Accuracy (trueness and precision) of measurement methods and results -- Part 5: Alternative methods for the determination of the precision of a standard measurement method

Exactitude (justesse et fidélité) des résultats et méthodes de mesure -- Partie 5: Méthodes alternatives pour la détermination de la fidélité d'une méthode de mesure normalisée

Točnost (pravilnost in natančnost) merilnih metod in rezultatov – 5. del : Alternativne metode določanja natančnosti standardne merilne metode

General Information

Status
Published
Publication Date
31-May-2003
Technical Committee
Current Stage
6060 - National Implementation/Publication (Adopted Project)
Start Date
01-Jun-2003
Due Date
01-Jun-2003
Completion Date
01-Jun-2003

RELATIONS

Buy Standard

Standard
ISO 5725-5:1998 - Accuracy (trueness and precision) of measurement methods and results
English language
56 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview
Standard
SIST ISO 5725-5:2003
English language
56 pages
sale 10% off
Preview
sale 10% off
Preview

e-Library read for
1 day
Standard
ISO 5725-5:1998 - Exactitude (justesse et fidélité) des résultats et méthodes de mesure
French language
57 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview

Standards Content (sample)

INTERNATIONAL ISO
STANDARD 5725-5
First edition
1998-07-15
Accuracy (trueness and precision) of
measurement methods and results —
Part 5:
Alternative methods for the determination of
the precision of a standard measurement
method
Exactitude (justesse et fidélité) des résultats et méthodes de mesure —
Partie 5: Méthodes alternatives pour la détermination de la fidélité d'une
méthode de mesure normalisée
Reference number
ISO 5725-5:1998(E)
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO 5725-5:1998(E)
Page
Contents

1 Scope ........................................................................................................................................................... 1

2 Normative references .................................................................................................................................. 1

3 Definitions .................................................................................................................................................... 2

4 Split-level design .......................................................................................................................................... 2

4.1 Applications of the split-level design .................................................................................................... 2

4.2 Layout of the split-level design ............................................................................................................ 2

4.3 Organization of a split-level experiment .............................................................................................. 3

4.4 Statistical model .................................................................................................................................. 4

4.5 Statistical analysis of the data from a split-level experiment ............................................................... 5

4.6 Scrutiny of the data for consistency and outliers ................................................................................. 6

4.7 Reporting the results of a split-level experiment .................................................................................. 7

4.8 Example 1: A split-level experiment — Determination of protein ........................................................ 7

5 A design for a heterogeneous material ........................................................................................................ 13

5.1 Applications of the design for a heterogeneous material ..................................................................... 13

5.2 Layout of the design for a heterogeneous material ............................................................................. 14

5.3 Organization of an experiment with a heterogeneous material ........................................................... 15

5.4 Statistical model for an experiment with a heterogeneous material .................................................... 16

5.5 Statistical analysis of the data from an experiment with a heterogeneous material ............................ 17

5.6 Scrutiny of the data for consistency and outliers ................................................................................. 20

5.7 Reporting the results of an experiment on a heterogeneous material ................................................. 21

5.8 Example 2: An experiment on a heterogeneous material .................................................................... 21

5.9 General formulae for calculations with the design for a heterogeneous material ................................ 29

5.10 Example 3: An application of the general formulae ............................................................................. 30

6 Robust methods for data analysis ............................................................................................................... 33

6.1 Applications of robust methods of data analysis ................................................................................. 33

6.2 Robust analysis: Algorithm A ............................................................................................................... 35

6.3 Robust analysis: Algorithm S ............................................................................................................... 36

6.4 Formulae: Robust analysis for a particular level of a uniform-level design ......................................... 38

6.5 Example 4: Robust analysis for a particular level of a uniform-level design ....................................... 38

6.6 Formulae: Robust analysis for a particular level of a split-level design ............................................... 42

6.7 Example 5: Robust analysis for a particular level of a split-level design ............................................. 42

6.8 Formulae: Robust analysis for a particular level of an experiment on a heterogeneous material ....... 45

6.9 Example 6: Robust analysis for a particular level of an experiment on a heterogeneous material ..... 45

Annexes

A (normative) Symbols and abbreviations used in ISO 5725 .............................................................................. 50

B (informative) Derivation of the factors used in algorithms A and S .................................................................. 53

C (informative) Derivation of equations used for robust analysis ........................................................................ 55

D (informative) Bibliography ................................................................................................................................. 56

© ISO 1998

All rights reserved. Unless otherwise specified, no part of this publication may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic

or mechanical, including photocopying and microfilm, without permission in writing from the publisher.

International Organization for Standardization
Case postale 56 • CH-1211 Genève 20 • Switzerland
Internet iso@iso.ch
Printed in Switzerland
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO ISO 5725-5:1998(E)
Foreword

ISO (the International Organization for Standardization) is a world-wide federation of national standards bodies (ISO

member bodies). The work of preparing International Standards is normally carried out through ISO technical

committees. Each member body interested in a subject for which a technical committee has been established has

the right to be represented on that committee. International organisations, governmental and non-governmental, in

liaison with ISO, also take part in the work. ISO collaborates closely with the International Electrotechnical

Commission (IEC) on all matters of electrotechnical standardization.

Draft International Standards adopted by the technical committees are circulated to the member bodies for voting.

Publication as an International standard requires approval by at least 75 % of the member bodies casting a vote.

ISO 5725-5 was prepared by Technical Committee ISO/TC 69, Applications of statistical methods, Subcommittee

SC 6, Measurement methods and results.

ISO 5725 consists of the following parts, under the general title Accuracy (trueness and precision) of measurement

methods and results:
— Part 1: General principles and definitions

— Part 2: Basic method for the determination of repeatability and reproducibility of a standard measurement

method

— Part 3: Intermediate measures of the precision of a standard measurement method

— Part 4: Basic methods for the determination of the trueness of a standard measurement method

— Part 5: Alternative methods for the determination of the precision of a standard measurement method

— Part 6: Use in practice of accuracy values

Parts 1 to 6 of ISO 5725 together cancel and replace ISO 5725:1986, which has been extended to cover trueness

(in addition to precision) and intermediate precision conditions (in addition to repeatability conditions and

reproducibility conditions).

Annex A forms an integral part of this part of ISO 5725. Annexes B, C and D are for information only.

iii
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO 5725-5:1998(E) ISO
Introduction

0.1 This part of ISO 5725 uses two terms trueness and precision to describe the accuracy of a measurement

method. Trueness refers to the closeness of agreement between the average value of a large number of test results

and the true or accepted reference value. Precision refers to the closeness of agreement between test results.

0.2 General consideration of these quantities is given in ISO 5725-1 and so is not repeated here. This part of

ISO 5725 should be read in conjunction with ISO 5725-1 because the underlying definitions and general principles

are given there.

0.3 ISO 5725-2 is concerned with estimating, by means of interlaboratory experiments, standard measures of

precision, namely the repeatability standard deviation and the reproducibility standard deviation. It gives a basic

method for doing this using the uniform-level design. This part of ISO 5725 describes alternative methods to this

basic method.

a) With the basic method there is a risk that an operator may allow the result of a measurement on one sample to

influence the result of a subsequent measurement on another sample of the same material, causing the

estimates of the repeatability and reproducibility standard deviations to be biased. When this risk is considered

to be serious, the split-level design described in this part of ISO 5725 may be preferred as it reduces this risk.

b) The basic method requires the preparation of a number of identical samples of the material for use in the

experiment. With heterogeneous materials this may not be possible, so that the use of the basic method then

gives estimates of the reproducibility standard deviation that are inflated by the variation between the samples.

The design for a heterogeneous material given in this part of ISO 5725 yields information about the variability

between samples which is not obtainable from the basic method; it may be used to calculate an estimate of

reproducibility from which the between-sample variation has been removed.

c) The basic method requires tests for outliers to be used to identify data that should be excluded from the

calculation of the repeatability and reproducibility standard deviations. Excluding outliers can sometimes have a

large effect on the estimates of repeatability and reproducibility standard deviations, but in practice, when

applying the outlier tests, the data analyst may have to use judgement to decide which data to exclude. This

part of ISO 5725 describes robust methods of data analysis that may be used to calculate repeatability and

reproducibility standard deviations from data containing outliers without using tests for outliers to exclude data,

so that the results are no longer affected by the data analyst’s judgement.
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
INTERNATIONAL STANDARD ISO ISO 5725-5:1998(E)
Accuracy (trueness and precision) of measurement methods and
results —
Part 5:
Alternative methods for the determination of the precision of a standard
measurement method
1 Scope
This part of ISO 5725

— provides detailed descriptions of alternatives to the basic method for determining the repeatability and

reproducibility standard deviations of a standard measurement method, namely the split-level design and a

design for heterogeneous materials;

— describes the use of robust methods for analysing the results of precision experiments without using outlier

tests to exclude data from the calculations, and in particular, the detailed use of one such method.

This part of ISO 5725 complements ISO 5725-2 by providing alternative designs that may be of more value in some

situations than the basic design given in ISO 5725-2, and by providing a robust method of analysis that gives

estimates of the repeatability and reproducibility standard deviations that are less dependent on the data analyst's

judgement than those given by the methods described in ISO 5725-2.
2 Normative references

The following standards contain provisions which, through reference in this text, constitute provisions of this part of

ISO 5725. At the time of publication, the editions indicated were valid. All standards are subject to revision, and

parties to agreements based on this part of ISO 5725 are encouraged to investigate the possibility of applying the

most recent editions of the standards indicated below. Members of IEC and ISO maintain registers of currently valid

International Standards.
ISO 3534-1:1993, .

