Toxicity testing of fire effluents -- Part 5: Prediction of toxic effects of fire effluents

Reviews the progress of bioanalytical methodology, including the application of mathematical models which are available and may be used in the toxicological assessment of fire effluent atmospheres. Attention is also given to the application of such models as a means to minimize the use of laboratory animals in the testing of materials for fire effluent toxicity.

Essais de toxicité des effluents du feu -- Partie 5: Prédictions concernant les effets toxiques des effluents du feu

Preskušanje toksičnosti dima – 5. del: Napovedovanje toksičnih učinkov dima

General Information

Status
Published
Publication Date
31-Aug-1999
Technical Committee
Current Stage
6060 - National Implementation/Publication (Adopted Project)
Start Date
01-Sep-1999
Due Date
01-Sep-1999
Completion Date
01-Sep-1999

Buy Standard

Technical report
ISO/TR 9122-5:1993 - Toxicity testing of fire effluents
English language
16 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview
Technical report
SIST ISO/TR 9122-5:1999
English language
16 pages
sale 10% off
Preview
sale 10% off
Preview

e-Library read for
1 day
Technical report
ISO/TR 9122-5:1993 - Essais de toxicité des effluents du feu
French language
17 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview
Technical report
ISO/TR 9122-5:1993 - Essais de toxicité des effluents du feu
French language
17 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview

Standards Content (sample)

TECHNICAL
ISO
REPORT
TR 9122-5
First edition
1993-04-15
Taxicity testing of fire effluents -
Part 5:
Prediction of tox ic effects of fire efflc
ients
Essais de toxicite des e ffluents du feu -
Partie 5: Pr6dictions concernant /es effets toxiques des effluents du feu
Reference number
ISO/TR 9122-5:1993(E)
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122=5:1993(E)
Contents
Page

1 Scope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..*.....................................

2 Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

......................................................................
3 General concepts
4 Predictions involving one Single fire gas ...................................
Predictions involving multiple fire gases ...................................

Use of mass loss measurements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

5.1
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
5.2 Use of analyzed concentrations of major toxicants

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

6 Fractional effective dose models

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6.1 Mass loss models
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.1.1 Hartzell-Emmons mass loss FED model

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6.1.2 Purser mass loss FED model
British Standards Institution mass loss FED model . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.1.3
6.1.4 National Institute of Standards and Technology (USA) Hazard I

model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6.2 Toxic gas models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..*...................................................

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
6.2.1 Hartzell-Emmons toxic gas FED model
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.2.2 National Research Council (Canada) model
6.2.3 National Institute of Standards and Technology (USA) N-gas

model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6.2.4 Human incapacitation model

7 Conclusions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..*.....................

Annexes
. . . . . . . . . . . 10
A Lethal toxic potency tables for fire effluent toxicants

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

B Bibliography
0 ISO 1993

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or utilized in any form or

by any means, electronie or mechanical, including photocopying and microfilm, without per-

mission in writing from the publisher.
International Organization for Standardization
Case Postale 56 l CH-l 211 Geneve 20 l Switzerland
Printed in Switzerland
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122=5:1993(E)
Foreword
ISO (the International Organization for Standardization) is a worldwide
federation of national Standards bodies (ISO member bodies). The work
of preparing International Standards is normally carried out through ISO
technical committees. Esch member body interested in a subject for
which a technical committee has been established has the right to be
represented on that committee. International organizations, governmental
and non-governmental, in liaison with ISO, also take part in the work. ISO
collaborates closely with the International Electrotechnical Commission
(IEC) on all matters of electrotechnical standardization.
The main task of technical committees is to prepare International Stan-
dards, but in exceptional circumstances a technical committee may pro-
pose the publication of a Technical Report of one of the following types:
- type 1, when the required support cannot be obtained for the publi-
cation of an International Standard, despite repeated efforts;
- type 2, when the subject is still under technical development or where
for any other reason there is the future but not immediate possibility
of an agreement on an International Standard;
- type 3, when a technical committee has collected data of a different
kind from that which is normally published as an International Standard
(“state of the art”, for example).
Technical Reports of types 1 and 2 are subject to review within three years
of publication, to decide whether they tan be transformed into Inter-
national Standards. Technical Reports of type 3 do not necessarily have to
be reviewed until the data they provide are considered to be no longer
valid or useful.
lSO/TR 9122-5, which is a Technical Report of type 2, was prepared by
Techrical Committee ISOFC 92, Fire tests on building materiak, compo-
nents and structures, Sub-Committee SC 3, Toxic hazards in fire.
This document is being issued in the type 2 Technical Report series of
publications (according to subclause G.4.2.2 of part 1 of the IEC/ISO Di-
rectives) as a “prospective Standard for provisional application” in the field
of toxicity testing of fire effluents because there is a’n urgent need for
guidance on how Standards in this field should be used to meet an ident-
ified need.
This document is not to be regarded as an “International Standard”. lt is
proposed for provisional application so that information and experience of
its use in practice may be gathered. Comments on the content of this
document should be sent to the ISO Central Secretariat.
A review of this type 2 Technical Report will be carried out not later than
two years after its publication with the Options of: extension for another
two years; conversion into an International Standard; or withdrawal.
. . .
Ill
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122=5:1993(E)
ISO/TR 9122 consists of the following Parts, under the general title
Taxicity testing of fire effluen ts:
- Part 1: General
- Part 2: Guidelines for biological assays to determine the acute
inhalation toxicity o f fire e ffluents (basic principles, criteria and
methodology)
- Part 3: Methods for the analysis of gases and vapours in fire
effluen ts
- Part 4: The fire model (furnaces and combustion apparatus used in
small-scale tes ting)
- Part 5: Prediction of toxic effects of fire effluents
Annexes A and B of this part of lSO/TR 9122 are for information only.
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
TECHNICAL REPORT ISO/TR 9122=5:1993(E)
Taxicity testing of fire effluents -
Part 5:
Prediction of toxic effects of fire effluents
modelling. A publication in 1981 by S.C. Packharn and
1 Scope
G.E. HartzelVl together with the work of
P.W. Smith[sl, established a foundation for such
This part of ISO/TR 9122 reviews the progress of
modelling in the United States. Research in this area
bioanalytical methodology, including the application
advanced considerably during the 198O’s, such that
of mathematical models which are available and may
more recent publications by G.E. Hartzellie ta 81,
be used in the toxicological assessment of fire
and
101,
BC. Levin[g D.A. Purser[ll] and
effluent atmospheres. Attention is also given to the
Y. Tsuchiya[l21 set the Stage for the development of
application of such models as a means to minimize
toxic hazard modelling which takes into account
the use of laboratory animals in the testing of ma-
combinations of toxic insults as they would occur in
terials for fire effluent toxicity.
a fire.
2 Background
3 General concepts
A major thrust in the assessment of the toxic effects

of fire effluents has been in the development of Basic to all the modelling techniques is some ex-

mathematical models for predicting such effects from
Pression of the concentration of a toxicant relative to
appropriate data on the composition and concen-
that concentration known to Cause a particular toxic

trations of the fire gases. The objectives of these ef- effect resulting from a given time of exposure. Lack-

forts are twofold. Assessment of smoke toxicity from ing in some of the early development efforts was a

analytical data could obviate much of the use of live clear concept of the “dose” of a toxicant, along with

animals in conventional bioassay methodology. Fur- appreciation of its Utility as a tool in modelling. Also

thermore, providing that both qualitative and quanti- lacking was a good base of toxicological data appro-

tative differentes in toxicological effects between priate for short exposures to relatively high concen-

laboratory animals and man are understood, such trations of toxicants. Additionally, there was

modelling methodology tan also be used for estimat- insufficient understanding of relevant laboratory de-

ing the time to development of untenable conditions composition models upon which the toxicological

in either real or simulated fire seenarios.
modelling was to be based.

The development of smoke toxicity modelling began Quantification of “dose” has been fundamental to the

in the late 1960’s and continued into the 197O’s, with development of methodology for modelling the

concepts proposed by Y. Tsuchiya and K. Sumi at the toxicological effects of inhalation of fire gases,

National Research Council Laboratories in Canada[l whether in laboratory animals or humans. Physiolog-

and 21. A deterrent to its acceptability at that time was ical responses are usually dose-related, i.e., the mag-

the widely-held perception that the toxicity of smoke nitude of the effect increases with increasing

could be as complex and as exotic as its composition. amounts or accumulated body burden of a

However, work in the United Kingdom by D.A. Purser physiologically active agent. Since the actual dose of

and W.D. Woolley[s] demonstrated that smoke
toxicants from inhalation of fire effluents cannot be

toxicity could, to a large extent, be explained both measured directly, the assumption is made that the

qualitatively and quantitatively in terms of a small dose is a function of fire effluent (or toxicant) con-

number of important toxic gases. This provided sup- centration and exposure time[lsl. This dose is really

port for the potential validity of smoke toxicity an expression of the insult to which a subject is ex-

---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122=5:1993(E)

posed. The term “exposure dose” is probably more ties that are generated from a fire, transported and

accurate and has become the preferred term in com- then administered to exposed subjects.

bustion toxicology.
4 Predictions involving one Single fire
Concentrations of common fire gas toxicants, such as
carbon monoxide and hydrogen cyanide, are usually SPS
expressed as Parts per million by volume [ppm
The simplest form of modelling involves the Situation
(V/V)]. Therefore, the exposure dose tan be ex-
in which only one toxic fire gas is considered and
pressed as the product of the concentration, C, and
where exposure doses associated with given effects,
time, t, (usually expressed in ppmmmin). In the case
e.g. incapacitation or death, are constants for any ex-
of a changing concentration of a gaseous toxicant, the
posure concentration (i.e. Habers rule is valid and
exposure dose is actually the integrated area under a
Cv = k, where k is a constant exposure dose required
concentration vs. time curve.
for a given toxic effect). Unfortunately, this may not
be the case over the range of concentrations of in-
Often, the concentrations of fire gas toxicants are not
terest and it is desirable to determine the dependence
known. In that event, one tan still deal with the con-
of the effective exposure dose on the concentration
cept of exposure dose as it applies to smoke. Since
of the toxicant. In practice it has been found that the
smoke concentration cannot be quantified, an ap-
exposure dose required to Cause a particular response
proximation is made that the smoke concentration is
decreases with increasing concentration of a toxicant.
proportional to the mass loss during a fire. The inte-
grated area under a mass loss per unit volume vs.
Numerous laboratory studies have involved the most
time curve thus becomes a measure of smoke expo-
prevalent gaseous fire effluents, i.e. CO, CO,, 0,,
Sure dose (usually expressed in g~m--3~rnin)[l4 and 151.
HCN, HCI, HF and NO,, with exposure doses associ-
(This concept of smoke exposure dose is described in
ated with lethality of rodents (mice, rats and guinea
ISO/TR 9122-2.) Smoke exposure dose at any Point in
pigs) being reasonably weil characterized. LC50 values
time tan be calculated from data obtained from a
from the literature are given in tables A.l to A.6. With
laboratory combustion device, instrumented exper-
the inclusion of some limited data on macaque mon-
imental fires, data generated from mathematically
keys, baboons and humans, the data appear to sug-
modelled fires and even data estimated from real
gest that, Overall, the rat may be a reasonable model
fires.
for humans with regard to lethality. (Sublethal effects,
especially respiratory effects of irritants, are another
In Order to model the toxic effects of exposure to fire
matter, and the rat may not be an adequate model;
effluents, it is necessary to obtain two basic pieces
however, some data are available for primates and
of information:
humans.)
a) the exposure dose Cv generated by the fire (for
Once effective exposure doses are characterized, the
the major toxic gases in the smoke or for the mass
concepts of the fractional exposure dose, along with
loss of the materials being combusted); and
the summation or integration of fractional exposure
doses, result in warkable tools in combustion
b) the exposure dose C=t required for a given toxic
toxicology[5 to 9, 11, 17 and 191. Incremental exposure
effect (lethality or incapacitation).
doses C=dt are calculated and related to the specific
C=t exposure dose required to produce the given
Elementary approaches to estimation of toxic hazards
toxicological effect. Thus a fractional effective dose
tan be based on simple mass loss per unit volume
(FED) is calculated for each small time interval. Con-
data, i.e. how much fire load is consumed and into
tinuous summation of these fractional effective doses
what volume it has been dispersed. Recognizing that
is carried out in Order to calculate the accumulated
most materials typically exhibit 30 min LC50 values for
exposure dose.
their fire effluents in the range of approximately
min[l61, the US National Institute of Stan-
30 gmrnw3m
Mathematically, the model for an individual toxicant i
dards and Technology Hazard I Model uses a lethal
tan be expressed as:
tenability limit of 900 gmrnB3a min[l7] if actual material
data is unavailable. The British Standards Institution,
dt . . .
(1)
somewhat more conservatively, employs a value of
500 gmrne3m min[l81. These simple methods avoid the
use of individual material LC50 values, which are not
Most toxicological modelling methodologies make
always known.
use of this concept in one form or another.
In the case of real fire seenarios, smoke transport,
5 Predictions involving multiple fire
dilution and layering calculations tan provide for esti-
mation of smoke exposure doses presented at the
breathing zone of subjects even in areas remote from

a fire[l7]. lt is an important concept that “toxicological re two me hods for pred i cting the toxic effects

