Toxicity testing of fire effluents -- Part 4: The fire model (furnaces and combustion apparatus used in small-scale testing)

Defines the criteria for an acceptable fire model, reviews existing fire models ("box" furnace models, tube furnace models, radiant heat models) against these criteria, and proposes that fire models be selected for use through consideration of these criteria which includes a capacity to generate fire conditions characteristics of known stages of fire. Does not give a detailed analysis of the physics and chemistry of fire.

Essais de toxicité des effluents du feu -- Partie 4: Modèle feu (fours et appareillages de combustion utilisés dans les essais à petite échelle)

Preskušanje toksičnosti dima – 4. del: Peči in sežigne naprave za preskuse v majhnem merilu

General Information

Status
Published
Publication Date
31-Aug-1999
Technical Committee
Current Stage
6060 - National Implementation/Publication (Adopted Project)
Start Date
01-Sep-1999
Due Date
01-Sep-1999
Completion Date
01-Sep-1999

Buy Standard

Technical report
ISO/TR 9122-4:1993 - Toxicity testing of fire effluents
English language
14 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview
Technical report
SIST ISO/TR 9122-4:1999
English language
14 pages
sale 10% off
Preview
sale 10% off
Preview

e-Library read for
1 day
Technical report
ISO/TR 9122-4:1993 - Essais de toxicité des effluents du feu
French language
15 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview
Technical report
ISO/TR 9122-4:1993 - Essais de toxicité des effluents du feu
French language
15 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview

Standards Content (sample)

ISO
TECHNICAL
TR 9122-4
REPORT
First edition
1993-05-15
Taxicity testing of fire effluents -
Part 4:
The fire model (furnaces and combustion
apparatus used in small-scale testing)
Essais de toxicite des effluents du feu -
Partie 4: Modele feu (fours et appareillages de combustion utilis6s dans
/es essais 4 petite 6cheIle)
Reference number
ISO/TR 9122-4:1993(E)
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122=4:1993(E)
Contents
Page

..............................................................................................

1 Scope
....................................................
2 Characteristics of fire stages
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3 Criteria for assessment of fire models
............................................................
3.1 Relevante to real fires
..........................................................
3.1 .l Oxygen concentration
........................................................................
3.1.2 CO&0 ratio
..................................................
3.1.3 Temperature and heat flux
.......................................
3.2 Validity to toxic hazard assessment
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
3.3 Specimen composition and configuration

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3.4 Documentation and experience

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3.5 Exposure dose quantification

3.6 Procedural criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

................................................................................
4 Fire models
...........................................................
41 . ” Box” f urnace models
..................................................................
4.1.1 NBS cup furnace
.................................................................
4.1.2 UPitt box furnace

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4.2 Tube furnace models

4.2.1 DIN 53436 tube furnace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

...............................................................
4.3 Radiant heat models
..............................................
4.3.1 US radiant furnace (modified)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

4.3.2 Cone calorimeter
....................................................
4.3.3 Japanese cone furnaces
.............. 10
4.3.3.1 BRI (Building Research Institute) cone furnace
4.3.3.2 RIPT (Research Institute for Polymers and Textiles) cone

f urnace ............................................................................

0 ISO 1993

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or utilized in any form or

by any means, electronie or mechanical, including photocopying and microfilm, without per-

mission in writing from the publisher.
International Organization for Standardization
Case Postale 56 l CH-1 211 Geneve 20 l Switzerland
Printed in Switzerland
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.3.4 Japanese Ministry of Construction model

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5 Selection of a fire model
Annex

A Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122=4:1993(E)
Foreword
ISO (the International Organization for Standardization) is a worldwide
federation of national Standards bodies (ISO member bodies). The work
of preparing International Standards is normally carried out through ISO
technical committees. Esch member body interested in a subject for
which a technical committee has been established has the right to be
represented on that committee. International organizations, governmental
and non-governmental, in liaison with ISO, also take patt in the work. ISO
collaborates closely with the International Electrotechnical Commission
(IEC) on all matters of electrotechnical standardization.
The main task of technical committees is to prepare International Stan-
dards, but in exceptional circumstances a technical committee may pro-
pose the publication of a Technical Report of one of the following types:
type 1, when the required support cannot be obtained for the publi-
cation of an International Standard, despite repeated efforts;
type 2, when the subject is still under technical development or where
for any other reason there is the future but not immediate possibility
of an agreement on an International Standard;
type 3, when a technical committee has collected data of a different
kind from that which is normally published as an International Standard
(“state of the art”, for example).
I echnical Reports of types 1 and 2 are subject to review within three years
of publication, to decide whether they tan be transformed into Inter-
national Standards. Technical Reports of type 3 do not necessarily have to
be reviewed until the data they provide are considered to be no longer
valid or useful.
lSO/rR 9122-4, which is a Technical Report of type 2, was prepared by
Technical Committee lSO/TC 92, Fire tests on building materials, com-
ponents and structures, Sub-Committee SC 3, Toxic hazards in fire.
This document is being issued in the type 2 Technical Report series of
publications (according to subclause G.4.2.2 of part 1 of the ISO/IEC Di-
rectives) as a “prospective Standard for provisional application” in the field
of toxicity testing of fire effluents because there is an urgent need for
guidance on how Standards in this field should be used to meet an ident-
ified need.
This document is not to be regarded as an “International Standard”. lt is
proposed for provisional application so that information and experience of
its use in practice may be gathered. Comments on the content of this
document should be sent to the ISO Central Secretariat.
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122=4:1993(E)
A review of this type 2 Technical Report will be carried out not later than
two years after its- publication with the 01 otions of: extension for ar other
two years; conversion into an Internationa I Standard; or withdrawal.
lSO/TR 9122 consists of the following Parts, under the genera title
Taxicity testing of fire effluents:
- Part 1: General
- Part 2: Guidelines for biological assa ys to determine the acute
inhalation toxicity of fire effluents (basic principles, criteria and
methodolog y)
- Part 3: Methods for the analysis o f gases and vapours in fire
effluen ts
- Part 4: The fire model (furnaces and combustion apparatus used in
small-scale tes ting)
- Part 5: Prediction of toxic effects of fire effluents
Annex A of this part of ISOnR 9122 is for information only.
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
ISO/TR 91224:1993(E)
Introduction
Fire involves a complex and interrelated array of physical and Chemical
phenomena. As a result, it is essentially impossible to simulate all aspects
of a real fire in laboratory-scale apparatus. This Problem of fire model val-
idity is perhaps the Single most perplexing technical Problem associated
with all of fire testing.
For fire models used in evaluating fire effluent toxicity, additional re-
strictions and criteria are necessarily imposed due to the need for the
laboratory combustion to be compatible with bioassay procedures using
live test animals. For example, reduced Oxygen levels and heat must not,
in themselves, be unduly compromising to exposed animals. At the Same
time, sufficiently high concentrations of fire effluents must be produced
so as to obtain measurable toxicological effects. As a result of these re-
strictions, compromises must often be made which tan further reduce the
apparent validity of the fire model.
Essentially two approaches are used to evaluate the toxicity of fire
effluents; i.e. those using full-scale fire models and those using small-scale
fire models. In full-scale procedures, fire models consisting of a room,
multiple rooms or a complete building are used which are intended to

simulate as far as possible the full characteristics of fires including ignition,

growth and evolution of toxic fire effluents. Full-scale methods are usually
applied in tests of the toxic hazard presented by the fire, although some
attempts have been made to model the main features of toxic hazard in
small-scale tests.
In small-scale fire models, it is considered possible to re-create the reac-
tive Chemical environments characteristic of various stages and types of
fire conditions in terms of temperature, the presence or absence of flame
and Oxygen supply. Under these conditions, the relative yields of toxic
products in the fire effluents from materials will be similar to those
evolved at equivalent stages in full-scale fires. Thus, small-scale fire mod-
els are regarded as relevant to the testing of the toxic potencies of the
Chemical products evolved from materials under the defined decompo-
sition conditions. These potency values may then be used as input data in
toxic hazard assessments which take into consideration the dynamic
characteristics of specific fire seenarios.
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
TECHNICAL REPORT ISO/TR 9122=4:1993(E)
Taxicity testing of fire effluents -
Part 4:
The fire model (furnaces and combustion apparatus used
in small-scale testing)
be selected for use through consideration of these
1 Scope
criteria which includes a capacity to generate fire
conditions characteristic of known stages of fire.
This part of ISO/TR 9122 is restricted to the con-
sideration of fire models (i.e. laboratory combustion
This part of ISO/TR 9122 does not give a detailed
devices) used in fire effluent toxicity studies, together
analysis of the physics and chemistry of fire.
with suggestions for the appropriate use of the fire
models in Standard testing. Reference should be
made to other Parts of ISO/TR 9122 for discussions
2 Characteristics of fire stages
of analytical methods, bioassay procedures, toxicity
testing and prediction of toxic effects of fire effluents.
For the purposes of a discussion of fire models and
their appropriate use, the combustion conditions
This part of ISO/TR 9122 defines the criteria for an
shown in table 1 are generally accepted as being
acceptable fire model, reviews existing fire models
characteristic of certain stages or phases of fireC11.
against these criteria, and proposes that fire models
Table 1 - General classification of fire stages
Oxygen
Temperature Irradiances)
CO&0 ratio*)
Stage or Phase of fire contentl)
OO ( Cl (kW/m*)
Non-flaming decomposition
a) Smouldering (self-sustaining) 21 not applicable < 100 not applicable
b) Non-flaming (oxidative)
5 to 21 not applicable < 500
< 25
c) Non-flaming (pyrolitic) <5 not applicable < 1 000 not applicable
Flaming developing fire 10 to 15 100 to 200 400 to 600 20 to 40
Flaming fully-developed fire
a) Relatively low Ventilation 1 to 5 < 10 600 to 900 40 to 70
b) Relatively high Ventilation
5tolO < 100 600 to 1 200 50 to 150
1) General environmental condition (average) within compartment.
2) Mean value in fire plume near to fire.
3) Incident irradiation on the Sample (average).
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122=4:1993(E)
The primary Chemical process leading to formation of
involve the conditions for a weil-ventilated, developing
combustion products is that of the thermal bond-
fire and for either a low- or highly-ventilated, fully-
breaking and decomposition of polymeric materials
developed (high temperature) fire. Particularly import-
which, in the presence of Oxygen, leads to a variety
ant are considerations involving Ventilation (Oxygen

of oxygenated species. Carbon compounds are availability), CO&0 ratios, temperature and/or heat

pyrolysed into volatile hydrocarbon fragments which
flux and residente times of fire effluents in the high
tan be oxidized to form various oxidized organic spe-
temperature Zone.
cies, carbon monoxide or carbon dioxide, depending
upon thermal and oxidative conditions. Both carbon
3.1.1 Oxygen concentration
monoxide and carbon dioxide are usually present in a
fire effluent atmosphere, with the ratio of the two of-
The Oxygen concentration is the residual concen-
ten being used as an indicator characteristic of the
tration in the primary fire effluent before any dilution.
particular type or Stage of a fire. In small, developing
Its value decreases during fire development from the
fires, a CO&0 ratio of 100 or more would indicate
normal ambient level of approximately 21 % to 10 %-
freely-ventilated (fuel-controlled) combustion. In large,
15 % in a small or developing fire, and further de-
fully-developed fires which are usually ventilation-
creases to between 1 % and 10 % in a fully-
controlled when they occur in buildings, a CO,ICO
developed fire, depending upon the Ventilation,
ratio of 10 or less would indicate relatively low venti-
burning rate and room geometry.
lation, while a ratio of more than 10 would be indic-
ative of relatively high Ventilation.
3.1.2 CO,/CO ratio
Hydrogen is oxidized to water, chlorine is most com-
monly released as hydrogen chloride and nitrogen
The CO,/CO ratio is calculated from the concen-
appears as nitrogenous organic compounds (es-
trations of these gases in the fire effluent atmos-
pecially nitriles), hydrogen cyanide, nitrogen oxides
phere. Since its value is independent of dilution, the
and molecular nitrogen, again depending upon the
sampling Point is not critical, providing it is beyond the
thermal and oxidative conditions. All flaming and non-
Point where Oxidation reactions are in progress. The
flaming (including smouldering) fires tan yield a myr-
CO&0 ratio undergoes rapid changes during the
iad of combustion products due to incomplete
development of a fire. Initially, in small fires under
decomposition and only partial Oxidation of the fuels
weil-ventilated conditions, it is usually high (100 to
involved; however, non-flaming fires produce the
200). In fully-developed, Ventilation-controlled fires, it
highest yields of such products. lt is important to re-
reaches an almost constant value (1
to IO) depending
member that these are all Chemical reactions, subject
upon the Ventilation. Real fire data for CO&0 ratios
to the usual principles of thermodynamics and
are shown in figure 1 VI.
kinetics. Thus, stoichiometry and thermal energy play
significant roles in determining the products of com-
bustion that are formed over the range of fire classi-
3.1.3 Temperature and heat flux
fications.
The temperature is the mean value within a compart-
ment. lt gives a measure of the thermal exposure to
3 Criteria for assessment of fire models
the materials present and also to their thermal de-
composition products. The radiant heat flux is also
3.1 Relevante to real fires
useful as a measure of exposure to thermal energy.
In small or early-developing fires, the temperature in
The best approach to the selection of an appropriate
the immediate fire environment is typically in the
fire model for fire effluent toxicity testing involves
400 OC to 600 OC range with the radiant flux between
careful consideration of data which would relate lab-
20 kW/m* to 40 kW/m! In fully-developed fires, the
oratory combustion conditions to the types and
temperature is in the 600 “C to 1 200 “C range with
stages of real fires (see table 1).
radiant fluxes of 50 kW/m* to 150 kW/m*.
All the fire models to be described are capable of
All these factors have a considerable influence on the
simulating the conditions of non-flaming decompo-
composition of the fire effluent atmosphere. The im-
sition. However, it is recognized that the majority of
portant features from a toxicity Point of view are that
fire injuries and deaths occur as a result of flaming
small or early-growing fires generally produce rela-
fires. These include both small fires (often restricted
tively low yields of carbon monoxide and hydrogen
to the item first ignited) where casualties occur in the
cyanide, together with a complex mixture of pyrolysis
room of origin and also large, fully-developed fires,
and Oxidation products which have escaped the flame
where casualties occur remotely from the compart-
Zone. Fully-developed fires, due to the high tempera-
ment of origin. In the latter, the toxic threat usually
tures and Oxygen vitiated conditions, generally pro-
develops after flashover occursC11 VI.
duce high yields of toxic low molecular weight