Statistics — Vocabulary and symbols — Part 1: Probability and general statistical terms

ISO 3534-3:1985, Statistics — Vocabulary and symbols — Part 3: Design of experiments.

ISO 5725-1:1994, Accuracy (trueness and precision) of measurement methods and results — Part 1: General

principles and definitions.

ISO 5725-2:1994, Accuracy (trueness and precision) of measurement methods and results — Part 2: Basic method

for the determination of repeatability and reproducibility of a standard measurement method.

---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
ISO 5725-5:1998(E) ISO
3 Definitions

For the purposes of this part of ISO 5725, the definitions given in ISO 3534-1 and in ISO 5725-1 apply.

The symbols used in ISO 5725 are given in annex A.
4 Split-level design
4.1 Applications of the split-level design

4.1.1 The uniform level design described in ISO 5725-2 requires two or more identical samples of a material to be

tested in each participating laboratory and at each level of the experiment. With this design there is a risk that an

operator may allow the result of a measurement on one sample to influence the result of a subsequent

measurement on another sample of the same material. If this happens, the results of the precision experiment will

be distorted: estimates of the repeatability standard deviation s will be decreased and estimates of the between-

laboratory standard deviation s will be increased. In the split-level design, each participating laboratory is provided

with a sample of each of two similar materials, at each level of the experiment, and the operators are told that the

samples are not identical, but they are not told by how much the materials differ. The split-level design thus provides

a method of determining the repeatability and reproducibility standard deviations of a standard measurement

method in a way that reduces the risk that a test result obtained on one sample will influence a test result on

another sample in the experiment.

4.1.2 The data obtained at a level of a split-level experiment may be used to draw a graph in which the data for

one material are plotted against the data for the other, similar, material. An example is given in figure 1. Such

graphs can help identify those laboratories that have the largest biases relative to the other laboratories. This is

useful when it is possible to investigate the causes of the largest laboratory biases with the aim of taking corrective

action.

4.1.3 It is common for the repeatability and reproducibility standard deviations of a measurement method to

depend on the level of the material. For example, when the test result is the proportion of an element obtained by

chemical analysis, the repeatability and reproducibility standard deviations usually increase as the proportion of the

element increases. It is necessary, for a split-level experiment, that the two similar materials used at a level of the

experiment are so similar that they can be expected to give the same repeatability and reproducibility standard

deviations. For the purposes of the split-level design, it is acceptable if the two materials used for a level of the

experiment give almost the same level of measurement results, and nothing is to be gained by arranging that they

differ substantially.

In many chemical analysis methods, the matrix containing the constituent of interest can influence the precision, so

for a split-level experiment two materials with similar matrices are required at each level of the experiment. A

sufficiently similar material can sometimes be prepared by spiking a material with a small addition of the constituent

of interest. When the material is a natural or manufactured product, it can be difficult to find two products that are

sufficiently similar for the purposes of a split-level experiment: a possible solution may be to use two batches of the

same product. It should be remembered that the object of choosing the materials for the split-level design is to

provide the operators with samples that they do not expect to be identical.
4.2 Layout of the split-level design
4.2.1 The layout of the split-level design is shown in table 1.
The p participating laboratories each test two samples at q levels.

The two samples within a level are denoted a and b, where a represents a sample of one material, and b represents

a sample of the other, similar, material.
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
ISO ISO 5725-5:1998(E)
4.2.2 The data from a split-level experiment are represented by:
ijk
where
subscript i represents the laboratory (i = 1, 2, ..., p);
subscript j represents the level (j = 1, 2, ..., q);
subscript k represents the sample (k = a or b).
4.3 Organization of a split-level experiment

4.3.1 Follow the guidance given in clause 6 of ISO 5725-1:1994 when planning a split-level experiment.

Subclause 6.3 of ISO 5725-1:1994 contains a number of formulae (involving a quantity denoted generally by A) that

are used to help decide how many laboratories to include in the experiment. The corresponding formulae for the

split-level experiment are set out below.

NOTE — These formulae have been derived by the method described in NOTE 24 of ISO 5725-1:1994.

To assess the uncertainties of the estimates of the repeatability and reproducibility standard deviations, calculate

the following quantities.
For repeatability
Ap=−19, 6 1 2 1 (1)
For reproducibility
 
2 4
Ap=+19, 6 1 2gg− 1+ 1 8 ()− 1 (2)
 
R ()
[] []
 
with g = s /s .
R r

If the number n of replicates is taken as two in equations (9) and (10) of ISO 5725-1:1994, then it can be seen that

equations (9) and (10) of ISO 5725-1:1994 are the same as equations (1) and (2) above, except that sometimes

p - 1 appears here in place of p in ISO 5725-1:1994. This is a small difference, so table 1 and figures B.1 and B.2 of

ISO 5725-1:1994 may be used to assess the uncertainty of the estimates of the repeatability and reproducibility

standard deviations in a split-level experiment.

To assess the uncertainty of the estimate of the bias of the measurement method in a split-level experiment,

calculate the quantity A as defined by equation (13) of ISO 5725-1:1994 with n = 2 (or use table 2 of

ISO 5725-1:1994), and use this quantity as described in ISO 5725-1.

To assess the uncertainty of the estimate of a laboratory bias in a split-level experiment, calculate the quantity A as

defined by equation (16) of ISO 5725-1:1994 with n = 2. Because the number of replicates in a split-level experiment

is, in effect, this number of two, it is not possible to reduce the uncertainty of the estimate of laboratory bias by

increasing the number of replicates. (If it is necessary to reduce this uncertainty, the uniform-level design should be

used instead.)

4.3.2 Follow the guidance given in clauses 5 and 6 of ISO 5725-2:1994 with regard to the details of the

organization of a split-level experiment. The number of replicates, n in ISO 5725-2, may be taken to be the number

of split-levels in a split-level design, i.e. two.

The a samples should be allocated to the participants at random, and the b samples should also be allocated to the

participants at random and in a separate randomization operation.
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
ISO 5725-5:1998(E) ISO

It is necessary in a split-level experiment for the statistical expert to be able to tell, when the data are reported,

which result was obtained on material a and which on material b, at each level of the experiment. Label the samples

so that this is possible, and be careful not to disclose this information to the participants.

Table 1 — Recommended form for the collation of data for the split-level design
Level
Laboratory 12 jq
abab ab ab
4.4 Statistical model

4.4.1 The basic model used in this part of ISO 5725 is given as equation (1) in clause 5 of ISO 5725-1:1994. It is

stated there that for estimating the accuracy (trueness and precision) of a measurement method, it is useful to

assume that every measurement result is the sum of three components:
ym=+B+e (3)
ijk j ij ijk
where, for the particular material tested,

m represents the general average (expectation) at a particular level j = 1, ..., q;

B represents the laboratory component of bias under repeatability conditions in a particular laboratory

i = 1, ..., p at a particular level j = 1, ..., q;

e represents the random error of test result k = 1, ..., n , obtained in laboratory i at level j, under repeatability

ijk
conditions.
4.4.2 For a split-level experiment, this model becomes:
y = m + B + e (4)
ijk jk ij ijk

This differs from equation (3) in 4.4.1 in only one feature: the subscript k in m implies that according to equation (4) the

general average may now depend on the material a or b (k = 1 or 2) within the level j.

The lack of a subscript k in B implies that it is assumed that the bias associated with a laboratory i does not depend

on the material a or b within a level. This is why it is important that the two materials should be similar.

4.4.3 Define the cell averages as:
y = (y + y ) / 2 (5)
ij ija ijb
and the cell differences as:
D = y - y (6)
ij ija ijb
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO ISO 5725-5:1998(E)

4.4.4 The general average for a level j of a split-level experiment may be defined as:

m = (m + m ) / 2 (7)
j ja jb
4.5 Statistical analysis of the data from a split-level experiment

4.5.1 Assemble the data into a table as shown in table 1. Each combination of a laboratory and a level gives a

“cell” in this table, containing two items of data, y and y .
ija ijb

Calculate the cell differences D and enter them into a table as shown in table 2. The method of analysis requires

each difference to be calculated in the same sense
a - b
and the sign of the difference to be retained.
Calculate the cell averages y and enter them into a table as shown in table 3.

4.5.2 If a cell in table 1 does not contain two test results (for example, because samples have been spoilt, or data

have been excluded following the application of the outlier tests described later) then the corresponding cells in

tables 2 and 3 both remain empty.

4.5.3 For each level j of the experiment, calculate the average D and standard deviation s of the differences in

j Dj
column j of table 2:
DD= p (8)
jij
s = DD−−p1 (9)
Dj ij j
Here, S represents summation over the laboratories i = 1, 2, ..., p.

If there are empty cells in table 2, p is now the number of cells in column j of table 2 containing data and the

summation is performed over non-empty cells.

4.5.4 For each level j of the experiment, calculate the average y and standard deviation s of the averages in

j yj
column j of table 3, using:
yy= p (10)
jij
sy=−y p−1 (11)
yj∑ ij j
Here, S represents summation over the laboratories i = 1, 2, ..., p.