There a

exposure doses” tan be visualized as quantified enti- eff luent atmospheres con tain ing multiple

of fire
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122=5:1993(E)
where toxic effects are being assessed for a fire that
toxicants. One is an empirical method involving mass
Starts in the non-flaming mode and Progresses
loss measurements combined with toxic potency data
through early flaming to become a large post-
of the material involved obtained from animal expo-
flashover fire, it will be necessary to use different le-
Sure data; the other is based upon analysis of the
thal mass loss exposure doses for each Stage of the
composition of the atmosphere in terms of the major
fire .
known toxic products. The latter is then used to make
predictions from the known effects of these gases
and the interactions between them.
5.2 Use of analyzed concentrations of major
toxicants
5.1 Use of mass loss measurements
This approach makes predictions of toxic effects
based upon Chemical analysis of the primary com-
This approach may be used to make assessments of
bustion products in the fire effluent along with know-
the toxic effects, in particular lethality, of mathemat-
ledge of the toxic effects and toxic interactions of
ically modelled fires, large scale experimental fires or
these products. lt has two types of application. One
real fire seenarios involving one or more materials.
is to replace or limit the use of animals in small scale
For this method, it is necessary to determine the rate
bioassay combustion toxicity tests. If the lethal expo-
of mass loss of the materials in the fire, either by di-
Sure dose to rodents for a particular test atmosphere
rect measurement or by mathematical modelling of
from a material tan be predicted from the measured
fire growth and mass loss. The latter is based upon
atmosphere composition, then animal exposures tan
input data from small scale tests or other sources.
be avoided or used in a limited way to tonfirm the
The mass loss curve for the fire is then used in con-
prediction. The other application is to make pre-
junction with toxic potency data for the specific ma-
dictions of the likely incapacitating or lethal effects of
terials as derived from small scale bioassay tests. The
exposure of humans to large scale or real fire atmos-
basic method for the determination of the toxic
pheres. This assumes a correlation between animal
potency of the combustion products from individual
and human responses.
materials is to perform a small scale combustion
The full consequences of exposure to atmospheres
toxicity test on a material under conditions relevant to
containing multiple toxicants have only recently been
those in the fire and to find the lethal mass loss ex-
examined in detail. Toxic fire gases may be classified
posure dose (LCtSO) expressed in gern-s-min or the
into two main types, those whose main effect is to
equivalent. The mass loss curve for each material in
Cause tissue hypoxia by impeding the delivery or use
the full scale fire is used to perform a fractional ef-
of Oxygen in the tissues (carbon monoxide, hydrogen
fective dose (FED) analysis in the same way as for a
cyanide and low Oxygen hypoxia) and those that are
Single gas as described previously. Where several
irritant, causing pain and tissue darnage upon contact
materials are involved in a fire, the FEDs of each ma-
with the eyes and respiratory tract epithelium (princi-
terial are summed since, in practice, each material
pally organic irritants and acid gases). In addition to
produces certain yields of the common major

toxicants which are mixed together in the smoke. A these, carbon dioxide is important, particularly due to

number of practical and essentially similar methods its effects on respiration. A final class may be as-

for applying this approach have been published [sf 1% signed as “unusual” toxicants.

17 and 181.
Since the main fire gases within each class exert
similar physiological effects through related mech-
The advantage of this approach is its simplicity, since
anisms, it is not surprising that they are basically ad-
it requires a knowledge only of the mass loss con-
ditive in their Overall effects. What is now emerging
centration curve for the materials involved in the fire
is that, although these main classes of gases exert
and the toxicities of those materials in terms of mass
rather different physiological effects through different
loss C-t products. lt is robust in that, in practice,

LCtsos of many tested materials have been shown mechanisms, when all are present in mixtures, each

tan result in a certain degree of compromise experi-
from small scale tests to fall into approximately one
enced by an exposed subject and these effects are
Order of magnitude[ll and 161.
roughly additive in contributing to incapacitation or
The disadvantages are that it normally only provides
death. lt should not be unexpected that varying de-
lethality information and does not allow for physio-
grees of a partially compromised condition may be
logical deviations from ideal behaviour. lt is also nec-
roughly additive, since an examination of the physio-
essary to assume that lethal exposure doses in rats
logical mechanisms whereby these toxicants exert
are similar to those in humans. Further, the method
their effects reveals a number of possible interactions,
assumes that the toxicity of a material in a real fire
and these effects have been demonstrated in a num-
will be the same as that in a small scale test. The last
ber of studies. This principle of additivity is a key el-
objection is probably the most serious limitation, but
ement in the assessment of toxicity from analytical
it tan be overcome to some extent providing that care
data.
is taken that the small scale bioassay combustion
One of the reasons for these interactions, and a fur-
toxicity tests on materials are conducted under con-
ther complication with combined toxicants which is
ditions similar to those in the full scale fire. Thus,
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
ISO/TR 912295:1993(E)

more difficult to deal with, is that an individual toxicant gases has already been mentioned, but apart from

may have physiological effects other than those of its this, it is a narcotic in its own right at concentrations

principal specific toxicity. One obvious and very im- above 5 %, causing impairment or loss of conscious-

portant effect is when toxicants affect respiration. ness in humans. Increased incidence of lethality (par-

Hydrogen cyanide Causes hyperventilation, with up to ticularly postexposure), has been observed with

four-fold increases in Ventilation (respiratory minute certain combinations of CO and COJ231, possibly as-

volume RMV) being reported for monkeys early in an sociated with the combined insults of respiratory aci-

exposure[*ol. This hyperventilation in primates (which dosis (from the CO,) with metabolic acidosis (caused

eventually slows as narcosis results) tan result in by the CO), a condition from which the rodent has

faster incapacitation from HCN itself than would oth- difficulty recovering postexposure. Other studies with

erwise be expected, along with more rapid uptake of rats involving CO, have shown combinations of CO,

CO and formation of carboxyhaemoglobin (COHb), and NO, to exhibit synergism[241.
should CO also be present. Similarly, carbon dioxide,
In the case of mixtures of hypoxic gases and an
although relatively innocuous itself at concentrations
irritant gas (hydrogen chloride), analysis of the
of up to 5 %, is a powerful respiratory stimulant
toxicological data Shows that exposure doses leading
causing an approximate doubling of respiration at a
to lethality of rats tan also be additive[zl and 301. Al-
concentration of 3 % to 4 % and trebling of respiration
though not yet confirmed with Primates, these stud-
at 5 % to 6 %[lll. This increases the rate of uptake
ies imply that hydrogen chloride tan be much more
of any other toxicants present approximately in pro-
dangerous than previously thought when in the pres-
Portion to the increase in Ventilation. The inhalation

of irritants also affects respiration and thereby tan af- ence of carbon monoxide (and vice versa). A rapid re-

fett the uptake of asphyxiant gases. Although in the spiratory acidosis was seen in the blood of rats

rat, respiratory depression resulting from HCI exposed to HCI which, when coupled with the

inhalation tan slow the uptake of CO[211, inhalation of metabolic acidosis produced by the CO, resulted in

irritants such as HCI by primates tends to Cause an severely compromised animals. lt is also possible that

increase in RMV[Y Lung function changes are in- in humans impairment of Oxygen uptake into the

duced which appear to impair Oxygen uptake into the blood occurs as a result of Ventilation Perfusion

changes caused by inhalation of irritants. This tan also
blood[221, thereby potentially adding to the hypoxic
be additive with the hypoxic effects of CO and other
effect of inhaled narcotic gases.
gases. These effects tan have significance with re-

Allied to these respiratory effects is the development gard to human fire exposures, impairing escape ca-

of acidosis. Evidente is emerging that metabolic aci- pability and leading to a prolonged hypoxaemia

dosis, resulting from tissue hypoxia induced by gases following rescue. The importante of these phenom-

such as CO and HCN, combined with respiratory aci- ena to humans is supported by evidente that the in-

dosi-s caused by inhalation of CO,, or stagnant hypoxia capacitating effects of carbon monoxide tan be

induced by irritants, tan result in toxic effects not ob- enhanced in primates upon simultaneous exposure to

viously predictable from the effects of the individual HCI, the presence of which Causes the partial pres-

gases[g# 23 and 241. With all these effects possible in in the arterial blood to be

Sure of Oxygen

the inhalation of mixtures of toxicants in real fire decreased[221. This is presumably the case with other

effluents, the Situation is extremely complex. Very lit- irritants as weil. lt has been observed that there tan

tle research using toxicant combinations has been also be additivity of fractional effective doses be-

conducted using primates and the full extent of the tween HCI and HCNW Particularly striking was the

combined effects on incapacitation and death of hu- incidence of postexposure deaths from concen-

mans exposed to fire gas combinations is not yet fully trations of the toxicants, each of which alone would

understood. not be expected to result in any postexposure
lethality. Deaths often occurred several days after ex-
In spite of the complexity of dealing with atmos-
posure.
pheres containing multiple toxicants, considerable
progress has been made in confirming and quantifying
Interactions between multiple combinations of fire
some of these effects from studies with rodents. For
effluent toxicants have been particularly well studied
example, it is now well established that carbon mon-
using mice, by T. Sakurai at the Research Institute of

Oxide and hydrogen cyanide are additive when ex- Marine Engineering, Higashimurayama, JaparWl. In

pressed as fractional exposure doses required to
general, these studies confirmed the effects reported

Cause a toxic effec0 9 and 101. This effect has also and predicted by other investigators, giving additional

been reported for dogs and primateG5 and 261. Thus
confidence to predictive modelling by the methodol-
to a reasonable approximation, the fraction of an ef-
ogy described.
fective exposure dose of CO tan be added to that of

HCN in estimating the presence of a hazardous con- A current limitation on the predictive power of gas

dition. When low Oxygen is added to either or both combination toxicity models is in the area of irritancy.

of these hypoxic gases, there is evidente that a fur- Only a small number of irritant chemicals are routinely

ther additive effect occurs based on studies in measured in smoke, although at least twenty have

rodents[g! 27 and 281 and human$W The effect of been identified. There is also evidente that smoke is

CO, in increasing the rate of uptake of other toxic more irritating in practice than would be predicted

---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122=5:1993(E)

from even a comprehensive analysis of its compo- 6.1.2 Purser mass loss FED model

sition, so that other factors, in addition to simple

Chemical toxicity, are possibly involved[lll. Two that A similar model has been proposed by Purser which

have been identified as important are the irritant ef- also relies upon knowledge of mass loss burning rate

fects of particulate matter (soot) carrying adsorbed and dispersal volume[~~l. A simple, elementar-y calcu-

toxicants deep into the lung and the possible role of lation makes use of a Single average mass loss expo-

free radicals in smoke in causing deep lung Sure dose for lethality for all materials of

damage[lll. These areas require further investigation 300 gmma3mmin. For more advanced calculations, use

in Order to improve the predictive power of models. is made of LCt50 data for individual materials obtained

Currently, the only way that smoke irritancy tan be under conditions relevant to the fire condition being

factored into models is to use data on irritancy from modelled (non-flaming,
early flaming or post-
small scale bioassay tests. lt is to be hoped that fol- flashover).
lowing further
...

SLOVENSKI STANDARD
SIST ISO/TR 9122-5:1999
01-september-1999
3UHVNXãDQMHWRNVLþQRVWLGLPD±GHO1DSRYHGRYDQMHWRNVLþQLKXþLQNRYGLPD

Toxicity testing of fire effluents -- Part 5: Prediction of toxic effects of fire effluents

Essais de toxicité des effluents du feu -- Partie 5: Prédictions concernant les effets

toxiques des effluents du feu
Ta slovenski standard je istoveten z: ISO/TR 9122-5:1993
ICS:
13.220.99 Drugi standardi v zvezi z Other standards related to
varstvom pred požarom protection against fire
SIST ISO/TR 9122-5:1999 en

2003-01.Slovenski inštitut za standardizacijo. Razmnoževanje celote ali delov tega standarda ni dovoljeno.

---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
SIST ISO/TR 9122-5:1999
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
SIST ISO/TR 9122-5:1999
TECHNICAL
ISO
REPORT
TR 9122-5
First edition
1993-04-15
Taxicity testing of fire effluents -
Part 5:
Prediction of tox ic effects of fire efflc
ients
Essais de toxicite des e ffluents du feu -
Partie 5: Pr6dictions concernant /es effets toxiques des effluents du feu
Reference number
ISO/TR 9122-5:1993(E)
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
SIST ISO/TR 9122-5:1999
ISO/TR 9122=5:1993(E)
Contents
Page

1 Scope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..*.....................................

2 Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

......................................................................
3 General concepts
4 Predictions involving one Single fire gas ...................................
Predictions involving multiple fire gases ...................................