In terms of a correlation with most fire fatalities, the species, such as carbon monoxide and hydrogen

most important criteria for an appropriate fire model
cyanide.
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122=4:1993(E)
C02/COratio,r
r 10 S r ( 20
ZOGr< 40
m-sm
w-w-
---v
m-m-
s-s- r 240
---v
s--e
Source: Bostonfiredepartment
Figure 1 - CO,/CO ratio in real fire situations
In addition to differentes in the heating of a speci-
3.2 Validity to toxic hazard assessment
men, the CO evolved from bench-scale experiments
tan differ from that produced with full-scale tests due
Demonstration of the validity of a fire model in gen-
to the following factors:
erating the toxic hazard of a real fire is an ideal cri-
terion which tan be approached but not necessarily
a) Air/fuel ratio. If this ratio is not the same in the two
reached. A few studies have been conducted using
scales, CO production will be different;
full-scale fires to evaluate the contribution of certain
construction materials and furnishings to toxic
b) Residente time effects. The time available to
hazardCU?lC51. However, considerable caution should
combust CO to CO2 will often be much greater in
be exercised in generalizing conclusions from these
the full-scale than in the small-scale device;
studies. Even in full-scale tests, a range of different
fires is possible in any one System.
c) “Freezing in” of CO. Effects which tend to stop
reactions from completion, thereby “freezing in”
The development of toxic hazard depends upon fire
a certain Proportion of CO. This effect is more
growth, which is essentially a large-scale phenom-
pronounced for increasing scale size.
enon, and carefully conducted, full-scale tests do rep-

licate at least some of the likely types of accidental The net effect of the above phenomena is that

fires. In general, however, it is economically unfeasi- bench-scale tests often have a tendency to show

ble to conduct routine large-scale tests. Thus, the lower yields of CO than are observed in full-scale

practical requirement becomes to provide bench-scale testingC71.
fire toxicity tests, whose predictions tan be validated
Small-scale tests, although they tan give better
against the full-scale.
reproducibility, provide only remote Simulation of ac-
tual fire conditions. Despite these limitations, small-
Since CO is the major toxicant in fires, much of the
scale tests are attractive on the grounds of tost. The
validity of bench-scale tests has traditionally been
best assessments of toxic hazard consist of a combi-
concerned with CO measurement, typically reported
nation of small- and large-scale tests, usually together
either as CO yield or C02/C0 ratios. Experimental
with appropriate engineering calculations.
studies generally indicate that CO production is inde-
pendent of Oxygen concentration until the
oxygenlfuel ratio drops to about 50 % more than that
3.3 Specimen composition and
needed for complete or stoichiometric
combustionC61. From that Point on, CO production configuration
rises sharply with decreasing Oxygen. In fully-

developed, post-flashover fires, CO yields of up to Small-scale fire models require the use of relatively

0,2 kg CO per kilogram of material burned are en- small Sample specimens. The size, orientation and

countered. This ratio appears to be fairly similar for a
shape of the specimen holder and combustion com-
wide variety of combustibles.
partment in the fire model should be considered when
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
ISO/TR 912294:1993(E)
Safety in use and Operation
selecting a fire model. The model should accommo- e)
date the testing of the test specimen in a manner
The device should be safe in its Operation.
which is consistent with its end-use. Spetimens of
composites and layered materials, for example,
should be tested with a minimum of alteration in their
end-use form and configuration.
4 Fire models
Although it is recognized that numerous fire models
3.4 Documentation and experience
are available, only a few satisfy sufficient criteria to
be detailed in this part of ISO/TR 9122. For example,
Protocols for use of the fire model should be well
the OSU rate of heat release apparatusl?l with
documented. Interlaboratory data and experience with
Chemical analysis satisfies major relevant criteria, but
candidate fire models should be considered when
is not readily adaptable to animal tests. On the other
selecting a fire model.
hand, fire model NES 713C91 definitely does not sat-
isfy major relevant criteria and its use is not rec-
ommended by the UK national Standards body.
3.5 Exposure dose quantification
None of the models satisfy all the criteria; however,
the types of fire model used which meet most of the
The actual dose administered in fire effluent toxicity
requirements, at least partially, are described here.
testing is very difficult to establish in terms of grams
of toxicant per kilogram body weight. lt is generally
accepted, however, that the body burden of an
inhaled toxicant will be proportional to the product of
41 . “Box” furnace models
its concentration in the inspired air and the duration
of the exposure. This product is referred to as the
exposure dose of fire effluent gases. lt is essential 4.1.1 NBS cup furnace
that the fire model permits a valid quantification of

exposure dose through the measurement, or calcu- The NBS) tesW1 employs a cup or crucible furnace

lation, of Sample specimen mass loss and System
(see figure2), often referred to as the “Potts
volume.
furnace”, named after the investigator who first re-
ported its use in combustion toxicology. Heating is
considered to be largely conductive, with the bottom
and lower Portion of the quartz cup constituting the
3.6 Procedural criteria
hot Zone. Test materials with masses of up to 8 g are
introduced into the CUP, which has a volume of about
There are a number of criteria to be considered in
1 1. Procedures for testing materials involve com-
selecting a fire model that deal with procedural con-
bustion at both just below (non-flaming) and just
sistency, animal compatibility and safety. These crite-
above (flaming) an autoignition temperature. There
ria are grouped together as procedural criteria and are
has been particular concern regarding air flow into the
as follows:
CUP, although it does communicate with a volume of
200 I of air contained in the exposure chamber. With
a) Repeatability of atmosphere generation
the variable Sample sizes used and an ill-defined fuel-
to-air ratio, some feel the System fails to carry out
Intralaboratory repeatability should have been
combustion in a weil-characterized manner. A further
demonstrated.
criticism has been that various materials are not
tested under the same conditions but often at con-
b) Reproducibility of atmosphere generation
siderably different temperatures.
Interlaboratory reproducibility should have been
The method provides a good model for non-flaming
demonstrated.
oxidative decomposition. lt is also a good model for
simulating the decomposition conditions during a
c) Adaptability to bioassay requirements
weil-ventilated, early-developing fire. lt cannot pro-

The fire model should be adaptable to animal ex- duce the high temperature, Oxygen-vitiated conditions

posure procedures. of a fully-developed, post-flashover fire.
Once in fairly common use in a number of laboratories
d) Adaptability to analytical requirements
in the US, the NBS cup furnace has been weil docu-

The fire model should be adaptable to analytical mented with considerable data availableC111. Its use

requirements. has declined, however, in favour of other fire models.

1) The US National Bureau of Standards is now known as the National Institute of Standards and Technology. To avoid con-

fusion, the former name will be retained in this report when reference is made to the NBS testing device.

---------------------- Page: 10 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122=4:1993(E)
4.1.2 UPitt box furnace the furnace, has not been reported to be sufficiently
severe as to rupture the apparatus, however.

In the UPitt test method, the combustion device is a The test begins in a non-flaming oxidative mode, and

muffle or box furnace, which is often used in an in- at some Stage, transition to flaming usually occurs.

At this time, the CO,/CO ratios tend to be low (under
verted Position in Order to provide for a pedestal con-
20, usually less than IO), while the temperature is still
nected to a mass Sensor (see figure3)El*lC131. With
low (less than 600 “C). This combination of conditions
this arrangement, continuous monitoring of Sample
does not, therefore, fit well into the scheme of fire
mass is conducted. Combustion is accomplished us-

ing a linear temperature increase of 20 “C/min up to classes shown in table 1. lt best represents the rather

a temperature as high as 1 100 OC, while chamber special Situation of a small fire load in a restricted

atmosphere is pulled through the furnace at a rate of Ventilation environment, for example in a sealed cup-

11 I/min. Smoke concentration is varied by changing board or cabinet. Although the Oxygen concentration

the mass of material charged to the furnace. The is rather low, there are some similarities to the

fuel/air ratio tan, therefore, vary widely depending Chemical decomposition environment in the early de-

upon the mass of Sample and also on its rate of de- veloping fire. The method does not simulate the con-

composition. A Problem of small explosions has been ditions of a large fully-developed post-flashover fire;

encountered with some materials which thermally however, the method could be used as a test for

decompose or burn very rapidly once ignition occurs. measuring the toxic potency of products resulting

This phenomenon, possibly the rapid emission of from the decomposition conditions of developing

gases whose volume exceeds that being pulled from fires.
Frontview
CO,CO2,02 sampling port
Pressurerelief Panel
Gas returnport-
yHCN sampling port
/-Animalports (6)
Clamp for door-
Cupfurnace-
Cupfurnace
1000 mlquartz
beaker
Insulation
Thermocouple
-Welt
Galvanized
sheet
Heating element
in bottom
Ceramic withrecessedverticalheatingelements
Figure 2 - NBS cup furnace smoke toxicity apparatus
---------------------- Page: 11 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122=4:1993(E)
Filter
GC/ms samples
r r
Thermocouples
Exposure
Mass
Sensor r
Figure 3 - UPitt sm( ke toxicity apparatus including box furnace
and/or the presence of an ignition device. Some diffi-
Another criticism of this method is the 20 “C/min
culty has been experienced in controlling smouldering
temperature increase, which is quite slow and not
and flaming conditions; however, work using Sample
associated with obsetved fires. lt results in a gradual
Segmentation has shown promise with these modes
fractionation of the pyrolysis products, with a dispro-
of combustionC231. lt must be recognized that such
portionately high percentage of low temperature de-
procedures tan alter the type of atmosphere pro-
composition products in the fire effluent which is
analysed and presented to the test animals. duced.
In spite of the Problems associated with the UPitt fire
The decomposition of a test material takes place in
model, it is specified in a fire effluent toxicity test re-
an air stream counter-current to the flame propa-
quired for certain construction products in the State
gation. This is opposed to the real fire Situation, but
of New YorkCW. The requirement is such that test
is done to prevent uncontrolled preheating effects by
data only be submitted, however. There are no criteria
the combustion products. However, co-current con-
for classification of products.
ditions have been imposedC181. The lack of continuous
monitoring of Sample weight is compensated for by
4.2 Tube furnace models the continuous decomposition process, which en-
ables one to relate the exposed mass, volume or
surface area to the bioassay and/or analytical test
4.2.1 DIN 53436 tube furnace
data.
The DIN 53436 combustion device (see figure4) is
The DIN 53436 method is clearly useful for toxic
characterized by the use of a moving annular tube
potency testing. lt is capable of producing the chemi-
furnace operating at a c
...

SLOVENSKI STANDARD
SIST ISO/TR 9122-4:1999
01-september-1999
3UHVNXãDQMHWRNVLþQRVWLGLPD±GHO3HþLLQVHåLJQHQDSUDYH]DSUHVNXVHY
PDMKQHPPHULOX

Toxicity testing of fire effluents -- Part 4: The fire model (furnaces and combustion

apparatus used in small-scale testing)

Essais de toxicité des effluents du feu -- Partie 4: Modèle feu (fours et appareillages de

combustion utilisés dans les essais à petite échelle)
Ta slovenski standard je istoveten z: ISO/TR 9122-4:1993
ICS:
13.220.99 Drugi standardi v zvezi z Other standards related to
varstvom pred požarom protection against fire
SIST ISO/TR 9122-4:1999 en

2003-01.Slovenski inštitut za standardizacijo. Razmnoževanje celote ali delov tega standarda ni dovoljeno.