If there are empty cells in table 3, p is now the number of cells in column j of table 3 containing data and the

summation is performed over non-empty cells.

4.5.5 Use tables 2 and 3 and the statistics calculated in 4.5.3 and 4.5.4 to examine the data for consistency and

outliers, as described in 4.6. If data are rejected, recalculate the statistics.
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
ISO 5725-5:1998(E) ISO

4.5.6 Calculate the repeatability standard deviation s and the reproducibility standard deviation s from:

rj Rj
ss= 2 (12)
rj Dj
22 2
ss=+s 2 (13)
Rj yj rj

4.5.7 Investigate whether s and s depend on the average y , and, if so, determine the functional relationships,

rj Rj j
using the methods described in subclause 7.5 of ISO 5725-2:1994.

Table 2 — Recommended form for tabulation of cell differences for the split-level design

Level
Laboratory 12 jq

Table 3 — Recommended form for tabulation of cell averages for the split-level design

Level
Laboratory 12 jq
4.6 Scrutiny of the data for consistency and outliers

4.6.1 Examine the data for consistency using the h statistics, described in subclause 7.3.1 of ISO 5725-2:1994.

To check the consistency of the cell differences, calculate the h statistics as:
hD=−D s (14)
ij()ij j Dj
---------------------- Page: 10 ----------------------
ISO ISO 5725-5:1998(E)
To check the consistency of the cell averages, calculate the h statistics as:
hy=−y s (15)
ij()ij j yj

To show up inconsistent laboratories, plot both sets of these statistics in the order of the levels, but grouped by

laboratory, as shown in figures 2 and 3. The interpretation of these graphs is discussed fully in subclause 7.3.1 of

ISO 5725-2:1994. If a laboratory is achieving generally worse repeatability than the others, then it will show up as

having an unusually large number of large h statistics in the graph derived from the cell differences. If a laboratory is

achieving results that are generally biased, then it will show up as having h statistics mostly in one direction on the

graph derived from the cell averages. In either case, the laboratory should be asked to investigate and report their

findings back to the organizer of the experiment.

4.6.2 Examine the data for stragglers and outliers using Grubbs’ tests, described in subclause 7.3.4 of

ISO 5725-2:1994.

To test for stragglers and outliers in the cell differences, apply Grubbs’ tests to the values in each column of table 2

in turn.

To test for stragglers and outliers in the cell averages, apply Grubbs’ tests to the values in each column of table 3 in

turn.

The interpretation of these tests is discussed fully in subclause 7.3.2 of ISO 5725-2:1994. They are used to identify

results that are so inconsistent with the remainder of the data reported in the experiment that their inclusion in the

calculation of the repeatability and reproducibility standard deviations would affect the values of these statistics

substantially. Usually, data shown to be outliers are excluded from the calculations, and data shown to be stragglers

are included, unless there is a good reason for doing otherwise. If the tests show that a value in one of tables 2 or 3

is to be excluded from the calculation of the repeatability and reproducibility standard deviations, then the

corresponding value in the other of these tables should also be excluded from the calculation.

4.7 Reporting the results of a split-level experiment
4.7.1 Advice is given in subclause 7.7 of ISO 5725-2:1994 on:
— reporting the results of the statistical analysis to the panel;
— decisions to be made by the panel; and
— the preparation of a full report.

4.7.2 Recommendations on the form of a published statement of the repeatability and reproducibility standard

deviations of a standard measurement method are given in subclause 7.1 of ISO 5725-1:1994.

4.8 Example 1: A split-level experiment — Determination of protein
[5]

4.8.1 Table 4 contains the data from an experiment which involved the determination by combustion of the

content of protein in feeds. There were nine participating laboratories, and the experiment contained 14 levels.

Within each level, two feeds were used having similar mass fraction of protein in feed.

4.8.2 Tables 5 and 6 show the cell averages and differences, calculated as described in clause 4.5.1, for just

Level 14 ( j = 14) of the experiment.
Using equations (8) and (9) in 4.5.3, the differences in table 5 give:
D = 8,34 %
s = 0,436 1 %
D14
---------------------- Page: 11 ----------------------
ISO 5725-5:1998(E) ISO
and applying equations (10) and (11) in 4.5.4 to the averages in table 6 gives:
y = 85,46 %
s = 0,453 4 %
Y14

so the repeatability and reproducibility standard deviations are, using equations (12) and (13) in 4.5.6:

s = 0,31 %
r14
s = 0,50 %
R14
Table 7 gives the results of the calculations for the other levels.

4.8.3 Figure 1 shows the results for samples a from table 4 plotted against the corresponding results for samples

b, for Level 14, in a “Youden plot”. Laboratory 5 gives a point in the bottom left-hand corner of the graph, and

Laboratory 1 gives a point in the top right-hand corner: this indicates that the data from Laboratory 5 have a

consistent negative bias over samples a and b, and that the data from Laboratory 1 have a consistent positive bias

over the two samples. It is common to find this sort of pattern when plotting the data from a split-level design as in

figure 1. The figure also shows that the results for Laboratory 4 are unusual, as the point for this laboratory is some

distance from the line of equality for the two samples. The other laboratories form a group in the middle of the plot.

This figure thus provides a case for investigating the causes of the biases at the three laboratories.

NOTE — For further information on the interpretation of “Youden plots”, see references [7] and [8].

4.8.4 The values of the h statistics, calculated as described in 4.6.1, are shown in tables 5 and 6, for only Level 14.

The values for all levels are plotted in figures 2 and 3.

In figure 3, the h statistics for cell averages show that Laboratory 5 gave negative h statistics at all levels, indicating

a consistent negative bias in their data. In the same figure, Laboratories 8 and 9 gave h statistics that are nearly all

positive,
...

SLOVENSKI STANDARD
SIST ISO 5725-5:2003
01-junij-2003
7RþQRVW SUDYLOQRVWLQQDWDQþQRVW PHULOQLKPHWRGLQUH]XOWDWRY±GHO
$OWHUQDWLYQHPHWRGHGRORþDQMDQDWDQþQRVWLVWDQGDUGQHPHULOQHPHWRGH
Accuracy (trueness and precision) of measurement methods and results -- Part 5:

Alternative methods for the determination of the precision of a standard measurement

method

Exactitude (justesse et fidélité) des résultats et méthodes de mesure -- Partie 5:

Méthodes alternatives pour la détermination de la fidélité d'une méthode de mesure

normalisée
Ta slovenski standard je istoveten z: ISO 5725-5:1998
ICS:
03.120.30 8SRUDEDVWDWLVWLþQLKPHWRG Application of statistical
methods
17.020 Meroslovje in merjenje na Metrology and measurement
splošno in general
SIST ISO 5725-5:2003 en

2003-01.Slovenski inštitut za standardizacijo. Razmnoževanje celote ali delov tega standarda ni dovoljeno.

---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
SIST ISO 5725-5:2003
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
SIST ISO 5725-5:2003
INTERNATIONAL ISO
STANDARD 5725-5
First edition
1998-07-15
Accuracy (trueness and precision) of
measurement methods and results —
Part 5:
Alternative methods for the determination of
the precision of a standard measurement
method
Exactitude (justesse et fidélité) des résultats et méthodes de mesure —
Partie 5: Méthodes alternatives pour la détermination de la fidélité d'une
méthode de mesure normalisée
Reference number
ISO 5725-5:1998(E)
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
SIST ISO 5725-5:2003
ISO 5725-5:1998(E)
Page
Contents

1 Scope ........................................................................................................................................................... 1

2 Normative references .................................................................................................................................. 1

3 Definitions .................................................................................................................................................... 2

4 Split-level design .......................................................................................................................................... 2

4.1 Applications of the split-level design .................................................................................................... 2

4.2 Layout of the split-level design ............................................................................................................ 2

4.3 Organization of a split-level experiment .............................................................................................. 3

4.4 Statistical model .................................................................................................................................. 4

4.5 Statistical analysis of the data from a split-level experiment ............................................................... 5

4.6 Scrutiny of the data for consistency and outliers ................................................................................. 6

4.7 Reporting the results of a split-level experiment .................................................................................. 7

4.8 Example 1: A split-level experiment — Determination of protein ........................................................ 7

5 A design for a heterogeneous material ........................................................................................................ 13

5.1 Applications of the design for a heterogeneous material ..................................................................... 13

5.2 Layout of the design for a heterogeneous material ............................................................................. 14

5.3 Organization of an experiment with a heterogeneous material ........................................................... 15

5.4 Statistical model for an experiment with a heterogeneous material .................................................... 16

5.5 Statistical analysis of the data from an experiment with a heterogeneous material ............................ 17

5.6 Scrutiny of the data for consistency and outliers ................................................................................. 20

5.7 Reporting the results of an experiment on a heterogeneous material ................................................. 21

5.8 Example 2: An experiment on a heterogeneous material .................................................................... 21

5.9 General formulae for calculations with the design for a heterogeneous material ................................ 29

5.10 Example 3: An application of the general formulae ............................................................................. 30

6 Robust methods for data analysis ............................................................................................................... 33

6.1 Applications of robust methods of data analysis ................................................................................. 33

6.2 Robust analysis: Algorithm A ............................................................................................................... 35

6.3 Robust analysis: Algorithm S ............................................................................................................... 36

6.4 Formulae: Robust analysis for a particular level of a uniform-level design ......................................... 38

6.5 Example 4: Robust analysis for a particular level of a uniform-level design ....................................... 38

6.6 Formulae: Robust analysis for a particular level of a split-level design ............................................... 42

6.7 Example 5: Robust analysis for a particular level of a split-level design ............................................. 42

6.8 Formulae: Robust analysis for a particular level of an experiment on a heterogeneous material ....... 45

6.9 Example 6: Robust analysis for a particular level of an experiment on a heterogeneous material ..... 45

Annexes

A (normative) Symbols and abbreviations used in ISO 5725 .............................................................................. 50

B (informative) Derivation of the factors used in algorithms A and S .................................................................. 53

C (informative) Derivation of equations used for robust analysis ........................................................................ 55

D (informative) Bibliography ................................................................................................................................. 56

© ISO 1998

All rights reserved. Unless otherwise specified, no part of this publication may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic

or mechanical, including photocopying and microfilm, without permission in writing from the publisher.