Use of mass loss measurements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

5.1
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
5.2 Use of analyzed concentrations of major toxicants

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

6 Fractional effective dose models

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6.1 Mass loss models
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.1.1 Hartzell-Emmons mass loss FED model

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6.1.2 Purser mass loss FED model
British Standards Institution mass loss FED model . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.1.3
6.1.4 National Institute of Standards and Technology (USA) Hazard I

model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6.2 Toxic gas models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..*...................................................

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
6.2.1 Hartzell-Emmons toxic gas FED model
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.2.2 National Research Council (Canada) model
6.2.3 National Institute of Standards and Technology (USA) N-gas

model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6.2.4 Human incapacitation model

7 Conclusions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..*.....................

Annexes
. . . . . . . . . . . 10
A Lethal toxic potency tables for fire effluent toxicants

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

B Bibliography
0 ISO 1993

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or utilized in any form or

by any means, electronie or mechanical, including photocopying and microfilm, without per-

mission in writing from the publisher.
International Organization for Standardization
Case Postale 56 l CH-l 211 Geneve 20 l Switzerland
Printed in Switzerland
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
SIST ISO/TR 9122-5:1999
ISO/TR 9122=5:1993(E)
Foreword
ISO (the International Organization for Standardization) is a worldwide
federation of national Standards bodies (ISO member bodies). The work
of preparing International Standards is normally carried out through ISO
technical committees. Esch member body interested in a subject for
which a technical committee has been established has the right to be
represented on that committee. International organizations, governmental
and non-governmental, in liaison with ISO, also take part in the work. ISO
collaborates closely with the International Electrotechnical Commission
(IEC) on all matters of electrotechnical standardization.
The main task of technical committees is to prepare International Stan-
dards, but in exceptional circumstances a technical committee may pro-
pose the publication of a Technical Report of one of the following types:
- type 1, when the required support cannot be obtained for the publi-
cation of an International Standard, despite repeated efforts;
- type 2, when the subject is still under technical development or where
for any other reason there is the future but not immediate possibility
of an agreement on an International Standard;
- type 3, when a technical committee has collected data of a different
kind from that which is normally published as an International Standard
(“state of the art”, for example).
Technical Reports of types 1 and 2 are subject to review within three years
of publication, to decide whether they tan be transformed into Inter-
national Standards. Technical Reports of type 3 do not necessarily have to
be reviewed until the data they provide are considered to be no longer
valid or useful.
lSO/TR 9122-5, which is a Technical Report of type 2, was prepared by
Techrical Committee ISOFC 92, Fire tests on building materiak, compo-
nents and structures, Sub-Committee SC 3, Toxic hazards in fire.
This document is being issued in the type 2 Technical Report series of
publications (according to subclause G.4.2.2 of part 1 of the IEC/ISO Di-
rectives) as a “prospective Standard for provisional application” in the field
of toxicity testing of fire effluents because there is a’n urgent need for
guidance on how Standards in this field should be used to meet an ident-
ified need.
This document is not to be regarded as an “International Standard”. lt is
proposed for provisional application so that information and experience of
its use in practice may be gathered. Comments on the content of this
document should be sent to the ISO Central Secretariat.
A review of this type 2 Technical Report will be carried out not later than
two years after its publication with the Options of: extension for another
two years; conversion into an International Standard; or withdrawal.
. . .
Ill
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
SIST ISO/TR 9122-5:1999
ISO/TR 9122=5:1993(E)
ISO/TR 9122 consists of the following Parts, under the general title
Taxicity testing of fire effluen ts:
- Part 1: General
- Part 2: Guidelines for biological assays to determine the acute
inhalation toxicity o f fire e ffluents (basic principles, criteria and
methodology)
- Part 3: Methods for the analysis of gases and vapours in fire
effluen ts
- Part 4: The fire model (furnaces and combustion apparatus used in
small-scale tes ting)
- Part 5: Prediction of toxic effects of fire effluents
Annexes A and B of this part of lSO/TR 9122 are for information only.
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
SIST ISO/TR 9122-5:1999
TECHNICAL REPORT ISO/TR 9122=5:1993(E)
Taxicity testing of fire effluents -
Part 5:
Prediction of toxic effects of fire effluents
modelling. A publication in 1981 by S.C. Packharn and
1 Scope
G.E. HartzelVl together with the work of
P.W. Smith[sl, established a foundation for such
This part of ISO/TR 9122 reviews the progress of
modelling in the United States. Research in this area
bioanalytical methodology, including the application
advanced considerably during the 198O’s, such that
of mathematical models which are available and may
more recent publications by G.E. Hartzellie ta 81,
be used in the toxicological assessment of fire
and
101,
BC. Levin[g D.A. Purser[ll] and
effluent atmospheres. Attention is also given to the
Y. Tsuchiya[l21 set the Stage for the development of
application of such models as a means to minimize
toxic hazard modelling which takes into account
the use of laboratory animals in the testing of ma-
combinations of toxic insults as they would occur in
terials for fire effluent toxicity.
a fire.
2 Background
3 General concepts
A major thrust in the assessment of the toxic effects

of fire effluents has been in the development of Basic to all the modelling techniques is some ex-

mathematical models for predicting such effects from
Pression of the concentration of a toxicant relative to
appropriate data on the composition and concen-
that concentration known to Cause a particular toxic

trations of the fire gases. The objectives of these ef- effect resulting from a given time of exposure. Lack-

forts are twofold. Assessment of smoke toxicity from ing in some of the early development efforts was a

analytical data could obviate much of the use of live clear concept of the “dose” of a toxicant, along with

animals in conventional bioassay methodology. Fur- appreciation of its Utility as a tool in modelling. Also

thermore, providing that both qualitative and quanti- lacking was a good base of toxicological data appro-

tative differentes in toxicological effects between priate for short exposures to relatively high concen-

laboratory animals and man are understood, such trations of toxicants. Additionally, there was

modelling methodology tan also be used for estimat- insufficient understanding of relevant laboratory de-

ing the time to development of untenable conditions composition models upon which the toxicological

in either real or simulated fire seenarios.
modelling was to be based.

The development of smoke toxicity modelling began Quantification of “dose” has been fundamental to the

in the late 1960’s and continued into the 197O’s, with development of methodology for modelling the

concepts proposed by Y. Tsuchiya and K. Sumi at the toxicological effects of inhalation of fire gases,

National Research Council Laboratories in Canada[l whether in laboratory animals or humans. Physiolog-

and 21. A deterrent to its acceptability at that time was ical responses are usually dose-related, i.e., the mag-

the widely-held perception that the toxicity of smoke nitude of the effect increases with increasing

could be as complex and as exotic as its composition. amounts or accumulated body burden of a

However, work in the United Kingdom by D.A. Purser physiologically active agent. Since the actual dose of

and W.D. Woolley[s] demonstrated that smoke
toxicants from inhalation of fire effluents cannot be

toxicity could, to a large extent, be explained both measured directly, the assumption is made that the

qualitatively and quantitatively in terms of a small dose is a function of fire effluent (or toxicant) con-

number of important toxic gases. This provided sup- centration and exposure time[lsl. This dose is really

port for the potential validity of smoke toxicity an expression of the insult to which a subject is ex-

---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
SIST ISO/TR 9122-5:1999
ISO/TR 9122=5:1993(E)

posed. The term “exposure dose” is probably more ties that are generated from a fire, transported and

accurate and has become the preferred term in com- then administered to exposed subjects.

bustion toxicology.
4 Predictions involving one Single fire
Concentrations of common fire gas toxicants, such as
carbon monoxide and hydrogen cyanide, are usually SPS
expressed as Parts per million by volume [ppm
The simplest form of modelling involves the Situation
(V/V)]. Therefore, the exposure dose tan be ex-
in which only one toxic fire gas is considered and
pressed as the product of the concentration, C, and
where exposure doses associated with given effects,
time, t, (usually expressed in ppmmmin). In the case
e.g. incapacitation or death, are constants for any ex-
of a changing concentration of a gaseous toxicant, the
posure concentration (i.e. Habers rule is valid and
exposure dose is actually the integrated area under a
Cv = k, where k is a constant exposure dose required
concentration vs. time curve.
for a given toxic effect). Unfortunately, this may not
be the case over the range of concentrations of in-
Often, the concentrations of fire gas toxicants are not
terest and it is desirable to determine the dependence
known. In that event, one tan still deal with the con-
of the effective exposure dose on the concentration
cept of exposure dose as it applies to smoke. Since
of the toxicant. In practice it has been found that the
smoke concentration cannot be quantified, an ap-
exposure dose required to Cause a particular response
proximation is made that the smoke concentration is
decreases with increasing concentration of a toxicant.
proportional to the mass loss during a fire. The inte-
grated area under a mass loss per unit volume vs.
Numerous laboratory studies have involved the most
time curve thus becomes a measure of smoke expo-
prevalent gaseous fire effluents, i.e. CO, CO,, 0,,
Sure dose (usually expressed in g~m--3~rnin)[l4 and 151.
HCN, HCI, HF and NO,, with exposure doses associ-
(This concept of smoke exposure dose is described in
ated with lethality of rodents (mice, rats and guinea
ISO/TR 9122-2.) Smoke exposure dose at any Point in
pigs) being reasonably weil characterized. LC50 values
time tan be calculated from data obtained from a
from the literature are given in tables A.l to A.6. With
laboratory combustion device, instrumented exper-
the inclusion of some limited data on macaque mon-
imental fires, data generated from mathematically
keys, baboons and humans, the data appear to sug-
modelled fires and even data estimated from real
gest that, Overall, the rat may be a reasonable model
fires.
for humans with regard to lethality. (Sublethal effects,
especially respiratory effects of irritants, are another
In Order to model the toxic effects of exposure to fire
matter, and the rat may not be an adequate model;
effluents, it is necessary to obtain two basic pieces
however, some data are available for primates and
of information:
humans.)
a) the exposure dose Cv generated by the fire (for
Once effective exposure doses are characterized, the
the major toxic gases in the smoke or for the mass
concepts of the fractional exposure dose, along with
loss of the materials being combusted); and
the summation or integration of fractional exposure
doses, result in warkable tools in combustion
b) the exposure dose C=t required for a given toxic
toxicology[5 to 9, 11, 17 and 191. Incremental exposure
effect (lethality or incapacitation).
doses C=dt are calculated and related to the specific
C=t exposure dose required to produce the given
Elementary approaches to estimation of toxic hazards
toxicological effect. Thus a fractional effective dose
tan be based on simple mass loss per unit volume
(FED) is calculated for each small time interval. Con-
data, i.e. how much fire load is consumed and into
tinuous summation of these fractional effective doses
what volume it has been dispersed. Recognizing that
is carried out in Order to calculate the accumulated
most materials typically exhibit 30 min LC50 values for
exposure dose.
their fire effluents in the range of approximately
min[l61, the US National Institute of Stan-
30 gmrnw3m
Mathematically, the model for an individual toxicant i
dards and Technology Hazard I Model uses a lethal
tan be expressed as:
tenability limit of 900 gmrnB3a min[l7] if actual material
data is unavailable. The British Standards Institution,
dt . . .
(1)
somewhat more conservatively, employs a value of
500 gmrne3m min[l81. These simple methods avoid the
use of individual material LC50 values, which are not
Most toxicological modelling methodologies make
always known.
use of this concept in one form or another.
In the case of real fire seenarios, smoke transport,
5 Predictions involving multiple fire
dilution and layering calculations tan provide for esti-
mation of smoke exposure doses presented at the
breathing zone of subjects even in areas remote from

a fire[l7]. lt is an important concept that “toxicological re two me hods for pred i cting the toxic effects

There a

exposure doses” tan be visualized as quantified enti- eff luent atmospheres con tain ing multiple

of fire
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
SIST ISO/TR 9122-5:1999
ISO/TR 9122=5:1993(E)
where toxic effects are being assessed for a fire that
toxicants. One is an empirical method involving mass
Starts in the non-flaming mode and Progresses
loss measurements combined with toxic potency data
through early flaming to become a large post-
of the material involved obtained from animal expo-
flashover fire, it will be necessary to use different le-
Sure data; the other is based upon analysis of the
thal mass loss exposure doses for each Stage of the
composition of the atmosphere in terms of the major
fire .
known toxic products. The latter is then used to make
predictions from the known effects of these gases
and the interactions between them.
5.2 Use of analyzed concentrations of major
toxicants
5.1 Use of mass loss measurements
This approach makes predictions of toxic effects
based upon Chemical analysis of the primary com-
This approach may be used to make assessments of
bustion products in the fire effluent along with know-
the toxic effects, in particular lethality, of mathemat-
ledge of the toxic effects and toxic interactions of
ically modelled fires, large scale experimental fires or
these products. lt has two types of application. One
real fire seenarios involving one or more materials.
is to replace or limit the use of animals in small scale
For this method, it is necessary to determine the rate
bioassay combustion toxicity tests. If the lethal expo-
of mass loss of the materials in the fire, either by di-
Sure dose to rodents for a particular test atmosphere
rect measurement or by mathematical modelling of
from a material tan be predicted from the measured
fire growth and mass loss. The latter is based upon
atmosphere composition, then animal exposures tan
input data from small scale tests or other sources.
be avoided or used in a limited way to tonfirm the
The mass loss curve for the fire is then used in con-
prediction. The other application is to make pre-
junction with toxic potency data for the specific ma-
dictions of the likely incapacitating or lethal effects of
terials as derived from small scale bioassay tests. The
exposure of humans to large scale or real fire atmos-
basic method for the determination of the toxic
pheres. This assumes a correlation between animal
potency of the combustion products from individual
and human responses.
materials is to perform a small scale combustion
The full consequences of exposure to atmospheres
toxicity test on a material under conditions relevant to
containing multiple toxicants have only recently been
those in the fire and to find the lethal mass loss ex-
examined in detail. Toxic fire gases may be classified
posure dose (LCtSO) expressed in gern-s-min or the
into two main types, those whose main effect is to
equivalent. The mass loss curve for each material in
Cause tissue hypoxia by impeding the delivery or use
the full scale fire is used to perform a fractional ef-
of Oxygen in the tissues (carbon monoxide, hydrogen
fective dose (FED) analysis in the same way as for a
cyanide and low Oxygen hypoxia) and those that are
Single gas as described previously. Where several
irritant, causing pain and tissue darnage upon contact
materials are involved in a fire, the FEDs of each ma-
with the eyes and respiratory tract epithelium (princi-
terial are summed since, in practice, each material
pally organic irritants and acid gases). In addition to
produces certain yields of the common major

toxicants which are mixed together in the smoke. A these, carbon dioxide is important, particularly due to

number of practical and essentially similar methods its effects on respiration. A final class may be as-

for applying this approach have been published [sf 1% signed as “unusual” toxicants.