---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
SIST ISO/TR 9122-4:1999
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
SIST ISO/TR 9122-4:1999
ISO
TECHNICAL
TR 9122-4
REPORT
First edition
1993-05-15
Taxicity testing of fire effluents -
Part 4:
The fire model (furnaces and combustion
apparatus used in small-scale testing)
Essais de toxicite des effluents du feu -
Partie 4: Modele feu (fours et appareillages de combustion utilis6s dans
/es essais 4 petite 6cheIle)
Reference number
ISO/TR 9122-4:1993(E)
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
SIST ISO/TR 9122-4:1999
ISO/TR 9122=4:1993(E)
Contents
Page

..............................................................................................

1 Scope
....................................................
2 Characteristics of fire stages
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3 Criteria for assessment of fire models
............................................................
3.1 Relevante to real fires
..........................................................
3.1 .l Oxygen concentration
........................................................................
3.1.2 CO&0 ratio
..................................................
3.1.3 Temperature and heat flux
.......................................
3.2 Validity to toxic hazard assessment
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
3.3 Specimen composition and configuration

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3.4 Documentation and experience

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3.5 Exposure dose quantification

3.6 Procedural criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

................................................................................
4 Fire models
...........................................................
41 . ” Box” f urnace models
..................................................................
4.1.1 NBS cup furnace
.................................................................
4.1.2 UPitt box furnace

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4.2 Tube furnace models

4.2.1 DIN 53436 tube furnace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

...............................................................
4.3 Radiant heat models
..............................................
4.3.1 US radiant furnace (modified)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

4.3.2 Cone calorimeter
....................................................
4.3.3 Japanese cone furnaces
.............. 10
4.3.3.1 BRI (Building Research Institute) cone furnace
4.3.3.2 RIPT (Research Institute for Polymers and Textiles) cone

f urnace ............................................................................

0 ISO 1993

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or utilized in any form or

by any means, electronie or mechanical, including photocopying and microfilm, without per-

mission in writing from the publisher.
International Organization for Standardization
Case Postale 56 l CH-1 211 Geneve 20 l Switzerland
Printed in Switzerland
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
SIST ISO/TR 9122-4:1999
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.3.4 Japanese Ministry of Construction model

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5 Selection of a fire model
Annex

A Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
SIST ISO/TR 9122-4:1999
ISO/TR 9122=4:1993(E)
Foreword
ISO (the International Organization for Standardization) is a worldwide
federation of national Standards bodies (ISO member bodies). The work
of preparing International Standards is normally carried out through ISO
technical committees. Esch member body interested in a subject for
which a technical committee has been established has the right to be
represented on that committee. International organizations, governmental
and non-governmental, in liaison with ISO, also take patt in the work. ISO
collaborates closely with the International Electrotechnical Commission
(IEC) on all matters of electrotechnical standardization.
The main task of technical committees is to prepare International Stan-
dards, but in exceptional circumstances a technical committee may pro-
pose the publication of a Technical Report of one of the following types:
type 1, when the required support cannot be obtained for the publi-
cation of an International Standard, despite repeated efforts;
type 2, when the subject is still under technical development or where
for any other reason there is the future but not immediate possibility
of an agreement on an International Standard;
type 3, when a technical committee has collected data of a different
kind from that which is normally published as an International Standard
(“state of the art”, for example).
I echnical Reports of types 1 and 2 are subject to review within three years
of publication, to decide whether they tan be transformed into Inter-
national Standards. Technical Reports of type 3 do not necessarily have to
be reviewed until the data they provide are considered to be no longer
valid or useful.
lSO/rR 9122-4, which is a Technical Report of type 2, was prepared by
Technical Committee lSO/TC 92, Fire tests on building materials, com-
ponents and structures, Sub-Committee SC 3, Toxic hazards in fire.
This document is being issued in the type 2 Technical Report series of
publications (according to subclause G.4.2.2 of part 1 of the ISO/IEC Di-
rectives) as a “prospective Standard for provisional application” in the field
of toxicity testing of fire effluents because there is an urgent need for
guidance on how Standards in this field should be used to meet an ident-
ified need.
This document is not to be regarded as an “International Standard”. lt is
proposed for provisional application so that information and experience of
its use in practice may be gathered. Comments on the content of this
document should be sent to the ISO Central Secretariat.
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
SIST ISO/TR 9122-4:1999
ISO/TR 9122=4:1993(E)
A review of this type 2 Technical Report will be carried out not later than
two years after its- publication with the 01 otions of: extension for ar other
two years; conversion into an Internationa I Standard; or withdrawal.
lSO/TR 9122 consists of the following Parts, under the genera title
Taxicity testing of fire effluents:
- Part 1: General
- Part 2: Guidelines for biological assa ys to determine the acute
inhalation toxicity of fire effluents (basic principles, criteria and
methodolog y)
- Part 3: Methods for the analysis o f gases and vapours in fire
effluen ts
- Part 4: The fire model (furnaces and combustion apparatus used in
small-scale tes ting)
- Part 5: Prediction of toxic effects of fire effluents
Annex A of this part of ISOnR 9122 is for information only.
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
SIST ISO/TR 9122-4:1999
ISO/TR 91224:1993(E)
Introduction
Fire involves a complex and interrelated array of physical and Chemical
phenomena. As a result, it is essentially impossible to simulate all aspects
of a real fire in laboratory-scale apparatus. This Problem of fire model val-
idity is perhaps the Single most perplexing technical Problem associated
with all of fire testing.
For fire models used in evaluating fire effluent toxicity, additional re-
strictions and criteria are necessarily imposed due to the need for the
laboratory combustion to be compatible with bioassay procedures using
live test animals. For example, reduced Oxygen levels and heat must not,
in themselves, be unduly compromising to exposed animals. At the Same
time, sufficiently high concentrations of fire effluents must be produced
so as to obtain measurable toxicological effects. As a result of these re-
strictions, compromises must often be made which tan further reduce the
apparent validity of the fire model.
Essentially two approaches are used to evaluate the toxicity of fire
effluents; i.e. those using full-scale fire models and those using small-scale
fire models. In full-scale procedures, fire models consisting of a room,
multiple rooms or a complete building are used which are intended to

simulate as far as possible the full characteristics of fires including ignition,

growth and evolution of toxic fire effluents. Full-scale methods are usually
applied in tests of the toxic hazard presented by the fire, although some
attempts have been made to model the main features of toxic hazard in
small-scale tests.
In small-scale fire models, it is considered possible to re-create the reac-
tive Chemical environments characteristic of various stages and types of
fire conditions in terms of temperature, the presence or absence of flame
and Oxygen supply. Under these conditions, the relative yields of toxic
products in the fire effluents from materials will be similar to those
evolved at equivalent stages in full-scale fires. Thus, small-scale fire mod-
els are regarded as relevant to the testing of the toxic potencies of the
Chemical products evolved from materials under the defined decompo-
sition conditions. These potency values may then be used as input data in
toxic hazard assessments which take into consideration the dynamic
characteristics of specific fire seenarios.
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
SIST ISO/TR 9122-4:1999
TECHNICAL REPORT ISO/TR 9122=4:1993(E)
Taxicity testing of fire effluents -
Part 4:
The fire model (furnaces and combustion apparatus used
in small-scale testing)
be selected for use through consideration of these
1 Scope
criteria which includes a capacity to generate fire
conditions characteristic of known stages of fire.
This part of ISO/TR 9122 is restricted to the con-
sideration of fire models (i.e. laboratory combustion
This part of ISO/TR 9122 does not give a detailed
devices) used in fire effluent toxicity studies, together
analysis of the physics and chemistry of fire.
with suggestions for the appropriate use of the fire
models in Standard testing. Reference should be
made to other Parts of ISO/TR 9122 for discussions
2 Characteristics of fire stages
of analytical methods, bioassay procedures, toxicity
testing and prediction of toxic effects of fire effluents.
For the purposes of a discussion of fire models and
their appropriate use, the combustion conditions
This part of ISO/TR 9122 defines the criteria for an
shown in table 1 are generally accepted as being
acceptable fire model, reviews existing fire models
characteristic of certain stages or phases of fireC11.
against these criteria, and proposes that fire models
Table 1 - General classification of fire stages
Oxygen
Temperature Irradiances)
CO&0 ratio*)
Stage or Phase of fire contentl)
OO ( Cl (kW/m*)
Non-flaming decomposition
a) Smouldering (self-sustaining) 21 not applicable < 100 not applicable
b) Non-flaming (oxidative)
5 to 21 not applicable < 500
< 25
c) Non-flaming (pyrolitic) <5 not applicable < 1 000 not applicable
Flaming developing fire 10 to 15 100 to 200 400 to 600 20 to 40
Flaming fully-developed fire
a) Relatively low Ventilation 1 to 5 < 10 600 to 900 40 to 70
b) Relatively high Ventilation
5tolO < 100 600 to 1 200 50 to 150
1) General environmental condition (average) within compartment.
2) Mean value in fire plume near to fire.
3) Incident irradiation on the Sample (average).
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
SIST ISO/TR 9122-4:1999
ISO/TR 9122=4:1993(E)
The primary Chemical process leading to formation of
involve the conditions for a weil-ventilated, developing
combustion products is that of the thermal bond-
fire and for either a low- or highly-ventilated, fully-
breaking and decomposition of polymeric materials
developed (high temperature) fire. Particularly import-
which, in the presence of Oxygen, leads to a variety
ant are considerations involving Ventilation (Oxygen

of oxygenated species. Carbon compounds are availability), CO&0 ratios, temperature and/or heat

pyrolysed into volatile hydrocarbon fragments which
flux and residente times of fire effluents in the high
tan be oxidized to form various oxidized organic spe-
temperature Zone.
cies, carbon monoxide or carbon dioxide, depending
upon thermal and oxidative conditions. Both carbon
3.1.1 Oxygen concentration
monoxide and carbon dioxide are usually present in a
fire effluent atmosphere, with the ratio of the two of-
The Oxygen concentration is the residual concen-
ten being used as an indicator characteristic of the
tration in the primary fire effluent before any dilution.
particular type or Stage of a fire. In small, developing
Its value decreases during fire development from the
fires, a CO&0 ratio of 100 or more would indicate
normal ambient level of approximately 21 % to 10 %-
freely-ventilated (fuel-controlled) combustion. In large,
15 % in a small or developing fire, and further de-
fully-developed fires which are usually ventilation-
creases to between 1 % and 10 % in a fully-
controlled when they occur in buildings, a CO,ICO
developed fire, depending upon the Ventilation,
ratio of 10 or less would indicate relatively low venti-
burning rate and room geometry.
lation, while a ratio of more than 10 would be indic-
ative of relatively high Ventilation.
3.1.2 CO,/CO ratio
Hydrogen is oxidized to water, chlorine is most com-
monly released as hydrogen chloride and nitrogen
The CO,/CO ratio is calculated from the concen-
appears as nitrogenous organic compounds (es-
trations of these gases in the fire effluent atmos-
pecially nitriles), hydrogen cyanide, nitrogen oxides
phere. Since its value is independent of dilution, the
and molecular nitrogen, again depending upon the
sampling Point is not critical, providing it is beyond the
thermal and oxidative conditions. All flaming and non-
Point where Oxidation reactions are in progress. The
flaming (including smouldering) fires tan yield a myr-
CO&0 ratio undergoes rapid changes during the
iad of combustion products due to incomplete
development of a fire. Initially, in small fires under
decomposition and only partial Oxidation of the fuels
weil-ventilated conditions, it is usually high (100 to
involved; however, non-flaming fires produce the
200). In fully-developed, Ventilation-controlled fires, it
highest yields of such products. lt is important to re-
reaches an almost constant value (1
to IO) depending
member that these are all Chemical reactions, subject
upon the Ventilation. Real fire data for CO&0 ratios
to the usual principles of thermodynamics and
are shown in figure 1 VI.
kinetics. Thus, stoichiometry and thermal energy play
significant roles in determining the products of com-
bustion that are formed over the range of fire classi-
3.1.3 Temperature and heat flux
fications.
The temperature is the mean value within a compart-
ment. lt gives a measure of the thermal exposure to
3 Criteria for assessment of fire models
the materials present and also to their thermal de-
composition products. The radiant heat flux is also
3.1 Relevante to real fires
useful as a measure of exposure to thermal energy.
In small or early-developing fires, the temperature in
The best approach to the selection of an appropriate
the immediate fire environment is typically in the
fire model for fire effluent toxicity testing involves
400 OC to 600 OC range with the radiant flux between
careful consideration of data which would relate lab-
20 kW/m* to 40 kW/m! In fully-developed fires, the
oratory combustion conditions to the types and
temperature is in the 600 “C to 1 200 “C range with
stages of real fires (see table 1).
radiant fluxes of 50 kW/m* to 150 kW/m*.
All the fire models to be described are capable of
All these factors have a considerable influence on the
simulating the conditions of non-flaming decompo-
composition of the fire effluent atmosphere. The im-
sition. However, it is recognized that the majority of
portant features from a toxicity Point of view are that
fire injuries and deaths occur as a result of flaming
small or early-growing fires generally produce rela-
fires. These include both small fires (often restricted
tively low yields of carbon monoxide and hydrogen
to the item first ignited) where casualties occur in the
cyanide, together with a complex mixture of pyrolysis
room of origin and also large, fully-developed fires,
and Oxidation products which have escaped the flame
where casualties occur remotely from the compart-
Zone. Fully-developed fires, due to the high tempera-
ment of origin. In the latter, the toxic threat usually
tures and Oxygen vitiated conditions, generally pro-
develops after flashover occursC11 VI.
duce high yields of toxic low molecular weight