International Organization for Standardization
Case postale 56 • CH-1211 Genève 20 • Switzerland
Internet iso@iso.ch
Printed in Switzerland
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
SIST ISO 5725-5:2003
ISO ISO 5725-5:1998(E)
Foreword

ISO (the International Organization for Standardization) is a world-wide federation of national standards bodies (ISO

member bodies). The work of preparing International Standards is normally carried out through ISO technical

committees. Each member body interested in a subject for which a technical committee has been established has

the right to be represented on that committee. International organisations, governmental and non-governmental, in

liaison with ISO, also take part in the work. ISO collaborates closely with the International Electrotechnical

Commission (IEC) on all matters of electrotechnical standardization.

Draft International Standards adopted by the technical committees are circulated to the member bodies for voting.

Publication as an International standard requires approval by at least 75 % of the member bodies casting a vote.

ISO 5725-5 was prepared by Technical Committee ISO/TC 69, Applications of statistical methods, Subcommittee

SC 6, Measurement methods and results.

ISO 5725 consists of the following parts, under the general title Accuracy (trueness and precision) of measurement

methods and results:
— Part 1: General principles and definitions

— Part 2: Basic method for the determination of repeatability and reproducibility of a standard measurement

method

— Part 3: Intermediate measures of the precision of a standard measurement method

— Part 4: Basic methods for the determination of the trueness of a standard measurement method

— Part 5: Alternative methods for the determination of the precision of a standard measurement method

— Part 6: Use in practice of accuracy values

Parts 1 to 6 of ISO 5725 together cancel and replace ISO 5725:1986, which has been extended to cover trueness

(in addition to precision) and intermediate precision conditions (in addition to repeatability conditions and

reproducibility conditions).

Annex A forms an integral part of this part of ISO 5725. Annexes B, C and D are for information only.

iii
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
SIST ISO 5725-5:2003
ISO 5725-5:1998(E) ISO
Introduction

0.1 This part of ISO 5725 uses two terms trueness and precision to describe the accuracy of a measurement

method. Trueness refers to the closeness of agreement between the average value of a large number of test results

and the true or accepted reference value. Precision refers to the closeness of agreement between test results.

0.2 General consideration of these quantities is given in ISO 5725-1 and so is not repeated here. This part of

ISO 5725 should be read in conjunction with ISO 5725-1 because the underlying definitions and general principles

are given there.

0.3 ISO 5725-2 is concerned with estimating, by means of interlaboratory experiments, standard measures of

precision, namely the repeatability standard deviation and the reproducibility standard deviation. It gives a basic

method for doing this using the uniform-level design. This part of ISO 5725 describes alternative methods to this

basic method.

a) With the basic method there is a risk that an operator may allow the result of a measurement on one sample to

influence the result of a subsequent measurement on another sample of the same material, causing the

estimates of the repeatability and reproducibility standard deviations to be biased. When this risk is considered

to be serious, the split-level design described in this part of ISO 5725 may be preferred as it reduces this risk.

b) The basic method requires the preparation of a number of identical samples of the material for use in the

experiment. With heterogeneous materials this may not be possible, so that the use of the basic method then

gives estimates of the reproducibility standard deviation that are inflated by the variation between the samples.

The design for a heterogeneous material given in this part of ISO 5725 yields information about the variability

between samples which is not obtainable from the basic method; it may be used to calculate an estimate of

reproducibility from which the between-sample variation has been removed.

c) The basic method requires tests for outliers to be used to identify data that should be excluded from the

calculation of the repeatability and reproducibility standard deviations. Excluding outliers can sometimes have a

large effect on the estimates of repeatability and reproducibility standard deviations, but in practice, when

applying the outlier tests, the data analyst may have to use judgement to decide which data to exclude. This

part of ISO 5725 describes robust methods of data analysis that may be used to calculate repeatability and

reproducibility standard deviations from data containing outliers without using tests for outliers to exclude data,

so that the results are no longer affected by the data analyst’s judgement.
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
SIST ISO 5725-5:2003
INTERNATIONAL STANDARD ISO ISO 5725-5:1998(E)
Accuracy (trueness and precision) of measurement methods and
results —
Part 5:
Alternative methods for the determination of the precision of a standard
measurement method
1 Scope
This part of ISO 5725

— provides detailed descriptions of alternatives to the basic method for determining the repeatability and

reproducibility standard deviations of a standard measurement method, namely the split-level design and a

design for heterogeneous materials;

— describes the use of robust methods for analysing the results of precision experiments without using outlier

tests to exclude data from the calculations, and in particular, the detailed use of one such method.

This part of ISO 5725 complements ISO 5725-2 by providing alternative designs that may be of more value in some

situations than the basic design given in ISO 5725-2, and by providing a robust method of analysis that gives

estimates of the repeatability and reproducibility standard deviations that are less dependent on the data analyst's

judgement than those given by the methods described in ISO 5725-2.
2 Normative references

The following standards contain provisions which, through reference in this text, constitute provisions of this part of

ISO 5725. At the time of publication, the editions indicated were valid. All standards are subject to revision, and

parties to agreements based on this part of ISO 5725 are encouraged to investigate the possibility of applying the

most recent editions of the standards indicated below. Members of IEC and ISO maintain registers of currently valid

International Standards.
ISO 3534-1:1993, .

Statistics — Vocabulary and symbols — Part 1: Probability and general statistical terms

ISO 3534-3:1985, Statistics — Vocabulary and symbols — Part 3: Design of experiments.

ISO 5725-1:1994, Accuracy (trueness and precision) of measurement methods and results — Part 1: General

principles and definitions.

ISO 5725-2:1994, Accuracy (trueness and precision) of measurement methods and results — Part 2: Basic method

for the determination of repeatability and reproducibility of a standard measurement method.

---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
SIST ISO 5725-5:2003
ISO 5725-5:1998(E) ISO
3 Definitions

For the purposes of this part of ISO 5725, the definitions given in ISO 3534-1 and in ISO 5725-1 apply.

The symbols used in ISO 5725 are given in annex A.
4 Split-level design
4.1 Applications of the split-level design

4.1.1 The uniform level design described in ISO 5725-2 requires two or more identical samples of a material to be

tested in each participating laboratory and at each level of the experiment. With this design there is a risk that an

operator may allow the result of a measurement on one sample to influence the result of a subsequent

measurement on another sample of the same material. If this happens, the results of the precision experiment will

be distorted: estimates of the repeatability standard deviation s will be decreased and estimates of the between-

laboratory standard deviation s will be increased. In the split-level design, each participating laboratory is provided

with a sample of each of two similar materials, at each level of the experiment, and the operators are told that the

samples are not identical, but they are not told by how much the materials differ. The split-level design thus provides

a method of determining the repeatability and reproducibility standard deviations of a standard measurement

method in a way that reduces the risk that a test result obtained on one sample will influence a test result on

another sample in the experiment.

4.1.2 The data obtained at a level of a split-level experiment may be used to draw a graph in which the data for

one material are plotted against the data for the other, similar, material. An example is given in figure 1. Such

graphs can help identify those laboratories that have the largest biases relative to the other laboratories. This is

useful when it is possible to investigate the causes of the largest laboratory biases with the aim of taking corrective

action.

4.1.3 It is common for the repeatability and reproducibility standard deviations of a measurement method to

depend on the level of the material. For example, when the test result is the proportion of an element obtained by

chemical analysis, the repeatability and reproducibility standard deviations usually increase as the proportion of the

element increases. It is necessary, for a split-level experiment, that the two similar materials used at a level of the

experiment are so similar that they can be expected to give the same repeatability and reproducibility standard

deviations. For the purposes of the split-level design, it is acceptable if the two materials used for a level of the

experiment give almost the same level of measurement results, and nothing is to be gained by arranging that they

differ substantially.

In many chemical analysis methods, the matrix containing the constituent of interest can influence the precision, so

for a split-level experiment two materials with similar matrices are required at each level of the experiment. A

sufficiently similar material can sometimes be prepared by spiking a material with a small addition of the constituent

of interest. When the material is a natural or manufactured product, it can be difficult to find two products that are

sufficiently similar for the purposes of a split-level experiment: a possible solution may be to use two batches of the

same product. It should be remembered that the object of choosing the materials for the split-level design is to

provide the operators with samples that they do not expect to be identical.
4.2 Layout of the split-level design
4.2.1 The layout of the split-level design is shown in table 1.
The p participating laboratories each test two samples at q levels.