17 and 181.
Since the main fire gases within each class exert
similar physiological effects through related mech-
The advantage of this approach is its simplicity, since
anisms, it is not surprising that they are basically ad-
it requires a knowledge only of the mass loss con-
ditive in their Overall effects. What is now emerging
centration curve for the materials involved in the fire
is that, although these main classes of gases exert
and the toxicities of those materials in terms of mass
rather different physiological effects through different
loss C-t products. lt is robust in that, in practice,

LCtsos of many tested materials have been shown mechanisms, when all are present in mixtures, each

tan result in a certain degree of compromise experi-
from small scale tests to fall into approximately one
enced by an exposed subject and these effects are
Order of magnitude[ll and 161.
roughly additive in contributing to incapacitation or
The disadvantages are that it normally only provides
death. lt should not be unexpected that varying de-
lethality information and does not allow for physio-
grees of a partially compromised condition may be
logical deviations from ideal behaviour. lt is also nec-
roughly additive, since an examination of the physio-
essary to assume that lethal exposure doses in rats
logical mechanisms whereby these toxicants exert
are similar to those in humans. Further, the method
their effects reveals a number of possible interactions,
assumes that the toxicity of a material in a real fire
and these effects have been demonstrated in a num-
will be the same as that in a small scale test. The last
ber of studies. This principle of additivity is a key el-
objection is probably the most serious limitation, but
ement in the assessment of toxicity from analytical
it tan be overcome to some extent providing that care
data.
is taken that the small scale bioassay combustion
One of the reasons for these interactions, and a fur-
toxicity tests on materials are conducted under con-
ther complication with combined toxicants which is
ditions similar to those in the full scale fire. Thus,
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
SIST ISO/TR 9122-5:1999
ISO/TR 912295:1993(E)

more difficult to deal with, is that an individual toxicant gases has already been mentioned, but apart from

may have physiological effects other than those of its this, it is a narcotic in its own right at concentrations

principal specific toxicity. One obvious and very im- above 5 %, causing impairment or loss of conscious-

portant effect is when toxicants affect respiration. ness in humans. Increased incidence of lethality (par-

Hydrogen cyanide Causes hyperventilation, with up to ticularly postexposure), has been observed with

four-fold increases in Ventilation (respiratory minute certain combinations of CO and COJ231, possibly as-

volume RMV) being reported for monkeys early in an sociated with the combined insults of respiratory aci-

exposure[*ol. This hyperventilation in primates (which dosis (from the CO,) with metabolic acidosis (caused

eventually slows as narcosis results) tan result in by the CO), a condition from which the rodent has

faster incapacitation from HCN itself than would oth- difficulty recovering postexposure. Other studies with

erwise be expected, along with more rapid uptake of rats involving CO, have shown combinations of CO,

CO and formation of carboxyhaemoglobin (COHb), and NO, to exhibit synergism[241.
should CO also be present. Similarly, carbon dioxide,
In the case of mixtures of hypoxic gases and an
although relatively innocuous itself at concentrations
irritant gas (hydrogen chloride), analysis of the
of up to 5 %, is a powerful respiratory stimulant
toxicological data Shows that exposure doses leading
causing an approximate doubling of respiration at a
to lethality of rats tan also be additive[zl and 301. Al-
concentration of 3 % to 4 % and trebling of respiration
though not yet confirmed with Primates, these stud-
at 5 % to 6 %[lll. This increases the rate of uptake
ies imply that hydrogen chloride tan be much more
of any other toxicants present approximately in pro-
dangerous than previously thought when in the pres-
Portion to the increase in Ventilation. The inhalation

of irritants also affects respiration and thereby tan af- ence of carbon monoxide (and vice versa). A rapid re-

fett the uptake of asphyxiant gases. Although in the spiratory acidosis was seen in the blood of rats

rat, respiratory depression resulting from HCI exposed to HCI which, when coupled with the

inhalation tan slow the uptake of CO[211, inhalation of metabolic acidosis produced by the CO, resulted in

irritants such as HCI by primates tends to Cause an severely compromised animals. lt is also possible that

increase in RMV[Y Lung function changes are in- in humans impairment of Oxygen uptake into the

duced which appear to impair Oxygen uptake into the blood occurs as a result of Ventilation Perfusion

changes caused by inhalation of irritants. This tan also
blood[221, thereby potentially adding to the hypoxic
be additive with the hypoxic effects of CO and other
effect of inhaled narcotic gases.
gases. These effects tan have significance with re-

Allied to these respiratory effects is the development gard to human fire exposures, impairing escape ca-

of acidosis. Evidente is emerging that metabolic aci- pability and leading to a prolonged hypoxaemia

dosis, resulting from tissue hypoxia induced by gases following rescue. The importante of these phenom-

such as CO and HCN, combined with respiratory aci- ena to humans is supported by evidente that the in-

dosi-s caused by inhalation of CO,, or stagnant hypoxia capacitating effects of carbon monoxide tan be

induced by irritants, tan result in toxic effects not ob- enhanced in primates upon simultaneous exposure to

viously predictable from the effects of the individual HCI, the presence of which Causes the partial pres-

gases[g# 23 and 241. With all these effects possible in in the arterial blood to be

Sure of Oxygen

the inhalation of mixtures of toxicants in real fire decreased[221. This is presumably the case with other

effluents, the Situation is extremely complex. Very lit- irritants as weil. lt has been observed that there tan

tle research using toxicant combinations has been also be additivity of fractional effective doses be-

conducted using primates and the full extent of the tween HCI and HCNW Particularly striking was the

combined effects on incapacitation and death of hu- incidence of postexposure deaths from concen-

mans exposed to fire gas combinations is not yet fully trations of the toxicants, each of which alone would

understood. not be expected to result in any postexposure
lethality. Deaths often occurred several days after ex-
In spite of the complexity of dealing with atmos-
posure.
pheres containing multiple toxicants, considerable
progress has been made in confirming and quantifying
Interactions between multiple combinations of fire
some of these effects from studies with rodents. For
effluent toxicants have been particularly well studied
example, it is now well established that carbon mon-
using mice, by T. Sakurai at the Research Institute of

Oxide and hydrogen cyanide are additive when ex- Marine Engineering, Higashimurayama, JaparWl. In

pressed as fractional exposure doses required to
general, these studies confirmed the effects reported

Cause a toxic effec0 9 and 101. This effect has also and predicted by other investigators, giving additional

been reported for dogs and primateG5 and 261. Thus
confidence to predictive modelling by the methodol-
to a reasonable approximation, the fraction of an ef-
ogy described.
fective exposure dose of CO tan be added to that of

HCN in estimating the presence of a hazardous con- A current limitation on the predictive power of gas

dition. When low Oxygen is added to either or both combination toxicity models is in the area of irritancy.

of these hypoxic gases, there is evidente that a fur- Only a small number of irritant chemicals are routinely

ther additive effect occurs based on studies in measured in smoke, although at least twenty have

rodents[g! 27 and 281 and human$W The effect of been identified. There is also evidente that smoke is

CO, in increasing the rate of uptake of other toxic more irritating in practice than would be predicted

---------------------- Page: 10 ----------------------
SIST ISO/TR 9122-5:1999
ISO/TR 9122=5:1993(E)

from even a comprehensive analysis of its compo- 6.1.2 Purser mass loss FED model

sition, so that other factors, in addition to simple
...

ISO
RAPPORT
TECHNIQUE TR 9122-5
Première édition
1993-04-I 5
Essais de toxicité des effluents du feu -
Partie 5:
Prédictions concernant les effets toxiques des
effluents du feu
Toxicity testing of fire effluents -
Part 5: Prediction of toxic effects of fire effluents
Numéro de référence
ISO/rR 9122-5:1993(F)
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122=5:1993(F)
Sommaire
Page

1 Domaine d’application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2 Historique . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

3 Concepts généraux
4 Prédictions concernant un seul gaz provenant d’incendies . . . . . . 2
. . . 3
5 Prédictions concernant plusieurs gaz provenant d’incendies
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
5.1 Utilisation des mesures de perte de masse
5.2 Utilisation de concentrations analysées de toxiques majeurs

6 Modèles à dose effective fractionnelle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

6.1 Modèles basés sur la perte de masse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

. . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
6.1 .l Modèle DEF de perte de masse Hartzell-Emmons

6.1.2 Modèle DEF de perte de masse Purser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

6.1.3 Modèle DEF de perte de masse British Standards Institution
6.1.4 Modèle Hazard I du National Institute of Standards and Technology
s.......................................................................... 6
(États-Unis)

6.2 Modèles de gaz toxiques ,.,.,..................................................

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
6.2.1 Modèle DEF de gaz toxiques Hartzell-Emmons

6.2.2 Modèle National Research Council (Canada) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6.2.3 Modèle gaz N du National Institute of Standards and Technology

(Etats-Unis) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

6.2.4 Modèle d’incapacitation humaine

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..*............................... 10

7 Conclusions
Annexes
A Tableaux des valeurs de l’activité toxique létale des éléments

toxiques des effluents du feu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...*..

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..*............... 15

B Bibliographie
0 ISO 1993

Droits de reproduction réservés. Aucune partie de cette publication ne peut être reproduite

ni utilisée sous quelque forme que ce soit et par aucun procédé, électronique ou mécanique,