In terms of a correlation with most fire fatalities, the species, such as carbon monoxide and hydrogen

most important criteria for an appropriate fire model
cyanide.
---------------------- Page: 10 ----------------------
SIST ISO/TR 9122-4:1999
ISO/TR 9122=4:1993(E)
C02/COratio,r
r 10 S r ( 20
ZOGr< 40
m-sm
w-w-
---v
m-m-
s-s- r 240
---v
s--e
Source: Bostonfiredepartment
Figure 1 - CO,/CO ratio in real fire situations
In addition to differentes in the heating of a speci-
3.2 Validity to toxic hazard assessment
men, the CO evolved from bench-scale experiments
tan differ from that produced with full-scale tests due
Demonstration of the validity of a fire model in gen-
to the following factors:
erating the toxic hazard of a real fire is an ideal cri-
terion which tan be approached but not necessarily
a) Air/fuel ratio. If this ratio is not the same in the two
reached. A few studies have been conducted using
scales, CO production will be different;
full-scale fires to evaluate the contribution of certain
construction materials and furnishings to toxic
b) Residente time effects. The time available to
hazardCU?lC51. However, considerable caution should
combust CO to CO2 will often be much greater in
be exercised in generalizing conclusions from these
the full-scale than in the small-scale device;
studies. Even in full-scale tests, a range of different
fires is possible in any one System.
c) “Freezing in” of CO. Effects which tend to stop
reactions from completion, thereby “freezing in”
The development of toxic hazard depends upon fire
a certain Proportion of CO. This effect is more
growth, which is essentially a large-scale phenom-
pronounced for increasing scale size.
enon, and carefully conducted, full-scale tests do rep-

licate at least some of the likely types of accidental The net effect of the above phenomena is that

fires. In general, however, it is economically unfeasi- bench-scale tests often have a tendency to show

ble to conduct routine large-scale tests. Thus, the lower yields of CO than are observed in full-scale

practical requirement becomes to provide bench-scale testingC71.
fire toxicity tests, whose predictions tan be validated
Small-scale tests, although they tan give better
against the full-scale.
reproducibility, provide only remote Simulation of ac-
tual fire conditions. Despite these limitations, small-
Since CO is the major toxicant in fires, much of the
scale tests are attractive on the grounds of tost. The
validity of bench-scale tests has traditionally been
best assessments of toxic hazard consist of a combi-
concerned with CO measurement, typically reported
nation of small- and large-scale tests, usually together
either as CO yield or C02/C0 ratios. Experimental
with appropriate engineering calculations.
studies generally indicate that CO production is inde-
pendent of Oxygen concentration until the
oxygenlfuel ratio drops to about 50 % more than that
3.3 Specimen composition and
needed for complete or stoichiometric
combustionC61. From that Point on, CO production configuration
rises sharply with decreasing Oxygen. In fully-

developed, post-flashover fires, CO yields of up to Small-scale fire models require the use of relatively

0,2 kg CO per kilogram of material burned are en- small Sample specimens. The size, orientation and

countered. This ratio appears to be fairly similar for a
shape of the specimen holder and combustion com-
wide variety of combustibles.
partment in the fire model should be considered when
---------------------- Page: 11 ----------------------
SIST ISO/TR 9122-4:1999
ISO/TR 912294:1993(E)
Safety in use and Operation
selecting a fire model. The model should accommo- e)
date the testing of the test specimen in a manner
The device should be safe in its Operation.
which is consistent with its end-use. Spetimens of
composites and layered materials, for example,
should be tested with a minimum of alteration in their
end-use form and configuration.
4 Fire models
Although it is recognized that numerous fire models
3.4 Documentation and experience
are available, only a few satisfy sufficient criteria to
be detailed in this part of ISO/TR 9122. For example,
Protocols for use of the fire model should be well
the OSU rate of heat release apparatusl?l with
documented. Interlaboratory data and experience with
Chemical analysis satisfies major relevant criteria, but
candidate fire models should be considered when
is not readily adaptable to animal tests. On the other
selecting a fire model.
hand, fire model NES 713C91 definitely does not sat-
isfy major relevant criteria and its use is not rec-
ommended by the UK national Standards body.
3.5 Exposure dose quantification
None of the models satisfy all the criteria; however,
the types of fire model used which meet most of the
The actual dose administered in fire effluent toxicity
requirements, at least partially, are described here.
testing is very difficult to establish in terms of grams
of toxicant per kilogram body weight. lt is generally
accepted, however, that the body burden of an
inhaled toxicant will be proportional to the product of
41 . “Box” furnace models
its concentration in the inspired air and the duration
of the exposure. This product is referred to as the
exposure dose of fire effluent gases. lt is essential 4.1.1 NBS cup furnace
that the fire model permits a valid quantification of

exposure dose through the measurement, or calcu- The NBS) tesW1 employs a cup or crucible furnace

lation, of Sample specimen mass loss and System
(see figure2), often referred to as the “Potts
volume.
furnace”, named after the investigator who first re-
ported its use in combustion toxicology. Heating is
considered to be largely conductive, with the bottom
and lower Portion of the quartz cup constituting the
3.6 Procedural criteria
hot Zone. Test materials with masses of up to 8 g are
introduced into the CUP, which has a volume of about
There are a number of criteria to be considered in
1 1. Procedures for testing materials involve com-
selecting a fire model that deal with procedural con-
bustion at both just below (non-flaming) and just
sistency, animal compatibility and safety. These crite-
above (flaming) an autoignition temperature. There
ria are grouped together as procedural criteria and are
has been particular concern regarding air flow into the
as follows:
CUP, although it does communicate with a volume of
200 I of air contained in the exposure chamber. With
a) Repeatability of atmosphere generation
the variable Sample sizes used and an ill-defined fuel-
to-air ratio, some feel the System fails to carry out
Intralaboratory repeatability should have been
combustion in a weil-characterized manner. A further
demonstrated.
criticism has been that various materials are not
tested under the same conditions but often at con-
b) Reproducibility of atmosphere generation
siderably different temperatures.
Interlaboratory reproducibility should have been
The method provides a good model for non-flaming
demonstrated.
oxidative decomposition. lt is also a good model for
simulating the decomposition conditions during a
c) Adaptability to bioassay requirements
weil-ventilated, early-developing fire. lt cannot pro-

The fire model should be adaptable to animal ex- duce the high temperature, Oxygen-vitiated conditions

posure procedures. of a fully-developed, post-flashover fire.
Once in fairly common use in a number of laboratories
d) Adaptability to analytical requirements
in the US, the NBS cup furnace has been weil docu-

The fire model should be adaptable to analytical mented with considerable data availableC111. Its use

requirements. has declined, however, in favour of other fire models.

1) The US National Bureau of Standards is now known as the National Institute of Standards and Technology. To avoid con-

fusion, the former name will be retained in this report when reference is made to the NBS testing device.

---------------------- Page: 12 ----------------------
SIST ISO/TR 9122-4:1999
ISO/TR 9122=4:1993(E)
4.1.2 UPitt box furnace the furnace, has not been reported to be sufficiently
severe as to rupture the apparatus, however.

In the UPitt test method, the combustion device is a The test begins in a non-flaming oxidative mode, and

muffle or box furnace, which is often used in an in- at some Stage, transition to flaming usually occurs.

At this time, the CO,/CO ratios tend to be low (under
verted Position in Order to provide for a pedestal con-
20, usually less than IO), while the temperature is still
nected to a mass Sensor (see figure3)El*lC131. With
low (less than 600 “C). This combination of conditions
this arrangement, continuous monitoring of Sample
does not, therefore, fit well into the scheme of fire
mass is conducted. Combustion is accomplished us-

ing a linear temperature increase of 20 “C/min up to classes shown in table 1. lt best represents the rather

a temperature as high as 1 100 OC, while chamber special Situation of a small fire load in a restricted

atmosphere is pulled through the furnace at a rate of Ventilation environment, for example in a sealed cup-

11 I/min. Smoke concentration is varied by changing board or cabinet. Although the Oxygen concentration

the mass of material charged to the furnace. The is rather low, there are some similarities to the

fuel/air ratio tan, therefore, vary widely depending Chemical decomposition environment in the early de-

upon the mass of Sample and also on its rate of de- veloping fire. The method does not simulate the con-

composition. A Problem of small explosions has been ditions of a large fully-developed post-flashover fire;

encountered with some materials which thermally however, the method could be used as a test for

decompose or burn very rapidly once ignition occurs. measuring the toxic potency of products resulting

This phenomenon, possibly the rapid emission of from the decomposition conditions of developing

gases whose volume exceeds that being pulled from fires.
Frontview
CO,CO2,02 sampling port
Pressurerelief Panel
Gas returnport-
yHCN sampling port
/-Animalports (6)
Clamp for door-
Cupfurnace-
Cupfurnace
1000 mlquartz
beaker
Insulation
Thermocouple
-Welt
Galvanized
sheet
Heating element
in bottom
Ceramic withrecessedverticalheatingelements
Figure 2 - NBS cup furnace smoke toxicity apparatus
---------------------- Page: 13 ----------------------
SIST ISO/TR 9122-4:1999
ISO/TR 9122=4:1993(E)
Filter
GC/ms samples
r r
Thermocouples
Exposure
Mass
Sensor r
Figure 3 - UPitt sm( ke toxicity apparatus including box furnace
and/or the presence of an ignition device. Some diffi-
Another criticism of this method is the 20 “C/min
culty has been experienced in controlling smouldering
temperature increase, which is quite slow and not
and flaming conditions; however, work using Sample
associated with obsetved fires. lt results in a gradual
Segmentation has shown promise with these modes
fractionation of the pyrolysis products, with a dispro-
of combustionC231. lt must be recognized that such
portionately high percentage of low temperature de-
procedures tan alter the type of atmosphere pro-
composition products in the fire effluent wh
...

RAPPORT
Iso
TECHNIQUE TR 9122-4
Première édition
1993-05-I 5
Essais de toxicité des effluents du feu -
Partie 4:
Modèle feu (fours et appareillages de
combustion utilisés dans les essais à petite
échelle)
Toxicity testing of fire effluents -
Part 4: The fire mode1 (furnaces and combustion apparatus used in
small-scale testing)
Numéro de référence
ISOTTR 91 Z-4:1 993(F)
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122=4:1993(F)
Sommaire
Page

1 Domaine d’application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Caractéristiques des étapes d’un incendie
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3 Criteres d’évaluation des modeles feu
. . . ..*...........................................
3.1 Applicabilité a des feux réels
................................................... 2
Concentration en oxygène
3.1 .l
...................................................................
3.1.2 Rapport CO&0
.,.........,...........,.,..................
3.1.3 Température et flux thermique
,.......................... 3
3.2 Validité pour l’évaluation du risque toxique
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
3.3 Composition et configuration de l’éprouvette

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

3.4 Documentation et expérience
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
3.5 Quantification de la dose d’exposition

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3.6 Criteres de procédure

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

4 Modèles feu
Modeles de fours «Box)) ........................................................
4.1
............................................................
4.1.1 Four a coupelle NBS

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4.i.2 Four a moufle UPitt
..................................................
4.2 Modeles de fours tubulaires
.................................................... 5
4.2.1 Four tubulaire DIN 53436

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4.3 Modèles a chaleur rayonnante
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Four a rayonnement U.S. (modifie)
4.3.1

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4.3.2 Calorimètre a cône
.................................................... 10
4.3.3 Fours coniques japonais
.............. 10
4.3.3.1 Four conique BRI (Building Research Institute)
4.3.3.2 Four conique RIPT (Research Institute for Polymers and

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..~.............................................