The two samples within a level are denoted a and b, where a represents a sample of one material, and b represents

a sample of the other, similar, material.
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
SIST ISO 5725-5:2003
ISO ISO 5725-5:1998(E)
4.2.2 The data from a split-level experiment are represented by:
ijk
where
subscript i represents the laboratory (i = 1, 2, ..., p);
subscript j represents the level (j = 1, 2, ..., q);
subscript k represents the sample (k = a or b).
4.3 Organization of a split-level experiment

4.3.1 Follow the guidance given in clause 6 of ISO 5725-1:1994 when planning a split-level experiment.

Subclause 6.3 of ISO 5725-1:1994 contains a number of formulae (involving a quantity denoted generally by A) that

are used to help decide how many laboratories to include in the experiment. The corresponding formulae for the

split-level experiment are set out below.

NOTE — These formulae have been derived by the method described in NOTE 24 of ISO 5725-1:1994.

To assess the uncertainties of the estimates of the repeatability and reproducibility standard deviations, calculate

the following quantities.
For repeatability
Ap=−19, 6 1 2 1 (1)
For reproducibility
 
2 4
Ap=+19, 6 1 2gg− 1+ 1 8 ()− 1 (2)
 
R ()
[] []
 
with g = s /s .
R r

If the number n of replicates is taken as two in equations (9) and (10) of ISO 5725-1:1994, then it can be seen that

equations (9) and (10) of ISO 5725-1:1994 are the same as equations (1) and (2) above, except that sometimes

p - 1 appears here in place of p in ISO 5725-1:1994. This is a small difference, so table 1 and figures B.1 and B.2 of

ISO 5725-1:1994 may be used to assess the uncertainty of the estimates of the repeatability and reproducibility

standard deviations in a split-level experiment.

To assess the uncertainty of the estimate of the bias of the measurement method in a split-level experiment,

calculate the quantity A as defined by equation (13) of ISO 5725-1:1994 with n = 2 (or use table 2 of

ISO 5725-1:1994), and use this quantity as described in ISO 5725-1.

To assess the uncertainty of the estimate of a laboratory bias in a split-level experiment, calculate the quantity A as

defined by equation (16) of ISO 5725-1:1994 with n = 2. Because the number of replicates in a split-level experiment

is, in effect, this number of two, it is not possible to reduce the uncertainty of the estimate of laboratory bias by

increasing the number of replicates. (If it is necessary to reduce this uncertainty, the uniform-level design should be

used instead.)

4.3.2 Follow the guidance given in clauses 5 and 6 of ISO 5725-2:1994 with regard to the details of the

organization of a split-level experiment. The number of replicates, n in ISO 5725-2, may be taken to be the number

of split-levels in a split-level design, i.e. two.

The a samples should be allocated to the participants at random, and the b samples should also be allocated to the

participants at random and in a separate randomization operation.
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
SIST ISO 5725-5:2003
ISO 5725-5:1998(E) ISO

It is necessary in a split-level experiment for the statistical expert to be able to tell, when the data are reported,

which result was obtained on material a and which on material b, at each level of the experiment. Label the samples

so that this is possible, and be careful not to disclose this information to the participants.

Table 1 — Recommended form for the collation of data for the split-level design
Level
Laboratory 12 jq
abab ab ab
4.4 Statistical model

4.4.1 The basic model used in this part of ISO 5725 is given as equation (1) in clause 5 of ISO 5725-1:1994. It is

stated there that for estimating the accuracy (trueness and precision) of a measurement method, it is useful to

assume that every measurement result is the sum of three components:
ym=+B+e (3)
ijk j ij ijk
where, for the particular material tested,

m represents the general average (expectation) at a particular level j = 1, ..., q;

B represents the laboratory component of bias under repeatability conditions in a particular laboratory

i = 1, ..., p at a particular level j = 1, ..., q;

e represents the random error of test result k = 1, ..., n , obtained in laboratory i at level j, under repeatability

ijk
conditions.
4.4.2 For a split-level experiment, this model becomes:
y = m + B + e (4)
ijk jk ij ijk

This differs from equation (3) in 4.4.1 in only one feature: the subscript k in m implies that according to equation (4) the

general average may now depend on the material a or b (k = 1 or 2) within the level j.

The lack of a subscript k in B implies that it is assumed that the bias associated with a laboratory i does not depend

on the material a or b within a level. This is why it is important that the two materials should be similar.

4.4.3 Define the cell averages as:
y = (y + y ) / 2 (5)
ij ija ijb
and the cell differences as:
D = y - y (6)
ij ija ijb
---------------------- Page: 10 ----------------------
SIST ISO 5725-5:2003
ISO ISO 5725-5:1998(E)

4.4.4 The general average for a level j of a split-level experiment may be defined as:

m = (m + m ) / 2 (7)
j ja jb
4.5 Statistical analysis of the data from a split-level experiment

4.5.1 Assemble the data into a table as shown in table 1. Each combination of a laboratory and a level gives a

“cell” in this table, containing two items of data, y and y .
ija ijb

Calculate the cell differences D and enter them into a table as shown in table 2. The method of analysis requires

each difference to be calculated in the same sense
a - b
and the sign of the difference to be retained.
Calculate the cell averages y and enter them into a table as shown in table 3.

4.5.2 If a cell in table 1 does not contain two test results (for example, because samples have been spoilt, or data

have been excluded following the application of the outlier tests described later) then the corresponding cells in

tables 2 and 3 both remain empty.

4.5.3 For each level j of the experiment, calculate the average D and standard deviation s of the differences in

j Dj
column j of table 2:
DD= p (8)
jij
s = DD−−p1 (9)
Dj ij j
Here, S represents summation over the laboratories i = 1, 2, ..., p.

If there are empty cells in table 2, p is now the number of cells in column j of table 2 containing data and the

summation is performed over non-empty cells.

4.5.4 For each level j of the experiment, calculate the average y and standard deviation s of the averages in

j yj
column j of table 3, using:
yy= p (10)
jij
sy=−y p−1 (11)
yj∑ ij j
Here, S represents summation over the laboratories i = 1, 2, ..., p.

If there are empty cells in table 3, p is now the number of cells in column j of table 3 containing data and the

summation is performed over non-empty cells.

4.5.5 Use tables 2 and 3 and the statistics calculated in 4.5.3 and 4.5.4 to examine the data for consistency and

outliers, as described in 4.6. If data are rejected, recalculate the statistics.
---------------------- Page: 11 ----------------------
SIST ISO 5725-5:2003
ISO 5725-5:1998(E) ISO

4.5.6 Calculate the repeatability standard deviation s and the reproducibility standard deviation s from:

rj Rj
ss= 2 (12)
rj Dj
22 2
ss=+s 2 (13)
Rj yj rj

4.5.7 Investigate whether s and s depend on the average y , and, if so, determine the functional relationships,

rj Rj j
using the methods described in subclause 7.5 of ISO 5725-2:1994.

Table 2 — Recommended form for tabulation of cell differences for the split-level design

Level
Laboratory 12 jq

Table 3 — Recommended form for tabulation of cell averages for the split-level design

Level
Laboratory 12 jq
4.6 Scrutiny of the data for consistency and outliers

4.6.1 Examine the data for consistency using the h statistics, described in subclause 7.3.1 of ISO 5725-2:1994.

To check the consistency of the cell differences, calculate the h statistics as:
hD=−D s (14)
ij()ij j Dj
---------------------- Page: 12 ----------------------
SIST ISO 5725-5:2003
ISO ISO 5725-5:1998(E)
To check the consistency of the cell averages, calculate the h statistics as:
hy=−y s (15)
ij()ij j yj

To show up inconsistent laboratories, plot both sets of these statistics in the order of the levels, but grouped by

laboratory, as shown in figures 2 and 3. The interpretation of these graphs is discussed fully in subclause 7.3.1 of

ISO 5725-2:1994. If a laboratory is achieving generally worse repeatability than the others, then it will show up as

having an unusually large number of large h statistics in the graph derived from the cell differences. If a laboratory is

achieving results that are generally biased, then it will show up as having h statistics mostly in one direction on the

graph derived from the cell averages. In either case, the laboratory should be asked to investigate and report their

findings back to the organizer of the experiment.

4.6.2 Examine the data for stragglers and outliers using Grubbs’ tests, described in subclause 7.3.4 of

ISO 5725-2:1994.

To test for stragglers and outliers in the cell differences, apply Grubbs’ tests to the values in each column of table 2

in turn.

To test for stragglers and outliers in the cell averages, apply Grubbs’ tests to the values in each column of table 3 in

turn.

The interpretation of these tests is discussed fully in subclause 7.3.2 of ISO 5725-2:1994. They are used to identify

results that are so inconsistent with the remainder of the data reported in the experiment that their inclusion in the

calculation of the repeatability and reproducibility standard deviations would affect the values of these statistics

substantially. Usually, data shown to be outliers are excluded from the calculations, and data shown to be stragglers

are included, unless there is a good reason for doing otherwise. If the tests show that a value in one of tables 2 or 3

is to be excluded from the calculation of the repeatability and reproducibility standard deviations, then the

corresponding value in the other of these tables should also be excluded from the calculation.