y compris la photocopie et les microfilms, sans l’accord écrit de l’éditeur.
Organisation internationale de normalisation
Case Postale 56 l CH-l 211 Genève 20 l Suisse
Imprimé en Suisse
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122-5:1993(F)
Avant-propos
L’ISO (Organisation internationale de normalisation) est une fédération
mondiale d’organismes nationaux de normalisation (comités membres de
I’ISO). L’élaboration des Normes internationales est en général confiée aux
comités techniques de I’ISO. Chaque comité membre intéressé par une
etude a le droit de faire partie du comité technique créé a cet effet. Les
organisations internationales, gouvernementales et non gouvernemen-
tales, en liaison avec I’ISO participent également aux travaux. L’ISO colla-
bore étroitement avec la Commission électrotechnique internationale (CEI)
en ce qui concerne la normalisation électrotechnique.
La tâche principale des comités techniques est d’élaborer les Normes
internationales, mais, exceptionnellement, un comité technique peut pro-
poser la publication d’un rapport technique de l’un des types suivants:
- type 1, lorsque, en dépit de maints efforts, l’accord requis ne peut être
réalisé en faveur de la publication d’une Norme internationale;
- type 2, lorsque le sujet en question est encore en cours de dévelop-
pement technique ou lorsque, pour toute autre raison, la possibilité
d’un accord pour la publication d’une Norme internationale peut être
envisagée pour l’avenir mais pas dans l’immédiat;
- type 3, lorsqu’un comité technique a réuni des données de nature dif-
férente de celles qui sont normalement publiées comme Normes
internationales (ceci pouvant comprendre des informations sur l’état
de la technique, par exemple).
Les rapports techniques des types 1 et 2 font l’objet d’un nouvel examen
trois ans au plus tard après leur publication afin de décider éventuellement
de leur transformation en Normes internationales. Les rapports techniques
du type 3 ne doivent pas nécessairement être révisés avant que les don-
nées fournies ne soient plus jugées valables ou utiles.
L’ISODR 9122-5, rapport technique du type 2, a été élaboré par le comité
technique lSO/TC 92, Essais au feu sur les matériaux de construction,
composants et structures, sous-comité SC 3, Risques d’intoxication par le
feu
Le présent document est publié dans la série des rapports techniques de
type 2 (conformément au paragraphe G.4.2.2 de la partie 1 des Directives
CEI/ISO) comme «norme prospective d’application provisoire)) dans le
domaine des essais de toxicité des effluents du feu, en raison de l’urgence
d’avoir une indication quant à la manière dont il convient d’utiliser les
normes dans ce domaine pour répondre à un besoin déterminé.
Ce document ne doit pas être considéré comme une ((Norme internatio-
nale». II est proposé pour une mise en œuvre provisoire, dans le but de
recueillir des informations et d’acquérir de l’expérience quant à son appli-
cation dans la pratique. II est de règle d’envoyer les observations éven-
. . .
III
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122=5:1993(F)
tuelles relatives au contenu de ce document au Secrétariat central de
I’ISO.
II sera procédé à un nouvel examen de ce rapport technique de type 2
deux ans au plus tard après sa publication, avec la faculté d’en prolonger
la validité pendant deux autres années, de le transformer en Norme inter-
nationale ou de l’annuler.
L’ISO/rR 9122 comprend les parties suivantes, présentées sous le titre
général Essais de toxicité des effluents du feu:
- Partie 1: Generalites
- Partie 2: Directives pour les essais biologiques permettant de dé-
terminer la toxicite aiguë par inhalation des effluents du feu (Irinci-
pes de base, critéres et me thodologie)
- Partie 3: Méthodes d’analyse des gaz et des vapeurs dans les
effluents du feu
- Partie 4: Modèle feu (fours et appareillages de combustion utilisés
dans les essais a petite échelle)
- Partie 5 . Prédictions concernant les effets toxiques des effluents du
feu
Les annexes A et B de la présente partie de I’ISO~R 9122 sont donnees
uniquement a titre d’information.
. iv
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
RAPPORT TECHNIQUE
ISO/TR 9122=5:1993(F)
Essais de toxicité des effluents du feu -
Partie 5:
Prédictions concernant les effets toxiques des effluents du
feu
que sa composition. Cependant, les travaux effectués
1 Domaine d’application
au Royaume-Uni par D.A. Purser et W.D. Woolley[s]
ont démontré que la toxicité de la fumée pouvait être
La présente partie de I’ISO/TR 9122 concerne le suivi
expliquée qualitativement et quantitativement en ter-
de la méthodologie bioanalytique, y compris I’applica-
mes d’un petit nombre de gaz toxiques importants.
tion des modèles mathématiques dont on dispose et
Ces travaux ont fourni un rapport à la validité poten-
peuvent être utilises pour l’évaluation
tielle de la reproduction de toxicité de la fumée. Une
toxicologique des atmosphéres des effluents du feu.
publication de 1981 par S.C. Packham et
On s’intéresse également à l’application de ces mo-
G.E. HartzelVl, ainsi que l’ouvrage de P.W. Smith151
dèles comme moyen de minimiser l’utilisation d’ani-
ont servi de base à ce type de reproduction aux
maux de laboratoires dans les essais de matériaux
États-Unis. La recherche dans ce domaine a considé-
pour la toxicité des effluents du feu.
rablement progressé durant les années 1980, de sorte
que B.C. Levin[gl, D.A. Purser[lll, et Y. Tsuchiya[l2]
ont préparé le développement de la modélisation des
2 Historique
risques toxiques qui prend en compte les combinai-
sons d’agressions toxiques telles qu’elles surviennent
Un progrès majeur dans l’évaluation des effets toxi-
dans un incendie.
ques des effluents du feu a été la mise au point de
modeles mathématiques de prédiction des dangers
toxiques à partir de données appropriées relatives à
la composition des gaz du feu. Les objectifs de ces 3 Concepts généraux
efforts sont doubles: l’évaluation de la toxicité de la

fumée à partir de données analytiques pourrait per- À la base de toutes les techniques de reproduction,

mettre de minimiser beaucoup l’utilisation d’animaux on trouve une expression de la concentration d’un

vivants en méthodologie biologique conventionnelle. toxique relative à la concentration dont on connaît

En outre, et à condition que l’on comprenne les dif- l’effet toxique particulier après un temps donné d’ex-

férences qualitatives et quantitatives d’effets position. Les premiers travaux souffraient de I’ab-

toxicologiques entre les animaux de laboratoire et les
sente d’un concept clair de la «dose)) de toxique,
humains, cette méthodologie de reproduction pourrait
ainsi que l’appréciation de son utilité comme outil de
aussi être utilisée pour l’estimation du développement
reproduction. II manquait également une bonne base
d’un danger toxique au cours de scénarios d’incendie
de données toxicologiques appropriées à une courte
réel ou simulé.
exposition de concentration relativement élevées de
toxiques, et, de plus, les modèles de décomposition
Le développement de la modélisation de la toxicité
en laboratoire applicables devant servir de base à la
des fumées a débuté à la fin des années 60 et a
reproduction toxicologique souffraient d’une compré-
continué durant les années 70, à l’aide de concepts
hension insuffisante.
proposés par Y. Tsuchiya et K. Sumi des National
Research Council Laboratories au Canada[1 et 21. À
La quantification de la «dose)) a été fondamentale

l’époque, I’acceptabilité de cette reproduction avait pour la mise au point de la méthodologie de repro-

été contrée par le sentiment général que la toxicité duction des effets toxiques de l’inhalation des gaz du

de la fumée pouvait être aussi complexe et exotique feu, que ce soit sur les animaux ou sur les humains.

---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122=5:1993(F)

Les réponses physiologiques sont habituellement position pour leurs effluents du feu dans une gamme

liées a la dose c’est-a-dire que l’amplitude de l’effet d’approximativement 30 gmrnm3= min[l61, le modéle du

augmente à mesure que la dose croî’t ou que la charge US National Institute of Standards and Technology

corporelle d’un agent physiologique actif s’accumule. Hazard I utilise une limite de tenabilité létale de

La dose reelle de toxiques due à l’inhalation 900 gmrnB3m min[l71, si les données sur ces matériaux

d’effluents du feu ne pouvant être mesurée direc- ne sont pas disponibles. Le British Standards Institu-

tement, on part du principe que la dose est fonction tion, quelque peu plus conservateur, s’en tient à une

valeur de 500 ggrnm3m

de la concentration d’effluents du feu (ou toxique) et min[W Ces méthodes simples

du temps d’expositionW Cette «dose)) est I’expres- évitent l’utilisation de valeur LC50 pour des matériaux

sion reelle de l’agression a laquelle un sujet est sou- traditionnels, celle-ci n’étant pas toujours connue.

mis. Le terme «dose d’exposition» est probablement
Dans le cas de scénarios d’incendies réels, les calculs
plus précis et a éte adopte en toxicologie de la com-
de transport de fumée de dilution et de pose peuvent
bustion.
fournir une estimation des doses d’exposition pré-
sente au niveau des zones respiratoires des sujets
Les concentrations de toxiques communes de gaz du
même dans des régions éloignées d’un incendieW
feu, tels que le monoxyde de carbone et le cyanure
II est important d’admettre le concept que des «doses
d’hydrogène, sont généralement exprimées en partie
d’exposition toxicologiques» peuvent être visualisées
par millions en volume [ppm (V/V)]. En conséquence,
comme des entités quantifiées générées a partir d’un
la dose d’exposition peut être exprimée comme le
incendie, transportées et ensuite administrées aux
produit de la concentration, C, et du temps, t, c’est-
sujets exposés.
a-dire en ppmemin. Dans le cas d’un changement de
concentration d’un toxique gazeux, la dose d’expo-
sition est en realité l’aire intégrée sous la courbe
temps/concentration. 4 Prédictions concernant un seul gaz
provenant d’incendies
Souvent, les concentrations de toxiques gazeux du
feu ne sont pas connues. Dans ce cas, on peut encore
La forme de reproduction la plus simple met en jeu
se servir du concept de dose d’exposition tel qu’il
une situation dans laquelle un seul gaz toxique est pris
s’applique a la fumée. La concentration de fumée ne
en considération, et où les doses d’exposition asso-
pouvant être quantifiée, on admet l’approximation,
ciées a des effets donnes, par exemple incapacitation
selon laquelle la concentration de fumée est propor-
ou mort, sont constantes pour toute concentration
tionnelle a la perte de masse durant un incendie.
d’exposition (c’est-a-dire que la règle Haber est valide
L’aire intégrée sous la courbe perte de masse expri-
et CV = k, k étant une dose constante requise pour
mée par unité de volume devient une mesure en
un effet toxique donné). Malheureusement, cela peut
fonction du temps d’exposition a la fumée, c’est-à-
ne pas être le cas sur la gamme de concentrations
dire gmrn-3mrnitW et 151. (Ce concept de dose d’expo-
intéressantes et il est souhaitable de déterminer la
sition à la fumée est décrit dans I’ISO/TR 9122-2.) On
dépendance de la dose effective à la concentration
peut, à tout moment, calculer la dose d’exposition à
du toxique. En pratique, il s’est avéré que la dose
la fumée à partir d’un dispositif de combustion de la-
d’exposition requise pour provoquer une réponse
boratoire, d’incendies expérimentaux sur instruments,
particulière décroît à mesure que la concentration du
de données générées à partir d’incendies reproduits
toxique croÎt.
mathématiquement, et même, de données estimées
à partir d’incendies réels.
De nombreuses études de laboratoires ont considéré
les effluents gazeux du feu les plus courants, c’est-à-
Pour reproduire les effets toxiques de l’exposition aux
dire CO, CO*, 02, HCN, HCI, HF et NO,, avec des
effuents du feu, il est nécessaire d’obtenir deux élé-
doses d’exposition associées à la Iétalité des rongeurs
ments d’information fondamentaux:
(souris, rats et cochons d’Inde) assez bien caracté-
risées. Des valeurs LC50 sont données aux tableaux
a) la dose d’exposition CV générée par l’incendie
A.1 a A.6. En plus de quelques données limites rela-
(pour les principaux gaz toxiques de la fumée ou
tives aux singes macaques, aux babouins et aux hu-
pour la perte de masse des matériaux consumés)
mains, les données semblent suggérer que le rat
et,
constitue le modèle le plus raisonnable pour les hu-
mains en ce qui concerne la Iétalité. (Les effets
b) la dose d’exposition CV requise pour un effet toxi-
sublétals, en particulier les effets respiratoires d’irri-
que donné (incapacitation ou Iétalité).
tants, sont d’un autre domaine, et le rat n’est peut
être pas un modèle adéquat; on dispose toutefois de
Des approches élémentaires de l’estimation de dan-
quelques données relatives aux primates et aux hu-
gers toxiques peuvent être basées sur de simples
mains.)
données relatives a la perte de masse exprimée en

volume, c’est-a-dire quelle charge d’incendie a été Une fois les doses effectives d’exposition caracté-

consumée et quel a été son volume de dispersion. risées, les concepts de la dose fractionnée, associés

Etant reconnu que la plupart des matériaux présen- a la somme ou a l’intégration de doses fractionnées

tent des valeurs typiques de LC50 pour 30 min d’ex- fournissent des outils de travail en toxicologie de la

---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
lSO/TR 9122=5:1993(F)

combustion(5 à 9, 1% 17 et 191. Des doses d’exposition sée pour effectuer une analyse de la dose effective

croissantes Cmdt sont calculées et rapportées a la dose
fractionnelle (DEF) de la même façon que pour un gaz

spécifique Cv d’exposition requise pour produire I’ef- isolé comme décrit précédemment. Lorsque plusieurs

fet toxicologique donné. Ainsi, une «dose effective matériaux sont présents dans un incendie, les DEF

fractionnelle» (DEF) est calculée pour chaque petit in- de chaque matériau sont totalisées, puisqu’en prati-

tervalle de temps. Une totalisation continue de ces
que chaque matériau fournit certains rendements des
doses fractionnées effectives est effectuée de façon
toxiques majeurs les plus usuels qui se trouvent mé-
à calculer la dose d’exposition totale accumulée.
langés dans la fumée. Un certain nombre de métho-
des pratiques et essentiellement similaires pour
Mathématiquement, on peut exprimer le modéle d’un
l’application de cette approche ont été publiées[a, 11,
toxique individuel i comme suit:
17 et 181,
L’avantage de cette approche est sa simplicité, puis-
dt . . .
(1)
qu’elle ne requiert que la seule connaissance de la
courbe de concentration de perte de masse pour les
La plupart des méthodologies de reproduction
matériaux impliqués dans l’incendie et les toxicités de
toxicologiques utilisent ce modele sous une forme ou
ces matériaux en fonction de la perte de masse Cv
une autre.
des produits. À partir d’essais effectués à petite
échelle, on a pu démontrer, qu’en pratique, la dose
d’exposition létale de perte de masse LCt50 de nom-
5 Prédictions concernant plusieurs gaz
breux matériaux testés est approximativement du
provenant d’incendies
même ordre de grandeur[ll et 161.