Textiles)
0 ISO 1993

Droits de reproduction reserves. Aucune partie de cette publication ne peut être reproduite

ni utilisée sous quelque forme que ce soit et par aucun procédé, électronique ou mécanique,

y compris la photocopie et les microfilms, sans l’accord écrit de l’éditeur.
Organisation internationale de normalisation
Case Postale 56 l CH-121 1 Geneve 20 l Suisse
Imprime en Suisse
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
.............
4.3.4 Modèle du Ministère japonais de la construction
......................................................
5 Sélection d’un modele feu
Annexe
...........................................................................
A Bibliographie
. . .
III
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO/TR 91224:1993(F)
Avant-propos
L’ISO (Organisation internationale de normalisation) est une fédération
mondiale d’organismes nationaux de normalisation (comités membres de
I’ISO). L’elaboration des Normes internationales est en général confiée aux
comités techniques de I’ISO. Chaque comite membre interessé par une
etude a le droit de faire partie du comité technique creé a cet effet. Les
organisations internationales, gouvernementales et non gouvernemen-
tales, en liaison avec I’ISO participent également aux travaux. L’ISO colla-
bore étroitement avec la Commission électrotechnique internationale (CEI)
en ce qui concerne la normalisation électrotechnique.
La tâche principale des comités techniques est d’elaborer les Normes
internationales, mais, exceptionnellement, un comité technique peut pro-
poser la publication d’un rapport technique de l’un des types suivants:
- type 1, lorsque, en dépit de maints efforts, l’accord requis ne peut être
realise en faveur de la publication d’une Norme internationale;
- type 2, lorsque le sujet en question est encore en cours de dévelop-
pement technique ou lorsque, pour toute autre raison, la possibilité
d’un accord pour la publication d’une Norme internationale peut être
envisagée pour l’avenir mais pas dans l’immédiat;
- type 3, lorsqu’un comite technique a réuni des données de nature dif-
fer-ente de celles qui sont normalement publiées comme Normes
internationales (ceci pouvant comprendre des informations sur l’état
de la technique, par exemple).
Les rapports techniques des types 1 et 2 font l’objet d’un nouvel examen
trois ans au plus tard aprés leur publication afin de décider eventuellement
de leur transformation en Normes internationales. Les rapports techniques
du type 3 ne doivent pas nécessairement être révises avant que les don-
nees fournies ne soient plus jugées valables ou utiles.
L’ISO/TR 9122-4, rapport: technique du type 2, a éte élabore par le comite
technique ISO/TC 92, Essais au feu sur les matbiaux de construction,
composants et structures, sous-comite SC 3, Risques d’intoxication par le
feu .
Le présent document est publie dans la série des rapports techniques de
type 2 (conformément au paragraphe G.4.2.2 de la partie 1 des Directives
ISO/CEI) comme ((norme prospective d’application provisoire» dans le
domaine des essais de toxicite des effluents du feu, en raison de l’urgence
d’avoir une indication quant à la maniere dont il convient d’utiliser les
normes dans ce domaine pour répondre a un besoin determiné.
Ce document ne doit pas être considere comme une «Norme internatio-
nale)). II est propose pour une mise en œuvre provisoire, dans le but de
recueillir des informations et d’acquérir de l’expérience quant a son appli-
cation dans la pratique. II est de règle d’envoyer les observations even-
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
ISO/TR 91224:1993(F)
tuelles relatives au contenu de ce document au Secrétariat central de
I’ISO.
II sera procédé a un nouvel examen de ce rapport technique de type 2
deux ans au plus tard après sa publication, avec la faculte d’en prolonger
la validité pendant deux autres années, de le transformer en Norme inter-
nationale ou de l’annuler.
L’ISO/TR 9122 comprend les parties suivantes, présentées sous le titre
général Essais de toxicité des effluents du feu:
- Partie 1: Généra/it&
- Partie 2: Directives pour les essais biologiques permettant de de-
terminer la toxicite aiguë par inhalation des effluents du feu (Princi-
pes de base, critères et méthodologie)
- Partie 3: Methodes d’analyse des gaz et des vapeurs dans les
effluents du feu
- Partie 4: Modèle feu (fours et appareillages de combustion utilises
dans les essais a petite echelle)
- Partie 5: Prédictions concernant les effets toxiques des effluents du
feu
L’annexe A de la présente partie de I’ISORR 9122 est donnee uniquement
a titre d’information.
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122=4:1993(F)
Introduction
Le feu implique un eventail de phénoménes physiques et chimiques
complexes, en corrélation les uns avec les autres. En conséquence, il est
pratiquement impossible de simuler tous les aspects d’un feu réel sur des
appareillages à l’échelle du laboratoire. Ce problème de validite du modèle
feu est peut-être l’unique problème technique complexe associe à tous les
essais feu.
Pour les modéles feu utilises pour l’évaluation de la toxicité des effluents
du feu, des restrictions et des criteres supplémentaires sont nécessai-
rement imposes, du fait du besoin de compatibilité entre la combustion
en laboratoire et les procédés d’essais biologiques utilisant des animaux
d’expérimentation. Par exemple, les niveaux d’oxygène eventuellement
réduits et la chaleur produite ne doivent pas, en eux-mêmes, être inuti-
lement nocifs pour les animaux. Dans le même temps, des concentrations
suffisamment elevees d’effluent du feu doivent être produites de façon à
obtenir des effets toxicologiques mesurables. II resulte de ces restrictions
que des compromis doivent souvent être faits, ce qui peut encore reduire
la validité apparente du modèle feu.
Deux approches sont essentiellement utilisées pour évaluer la toxicite des
effluents du feu, à savoir, celle utilisant les modèles feu en vraie grandeur
et celle utilisant les modèles feu à petite échelle. Dans les procédures en
vraie grandeur, les modéles feu consistant en une pièce, ou plusieurs
pièces, ou un bâtiment complet sont utilises dans le but de simuler le plus
fidélement possible les caractéristiques complétes des incendies, c’est-à-
dire, l’allumage, la croissance et l’evolution des effluents toxiques. Les
methodes en vraie grandeur sont généralement appliquées pour les essais
de risques toxiques présents lors d’un incendie, bien que quelques ten-
tatives aient eté faites pour modéliser les principales caractéristiques du
risque toxique à partir d’essais à petite échelle.
Dans les modèles feu à petite échelle, on considère qu’il est possible de
recreer la caractéristique d’environnements chimiques réactifs de diffe-
rents stades et types de feu en termes de température, de présence ou
d’absence de flamme et d’alimentation en oxygène. Dans ces conditions,
les productions relatives de produits toxiques des effluents du feu issus
de matériaux seront similaires à celles qui se produisent aux différents
stades d’incendie en vraie grandeur. Les modèles feu à petite échelle sont
alors considérés comme des essais de pouvoir toxique des produits chi-
miques de combustion dégagés par des matériaux dans des conditions
de décomposition définie. Ces valeurs de pouvoir toxique pourraient alors
être utilisées comme un élément d’analyse pour les évaluations de risque
toxique, lesquelles prendraient en compte les caractéristiques dynamiques
de scénarios d’incendie spécifiques.
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
RAPPORT TECHNIQUE
ISO/TR 9122=4:1993(F)
Essais de toxicité des effluents du feu -
Partie 4:
Modèle feu (fours et appareil
ages de combustion utilisés
dans les essais à petite éche
Les composes du carbone sont pyrolysés en frag-
1 Domaine d’application
ments d’hydrocarbures volatils qui peuvent être
oxydes pour former des espèces organiques oxydées
La présente partie de I’ISO/TR 9122 est limitee a la
variées, monoxyde de carbone ou dioxyde de car-
consideration des modeles feu (c’est-à-dire des dis-
bone, selon les conditions thermiques et d’oxydation.
positifs de combustion en laboratoire), utilisés dans
Le monoxyde et le dioxyde de carbone sont habi-
les etudes de toxicité des effluents du feu, avec des
tuellement prksents dans l’atmosphère d’un effluent
suggestions pour l’usage approprie des modeles feu
du feu, le rapport des deux étant souvent utilise
en essai standard. II sera fait reference à d’autres
comme un indicateur caractéristique du stade parti-
parties de I’ISO/TR 9122 pour discuter des methodes
culier d’un incendie. Dans des incendies de petite di-
analytiques, des procédures d’essai biologique, des
mension, en cours de développement, un rapport
essais de toxicite et de la prédiction des effets toxi-
CO&0 de 100 ou plus indiquerait une combustion
ques des effluents du feu.
librement ventilee (dont le combustible est contrôle).

La présente partie de I’ISO/TR 9122 définit les crité- Dans des incendies de grande dimension, pleinement

res d’un modèle feu acceptable, revoit les modèles
développés, dont la ventilation est généralement
feu existants par rapport à ces critères et propose que
contrôlee lorsqu’ils swiennent dans des bâtiments,
les modèles feu soient sélectionnés pour l’utilisation,
un rapport CO&0 de 10 indiquerait une ventilation
en prenant en compte ces criteres qui incluent une
relativement faible, alors qu’un rapport supérieur à 10
capacité à générer des conditions d’incendie caracte-
indiquerait une ventilation relativement forte.
ristique des étapes connues d’un incendie.
L’hydrogène est oxyde en eau, le chlore se dégage
La présente partie de I’ISO/TR 9122 ne comprend pas
communement sous forme de chlorure d’hydrogéne
l’analyse detaillee de la physique et de la chimie du
et l’azote apparaît sous forme de composes d’azote
feu .
organique, (spécialement nitriles) de cyanure d’hydro-
gène, d’oxydes d’azote, et d’azote moléculaire, tou-
jours en fonction des conditions thermiques et
2 Caractéristiques des étapes d’un
d’oxydation. Tous les feux, avec ou sans flamme (y
incendie
compris les feux couvant@, peuvent produire une
myriade de produits de combustion dus a la decom-
À des fins de discussion de modèles feu et de leur
position incomplète et a l’oxydation seulement par-
utilisation appropriée, les conditions de combustion
tielle des combustibles concernes, les incendies sans
présentées dans le tableau 1 sont généralement ac-
flamme produisant le plus fort rendement de ces
ceptées comme étant caractéristiques de certaines
produits. II est important de se souvenir que ceux-ci
étapes ou phases d’un incendieCIl.
sont formes par reactions chimiques, sujets aux prin-
cipes habituels de la cinétique et de la thermodyna-
Le processus chimique primaire aboutissant a la for-
mique. Ainsi, les énergies stoechiométrique et
mation de produits de combustion est le processus
thermique jouent des rôles significatifs dans la déter-
de rupture thermique des liaisons et de décompo-
mination des produits de combustion formes tout au
sition des materiaux polymères, qui, en présence
long de la gamme de classification des incendies.
d’oxygène, produit une variete d’espéces oxygénées.
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122=4:1993(F)
Tableau 1 - Classification générale des étapes d’un incendie
Teneur en
Irradiantes)
Température
Rapport CO,/CO 2)
Étapes ou phases d’un incendie oxygènel)
(4 OO ( Cl (kW/m*)
Décomposition sans flamme
a) feu couvant (auto-entretenu) 21 non applicable < 100 non applicable
b) sans flamme (par oxydation) 5 à 21 non applicable <500 <25
c) sans flamme (pyrolitique) <5 non applicable < 1 000 non applicable
Incendie en cours de développement lOàl5 100à200 400 à 600 20 à 40
(avec flammes)
Incendie pleinement dbveloppb
(avec flammes)
a) ventilation relativement faible là5 < 10 600 à 900 40 à 70
b) ventilation relativement forte 5àlO < 100 600à 1200 50à 150
1) Condition générale (moyenne) d’environnement dans le compartiment.
2) Valeur moyenne dans les flammèches aux abords de l’incendie.
3) Irradiante incidente sur l’échantillon (moyenne).
ventilation, (apport d’oxygène), les rapports CO,/CO,
3 Critères d’évaluation des modèles feu
la température et/ou le flux de chaleur et les durees
pendant lesquelles des effluents du feu séjournent
3.1 Applicabilité à des feux réels
dans la zone à haute température.
La meilleure approche de sélection d’un dispositif de
3.1 .l
Concentration en oxygène
combustion approprie pour les essais de toxicité des
effluents du feu consiste a selectionner soi-
La concentration en oxygène est la concentration re-
gneusement les donnees qui permettent d’établir une
siduelle dans I’effluent du feu primaire avant toute di-
relation entre les conditions de combustion en labo-
lution. Sa valeur décroît durant le développement de
ratoire et les types et stades d’incendies réels (voir
l’incendie du niveau ambiant normal d’approxi-
tableau 1).
mativement 21 % a 10 %-15 % dans un incendie de
petite dimension ou en cours de développement, et
Tous les modeles feu dont la description va suivre
jusqu’à 1 %-10 % dans un incendie pleinement déve-
permettent de simuler les conditions de décompo-
loppe, en fonction de la ventilation, du taux de brûlage
sition sans flamme. Cependant, il est admis que la
et de la géométrie de la pièce.
majorité des blessures et des morts par incendie sont
dues à des incendies avec flammes. Ces incendies
3.1.2 Rapport CO,/CO
comprennent les incendies de petite dimension (sou-
vent limites au premier produit ayant pris feu) où les
Le rapport C02/C0 est calcule a partir de la concen-
pertes humaines swiennent dans la pièce même, et
tration de ces gaz dans I’atmosphére des effluents du
les incendies de grande dimension, pleinement deve-
feu. Sa valeur étant indépendante de la dilution, le
loppés où les pertes swiennent loin du comparti-
point d’échantillonnage n’est pas critique pourvu qu’il
ment d’origine. Pour ces derniers, la menace toxique
se situe au delà du point où se produisent les réac-
se manifeste généralement après I’embra-
tions d’oxydation. Le rapport CO&0 subit des chan-
sementC1lC*l.
gements rapides durant le développement d’un