4.7 Reporting the results of a split-level experiment
4.7.1 Advice is given in subclause 7.7 of ISO 5725-2:1994 on:
— reporting the results of the statistical analysis to the panel;
— decisions to be made by the panel; and
— the preparation of a full report.

4.7.2 Recommendations on the form of a published statement of the repeatability and reproducibility standard

deviations of a standard measurement method are given in subclause 7.1 of ISO 5725-1:1994.

4.8 Example 1: A split-level experiment — Determination of protein
[5]

4.8.1 Table 4 contains the data from an experiment which involved the determination by combustion of the

content of protein in feeds. There were nine participating laboratories, and the experiment contained 14 levels.

Within each level, two feeds were used having similar mass fraction of protein in feed.

4.8.2 Tables 5 and 6 show the cell averages and differences, calculated as described in clause 4.5.1, for just

Level 14 ( j = 14) of the experiment.
Using equations (8) and (9) in 4.5.3, the differences in table 5 give:
D = 8,34 %
s = 0,436 1 %
D14
---------------------- Page: 13 ----------------------
SIST ISO 5725-5:2003
ISO 5725-5:1998(E) ISO
and applying equations (10) and (11) in 4.5.4 to the averages in table 6 gives:
y = 85,46 %
s = 0,453 4 %
Y14

so the repeatability and reproducibility standard deviations are, using equations (12) and (13) in 4.5.6:

s = 0,31 %
r14
s = 0,50 %
R14
Table 7 gives the results of the calculations for the other levels.

4.8.3 Figure 1 shows the results for samples a from table 4 plotted against the corresponding results for samples

b, for Level 14, in a “You
...

NORME ISO
INTERNATIONALE 5725-5
Première édition
1998-07-15
Exactitude (justesse et fidélité) des
résultats et méthodes de mesure —
Partie 5:
Méthodes alternatives pour la détermination
de la fidélité d'une méthode de mesure
normalisée
Accuracy (trueness and precision) of measurement methods and results —
Part 5: Alternative methods for the determination of the precision of a
standard measurement method
Numéro de référence
ISO 5725-5:1998(F)
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO 5725-5:1998(F)
Page
Sommaire

1 Domaine d'application .................................................................................................................................. 1

2 Références normatives ................................................................................................................................ 1

3 Définitions .................................................................................................................................................... 2

4 Plan à niveau fractionné .............................................................................................................................. 2

4.1 Applications du plan à niveau fractionné ............................................................................................. 2

4.2 Disposition du plan à niveau fractionné ............................................................................................... 2

4.3 Organisation d'une expérience à niveau fractionné ............................................................................ 3

4.4 Modèle statistique ................................................................................................................................ 4

4.5 Analyse statistique des données d'une expérience à niveau fractionné ............................................. 4

4.6 Examen des données en ce qui concerne la cohérence et les valeurs aberrantes ............................ 7

4.7 Report des résultats d'une expérience à niveau fractionné ................................................................. 7

4.8 Exemple 1: Une expérience à niveau fractionné — Détermination de protéine .................................. 8

5 Plan pour un matériau hétérogène .............................................................................................................. 13

5.1 Les applications du plan pour un matériau hétérogène ....................................................................... 13

5.2 Établissement du plan pour un matériau hétérogène .......................................................................... 14

5.3 Organisation d'une expérience avec un matériau hétérogène ............................................................ 15

5.4 Modèle statistique pour une expérience avec un matériau hétérogène .............................................. 16

5.5 Analyse statistique des données provenant d'une expérience avec un matériau hétérogène ............ 17

5.6 Examen des données pour la cohérence et les valeurs aberrantes ................................................... 20

5.7 Expression des résultats d'une expérience sur un matériau hétérogène ............................................ 21

5.8 Exemple 2: Une expérience sur un matériau hétérogène ................................................................... 21

5.9 Formules générales pour les calculs avec le plan pour un matériau hétérogène ............................... 29

5.10 Exemple 3: Une application des formules générales ........................................................................... 30

6 Méthodes robustes pour l'analyse des données ......................................................................................... 33

6.1 Les applications des méthodes robustes d'analyse des données ...................................................... 33

6.2 Analyse robuste: Algorithme A ............................................................................................................ 35

6.3 Analyse robuste: Algorithme S ............................................................................................................ 36

6.4 Formules: Analyse robuste pour un niveau particulier d'un plan à niveau uniforme ........................... 38

6.5 Exemple 4: Analyse robuste pour un niveau particulier d'un plan à niveau uniforme ......................... 39

6.6 Formules: Analyse robuste pour un niveau particulier d'un plan à niveau fractionné ......................... 42

6.7 Exemple 5: Analyse robuste pour un niveau particulier d'un plan à niveau fractionné ....................... 42

6.8 Formules: Analyse robuste pour un niveau particulier d'une expérience sur un matériau

hétérogène .......................................................................................................................................... 45

6.9 Exemple 6: Analyse robuste pour un niveau particulier d'une expérience sur un matériau

hétérogène .......................................................................................................................................... 46

Annexes

A (normative) Symboles et abréviations utilisés dans l'ISO 5725 ....................................................................... 50

B (informative) Calcul des facteurs utilisés dans les algorithmes A et S ............................................................. 53

C (informative) Calcul des équations utilisées dans l'analyse robuste ................................................................ 56

D (informative) Bibliographie ................................................................................................................................ 57

© ISO 1998

Droits de reproduction réservés. Sauf prescription différente, aucune partie de cette publication ne peut être reproduite ni utilisée sous quelque

forme que ce soit et par aucun procédé, électronique ou mécanique, y compris la photocopie et les microfilms, sans l'accord écrit de l'éditeur.

Organisation internationale de normalisation
Case postale 56 • CH-1211 Genève 20 • Suisse
Internet iso@iso.ch
Imprimé en Suisse
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO ISO 5725-5:1998(F)
Avant-propos

L'ISO (Organisation internationale de normalisation) est une fédération mondiale d'organismes nationaux de

normalisation (comité membres de l'ISO). L'élaboration des Normes internationales est en général confiée aux

comités techniques de l'ISO. Chaque comité membre intéressé par une étude a le droit de faire partie du comité

technique créé à cet effet. Les organisations internationales, gouvernementales et non gouvernementales, en

liaison avec l'ISO participent également aux travaux. L'ISO collabore étroitement avec la Commission

électrotechnique internationale (CEI) en ce qui concerne la normalisation électrotechnique.

Les projets de Normes internationales adoptés par les comités techniques sont soumis aux comités membres pour

vote. Leur publication comme Normes internationales requiert l'approbation de 75 % au moins des comités

membres votants.

La Norme internationale ISO 5725-5 a été élaborée par le comité technique ISO/TC 69, Application des méthodes

statistiques, sous-comité SC 6, Méthodes et résultats de mesure.

L'ISO 5725 comprend les parties suivantes, présentées sous le titre général Exactitude (justesse et fidélité) des

résultats et méthodes de mesure:
— Partie 1: Principes généraux et définitions

— Partie 2: Méthode de base pour la détermination de la répétabilité et de la reproductibilité d'une méthode de

mesure normalisée

— Partie 3: Méthodes intermédiaires de la fidélité d'une méthode de mesure normalisée

— Partie 4: Méthodes de base pour la détermination de la justesse d'une méthode de mesure normalisée

— Partie 5: Méthodes alternatives pour la détermination de la fidélité d'une méthode de mesure normalisée

— Partie 6: Utilisation dans la pratique des valeurs d'exactitude

L'ISO 5725 parties 1 à 6 annule et remplace l'ISO 5725, 2ème édition 1986-09-05, qui a été étendue pour traiter de

la justesse (en supplément de la fidélité) et des conditions intermédiaires de fidélité (en supplément des conditions

de répétabilité et de reproductibilité).

L'annexe A fait partie intégrante de la présente partie de l'ISO 5725. Les annexes B, C et D sont données

uniquement à titre d'information.
iii
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO 5725-5:1998(F) ISO
Introduction

0.1 La présente partie de l'ISO 5725 utilise deux termes, justesse et fidélité pour décrire l'exactitude d'une

méthode de mesure. La justesse se réfère à l'étroitesse de l'accord entre la valeur moyenne d'un grand nombre de

résultats d'essai et la valeur de référence vraie ou acceptée. La fidélité se réfère à l'étroitesse de l'accord entre les

résultats d'essai.

0.2 Les considérations générales sur ces grandeurs sont données dans l'ISO 5725-1 et ne sont donc pas

répétées ici. Il convient de lire la présente partie de l'ISO 5725 conjointement avec l'ISO 5725-1, puisque les

définitions sous-jacentes et les principes généraux y sont donnés.