II existe deux méthodes de prédiction des effets Les inconvénients de cette méthode résident dans le

toxiques des atmosphéres d’effluents du feu conte- fait qu’elle ne donne des informations qu’en terme de

Iétalité et ne permet pas de variation physio.logique
nant des toxiques multiples. L’une d’elles est une
par rapport à un comportement idéal. II est également
méthode empirique mettant en jeu des mesures de
nécessaire de supposer que les expositions de doses
perte de masse ,combinées à des données de puis-
létales chez les rats sont similaires pour les humains.
sance toxique obtenues a partir de données d’expo-

sition des animaux; l’autre est basée sur l’analyse de En outre, la méthode suppose que la toxicité d’un

matériau en incendie réel sera la même que celle d’un
la composition de I’atmosphére en fonction des prin-
essai à petite échelle. Cette dernière objection
cipaux produits toxiques connus. Cette dernière est
constitue sans doute la limite la plus sérieuse, mais
alors utilisée pour élaborer les prédictions relatives

aux effets connus de ces gaz et a leurs interactions. elle peut être surmontée jusqu’à un certain point,

pourvu que l’on prenne soin de conduire les essais
de toxicité de combustion biologiques à échelle ré-
5.1 Utilisation des mesures de perte de
duite sur des matériaux dans des conditions similaires
masse
de celles d’un incendie en vraie grandeur. Ainsi, là où
l’on procédera à l’évaluation des effets toxiques pour
Cette approche peut être utilisée pour faire I’éva-
un incendie qui débute sans flammes, progresse par
luation des effets toxiques, en particulier de la Iétalité,
flammes à leur début pour devenir un incendie de
des incendies reproduits mathématiquement, des in-
grande dimension post-flashover, il sera nécessaire
cendies expérimentaux en vraie grandeur, ou des
d’utiliser des doses d’exposition létales exprimées en
scénarios d’incendie réels impliquant un matériau ou
perte de masse, pour chaque stade de l’incendie.
plus .
Pour cette méthode, il est nécessaire de déterminer
5.2 Utilisation de concentrations analysées
le taux de perte de masse des matériaux dans I’in-
cendie, soit par mesure directe, soit par reproduction de toxiques majeurs
mathématique de la croissance du feu et de la perte

de masse. La dernière méthode est basée sur des Cette approche permet d’etablir des prédictions des

données d’entrée d’essais a échelle réduite ou d’au- effets toxiques basées sur une analyse chimique des

tres sources. La courbe de perte de masse pour I’in- produits de combustion des effluents du feu et sur la

cendie est ensuite utilisée en conjonction avec les connaissance des effets toxiques et des interactions

donées de puissance toxique dérivées d’essais biolo- toxiques de ces produits. Elle a deux types d’applica-

giques a petite échelle. La méthode de base de dé- tion. L’une est de remplacer ou de limiter l’utilisation

termination de la puissance toxique des produits de d’animaux dans des essais de toxicité de combustion

combustion de matériaux individuels consiste à ef- biologique à petite échelle. Si la dose d’exposition

fectuer un essai de toxicité de combustion à petite létale des rongeurs relative à une atmosphère parti-

échelle dans des conditions similaires à celles de I’in- culier-e caractéristique de la combustion d’un matériau

cendie et de trouver la dose d’exposition létale de peut être prédite à partir de la mesure des compo-

perte de masse (LCt50) exprimée en ggrnm3m min ou sants de cette atmosphère, alors on pourrait ainsi

l’équivalent. La courbe de perte de masse pour cha- éviter l’exposition des animaux ou ne les utiliser que

que matériau de l’incendie en vraie grandeur est utili- d’une façon limitée pour confirmer la prédiction.

---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122=5:1993(F)

L’autre application consiste à faire des prédictions des y a également du CO. De façon similaire, le dioxyde

effets susceptibles d’incapacités ou mortels de I’ex-
de carbone, bien que relativement inoffensif a des
position des humains à des atmosphères d’incendie
concentrations allant jusqu’à 5 %, est un stimulant
en vraie grandeur ou réels. Cela implique une corréla-
respiratoire puissant provoquant un doublement ap-

tion entre les réactions des animaux et celles des proximatif de la respiration à une concentration de

humains. 3 % à 4 % et un triplement de la respiration à 5 % à
6 %[Il]. Cela augmente le taux d’absorption de tout
Les pleines conséquences de l’exposition à des at-
autre toxique présent approximativement proportion-
mosphères contenant des toxiques multiples n’ont
nellement à l’augmentation de la ventilation.
été examinées en détail que récemment. Les gaz
L’inhalation d’irritants affecte également la respiration
toxiques dégagés lors d’un incendie peuvent être
et peut aussi affecter l’absorption des gaz
classés selon deux principaux types: ceux dont l’effet
asphyxiants. Bien que chez le rat, la dépression res-
principal est de causer un hypoxie des tissus en en-
piratoire résultant de l’inhalation de HCI ralentisse
travant le débit d’oxygène ou l’utilisation d’oxygène
l’absorption de CO[211, l’inhalation d’irritants tels que
dans les tissus (monoxyde de carbone, cyanure d’hy-
HCI par les primates tend à produire une augmen-
drogéne, et hypoxie due à une faible concentration
tation de VRMW II en résulte des changements dans
d’oxygéne) et ceux qui sont irritants, provoquant dou-
le fonctionnement des poumons qui paraissent porter

leur et détérioration des tissus au contact des yeux atteinte à l’absorption d’oxygéne dans le sang[221,

et de l’épithélium de l’appareil respiratoire (princi-
ajoutant ainsi à l’effet hypoxique des gaz narcotiques
palement les irritants organiques et les gaz acides).
inhalés.
En plus de ces agents, le dioxyde de carbone est im-

. portant, en raison de ces effets sur la respiration. Une En plus de ces effets respiratoires se produit le dé-

derniere classe, enfin, peut être répertoriée comme veloppement d’une acidose. II devient évident que

toxiques «inhabituels). I’acidose métabolique, résultant de I’hypoxie des tis-
sus provoqués par des gaz tels que CO et HCN,

Puisque les principaux gaz d’incendie de chaque contribue à une acidose respiratoire causée par

classe exerce des effets physiologiques similaires par l’inhalation de CO*, ou une hypoxie stagnante provo-

l’intermédiaire de mécanismes liés, il n’est pas sur-
quée par les irritants, peut résulter aux effets toxiques

prenant qu’ils s’additionnent fondamentalement par qui s’ajoutent et qu’on ne peut prévoir de façon évi-

leurs effets globaux. Ce que l’on constate en revan- dente à partir des effets de gaz individuels[g8 23 et 241.

che maintenant c’est que, bien que ces grandes ca- La multiplicité des effets possibles dans l’inhalation

tégories de gaz exercent des effets physiologiques de mélanges de toxiques dans les effluents réels du

plutôt différents par l’intermédiaire de différents mé- feu, rend la situation extrêmement complexe. Très

canismes, lorsque ceux-ci sont présents en mélanges, peu de recherches utilisant des combina sons de

chacun peut aboutir à un certain degré de compromis toxiques ont été effectuées en utili sant des primates

expérimental sur un sujet exposé et les effets s’addi- cependant que les effets combinés sur I’incapaci-

tionnent en gros pour contribuer à I’incapacitation ou
tation et la mort des humains exposés à des combi-
à la mort. II faut s’attendre à ce que des degrés va-
naisons de gaz n’a pas encore été totalement compris
riables d’une condition partiellement compromise
dans toute leur étendue.
s’additionnent en gros, puisqu’un examen des méca-
En dépit de la complexité que présente l’étude d’at-
nismes physiologiques par lesquels ces toxiques
mosphère contenant des toxiques multiples, des pro-
exercent leurs effets révéle un grand nombre d’inter-
grès considérables ont été accomplis dans la
actions possibles, et les effets ont été démontrés
confirmation et la qualification de certains de ces ef-
dans un grand nombre d’études. Ce principe

d’additivité est un élément clé dans l’évaluation du fets à partir d’études effectuées sur les rongeurs. Par

. danger toxique à partir d’éléments analytiques. exemple, il est désormais bien établi que le monoxyde

de carbone et le cyanure d’hydrogène sont additifs
L’une des raisons de ces interactions, et une autre
lorsqu’ils sont exprimés en doses d’exposition
complication des toxiques combinés qui est plus déli-
fractionnelles requises pour causer un effet toxique
donné[T 9 et 101. A’

cate à traiter, est le fait qu’un toxique individuel peut Insi, à une approximation raison-

avoir des effets physiologiques autres que ceux de sa nable, la fraction d’une dose d’exposition effective de

toxicité spécifique principale. Un effet évident et très CO peut être ajoutée à celle de HCN pour l’estimation

important se présente lorsque les toxiques affectent de la présence d’une condition dangereuse. Lorsque

la respiration. Le cyanure d’hydrogène produit une l’on a une atmosphère pauvre en oxygène en plus de

hyperventilation, multipliant la ventilation par quatre la présence de ces deux gaz hypoxiques, il est évident

(volume respiratoire par minute, VRM) comme dé- qu’un effet additif supplémentaire se produit, sur la

montré sur les singes au début de I’exposition[W base d’études faites sur les rongeur& 27 et 281 et sur

Cette hyperventilation chez les primates (qui fi- les humains[291. L’effet du CO9 dans l’accroissement

nalement ralentit lorsque la narcose apparaît) peut
du taux d’absorption d’autres gaz narcotique en soi à

entraîner une incapacitation plus rapide du fait du des concentrations supérieures à 5 %, provoquant

cyanure d’hydrogène que celle qui aurait pû apparaître faiblesse et perte de conscience des humains. Une

autrement, combinée avec une plus forte montée de
incidence plus forte de la Iétalité (en particulier par
CO et formation de carboxyhémoglobine (COHb), s’il
exposition) a été observée avec certaines combinai-
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122=5:1993(F)

sons de CO et de C02[231 pouvant être associées que la fumée était plus irritante en pratique que l’on

avec les dommages combinés de I’acidose respi-
aurait pû le prédire, même à partir d’une analyse ap-

ratoire (du CO,) avec I’acidose métabolique (causée profondie de sa composition, de sorte que d’autres

par le CO), le rongeur a des difficultés à se remettre facteurs, peuvent être impliqués, en plus d’une sim-

en post-exposition. D’autres études faites sur les rats
ple toxicité chimique[lll. Deux d’entre eux, identi,fiés
avec de l’oxygène ont révélé que CO2 et NO2 pré-
comme importants, sont les effets irritants de nature
sentaient une synergieW
particuliére (suie) transportant des toxiques absorbés
en profondeur dans les poumons, et le rôle possible
Dans le cas de mélanges de gaz hypoxiques et d’un
des radicaux libres dans la fumée, qui provoqueraient
gaz irritant (chlorure d’hyd
...

ISO
RAPPORT
TECHNIQUE TR 9122-5
Première édition
1993-04-I 5
Essais de toxicité des effluents du feu -
Partie 5:
Prédictions concernant les effets toxiques des
effluents du feu
Toxicity testing of fire effluents -
Part 5: Prediction of toxic effects of fire effluents
Numéro de référence
ISO/rR 9122-5:1993(F)
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122=5:1993(F)
Sommaire
Page

1 Domaine d’application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2 Historique . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

3 Concepts généraux
4 Prédictions concernant un seul gaz provenant d’incendies . . . . . . 2
. . . 3
5 Prédictions concernant plusieurs gaz provenant d’incendies
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
5.1 Utilisation des mesures de perte de masse
5.2 Utilisation de concentrations analysées de toxiques majeurs

6 Modèles à dose effective fractionnelle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

6.1 Modèles basés sur la perte de masse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

. . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
6.1 .l Modèle DEF de perte de masse Hartzell-Emmons

6.1.2 Modèle DEF de perte de masse Purser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

6.1.3 Modèle DEF de perte de masse British Standards Institution
6.1.4 Modèle Hazard I du National Institute of Standards and Technology
s.......................................................................... 6
(États-Unis)

6.2 Modèles de gaz toxiques ,.,.,..................................................

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
6.2.1 Modèle DEF de gaz toxiques Hartzell-Emmons

6.2.2 Modèle National Research Council (Canada) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6.2.3 Modèle gaz N du National Institute of Standards and Technology

(Etats-Unis) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

6.2.4 Modèle d’incapacitation humaine

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..*............................... 10

7 Conclusions
Annexes
A Tableaux des valeurs de l’activité toxique létale des éléments

toxiques des effluents du feu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...*..