En terme de correlation avec la plupart des morts incendie. Initialement, dans de petits incendies bien

dues aux incendies, les criteres les plus importants ventiles, le rapport est généralement éleve (100 a

pour un modèle feu approprie sont bases sur les 200). Dans les incendies en plein développement, a

conditions d’un incendie en cours de développement
ventilation contrôlee, il atteint une valeur presque

bien ventile, d’un incendie faiblement ou fortement constante (1 a 10) fonction de la ventilation. Les don-

ventile, en plein développement (haute température).
nees expérimentales d’incendie réel pour les rapports
II est particulièrement important de considérer la
CO&0 sont présentées a la figure 1 VI.
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122=4:1993(F)
Rapport,r CO2/CO
Source:Bostonfiredepartment
Figure 1 - Rapport CO*/CO en situations d’incendie r6el
3.1.3 tére idéal qui peut être approche, mais pas forcement
Température et flux thermique
atteint. Quelques études ont utilise des incendies en
vraie grandeur afin d’evaluer la contribution de cer-
La température est la valeur moyenne dans un com-
tains materiaux de construction et du mobilier au ris-
partiment. Elle donne une mesure de l’exposition
que toxiqueC*lC4lC51. Cependant, il convient de rester
thermique aux materiaux présents ainsi qu’à leurs
très prudent avant de tirer les conclusions de ces
produits de décomposition thermique. Le flux de
études. Même au cours d’essais en vraie grandeur,
chaleur rayonnante est également utile comme me-
toutes sortes d’incendies peuvent survenir dans
sure d’exposition à l’énergie thermique. Dans des in-
n’importe quel système.
cendies de petite dimension ou au debut de leur
développement, la température dans l’environnement
Le developpement du risque toxique dépend de la
immédiat du feu se situe dans une gamme typique
croissance du feu, qui est essentiellement un phéno-
de température de 400 OC à 600 OC, le flux rayonnant
mene à grande échelle et les essais bien conduits, en
se situant de 20 kW/m* a 40 kW/m*. Dans les incen-
vraie grandeur, reproduisent vraiment au moins
dies pleinement développés, la température se situe
quelques-uns des types vraisemblables d’incendies
dans une gamme de 600 OC à 1 200 OC avec flux
accidentels. Cependant, il n’est en général pas possi-
rayonnant de 50 kW/m* a 150 kW/m*.
ble économiquement d’effectuer des essais de rou-
Tous ces facteurs ont une influence considérable sur
tine en vraie grandeur. En conséquence, il devient
la composition de I’atmosphére des effluents du feu.
usuel en pratique de recourir à des essais de toxicité
Du point de vue de la toxicité, le fait que des incen-
au banc, dont les prédictions peuvent être validées
dies de petite dimension ou en cours de dévelop-
par rapport aux essais en vraie grandeur.
pement produisent généralement de bas rendement
de monoxyde de carbone et de cyanure d’hydrogéne,
Le CO étant le produit toxique principal des incendies,
en même temps qu’un mélange complexe de
traditionnellement la validité des essais au banc
pyrolyse et de produits d’oxydation ayant échappé a
concerne pour une grande part les mesures de CO,
la zone de flammes, constitue une caractéristique
que l’on caractérise soit par les rendements CO soit
importante. Les incendies pleinement développés,
par les rapports C02/C0. Les études expérimentales
dus à des conditions de température élevée et d’oxy-
indiquent généralement que la production de CO est
gène vicie, produisent généralement des rendements
indépendante de la concentration ,d’oxygène jusqu’à
élevés d’espèces toxiques à faible masse moléculaire,
ce que le rapport oxygène/carburant tombe aux envi-
telles que le monoxyde de carbone et le cyanure
rons de 50 % de plus que celle qui est nécessaire
d’hydrogène.
pour la combustion complète ou stoechiométriqueCs3.
À partir de ce point, la production de CO augmente
fortement à mesure que I’oxygéne décroît. Dans les
incendies pleinement développés, apres embra-
3.2 Validité pour l’évaluation du risque
sement, on rencontre couramment des rendements
toxique
d’environ 0,2 kg de CO par kilogramme de matiere
brûlee. Le rapport semble être sensiblement similaire
La démonstration de la validite d’un modéle feu re-
pour une large varieté de combustibles.
produisant le risque toxique d’un feu réel est un cri-
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------

En plus des differences rencontrees dans I’échauf- corps (de l’animal d’expérimentation). II est géné-

fement des éprouvettes, le CO produit à partir d’es- ralement accepte, cependant, que les effets pour le

sais au banc peut différer de celui produit au cours corps, engendres par l’inhalation de toxiques, seront

d’essais en vraie grandeur, en raison des facteurs proportionnels au produit de leur concentration dans

suivants: l’air inspire par la duree de l’exposition. Le produit du
temps par la concentration équivaut à la dose d’ex-

Rapport air/combustible. Si le rapport n’est pas le position aux gaz des effluents du feu. II est essentiel

même sur les deux échelles, la production de CO que le modèle feu permette, grâce a une mesure, ou

sera différente. un calcul de la perte de masse de l’échantillon et du
volume du système, une quantification valable de la
Effets du temps de residence. Le temps disponi- dose d’exposition.
ble pour transformer le CO en CO2 par combustion
sera souvent beaucoup plus long dans les dispo-
3.6 Critères de procédure
sitifs en vraie grandeur que dans les dispositifs à
petite Rchelle.
II y a un certain nombre de criteres a considerer lors
du choix d’un modéle feu, en rapport avec la logique
(Congélation)) du CO. Effets tendant à empêcher
de la procédure, la compatibilité animale et la securité.
les reactions d’aboutir, «gelant» ainsi une certaine
Ces criteres sont regroupes dans «les critères de
proportion de CO. Cet effet augmente avec la di-
procédure)):
mension de l’echelle.
a) Répétabilité de la génération de l’atmosphère
L’effet le plus net du phénoméne ci-dessus est que
les essais au banc ont souvent tendance à produire
La répétabilité intralaboratoire devrait avoir ete dé-
des rendements plus bas de CO que les essais en
montree.
vraie grandeurC71.
Reproductibilité de la génération d’atmosphère
Les essais à echelle réduite, bien que permettant une
meilleure reproductibilité, n’autorisent qu’une simu-
La reproductibilité interlaboratoire devrait avoir éte
lation lointaine des conditions reelles d’incendie. En
demontree.
dépit de ces limitations, les essais à l’échelle réduite
sont attractifs du point de vue du prix. La meilleure
Adaptabilité aux prescriptions d’essais biologi-
évaluation du risque toxique consiste en une combi-
ques
naison d’essais à échelle reduite et en vraie grandeur,
associes à un programme de simulation approprie.
Le modéle feu devrait être adaptable aux procédés
d’exposition des animaux.
3.3 Composition et configuration de
Adaptabilité aux prescriptions analytiques
l’éprouvette
Le modèle feu devrait être adaptable aux pres-
Les modèles feu à petite echelle demandent qu’on
criptions analytiques.
utilise de petites éprouvettes échantillons. La taille,
l’orientation et la forme du support échantillon et le
Sécurité d’utilisation et fonctionnement
compartiment combustion dans le modèle feu doivent
être considérés lors de sa sélection. Le modele devra
Le dispositif devrait être sûr dans son fonction-
permettre l’essai des echantillons conformement à
nement.
leur utilisation finale. Les echantillons composites et
les materiaux multi-couches, par exemple, devront
être testes en altérant au minimum leur forme et leur Modèles feu
configuration d’utilisation finale.
Bien qu’il soit reconnu qu’un grand nombre de mo-
déles feu existent, quelques-uns seulement réunis-
3.4 Documentation et expérience
sent des critéres suffisants pour être détaillés dans la
présente partie de I’ISO/TR 9122. Par exemple, I’ap-
Les protocoles d’utilisation du modèle feu doivent
pareil de débit calorifique OSUC avec les analyses
être bien documentes. Les donnees d’essais interla-
chimiques satisfait à la plupart des criteres majeurs
boratoire et l’expérience acquise sur les modèles feu
sélectionnés, mais il n’est pas totalement adapté pour
à choix devront être prises en compte lors du choix
les essais d’animaux. En revanche, le modele feu
d’un modèle.
NES 713191 ne satisfait absolument pas aux critères
majeurs sélectionnés et son utilisation n’est pas re-
3.5 Quantification de la dose d’exposition
commandée par les autorités normatives du Royaume
Uni .
La dose réelle administrée dans les essais de toxicite

d’effluents du feu est tres difficile à etablir en terme Aucun des modéles ne satisfait a tous les critères;

de gramme de toxique par kilogramme du poids du toutefois, les types de modeles feu utilisés satisfai-

---------------------- Page: 10 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122-4:1993(F)

sant, au moins partiellement, à la plupart des exi- concentration de fumée en changeant la masse des

gences sont décrits ci-après. matériaux placés dans le four. En conséquence, le
rapport carburantlair peut varier largement en fonction
de la masse de l’échantillon et de son taux de dé-
4.1 Modèles de fours «Box»
composition. On a rencontré un problème de petites
explosions avec certains matériaux qui se décompo-
4.1.1 Four h coupelle NBS .
sent à la chaleur ou brûlent très vite une fois allumés.
Cependant, ce phénomène, dû probablement à
L’essaiCi NBS) utilise un four à coupelle ou à creu-
l’émission rapide de gaz dont le volume dépasse celui
set (voir figure 2) souvent appelé «four Pottw, du nom
qui provient du four, n’a pas été considéré comme
du chercheur auteur du premier rapport d’utilisation
suffisamment sévere pour constituer un risque et en-
de ce four en toxicologie de combustion. On consi-
dommager l’appareillage.
dére que l’échauffement est largement conducteur, le
L’essai commence sur un mode d’oxydation sans
bas et la partie inférieure de la coupelle à quartz
flamme, et à un certain stade, habituellement, les
constituant la zone de chaleur. Des matériaux d’essais
flammes apparaissent. A ce moment, les rapports
jusqu’à 8 g sont introduits dans la coupelle dont le
CO,/CO tendent à être bas, (au-dessous de 20, nor-
volume est d’environ 1 litre. Les procédures d’essai
malement moins de 10) alors que la température est
des matériaux supposent une combustion à deux
encore basse (inférieure à 600 OC). Cette combinaison
températures:
l’une juste au-dessous de I’auto-
de conditions ne s’intègre pas bien par conséquent,
allumage (sans flamme), l’autre au-dessus (avec
dans la classification des incendies présentée au ta-
flammes). La circulation d’air dans la coupelle s’est
bleau 1. Elle représente au mieux la situation vraiment
révélée particuliérement préoccupante, bien que
spéciale d’une petite charge d’incendie dans un envi-
celle-ci communique avec un volume de 200 I d’air
ronnement à ventilation réduite, par exemple dans un
contenu dans la chambre d’exposition. Étant donné
placard ou une enceinte hermétique. Bien que la
les dimensions variables d’échantillons utilisés et le
concentration d’oxygène soit assez basse, il existe
rapport mal défini carburant-air, certains pensent que
certaines similitudes avec l’environnement de dé-
le système n’effectue pas la combustion d’une ma-
composition chimique d’un feu en cours de dévelop-
niere bien caractérisée ou objectent que les différents
pement. La méthode ne simule pas les conditions
matériaux ne sont pas testés dans les mêmes condi-
d’un incendie de grande dimension, pleinement dé-
tions, mais souvent à des températures extrêmement
veloppé, apres embrasement; cependant, la méthode
différentes.
pourrait être utilisée comme essai pour mesurer le
Cette méthode propose un bon modèle de décompo-
pouvoir toxique de produits résultant des conditions
sition par oxydation sans fla,mme.
...

RAPPORT
Iso
TECHNIQUE TR 9122-4
Première édition
1993-05-I 5
Essais de toxicité des effluents du feu -
Partie 4:
Modèle feu (fours et appareillages de
combustion utilisés dans les essais à petite
échelle)
Toxicity testing of fire effluents -
Part 4: The fire mode1 (furnaces and combustion apparatus used in
small-scale testing)
Numéro de référence
ISOTTR 91 Z-4:1 993(F)
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122=4:1993(F)
Sommaire
Page

1 Domaine d’application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Caractéristiques des étapes d’un incendie
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3 Criteres d’évaluation des modeles feu
. . . ..*...........................................
3.1 Applicabilité a des feux réels
................................................... 2
Concentration en oxygène
3.1 .l
...................................................................
3.1.2 Rapport CO&0
.,.........,...........,.,..................
3.1.3 Température et flux thermique
,.......................... 3
3.2 Validité pour l’évaluation du risque toxique
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
3.3 Composition et configuration de l’éprouvette

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

3.4 Documentation et expérience
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
3.5 Quantification de la dose d’exposition

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3.6 Criteres de procédure

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

4 Modèles feu
Modeles de fours «Box)) ........................................................
4.1
............................................................
4.1.1 Four a coupelle NBS

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4.i.2 Four a moufle UPitt
..................................................
4.2 Modeles de fours tubulaires
.................................................... 5
4.2.1 Four tubulaire DIN 53436

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4.3 Modèles a chaleur rayonnante
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Four a rayonnement U.S. (modifie)
4.3.1

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4.3.2 Calorimètre a cône
.................................................... 10
4.3.3 Fours coniques japonais
.............. 10
4.3.3.1 Four conique BRI (Building Research Institute)
4.3.3.2 Four conique RIPT (Research Institute for Polymers and

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..~.............................................

