed to be the source of a significant portion of the

harvestable volume of stormwater in the previous concept design, a comprehensive optioneering phase

was undertaken to identify alternative harvesting sites that can meet or exceed the yield targets.

Through careful planning, design and management the yield (irrigation demand met) from the eight

harvesting sites currently connected to the scheme is expected to be approximately 230 ML annually,

based on average rainfall in Murray Bridge. The scheme has also made provision for the connection of

future pump stations at the Newbridge (Old Racecourse) and Gifford Hill development sites. Once these

pump stations are installed and the developments are completed, the total harvestable volume for the

scheme may exceed 700 ML annually.

The ECI process also identified a parcel of vacant land on Old Swanport Rd that was ideally located to

become the hub of the scheme (Figure A.2). Located between the existing and Rural Avenue Wetland

and the Gifford Hill Lagoon, with existing power supply available from Old Swanport Rd and only a

short drive to the Council Depot, the site was ideal for the construction of the new treatment plant.

Figure A.2 — The ‘hub’ of the scheme; Rural Avenue Wetland, the treatment plant and Gifford

Hill Lagoon

A route for the new pipelines along Rural Avenue, Prosperity Grove and Maurice Road was selected to

provide a link between the treatment plant and the existing Council irrigation network on Adelaide

Road. This route also enabled stormwater to be harvested from the existing Council wetlands and

basins using parallel pipelines to reduce construction cost (i.e. one set of pipelines for harvesting, and

another set of pipelines for distribution, within the same road reserve).

The planning and design of the scheme included consideration of opportunities for future expansion to

include additional harvesting sites, increased demand for treated stormwater, and a possible link to a

regional water diversification scheme that links Murray Bridge to the District Council of Mount Barker.

Examples of the “future-proofing” measures that were incorporated into the design include:

— The siting of the 110 ML storage lagoon on land that acts as a buffer to the SE Freeway at Gifford Hill,

with surrounding land available for additional storage lagoons in the future (an ultimate storage of

440 ML is envisaged).

— The inclusion of a UV disinfection unit in the Old Swanport Road treatment plant to provide treated

stormwater that is fit for purpose under an “unrestricted” irrigation regime. This provides flexibility

for Council and third party water users to irrigate public open spaces 24 h a day. Provision was also

made in the treatment plant for a second UV disinfection unit to be retrofitted in the future, should

higher treatment flow rates be desirable.

— The treatment plant and treated water storage tank have been sized to accommodate Council’s peak

irrigation demand (night time, typically from 10 pm to 8 am) while also filling the tank shared by

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ISO/TR 24539:2021(E)

two other local organizations. There is further opportunity to operate the treatment plant during

non-peak times (day time, 8 am to 10 pm) to service additional Council sites and other water users.

— The harvesting and distribution pipelines were sized to accommodate stormwater flows from the

planned housing developments at the Old Racecourse (Newbridge) and Gifford Hill development

sites, to enable simultaneous pumping from these sites together with the current harvesting sites.

In particular the pipe crossings of the SE Freeway, which were installed using horizontal directional

drilling (HDD) techniques, have significant redundancy to accommodate increase flows.

With the Council’s unique stormwater drainage system consisting of a series of stormwater basins

in localized depressions, it was also important that the harvesting and reuse strategy was able to

improve the performance of the drainage system and level of flood protection to public and private

infrastructure.

The basins do not naturally drain to the River Murray, but rather they rely on infiltration or pumps to

dispose of stormwater. In the past, these basins have not always been able to cope during large rainfall

events, resulting in flooding of roadways and in some instances, private property, as represented in

Figure A.3. Floodplain modelling was therefore used to inform the selection of pump rates and to

inform the scheme’s control philosophy, to ensure that the improvements to drainage performance and

flood protection were maximized.

Figure A.3 — Before and after floodplain maps for golf course basin, 5-year average recurrence

interval

The planning and design of the scheme also placed strong emphasis on the future operation and

maintenance by Council staff. The scheme has a central Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition

(SCADA) system located at the Old Swanport Road treatment plant that is connected to all sites via

fibre optic cable or mobile phone based telemetry systems. The SCADA system enables Council staff to

remotely monitor the harvesting and distribution infrastructure for the purpose of automated control,

using their personal computers and/or tablet devices. In addition, critical alarms are alerted to the

operators via an SMS service.

Many of the new pumps utilize variable speed drive functionality to provide operational flexibility,

reduce wear on the mechanical components of the system, and to maintain system pressure as required.

Under standard operating conditions all harvesting sites will pump simultaneously to the Gifford Hill

Lagoon at pre-determined flowrates, in order to maximize the harvestable volume that is generated by

small and frequent rainfall events.

In anticipation of and during large rainfall events, Council staff can use the new control system to

remotely monitor the water levels in the basins and adjust pump rates and sequencing to manage

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ISO/TR 24539:2021(E)

flood risk in real time. For example, Council will have the flexibility to reduce the pump rate at one site,

to enable a higher pump rate to be achieved at another site that is considered to be at greater risk of

flooding.

While the scheme has been designed to operate automatically with minimal operator intervention,

manual and local modes have also been provided on all equipment to facilitate testing and operation in

unusual circumstances
Other notable operation and maintenance provisions include:

— Lifting mechanisms in the treatment plant to enable the safe and practical maintenance of pump

sets and filters.

— Two solar powered pump stations that can easily be converted to mains power supply if higher

flowrates are required in the future (i.e. after the ultimate development scenario is reached).

— Control manholes with isolation valves at each of the
...

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