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..*............... 15

B Bibliographie
0 ISO 1993

Droits de reproduction réservés. Aucune partie de cette publication ne peut être reproduite

ni utilisée sous quelque forme que ce soit et par aucun procédé, électronique ou mécanique,

y compris la photocopie et les microfilms, sans l’accord écrit de l’éditeur.
Organisation internationale de normalisation
Case Postale 56 l CH-l 211 Genève 20 l Suisse
Imprimé en Suisse
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122-5:1993(F)
Avant-propos
L’ISO (Organisation internationale de normalisation) est une fédération
mondiale d’organismes nationaux de normalisation (comités membres de
I’ISO). L’élaboration des Normes internationales est en général confiée aux
comités techniques de I’ISO. Chaque comité membre intéressé par une
etude a le droit de faire partie du comité technique créé a cet effet. Les
organisations internationales, gouvernementales et non gouvernemen-
tales, en liaison avec I’ISO participent également aux travaux. L’ISO colla-
bore étroitement avec la Commission électrotechnique internationale (CEI)
en ce qui concerne la normalisation électrotechnique.
La tâche principale des comités techniques est d’élaborer les Normes
internationales, mais, exceptionnellement, un comité technique peut pro-
poser la publication d’un rapport technique de l’un des types suivants:
- type 1, lorsque, en dépit de maints efforts, l’accord requis ne peut être
réalisé en faveur de la publication d’une Norme internationale;
- type 2, lorsque le sujet en question est encore en cours de dévelop-
pement technique ou lorsque, pour toute autre raison, la possibilité
d’un accord pour la publication d’une Norme internationale peut être
envisagée pour l’avenir mais pas dans l’immédiat;
- type 3, lorsqu’un comité technique a réuni des données de nature dif-
férente de celles qui sont normalement publiées comme Normes
internationales (ceci pouvant comprendre des informations sur l’état
de la technique, par exemple).
Les rapports techniques des types 1 et 2 font l’objet d’un nouvel examen
trois ans au plus tard après leur publication afin de décider éventuellement
de leur transformation en Normes internationales. Les rapports techniques
du type 3 ne doivent pas nécessairement être révisés avant que les don-
nées fournies ne soient plus jugées valables ou utiles.
L’ISODR 9122-5, rapport technique du type 2, a été élaboré par le comité
technique lSO/TC 92, Essais au feu sur les matériaux de construction,
composants et structures, sous-comité SC 3, Risques d’intoxication par le
feu
Le présent document est publié dans la série des rapports techniques de
type 2 (conformément au paragraphe G.4.2.2 de la partie 1 des Directives
CEI/ISO) comme «norme prospective d’application provisoire)) dans le
domaine des essais de toxicité des effluents du feu, en raison de l’urgence
d’avoir une indication quant à la manière dont il convient d’utiliser les
normes dans ce domaine pour répondre à un besoin déterminé.
Ce document ne doit pas être considéré comme une ((Norme internatio-
nale». II est proposé pour une mise en œuvre provisoire, dans le but de
recueillir des informations et d’acquérir de l’expérience quant à son appli-
cation dans la pratique. II est de règle d’envoyer les observations éven-
. . .
III
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122=5:1993(F)
tuelles relatives au contenu de ce document au Secrétariat central de
I’ISO.
II sera procédé à un nouvel examen de ce rapport technique de type 2
deux ans au plus tard après sa publication, avec la faculté d’en prolonger
la validité pendant deux autres années, de le transformer en Norme inter-
nationale ou de l’annuler.
L’ISO/rR 9122 comprend les parties suivantes, présentées sous le titre
général Essais de toxicité des effluents du feu:
- Partie 1: Generalites
- Partie 2: Directives pour les essais biologiques permettant de dé-
terminer la toxicite aiguë par inhalation des effluents du feu (Irinci-
pes de base, critéres et me thodologie)
- Partie 3: Méthodes d’analyse des gaz et des vapeurs dans les
effluents du feu
- Partie 4: Modèle feu (fours et appareillages de combustion utilisés
dans les essais a petite échelle)
- Partie 5 . Prédictions concernant les effets toxiques des effluents du
feu
Les annexes A et B de la présente partie de I’ISO~R 9122 sont donnees
uniquement a titre d’information.
. iv
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
RAPPORT TECHNIQUE
ISO/TR 9122=5:1993(F)
Essais de toxicité des effluents du feu -
Partie 5:
Prédictions concernant les effets toxiques des effluents du
feu
que sa composition. Cependant, les travaux effectués
1 Domaine d’application
au Royaume-Uni par D.A. Purser et W.D. Woolley[s]
ont démontré que la toxicité de la fumée pouvait être
La présente partie de I’ISO/TR 9122 concerne le suivi
expliquée qualitativement et quantitativement en ter-
de la méthodologie bioanalytique, y compris I’applica-
mes d’un petit nombre de gaz toxiques importants.
tion des modèles mathématiques dont on dispose et
Ces travaux ont fourni un rapport à la validité poten-
peuvent être utilises pour l’évaluation
tielle de la reproduction de toxicité de la fumée. Une
toxicologique des atmosphéres des effluents du feu.
publication de 1981 par S.C. Packham et
On s’intéresse également à l’application de ces mo-
G.E. HartzelVl, ainsi que l’ouvrage de P.W. Smith151
dèles comme moyen de minimiser l’utilisation d’ani-
ont servi de base à ce type de reproduction aux
maux de laboratoires dans les essais de matériaux
États-Unis. La recherche dans ce domaine a considé-
pour la toxicité des effluents du feu.
rablement progressé durant les années 1980, de sorte
que B.C. Levin[gl, D.A. Purser[lll, et Y. Tsuchiya[l2]
ont préparé le développement de la modélisation des
2 Historique
risques toxiques qui prend en compte les combinai-
sons d’agressions toxiques telles qu’elles surviennent
Un progrès majeur dans l’évaluation des effets toxi-
dans un incendie.
ques des effluents du feu a été la mise au point de
modeles mathématiques de prédiction des dangers
toxiques à partir de données appropriées relatives à
la composition des gaz du feu. Les objectifs de ces 3 Concepts généraux
efforts sont doubles: l’évaluation de la toxicité de la

fumée à partir de données analytiques pourrait per- À la base de toutes les techniques de reproduction,

mettre de minimiser beaucoup l’utilisation d’animaux on trouve une expression de la concentration d’un

vivants en méthodologie biologique conventionnelle. toxique relative à la concentration dont on connaît

En outre, et à condition que l’on comprenne les dif- l’effet toxique particulier après un temps donné d’ex-

férences qualitatives et quantitatives d’effets position. Les premiers travaux souffraient de I’ab-

toxicologiques entre les animaux de laboratoire et les
sente d’un concept clair de la «dose)) de toxique,
humains, cette méthodologie de reproduction pourrait
ainsi que l’appréciation de son utilité comme outil de
aussi être utilisée pour l’estimation du développement
reproduction. II manquait également une bonne base
d’un danger toxique au cours de scénarios d’incendie
de données toxicologiques appropriées à une courte
réel ou simulé.
exposition de concentration relativement élevées de
toxiques, et, de plus, les modèles de décomposition
Le développement de la modélisation de la toxicité
en laboratoire applicables devant servir de base à la
des fumées a débuté à la fin des années 60 et a
reproduction toxicologique souffraient d’une compré-
continué durant les années 70, à l’aide de concepts
hension insuffisante.
proposés par Y. Tsuchiya et K. Sumi des National
Research Council Laboratories au Canada[1 et 21. À
La quantification de la «dose)) a été fondamentale

l’époque, I’acceptabilité de cette reproduction avait pour la mise au point de la méthodologie de repro-

été contrée par le sentiment général que la toxicité duction des effets toxiques de l’inhalation des gaz du

de la fumée pouvait être aussi complexe et exotique feu, que ce soit sur les animaux ou sur les humains.

---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122=5:1993(F)

Les réponses physiologiques sont habituellement position pour leurs effluents du feu dans une gamme

liées a la dose c’est-a-dire que l’amplitude de l’effet d’approximativement 30 gmrnm3= min[l61, le modéle du

augmente à mesure que la dose croî’t ou que la charge US National Institute of Standards and Technology

corporelle d’un agent physiologique actif s’accumule. Hazard I utilise une limite de tenabilité létale de

La dose reelle de toxiques due à l’inhalation 900 gmrnB3m min[l71, si les données sur ces matériaux

d’effluents du feu ne pouvant être mesurée direc- ne sont pas disponibles. Le British Standards Institu-

tement, on part du principe que la dose est fonction tion, quelque peu plus conservateur, s’en tient à une

valeur de 500 ggrnm3m

de la concentration d’effluents du feu (ou toxique) et min[W Ces méthodes simples

du temps d’expositionW Cette «dose)) est I’expres- évitent l’utilisation de valeur LC50 pour des matériaux

sion reelle de l’agression a laquelle un sujet est sou- traditionnels, celle-ci n’étant pas toujours connue.

mis. Le terme «dose d’exposition» est probablement
Dans le cas de scénarios d’incendies réels, les calculs
plus précis et a éte adopte en toxicologie de la com-
de transport de fumée de dilution et de pose peuvent
bustion.
fournir une estimation des doses d’exposition pré-
sente au niveau des zones respiratoires des sujets
Les concentrations de toxiques communes de gaz du
même dans des régions éloignées d’un incendieW
feu, tels que le monoxyde de carbone et le cyanure
II est important d’admettre le concept que des «doses
d’hydrogène, sont généralement exprimées en partie
d’exposition toxicologiques» peuvent être visualisées
par millions en volume [ppm (V/V)]. En conséquence,
comme des entités quantifiées générées a partir d’un
la dose d’exposition peut être exprimée comme le
incendie, transportées et ensuite administrées aux
produit de la concentration, C, et du temps, t, c’est-
sujets exposés.
a-dire en ppmemin. Dans le cas d’un changement de
concentration d’un toxique gazeux, la dose d’expo-
sition est en realité l’aire intégrée sous la courbe
temps/concentration. 4 Prédictions concernant un seul gaz
provenant d’incendies
Souvent, les concentrations de toxiques gazeux du
feu ne sont pas connues. Dans ce cas, on peut encore
La forme de reproduction la plus simple met en jeu
se servir du concept de dose d’exposition tel qu’il
une situation dans laquelle un seul gaz toxique est pris
s’applique a la fumée. La concentration de fumée ne
en considération, et où les doses d’exposition asso-
pouvant être quantifiée, on admet l’approximation,
ciées a des effets donnes, par exemple incapacitation
selon laquelle la concentration de fumée est propor-
ou mort, sont constantes pour toute concentration
tionnelle a la perte de masse durant un incendie.
d’exposition (c’est-a-dire que la règle Haber est valide
L’aire intégrée sous la courbe perte de masse expri-
et CV = k, k étant une dose constante requise pour
mée par unité de volume devient une mesure en
un effet toxique donné). Malheureusement, cela peut
fonction du temps d’exposition a la fumée, c’est-à-
ne pas être le cas sur la gamme de concentrations
dire gmrn-3mrnitW et 151. (Ce concept de dose d’expo-
intéressantes et il est souhaitable de déterminer la
sition à la fumée est décrit dans I’ISO/TR 9122-2.) On
dépendance de la dose effective à la concentration
peut, à tout moment, calculer la dose d’exposition à
du toxique. En pratique, il s’est avéré que la dose
la fumée à partir d’un dispositif de combustion de la-
d’exposition requise pour provoquer une réponse
boratoire, d’incendies expérimentaux sur instruments,
particulière décroît à mesure que la concentration du
de données générées à partir d’incendies reproduits
toxique croÎt.
mathématiquement, et même, de données estimées
à partir d’incendies réels.
De nombreuses études de laboratoires ont considéré
les effluents gazeux du feu les plus courants, c’est-à-
Pour reproduire les effets toxiques de l’exposition aux
dire CO, CO*, 02, HCN, HCI, HF et NO,, avec des
effuents du feu, il est nécessaire d’obtenir deux élé-
doses d’exposition associées à la Iétalité des rongeurs
ments d’information fondamentaux:
(souris, rats et cochons d’Inde) assez bien caracté-
risées. Des valeurs LC50 sont données aux tableaux
a) la dose d’exposition CV générée par l’incendie
A.1 a A.6. En plus de quelques données limites rela-
(pour les principaux gaz toxiques de la fumée ou
tives aux singes macaques, aux babouins et aux hu-
pour la perte de masse des matériaux consumés)
mains, les données semblent suggérer que le rat
et,
constitue le modèle le plus raisonnable pour les hu-
mains en ce qui concerne la Iétalité. (Les effets
b) la dose d’exposition CV requise pour un effet toxi-
sublétals, en particulier les effets respiratoires d’irri-
que donné (incapacitation ou Iétalité).
tants, sont d’un autre domaine, et le rat n’est peut
être pas un modèle adéquat; on dispose toutefois de
Des approches élémentaires de l’estimation de dan-
quelques données relatives aux primates et aux hu-
gers toxiques peuvent être basées sur de simples
mains.)
données relatives a la perte de masse exprimée en

volume, c’est-a-dire quelle charge d’incendie a été Une fois les doses effectives d’exposition caracté-

consumée et quel a été son volume de dispersion. risées, les concepts de la dose fractionnée, associés