Textiles)
0 ISO 1993

Droits de reproduction reserves. Aucune partie de cette publication ne peut être reproduite

ni utilisée sous quelque forme que ce soit et par aucun procédé, électronique ou mécanique,

y compris la photocopie et les microfilms, sans l’accord écrit de l’éditeur.
Organisation internationale de normalisation
Case Postale 56 l CH-121 1 Geneve 20 l Suisse
Imprime en Suisse
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
.............
4.3.4 Modèle du Ministère japonais de la construction
......................................................
5 Sélection d’un modele feu
Annexe
...........................................................................
A Bibliographie
. . .
III
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO/TR 91224:1993(F)
Avant-propos
L’ISO (Organisation internationale de normalisation) est une fédération
mondiale d’organismes nationaux de normalisation (comités membres de
I’ISO). L’elaboration des Normes internationales est en général confiée aux
comités techniques de I’ISO. Chaque comite membre interessé par une
etude a le droit de faire partie du comité technique creé a cet effet. Les
organisations internationales, gouvernementales et non gouvernemen-
tales, en liaison avec I’ISO participent également aux travaux. L’ISO colla-
bore étroitement avec la Commission électrotechnique internationale (CEI)
en ce qui concerne la normalisation électrotechnique.
La tâche principale des comités techniques est d’elaborer les Normes
internationales, mais, exceptionnellement, un comité technique peut pro-
poser la publication d’un rapport technique de l’un des types suivants:
- type 1, lorsque, en dépit de maints efforts, l’accord requis ne peut être
realise en faveur de la publication d’une Norme internationale;
- type 2, lorsque le sujet en question est encore en cours de dévelop-
pement technique ou lorsque, pour toute autre raison, la possibilité
d’un accord pour la publication d’une Norme internationale peut être
envisagée pour l’avenir mais pas dans l’immédiat;
- type 3, lorsqu’un comite technique a réuni des données de nature dif-
fer-ente de celles qui sont normalement publiées comme Normes
internationales (ceci pouvant comprendre des informations sur l’état
de la technique, par exemple).
Les rapports techniques des types 1 et 2 font l’objet d’un nouvel examen
trois ans au plus tard aprés leur publication afin de décider eventuellement
de leur transformation en Normes internationales. Les rapports techniques
du type 3 ne doivent pas nécessairement être révises avant que les don-
nees fournies ne soient plus jugées valables ou utiles.
L’ISO/TR 9122-4, rapport: technique du type 2, a éte élabore par le comite
technique ISO/TC 92, Essais au feu sur les matbiaux de construction,
composants et structures, sous-comite SC 3, Risques d’intoxication par le
feu .
Le présent document est publie dans la série des rapports techniques de
type 2 (conformément au paragraphe G.4.2.2 de la partie 1 des Directives
ISO/CEI) comme ((norme prospective d’application provisoire» dans le
domaine des essais de toxicite des effluents du feu, en raison de l’urgence
d’avoir une indication quant à la maniere dont il convient d’utiliser les
normes dans ce domaine pour répondre a un besoin determiné.
Ce document ne doit pas être considere comme une «Norme internatio-
nale)). II est propose pour une mise en œuvre provisoire, dans le but de
recueillir des informations et d’acquérir de l’expérience quant a son appli-
cation dans la pratique. II est de règle d’envoyer les observations even-
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
ISO/TR 91224:1993(F)
tuelles relatives au contenu de ce document au Secrétariat central de
I’ISO.
II sera procédé a un nouvel examen de ce rapport technique de type 2
deux ans au plus tard après sa publication, avec la faculte d’en prolonger
la validité pendant deux autres années, de le transformer en Norme inter-
nationale ou de l’annuler.
L’ISO/TR 9122 comprend les parties suivantes, présentées sous le titre
général Essais de toxicité des effluents du feu:
- Partie 1: Généra/it&
- Partie 2: Directives pour les essais biologiques permettant de de-
terminer la toxicite aiguë par inhalation des effluents du feu (Princi-
pes de base, critères et méthodologie)
- Partie 3: Methodes d’analyse des gaz et des vapeurs dans les
effluents du feu
- Partie 4: Modèle feu (fours et appareillages de combustion utilises
dans les essais a petite echelle)
- Partie 5: Prédictions concernant les effets toxiques des effluents du
feu
L’annexe A de la présente partie de I’ISORR 9122 est donnee uniquement
a titre d’information.
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122=4:1993(F)
Introduction
Le feu implique un eventail de phénoménes physiques et chimiques
complexes, en corrélation les uns avec les autres. En conséquence, il est
pratiquement impossible de simuler tous les aspects d’un feu réel sur des
appareillages à l’échelle du laboratoire. Ce problème de validite du modèle
feu est peut-être l’unique problème technique complexe associe à tous les
essais feu.
Pour les modéles feu utilises pour l’évaluation de la toxicité des effluents
du feu, des restrictions et des criteres supplémentaires sont nécessai-
rement imposes, du fait du besoin de compatibilité entre la combustion
en laboratoire et les procédés d’essais biologiques utilisant des animaux
d’expérimentation. Par exemple, les niveaux d’oxygène eventuellement
réduits et la chaleur produite ne doivent pas, en eux-mêmes, être inuti-
lement nocifs pour les animaux. Dans le même temps, des concentrations
suffisamment elevees d’effluent du feu doivent être produites de façon à
obtenir des effets toxicologiques mesurables. II resulte de ces restrictions
que des compromis doivent souvent être faits, ce qui peut encore reduire
la validité apparente du modèle feu.
Deux approches sont essentiellement utilisées pour évaluer la toxicite des
effluents du feu, à savoir, celle utilisant les modèles feu en vraie grandeur
et celle utilisant les modèles feu à petite échelle. Dans les procédures en
vraie grandeur, les modéles feu consistant en une pièce, ou plusieurs
pièces, ou un bâtiment complet sont utilises dans le but de simuler le plus
fidélement possible les caractéristiques complétes des incendies, c’est-à-
dire, l’allumage, la croissance et l’evolution des effluents toxiques. Les
methodes en vraie grandeur sont généralement appliquées pour les essais
de risques toxiques présents lors d’un incendie, bien que quelques ten-
tatives aient eté faites pour modéliser les principales caractéristiques du
risque toxique à partir d’essais à petite échelle.
Dans les modèles feu à petite échelle, on considère qu’il est possible de
recreer la caractéristique d’environnements chimiques réactifs de diffe-
rents stades et types de feu en termes de température, de présence ou
d’absence de flamme et d’alimentation en oxygène. Dans ces conditions,
les productions relatives de produits toxiques des effluents du feu issus
de matériaux seront similaires à celles qui se produisent aux différents
stades d’incendie en vraie grandeur. Les modèles feu à petite échelle sont
alors considérés comme des essais de pouvoir toxique des produits chi-
miques de combustion dégagés par des matériaux dans des conditions
de décomposition définie. Ces valeurs de pouvoir toxique pourraient alors
être utilisées comme un élément d’analyse pour les évaluations de risque
toxique, lesquelles prendraient en compte les caractéristiques dynamiques
de scénarios d’incendie spécifiques.
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
RAPPORT TECHNIQUE
ISO/TR 9122=4:1993(F)
Essais de toxicité des effluents du feu -
Partie 4:
Modèle feu (fours et appareil
ages de combustion utilisés
dans les essais à petite éche
Les composes du carbone sont pyrolysés en frag-
1 Domaine d’application
ments d’hydrocarbures volatils qui peuvent être
oxydes pour former des espèces organiques oxydées
La présente partie de I’ISO/TR 9122 est limitee a la
variées, monoxyde de carbone ou dioxyde de car-
consideration des modeles feu (c’est-à-dire des dis-
bone, selon les conditions thermiques et d’oxydation.
positifs de combustion en laboratoire), utilisés dans
Le monoxyde et le dioxyde de carbone sont habi-
les etudes de toxicité des effluents du feu, avec des
tuellement prksents dans l’atmosphère d’un effluent
suggestions pour l’usage approprie des modeles feu
du feu, le rapport des deux étant souvent utilise
en essai standard. II sera fait reference à d’autres
comme un indicateur caractéristique du stade parti-
parties de I’ISO/TR 9122 pour discuter des methodes
culier d’un incendie. Dans des incendies de petite di-
analytiques, des procédures d’essai biologique, des
mension, en cours de développement, un rapport
essais de toxicite et de la prédiction des effets toxi-
CO&0 de 100 ou plus indiquerait une combustion
ques des effluents du feu.
librement ventilee (dont le combustible est contrôle).

La présente partie de I’ISO/TR 9122 définit les crité- Dans des incendies de grande dimension, pleinement

res d’un modèle feu acceptable, revoit les modèles
développés, dont la ventilation est généralement
feu existants par rapport à ces critères et propose que
contrôlee lorsqu’ils swiennent dans des bâtiments,
les modèles feu soient sélectionnés pour l’utilisation,
un rapport CO&0 de 10 indiquerait une ventilation
en prenant en compte ces criteres qui incluent une
relativement faible, alors qu’un rapport supérieur à 10
capacité à générer des conditions d’incendie caracte-
indiquerait une ventilation relativement forte.
ristique des étapes connues d’un incendie.
L’hydrogène est oxyde en eau, le chlore se dégage
La présente partie de I’ISO/TR 9122 ne comprend pas
communement sous forme de chlorure d’hydrogéne
l’analyse detaillee de la physique et de la chimie du
et l’azote apparaît sous forme de composes d’azote
feu .
organique, (spécialement nitriles) de cyanure d’hydro-
gène, d’oxydes d’azote, et d’azote moléculaire, tou-
jours en fonction des conditions thermiques et
2 Caractéristiques des étapes d’un
d’oxydation. Tous les feux, avec ou sans flamme (y
incendie
compris les feux couvant@, peuvent produire une
myriade de produits de combustion dus a la decom-
À des fins de discussion de modèles feu et de leur
position incomplète et a l’oxydation seulement par-
utilisation appropriée, les conditions de combustion
tielle des combustibles concernes, les incendies sans
présentées dans le tableau 1 sont généralement ac-
flamme produisant le plus fort rendement de ces
ceptées comme étant caractéristiques de certaines
produits. II est important de se souvenir que ceux-ci
étapes ou phases d’un incendieCIl.
sont formes par reactions chimiques, sujets aux prin-
cipes habituels de la cinétique et de la thermodyna-
Le processus chimique primaire aboutissant a la for-
mique. Ainsi, les énergies stoechiométrique et
mation de produits de combustion est le processus
thermique jouent des rôles significatifs dans la déter-
de rupture thermique des liaisons et de décompo-
mination des produits de combustion formes tout au
sition des materiaux polymères, qui, en présence
long de la gamme de classification des incendies.
d’oxygène, produit une variete d’espéces oxygénées.
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122=4:1993(F)
Tableau 1 - Classification générale des étapes d’un incendie
Teneur en
Irradiantes)
Température
Rapport CO,/CO 2)
Étapes ou phases d’un incendie oxygènel)
(4 OO ( Cl (kW/m*)
Décomposition sans flamme
a) feu couvant (auto-entretenu) 21 non applicable < 100 non applicable
b) sans flamme (par oxydation) 5 à 21 non applicable <500 <25
c) sans flamme (pyrolitique) <5 non applicable < 1 000 non applicable
Incendie en cours de développement lOàl5 100à200 400 à 600 20 à 40
(avec flammes)
Incendie pleinement dbveloppb
(avec flammes)
a) ventilation relativement faible là5 < 10 600 à 900 40 à 70
b) ventilation relativement forte 5àlO < 100 600à 1200 50à 150
1) Condition générale (moyenne) d’environnement dans le compartiment.
2) Valeur moyenne dans les flammèches aux abords de l’incendie.
3) Irradiante incidente sur l’échantillon (moyenne).
ventilation, (apport d’oxygène), les rapports CO,/CO,
3 Critères d’évaluation des modèles feu
la température et/ou le flux de chaleur et les durees
pendant lesquelles des effluents du feu séjournent
3.1 Applicabilité à des feux réels
dans la zone à haute température.
La meilleure approche de sélection d’un dispositif de
3.1 .l
Concentration en oxygène
combustion approprie pour les essais de toxicité des
effluents du feu consiste a selectionner soi-
La concentration en oxygène est la concentration re-
gneusement les donnees qui permettent d’établir une
siduelle dans I’effluent du feu primaire avant toute di-
relation entre les conditions de combustion en labo-
lution. Sa valeur décroît durant le développement de
ratoire et les types et stades d’incendies réels (voir
l’incendie du niveau ambiant normal d’approxi-
tableau 1).
mativement 21 % a 10 %-15 % dans un incendie de
petite dimension ou en cours de développement, et
Tous les modeles feu dont la description va suivre
jusqu’à 1 %-10 % dans un incendie pleinement déve-
permettent de simuler les conditions de décompo-
loppe, en fonction de la ventilation, du taux de brûlage
sition sans flamme. Cependant, il est admis que la
et de la géométrie de la pièce.
majorité des blessures et des morts par incendie sont
dues à des incendies avec flammes. Ces incendies
3.1.2 Rapport CO,/CO
comprennent les incendies de petite dimension (sou-
vent limites au premier produit ayant pris feu) où les
Le rapport C02/C0 est calcule a partir de la concen-
pertes humaines swiennent dans la pièce même, et
tration de ces gaz dans I’atmosphére des effluents du
les incendies de grande dimension, pleinement deve-
feu. Sa valeur étant indépendante de la dilution, le
loppés où les pertes swiennent loin du comparti-
point d’échantillonnage n’est pas critique pourvu qu’il
ment d’origine. Pour ces derniers, la menace toxique
se situe au delà du point où se produisent les réac-
se manifeste généralement après I’embra-
tions d’oxydation. Le rapport CO&0 subit des chan-
sementC1lC*l.
gements rapides durant le développement d’un