0.3 L'ISO 5725-2 concerne l'estimation, au moyen d'essais interlaboratoires, de mesures normalisées de la

fidélité, à savoir les écarts-types de répétabilité et de reproductibilité. Elle donne une méthode de base pour le faire,

en utilisant le plan à niveau uniforme. La présente partie de l'ISO 5725 décrit des méthodes alternatives à cette

méthode de base.

a) Avec la méthode de base, il y a un risque qu'un opérateur puisse laisser le résultat d'une mesure sur un

échantillon influencer celui d'une mesure ultérieure sur un autre échantillon du même matériau, entraînant un

biais sur les estimations des écarts-types de répétabilité et de reproductibilité. Quand ce risque est considéré

comme sérieux, le plan à niveau fractionné décrit dans la présente partie de l'ISO 5725 peut être préféré, car il

réduit ce risque.

b) La méthode de base requiert la préparation d'un certain nombre d'échantillons identiques du matériau, destinés

à être utilisés dans l'expérience. Avec des matériaux hétérogènes, cela peut ne pas être possible, et l'utilisation

de la méthode de base donne alors des estimations de l'écart-type de reproductibilité augmentées par la

variation entre échantillons. Le plan pour un matériau hétérogène donné dans la présente partie de l'ISO 5725

fournit une information sur la variabilité entre échantillons qu'on ne peut obtenir par la méthode de base, et qui

peut être utilisée pour calculer une estimation de la reproductibilité d'où est éliminée la variation entre

échantillons.

c) La méthode de base requiert d'utiliser des tests pour valeurs aberrantes afin d'identifier les données qui doivent

être exclues des calculs des écarts-types de répétabilité et de reproductibilité. L'exclusion des valeurs

aberrantes peut parfois avoir un effet important sur les estimations des écarts-types de répétabilité et de

reproductibilité, mais dans la pratique, en appliquant les tests pour valeurs aberrantes, l'analyste des données

peut avoir à exercer son jugement pour décider quelles données il doit exclure. La présente partie de

l'ISO 5725 décrit des méthodes robustes d'analyse des données permettant de calculer les écarts-types de

répétabilité et de reproductibilité à partir de données contenant des valeurs aberrantes sans utiliser de tests

pour valeurs aberrantes afin d'exclure des données, de sorte que les résultats ne sont plus affectés par le

jugement de l'analyste des données.
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
NORME INTERNATIONALE ISO ISO 5725-5:1998(F)
Exactitude (justesse et fidélité) des résultats et méthodes
de mesure —
Partie 5:
Méthodes alternatives pour la détermination de la fidélité d'une
méthode de mesure normalisée
1 Domaine d'application
La présente partie de l'ISO 5725

— fournit une description détaillée d'alternatives à la méthode de base pour déterminer les écarts-types de

répétabilité et de reproductibilité d'une méthode de mesure normalisée, à savoir le plan à niveau fractionné et

un plan pour les matériaux hétérogènes;

— décrit l'utilisation des méthodes robustes pour analyser les résultats d'expériences de fidélité sans recourir à

des tests de valeurs aberrantes pour exclure des données des calculs, et en particulier, l'utilisation détaillée

d'une de ces méthodes.

La présente partie de l'ISO 5725 complète l'ISO 5725-2 en fournissant des plans alternatifs qui peuvent être plus

valables dans certaines situations que le plan de base donné dans l'ISO 5725-2, et en fournissant une méthode

robuste d'analyse qui donne des estimations des écarts-types de répétabilité et de reproductibilité moins

dépendants du jugement de l'analyste des données que celles qui sont données par les méthodes décrites dans

l'ISO 5725-2.
2 Références normatives

Les normes suivantes contiennent des dispositions qui, par suite de la référence qui en est faite, constituent des

dispositions valables pour la présente partie de l'ISO 5725. Au moment de la publication, les éditions indiquées

étaient en vigueur. Toute norme est sujette à révision et les parties prenantes des accords fondés sur la présente

partie de l'ISO 5725 sont invitées à rechercher la possibilité d'appliquer les éditions les plus récentes des normes

indiquées ci-après. Les membres de la CEI et de l'ISO possèdent le registre des Normes internationales en vigueur

à un moment donné.

ISO 3534-1:1993, Statistique — Vocabulaire et symboles — Partie 1: Probabilité et termes statistiques généraux.

ISO 3534-3:1985, Statistique — Vocabulaire et symboles — Partie 3: Plans d'expérience.

ISO 5725-1:1994, Exactitude (justesse et fidélité) des méthodes et résultats de mesure — Partie 1: Principes

généraux et définitions.

ISO 5725-2:1994, Exactitude (justesse et fidélité) des méthodes et résultats de mesure — Partie 2: Méthode de

base pour la détermination de la répétabilité et de la reproductibilité d'une méthode de mesure normalisée.

---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
ISO 5725-5:1998(F) ISO
3 Définitions

Pour les besoins de la présente partie de l'ISO 5725, les définitions données dans l'ISO 3534-1 et dans

l'ISO 5725-1 s'appliquent.
Les symboles utilisés dans l'ISO 5725 sont donnés dans l'annexe A.
4 Plan à niveau fractionné
4.1 Applications du plan à niveau fractionné

4.1.1 Le plan à niveau uniforme décrit dans l'ISO 5725-2 exige que deux échantillons identiques d'un matériau, ou

davantage, soient essayés par chaque laboratoire participant et à chaque niveau de l'expérience. Avec ce plan il y

a un risque qu'un opérateur puisse laisser le résultat d'une mesure sur un échantillon influencer le résultat d'une

mesure ultérieure sur un autre échantillon du même matériau. Si cela se produit, les résultats de l'expérience de

fidélité seront faussés — les estimations de l'écart-type de répétabilité s diminueront et celles de l'écart-type

interlaboratoires s augmenteront. Dans le plan à niveau fractionné, chaque laboratoire participant reçoit un

échantillon de chacun de deux matériaux similaires à chaque niveau de l'expérience, et on dit aux opérateurs que

les échantillons ne sont pas identiques, sans leur dire de combien ils diffèrent. Le plan à niveau fractionné fournit

ainsi une méthode de détermination des écarts-types de répétabilité et de reproductibilité d'une méthode de mesure

normalisée d'une façon qui réduit le risque qu'un résultat d'essai obtenu sur un échantillon influence celui obtenu

sur un autre échantillon dans l'expérience.

4.1.2 Les données obtenues à un niveau de l'expérience à niveau fractionné peuvent être utilisées pour établir un

graphique dans lequel les données obtenues pour un matériau sont représentées en fonction des données pour

l'autre matériau, similaire. Un exemple est donné à la figure 1. De tels graphiques peuvent aider à identifier ceux

des laboratoires qui ont le plus grand biais par rapport aux autres laboratoires. Cela est utile quand il est possible

de rechercher les causes des plus grands biais de laboratoire, dans le but de décider une action corrective.

4.1.3 Il est habituel que les écarts-types de répétabilité et de reproductibilité d'une méthode d'essai dépendent du

niveau du matériau. Par exemple, quand le résultat d'essai est la proportion d'un élément, obtenue par analyse

chimique, les écarts-types de répétabilité et de reproductibilité augmentent généralement quand augmente la

proportion de l'élément. Il est nécessaire, pour une expérience à niveau fractionné, que les deux matériaux

similaires utilisés à un niveau de l'expérience soient si semblables qu'on peut s'attendre à ce qu'ils donnent les

mêmes écarts-types de répétabilité et de reproductibilité. Pour les buts du plan à niveau fractionné, on accepte que

les deux matériaux utilisés pour un niveau d'expérience donnent presque le même niveau de résultats de mesure,

et rien ne peut être gagné en s'arrangeant pour qu'ils diffèrent de façon substantielle.

Dans de nombreuses méthodes d'analyse chimique, la matrice contenant le constituant considéré peut influencer la

fidélité, de sorte que pour une expérience à niveau fractionné, il faut deux matériaux avec des matrices similaires à

chaque niveau de l'expérience. On peut parfois préparer un matériau suffisamment similaire en allongeant un

matériau par une petite adjonction du constituant considéré. Quand le matériau est un produit naturel ou

manufacturé, il peut être difficile de trouver deux produits suffisamment similaires pour les buts d'une expérience à

niveau fractionné: une solution possible peut être d'utiliser deux lots du même produit. Il faut se rappeler que

l'objectif du choix des matériaux pour le plan à niveau fractionné est de donner aux opérateurs des échantillons

qu'ils ne s'attendent pas à trouver identiques.
4.2 Disposition du plan à niveau fractionné

4.2.1 La disposition du plan à niveau fractionné est indiquée dans le tableau 1.

Les p laboratoires participants essaient chacun deux échantillons à q niveaux.

Les deux échantillons à un niveau donné sont notés a et b, où a représente un échantillon d'un matériau, et b

représente un échantillon de l'autre matériau, similaire.
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
ISO ISO 5725-5:1998(F)
4.2.2 Les données d'une expérience à niveau fractionné sont représentées par:
ijk
l'indice i représente le laboratoire (i = 1, 2, ..., p);
l'indice j représente le niveau (j = 1, 2, ..., q);
l'indice k représente l'échantillon (k = a ou b).
4.3 Organisation d'une expérience à niveau fractionné

4.3.1 Pour planifier une expérience à niveau fractionné, suivre les indications données à l'article 6 de

l'ISO 5725-1:1994.

Le paragraphe 6.3 de l'ISO 5725-1:1994 contient un certain nombre de formules (impliquant une quantité notée

généralement A) qui sont utilisées pour aider à décider combien de laboratoires inclure dans l'expérience. Les

formules correspondantes pour le plan à niveau fractionné sont indiquées ci-dessous.

NOTE — Ces formules ont été établies par la méthode décrite dans la NOTE 24 de l'ISO 5725-1:1994.