Etant reconnu que la plupart des matériaux présen- a la somme ou a l’intégration de doses fractionnées

tent des valeurs typiques de LC50 pour 30 min d’ex- fournissent des outils de travail en toxicologie de la

---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
lSO/TR 9122=5:1993(F)

combustion(5 à 9, 1% 17 et 191. Des doses d’exposition sée pour effectuer une analyse de la dose effective

croissantes Cmdt sont calculées et rapportées a la dose
fractionnelle (DEF) de la même façon que pour un gaz

spécifique Cv d’exposition requise pour produire I’ef- isolé comme décrit précédemment. Lorsque plusieurs

fet toxicologique donné. Ainsi, une «dose effective matériaux sont présents dans un incendie, les DEF

fractionnelle» (DEF) est calculée pour chaque petit in- de chaque matériau sont totalisées, puisqu’en prati-

tervalle de temps. Une totalisation continue de ces
que chaque matériau fournit certains rendements des
doses fractionnées effectives est effectuée de façon
toxiques majeurs les plus usuels qui se trouvent mé-
à calculer la dose d’exposition totale accumulée.
langés dans la fumée. Un certain nombre de métho-
des pratiques et essentiellement similaires pour
Mathématiquement, on peut exprimer le modéle d’un
l’application de cette approche ont été publiées[a, 11,
toxique individuel i comme suit:
17 et 181,
L’avantage de cette approche est sa simplicité, puis-
dt . . .
(1)
qu’elle ne requiert que la seule connaissance de la
courbe de concentration de perte de masse pour les
La plupart des méthodologies de reproduction
matériaux impliqués dans l’incendie et les toxicités de
toxicologiques utilisent ce modele sous une forme ou
ces matériaux en fonction de la perte de masse Cv
une autre.
des produits. À partir d’essais effectués à petite
échelle, on a pu démontrer, qu’en pratique, la dose
d’exposition létale de perte de masse LCt50 de nom-
5 Prédictions concernant plusieurs gaz
breux matériaux testés est approximativement du
provenant d’incendies
même ordre de grandeur[ll et 161.

II existe deux méthodes de prédiction des effets Les inconvénients de cette méthode résident dans le

toxiques des atmosphéres d’effluents du feu conte- fait qu’elle ne donne des informations qu’en terme de

Iétalité et ne permet pas de variation physio.logique
nant des toxiques multiples. L’une d’elles est une
par rapport à un comportement idéal. II est également
méthode empirique mettant en jeu des mesures de
nécessaire de supposer que les expositions de doses
perte de masse ,combinées à des données de puis-
létales chez les rats sont similaires pour les humains.
sance toxique obtenues a partir de données d’expo-

sition des animaux; l’autre est basée sur l’analyse de En outre, la méthode suppose que la toxicité d’un

matériau en incendie réel sera la même que celle d’un
la composition de I’atmosphére en fonction des prin-
essai à petite échelle. Cette dernière objection
cipaux produits toxiques connus. Cette dernière est
constitue sans doute la limite la plus sérieuse, mais
alors utilisée pour élaborer les prédictions relatives

aux effets connus de ces gaz et a leurs interactions. elle peut être surmontée jusqu’à un certain point,

pourvu que l’on prenne soin de conduire les essais
de toxicité de combustion biologiques à échelle ré-
5.1 Utilisation des mesures de perte de
duite sur des matériaux dans des conditions similaires
masse
de celles d’un incendie en vraie grandeur. Ainsi, là où
l’on procédera à l’évaluation des effets toxiques pour
Cette approche peut être utilisée pour faire I’éva-
un incendie qui débute sans flammes, progresse par
luation des effets toxiques, en particulier de la Iétalité,
flammes à leur début pour devenir un incendie de
des incendies reproduits mathématiquement, des in-
grande dimension post-flashover, il sera nécessaire
cendies expérimentaux en vraie grandeur, ou des
d’utiliser des doses d’exposition létales exprimées en
scénarios d’incendie réels impliquant un matériau ou
perte de masse, pour chaque stade de l’incendie.
plus .
Pour cette méthode, il est nécessaire de déterminer
5.2 Utilisation de concentrations analysées
le taux de perte de masse des matériaux dans I’in-
cendie, soit par mesure directe, soit par reproduction de toxiques majeurs
mathématique de la croissance du feu et de la perte

de masse. La dernière méthode est basée sur des Cette approche permet d’etablir des prédictions des

données d’entrée d’essais a échelle réduite ou d’au- effets toxiques basées sur une analyse chimique des

tres sources. La courbe de perte de masse pour I’in- produits de combustion des effluents du feu et sur la

cendie est ensuite utilisée en conjonction avec les connaissance des effets toxiques et des interactions

donées de puissance toxique dérivées d’essais biolo- toxiques de ces produits. Elle a deux types d’applica-

giques a petite échelle. La méthode de base de dé- tion. L’une est de remplacer ou de limiter l’utilisation

termination de la puissance toxique des produits de d’animaux dans des essais de toxicité de combustion

combustion de matériaux individuels consiste à ef- biologique à petite échelle. Si la dose d’exposition

fectuer un essai de toxicité de combustion à petite létale des rongeurs relative à une atmosphère parti-

échelle dans des conditions similaires à celles de I’in- culier-e caractéristique de la combustion d’un matériau

cendie et de trouver la dose d’exposition létale de peut être prédite à partir de la mesure des compo-

perte de masse (LCt50) exprimée en ggrnm3m min ou sants de cette atmosphère, alors on pourrait ainsi

l’équivalent. La courbe de perte de masse pour cha- éviter l’exposition des animaux ou ne les utiliser que

que matériau de l’incendie en vraie grandeur est utili- d’une façon limitée pour confirmer la prédiction.

---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122=5:1993(F)

L’autre application consiste à faire des prédictions des y a également du CO. De façon similaire, le dioxyde

effets susceptibles d’incapacités ou mortels de I’ex-
de carbone, bien que relativement inoffensif a des
position des humains à des atmosphères d’incendie
concentrations allant jusqu’à 5 %, est un stimulant
en vraie grandeur ou réels. Cela implique une corréla-
respiratoire puissant provoquant un doublement ap-

tion entre les réactions des animaux et celles des proximatif de la respiration à une concentration de

humains. 3 % à 4 % et un triplement de la respiration à 5 % à
6 %[Il]. Cela augmente le taux d’absorption de tout
Les pleines conséquences de l’exposition à des at-
autre toxique présent approximativement proportion-
mosphères contenant des toxiques multiples n’ont
nellement à l’augmentation de la ventilation.
été examinées en détail que récemment. Les gaz
L’inhalation d’irritants affecte également la respiration
toxiques dégagés lors d’un incendie peuvent être
et peut aussi affecter l’absorption des gaz
classés selon deux principaux types: ceux dont l’effet
asphyxiants. Bien que chez le rat, la dépression res-
principal est de causer un hypoxie des tissus en en-
piratoire résultant de l’inhalation de HCI ralentisse
travant le débit d’oxygène ou l’utilisation d’oxygène
l’absorption de CO[211, l’inhalation d’irritants tels que
dans les tissus (monoxyde de carbone, cyanure d’hy-
HCI par les primates tend à produire une augmen-
drogéne, et hypoxie due à une faible concentration
tation de VRMW II en résulte des changements dans
d’oxygéne) et ceux qui sont irritants, provoquant dou-
le fonctionnement des poumons qui paraissent porter

leur et détérioration des tissus au contact des yeux atteinte à l’absorption d’oxygéne dans le sang[221,

et de l’épithélium de l’appareil respiratoire (princi-
ajoutant ainsi à l’effet hypoxique des gaz narcotiques
palement les irritants organiques et les gaz acides).
inhalés.
En plus de ces agents, le dioxyde de carbone est im-

. portant, en raison de ces effets sur la respiration. Une En plus de ces effets respiratoires se produit le dé-

derniere classe, enfin, peut être répertoriée comme veloppement d’une acidose. II devient évident que

toxiques «inhabituels). I’acidose métabolique, résultant de I’hypoxie des tis-
sus provoqués par des gaz tels que CO et HCN,

Puisque les principaux gaz d’incendie de chaque contribue à une acidose respiratoire causée par

classe exerce des effets physiologiques similaires par l’inhalation de CO*, ou une hypoxie stagnante provo-

l’intermédiaire de mécanismes liés, il n’est pas sur-
quée par les irritants, peut résulter aux effets toxiques

prenant qu’ils s’additionnent fondamentalement par qui s’ajoutent et qu’on ne peut prévoir de façon évi-

leurs effets globaux. Ce que l’on constate en revan- dente à partir des effets de gaz individuels[g8 23 et 241.

che maintenant c’est que, bien que ces grandes ca- La multiplicité des effets possibles dans l’inhalation

tégories de gaz exercent des effets physiologiques de mélanges de toxiques dans les effluents réels du

plutôt différents par l’intermédiaire de différents mé- feu, rend la situation extrêmement complexe. Très

canismes, lorsque ceux-ci sont présents en mélanges, peu de recherches utilisant des combina sons de

chacun peut aboutir à un certain degré de compromis toxiques ont été effectuées en utili sant des primates

expérimental sur un sujet exposé et les effets s’addi- cependant que les effets combinés sur I’incapaci-

tionnent en gros pour contribuer à I’incapacitation ou
tation et la mort des humains exposés à des combi-
à la mort. II faut s’attendre à ce que des degrés va-
naisons de gaz n’a pas encore été totalement compris
riables d’une condition partiellement compromise
dans toute leur étendue.
s’additionnent en gros, puisqu’un examen des méca-
En dépit de la complexité que présente l’étude d’at-
nismes physiologiques par lesquels ces toxiques
mosphère contenant des toxiques multiples, des pro-
exercent leurs effets révéle un grand nombre d’inter-
grès considérables ont été accomplis dans la
actions possibles, et les effets ont été démontrés
confirmation et la qualification de certains de ces ef-
dans un grand nombre d’études. Ce principe

d’additivité est un élément clé dans l’évaluation du fets à partir d’études effectuées sur les rongeurs. Par

. danger toxique à partir d’éléments analytiques. exemple, il est désormais bien établi que le monoxyde

de carbone et le cyanure d’hydrogène sont additifs
L’une des raisons de ces interactions, et une autre
lorsqu’ils sont exprimés en doses d’exposition
complication des toxiques combinés qui est plus déli-
fractionnelles requises pour causer un effet toxique
donné[T 9 et 101. A’

cate à traiter, est le fait qu’un toxique individuel peut Insi, à une approximation raison-

avoir des effets physiologiques autres que ceux de sa nable, la fraction d’une dose d’exposition effective de

toxicité spécifique principale. Un effet évident et très CO peut être ajoutée à celle de HCN pour l’estimation

important se présente lorsque les toxiques affectent de la présence d’une condition dangereuse. Lorsque

la respiration. Le cyanure d’hydrogène produit une l’on a une atmosphère pauvre en oxygène en plus de

hyperventilation, multipliant la ventilation par quatre la présence de ces deux gaz hypoxiques, il est évident

(volume respiratoire par minute, VRM) comme dé- qu’un effet additif supplémentaire se produit, sur la

montré sur les singes au début de I’exposition[W base d’études faites sur les rongeur& 27 et 281 et sur

Cette hyperventilation chez les primates (qui fi- les humains[291. L’effet du CO9 dans l’accroissement

nalement ralentit lorsque la narcose apparaît) peut
du taux d’absorption d’autres gaz narcotique en soi à

entraîner une incapacitation plus rapide du fait du des concentrations supérieures à 5 %, provoquant

cyanure d’hydrogène que celle qui aurait pû apparaître faiblesse et perte de conscience des humains. Une

autrement, combinée avec une plus forte montée de
incidence plus forte de la Iétalité (en particulier par
CO et formation de carboxyhémoglobine (COHb), s’il
exposition) a été observée avec certaines combinai-
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122=5:1993(F)

sons de CO et de C02[231 pouvant être associées que la fumée était plus irritante en pratique que l’on

avec les dommages combinés de I’acidose respi-
aurait pû le prédire, même à partir d’une analyse ap-

ratoire (du CO,) avec I’acidose métabolique (causée profondie de sa composition, de sorte que d’autres

par le CO), le rongeur a des difficultés à se remettre facteurs, peuvent être impliqués, en plus d’une sim-

en post-exposition. D’autres études faites sur les rats
ple toxicité chimique[lll. Deux d’entre eux, identi,fiés
avec de l’oxygène ont révélé que CO2 et NO2 pré-
comme importants, sont les effets irritants de nature
sentaient une synergieW
particuliére (suie) transportant des toxiques absorbés
en profondeur dans les poumons, et le rôle possible
Dans le cas de mélanges de gaz hypoxiques et d’un
des radicaux libres dans la fumée, qui provoqueraient
gaz irritant (chlorure d’hyd
...

Questions, Comments and Discussion

Ask us and Technical Secretary will try to provide an answer. You can facilitate discussion about the standard in here.