En terme de correlation avec la plupart des morts incendie. Initialement, dans de petits incendies bien

dues aux incendies, les criteres les plus importants ventiles, le rapport est généralement éleve (100 a

pour un modèle feu approprie sont bases sur les 200). Dans les incendies en plein développement, a

conditions d’un incendie en cours de développement
ventilation contrôlee, il atteint une valeur presque

bien ventile, d’un incendie faiblement ou fortement constante (1 a 10) fonction de la ventilation. Les don-

ventile, en plein développement (haute température).
nees expérimentales d’incendie réel pour les rapports
II est particulièrement important de considérer la
CO&0 sont présentées a la figure 1 VI.
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122=4:1993(F)
Rapport,r CO2/CO
Source:Bostonfiredepartment
Figure 1 - Rapport CO*/CO en situations d’incendie r6el
3.1.3 tére idéal qui peut être approche, mais pas forcement
Température et flux thermique
atteint. Quelques études ont utilise des incendies en
vraie grandeur afin d’evaluer la contribution de cer-
La température est la valeur moyenne dans un com-
tains materiaux de construction et du mobilier au ris-
partiment. Elle donne une mesure de l’exposition
que toxiqueC*lC4lC51. Cependant, il convient de rester
thermique aux materiaux présents ainsi qu’à leurs
très prudent avant de tirer les conclusions de ces
produits de décomposition thermique. Le flux de
études. Même au cours d’essais en vraie grandeur,
chaleur rayonnante est également utile comme me-
toutes sortes d’incendies peuvent survenir dans
sure d’exposition à l’énergie thermique. Dans des in-
n’importe quel système.
cendies de petite dimension ou au debut de leur
développement, la température dans l’environnement
Le developpement du risque toxique dépend de la
immédiat du feu se situe dans une gamme typique
croissance du feu, qui est essentiellement un phéno-
de température de 400 OC à 600 OC, le flux rayonnant
mene à grande échelle et les essais bien conduits, en
se situant de 20 kW/m* a 40 kW/m*. Dans les incen-
vraie grandeur, reproduisent vraiment au moins
dies pleinement développés, la température se situe
quelques-uns des types vraisemblables d’incendies
dans une gamme de 600 OC à 1 200 OC avec flux
accidentels. Cependant, il n’est en général pas possi-
rayonnant de 50 kW/m* a 150 kW/m*.
ble économiquement d’effectuer des essais de rou-
Tous ces facteurs ont une influence considérable sur
tine en vraie grandeur. En conséquence, il devient
la composition de I’atmosphére des effluents du feu.
usuel en pratique de recourir à des essais de toxicité
Du point de vue de la toxicité, le fait que des incen-
au banc, dont les prédictions peuvent être validées
dies de petite dimension ou en cours de dévelop-
par rapport aux essais en vraie grandeur.
pement produisent généralement de bas rendement
de monoxyde de carbone et de cyanure d’hydrogéne,
Le CO étant le produit toxique principal des incendies,
en même temps qu’un mélange complexe de
traditionnellement la validité des essais au banc
pyrolyse et de produits d’oxydation ayant échappé a
concerne pour une grande part les mesures de CO,
la zone de flammes, constitue une caractéristique
que l’on caractérise soit par les rendements CO soit
importante. Les incendies pleinement développés,
par les rapports C02/C0. Les études expérimentales
dus à des conditions de température élevée et d’oxy-
indiquent généralement que la production de CO est
gène vicie, produisent généralement des rendements
indépendante de la concentration ,d’oxygène jusqu’à
élevés d’espèces toxiques à faible masse moléculaire,
ce que le rapport oxygène/carburant tombe aux envi-
telles que le monoxyde de carbone et le cyanure
rons de 50 % de plus que celle qui est nécessaire
d’hydrogène.
pour la combustion complète ou stoechiométriqueCs3.
À partir de ce point, la production de CO augmente
fortement à mesure que I’oxygéne décroît. Dans les
incendies pleinement développés, apres embra-
3.2 Validité pour l’évaluation du risque
sement, on rencontre couramment des rendements
toxique
d’environ 0,2 kg de CO par kilogramme de matiere
brûlee. Le rapport semble être sensiblement similaire
La démonstration de la validite d’un modéle feu re-
pour une large varieté de combustibles.
produisant le risque toxique d’un feu réel est un cri-
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------

En plus des differences rencontrees dans I’échauf- corps (de l’animal d’expérimentation). II est géné-

fement des éprouvettes, le CO produit à partir d’es- ralement accepte, cependant, que les effets pour le

sais au banc peut différer de celui produit au cours corps, engendres par l’inhalation de toxiques, seront

d’essais en vraie grandeur, en raison des facteurs proportionnels au produit de leur concentration dans

suivants: l’air inspire par la duree de l’exposition. Le produit du
temps par la concentration équivaut à la dose d’ex-

Rapport air/combustible. Si le rapport n’est pas le position aux gaz des effluents du feu. II est essentiel

même sur les deux échelles, la production de CO que le modèle feu permette, grâce a une mesure, ou

sera différente. un calcul de la perte de masse de l’échantillon et du
volume du système, une quantification valable de la
Effets du temps de residence. Le temps disponi- dose d’exposition.
ble pour transformer le CO en CO2 par combustion
sera souvent beaucoup plus long dans les dispo-
3.6 Critères de procédure
sitifs en vraie grandeur que dans les dispositifs à
petite Rchelle.
II y a un certain nombre de criteres a considerer lors
du choix d’un modéle feu, en rapport avec la logique
(Congélation)) du CO. Effets tendant à empêcher
de la procédure, la compatibilité animale et la securité.
les reactions d’aboutir, «gelant» ainsi une certaine
Ces criteres sont regroupes dans «les critères de
proportion de CO. Cet effet augmente avec la di-
procédure)):
mension de l’echelle.
a) Répétabilité de la génération de l’atmosphère
L’effet le plus net du phénoméne ci-dessus est que
les essais au banc ont souvent tendance à produire
La répétabilité intralaboratoire devrait avoir ete dé-
des rendements plus bas de CO que les essais en
montree.
vraie grandeurC71.
Reproductibilité de la génération d’atmosphère
Les essais à echelle réduite, bien que permettant une
meilleure reproductibilité, n’autorisent qu’une simu-
La reproductibilité interlaboratoire devrait avoir éte
lation lointaine des conditions reelles d’incendie. En
demontree.
dépit de ces limitations, les essais à l’échelle réduite
sont attractifs du point de vue du prix. La meilleure
Adaptabilité aux prescriptions d’essais biologi-
évaluation du risque toxique consiste en une combi-
ques
naison d’essais à échelle reduite et en vraie grandeur,
associes à un programme de simulation approprie.
Le modéle feu devrait être adaptable aux procédés
d’exposition des animaux.
3.3 Composition et configuration de
Adaptabilité aux prescriptions analytiques
l’éprouvette
Le modèle feu devrait être adaptable aux pres-
Les modèles feu à petite echelle demandent qu’on
criptions analytiques.
utilise de petites éprouvettes échantillons. La taille,
l’orientation et la forme du support échantillon et le
Sécurité d’utilisation et fonctionnement
compartiment combustion dans le modèle feu doivent
être considérés lors de sa sélection. Le modele devra
Le dispositif devrait être sûr dans son fonction-
permettre l’essai des echantillons conformement à
nement.
leur utilisation finale. Les echantillons composites et
les materiaux multi-couches, par exemple, devront
être testes en altérant au minimum leur forme et leur Modèles feu
configuration d’utilisation finale.
Bien qu’il soit reconnu qu’un grand nombre de mo-
déles feu existent, quelques-uns seulement réunis-
3.4 Documentation et expérience
sent des critéres suffisants pour être détaillés dans la
présente partie de I’ISO/TR 9122. Par exemple, I’ap-
Les protocoles d’utilisation du modèle feu doivent
pareil de débit calorifique OSUC avec les analyses
être bien documentes. Les donnees d’essais interla-
chimiques satisfait à la plupart des criteres majeurs
boratoire et l’expérience acquise sur les modèles feu
sélectionnés, mais il n’est pas totalement adapté pour
à choix devront être prises en compte lors du choix
les essais d’animaux. En revanche, le modele feu
d’un modèle.
NES 713191 ne satisfait absolument pas aux critères
majeurs sélectionnés et son utilisation n’est pas re-
3.5 Quantification de la dose d’exposition
commandée par les autorités normatives du Royaume
Uni .
La dose réelle administrée dans les essais de toxicite

d’effluents du feu est tres difficile à etablir en terme Aucun des modéles ne satisfait a tous les critères;

de gramme de toxique par kilogramme du poids du toutefois, les types de modeles feu utilisés satisfai-

---------------------- Page: 10 ----------------------
ISO/TR 9122-4:1993(F)

sant, au moins partiellement, à la plupart des exi- concentration de fumée en changeant la masse des

gences sont décrits ci-après. matériaux placés dans le four. En conséquence, le
rapport carburantlair peut varier largement en fonction
de la masse de l’échantillon et de son taux de dé-
4.1 Modèles de fours «Box»
composition. On a rencontré un problème de petites
explosions avec certains matériaux qui se décompo-
4.1.1 Four h coupelle NBS .
sent à la chaleur ou brûlent très vite une fois allumés.
Cependant, ce phénomène, dû probablement à
L’essaiCi NBS) utilise un four à coupelle ou à creu-
l’émission rapide de gaz dont le volume dépasse celui
set (voir figure 2) souvent appelé «four Pottw, du nom
qui provient du four, n’a pas été considéré comme
du chercheur auteur du premier rapport d’utilisation
suffisamment sévere pour constituer un risque et en-
de ce four en toxicologie de combustion. On consi-
dommager l’appareillage.
dére que l’échauffement est largement conducteur, le
L’essai commence sur un mode d’oxydation sans
bas et la partie inférieure de la coupelle à quartz
flamme, et à un certain stade, habituellement, les
constituant la zone de chaleur. Des matériaux d’essais
flammes apparaissent. A ce moment, les rapports
jusqu’à 8 g sont introduits dans la coupelle dont le
CO,/CO tendent à être bas, (au-dessous de 20, nor-
volume est d’environ 1 litre. Les procédures d’essai
malement moins de 10) alors que la température est
des matériaux supposent une combustion à deux
encore basse (inférieure à 600 OC). Cette combinaison
températures:
l’une juste au-dessous de I’auto-
de conditions ne s’intègre pas bien par conséquent,
allumage (sans flamme), l’autre au-dessus (avec
dans la classification des incendies présentée au ta-
flammes). La circulation d’air dans la coupelle s’est
bleau 1. Elle représente au mieux la situation vraiment
révélée particuliérement préoccupante, bien que
spéciale d’une petite charge d’incendie dans un envi-
celle-ci communique avec un volume de 200 I d’air
ronnement à ventilation réduite, par exemple dans un
contenu dans la chambre d’exposition. Étant donné
placard ou une enceinte hermétique. Bien que la
les dimensions variables d’échantillons utilisés et le
concentration d’oxygène soit assez basse, il existe
rapport mal défini carburant-air, certains pensent que
certaines similitudes avec l’environnement de dé-
le système n’effectue pas la combustion d’une ma-
composition chimique d’un feu en cours de dévelop-
niere bien caractérisée ou objectent que les différents
pement. La méthode ne simule pas les conditions
matériaux ne sont pas testés dans les mêmes condi-
d’un incendie de grande dimension, pleinement dé-
tions, mais souvent à des températures extrêmement
veloppé, apres embrasement; cependant, la méthode
différentes.
pourrait être utilisée comme essai pour mesurer le
Cette méthode propose un bon modèle de décompo-
pouvoir toxique de produits résultant des conditions
sition par oxydation sans fla,mme.
...

Questions, Comments and Discussion

Ask us and Technical Secretary will try to provide an answer. You can facilitate discussion about the standard in here.