Pour évaluer les incertitudes des estimations des écarts-types de répétabilité et de reproductibilité, calculer les

quantités suivantes.
Pour la répétabilité
Ap=−19, 6 1 2()1 (1)
Pour la reproductibilité
 
2 4
Ap=+19, 6 1 2gg− 1+ 1 8 − 1 (2)
 () 
R []
 
avec g = s /s .
R r

Si le nombre n de répétitions est égal à 2 dans les équations (9) et (10) de l'ISO 5725-1:1994, on peut alors voir que

les équations (9) et (10) de l'ISO 5725-1:1994 sont les mêmes que les équations (1) et (2) ci-dessus, sauf que

parfois p - 1 apparaît ici à la place de p dans l'ISO 5725-1:1994. Ce n'est qu'une petite différence, de sorte que le

tableau 1 et les figures B.1 et B.2 de l'ISO 5725-1:1994 peuvent être utilisés pour évaluer l'incertitude des

estimations des écarts-types de répétabilité et de reproductibilité dans une expérience à niveau fractionné.

Pour évaluer l'incertitude de l'estimation du biais de la méthode de mesure dans une expérience à niveau

fractionné, calculer la quantité A définie dans l'équation (13) de l'ISO 5725-1:1994 avec n = 2 (ou utiliser le tableau 2

de l'ISO 5725-1:1994) et utiliser cette quantité comme décrit dans l'ISO 5725-1.

Pour évaluer l'incertitude de l'estimation du biais d'un laboratoire dans une expérience à niveau fractionné, calculer

la quantité A définie par l'équation (16) de l'ISO 5725-1:1994 avec n = 2. Comme le nombre de répétitions dans

une expérience à niveau fractionnée est, en fait, ce nombre de 2, il n'est pas possible de réduire l'incertitude de

l'estimation du biais de laboratoire en augmentant le nombre de répétitions. (S'il est nécessaire de réduire cette

incertitude, il faut utiliser à la place le plan à niveau uniforme.)

4.3.2 Suivre les indications données aux articles 5 et 6 de l'ISO 5725-2:1994 en ce qui concerne les détails de

l'organisation d'une expérience à niveau fractionné. Le nombre de répétitions, n dans l'ISO 5725-2:1994, peut être

pris égal au nombre de niveaux fractionnés dans un plan à niveau fractionné, c'est-à-dire 2.

---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
ISO 5725-5:1998(F) ISO

Les échantillons a doivent être affectés aux participants au hasard, et les échantillons b doivent également, dans

une opération séparée, être affectés aux participants au hasard.

Il est nécessaire dans une expérience à niveau fractionné que l'expert statisticien soit capable de dire, quand on lui

apporte les données, quel résultat a été obtenu sur un matériau a et de même pour un matériau b à chaque niveau

de l'expérience. Étiqueter les échantillons pour que ce soit possible. Prendre soin de ne pas divulguer ces

informations aux participants.
4.4 Modèle statistique

4.4.1 Le modèle de base utilisé dans la présente partie de l'ISO 5725 est donné par l'équation (1) de l'article 5 de

l'ISO 5725-1:1994. Il y est précisé que pour estimer l'exactitude (justesse et fidélité) d'une méthode de mesure, il

est utile de supposer que tout résultat de mesure est la somme de trois composants:

ym=+B+e (3)
ijk j ij ijk
où, pour le matériau particulier essayé,

m représente la moyenne générale (espérance mathématique) à un niveau donné j = 1, ..., q;

B représente la composante de laboratoire du biais sous des conditions de répétabilité dans un laboratoire

donné i = 1, ..., p à un niveau donné j = 1, ..., q;

e représente l'erreur aléatoire du résultat de l'essai k = 1, ..., n, obtenu dans le laboratoire i au niveau j, sous

ijk
des conditions de répétabilité.
4.4.2 Pour une expérience à niveau fractionné, ce modèle devient:
y = m + B + e (4)
ijk jk ij ijk

Cela diffère de l'équation (3) en 4.4.1 sur le seul point suivant: l'indice k dans m implique que conformément à

l'équation (4) la moyenne générale peut maintenant dépendre du matériau a ou b (k = 1 ou 2) à l'intérieur du niveau j.

L'absence d'indice k dans B implique qu'on suppose que le biais associé à un laboratoire i ne dépend pas du

matériau a ou b à l'intérieur d'un niveau. C'est pourquoi il est important que les deux matériaux soient similaires.

4.4.3 Définir les moyennes de cellules par:
y = (y + y ) / 2 (5)
ij ija ijb
et les différences de cellules par:
D = y - y (6)
ij ija ijb

4.4.4 La moyenne générale pour un niveau j d'une expérience à niveau fractionné peut être définie par:

m = (m + m ) / 2 (7)
j ja jb
4.5 Analyse statistique des données d'une expérience à niveau fractionné

4.5.1 Arranger les données en un tableau comme présenté dans le tableau 1. Chaque combinaison d'un

laboratoire et d'un niveau donne une «cellule» dans ce tableau, contenant deux unités de données, y et y .

ija ijb
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO ISO 5725-5:1998(F)

Calculer les différences de cellules D et les introduire dans un tableau comme présenté dans le tableau 2. La

méthode d'analyse exige que chaque différence soit calculée dans le même sens
a - b
et qu'on tienne compte du signe de la différence.

Calculer les moyennes de cellules y et les introduire dans un tableau comme présenté dans le tableau 3.

4.5.2 Si une cellule du tableau 1 ne contient pas deux résultats d'essai (par exemple, parce qu'on a gaspillé des

échantillons, ou que des données ont été écartées à la suite de tests de valeurs aberrantes décrits plus loin), les

cellules correspondantes des tableaux 2 et 3 doivent rester vides.

Pour chaque niveau de l'expérience, calculer la moyenne et l'écart-type des différences de la colonne

4.5.3 j D s
j Dj
j du tableau 2:
DD= p (8)
jij
s = DD−−p1 (9)
Dj ij j
Ici, S représente la sommation sur les laboratoires i = 1, 2, ..., p.

S'il y a des cellules vides dans le tableau 2, p est alors le nombre de cellules de la colonne j du tableau 2 qui

contiennent des données et la sommation est représentée avec des cellules non vides.

Pour chaque niveau de l'expérience, calculer la moyenne et l'écart-type des moyennes de la colonne

4.5.4 j y s j
j yj
du tableau 3, avec:
yy= p (10)
jij
sy=−y p−1 (11)
yj∑ ij j
Ici, S représente la sommation sur les laboratoires i = 1, 2, ..., p.

S'il y a des cellules vides dans le tableau 3, p est alors le nombre de cellules de la colonne j du tableau 3 contenant

des données et la sommation est représentée avec des cellules non vides.

4.5.5 Utiliser les tableaux 2 et 3 et les statistiques calculées en 4.5.3 et 4.5.4 pour examiner les données en ce qui

concerne la cohérence et les valeurs aberrantes, comme décrit en 4.6. Si des données sont rejetées, recalculer les

statistiques.

4.5.6 Calculer les écarts-types de répétabilité s et de reproductibilité s par:

rj Rj
= 2 (12)
rj Dj
2 2 2
ss=+s 2 (13)
Rj yj rj

4.5.7 Examiner si s et s dépendent de la moyenne y , et si c'est le cas, déterminer les relations fonctionnelles en

rj Rj j
utilisant les méthodes données au paragraphe 7.5 de l'ISO 5725-2:1994.
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
ISO 5725-5:1998(F) ISO

Tableau 1 — Format recommandé pour la présentation des données pour le plan à niveau fractionné

Niveau
12 jq
Laboratoire
abab ab ab

Tableau 2 — Format recommandé pour la présentation des différences de cellules pour le plan

à niveau fractionné
Niveau
Laboratoire 12 jq

Tableau 3 — Format recommandé pour la présentation des moyennes des cellules pour le plan

à niveau fractionné
Niveau
Laboratoire 12 jq
---------------------- Page: 10 ----------------------
ISO ISO 5725-5:1998(F)

4.6 Examen des données en ce qui concerne la cohérence et les valeurs aberrantes

4.6.1 Examiner les données pour la cohérence en utilisant les statistiques h décrites au paragraphe 7.3.1 de

l'ISO 5725-2:1994.

Pour vérifier la cohérence des différences de cellules, calculer les statistiques h comme suit:

hD=−D s (14)
ij()ij j Dj

Pour vérifier la cohérence des moyennes de cellules, calculer les statistiques h comme suit:

hy=−y s (15)
ij ij jyj

Pour révéler des laboratoires incohérents, établir un graphique des deux ensembles de ces statistiques en les

plaçant dans l'ordre des niveaux, mais groupées par laboratoire, comme indiqué sur les figures 2 et 3.

L'interprétation de ces graphiques est présentée en détail au paragraphe 7.3.1 de l'ISO 5725-2:1994. Si un

laboratoire présente une répétabilité généralement moins bonne que les autres, cela se révélera en montrant un

nombre inhabituellement grand de statistiques h dans le graphique concernant les différences de cellules. Si un

laboratoire parvient à des résultats généralement biaisés, cela se révélera par des statistiques h principalement

dans une direction sur le graphique concernant les moyennes de cellules. Dans les deux cas, le laboratoire doit être

invité à faire des recherches et à présenter les résultats à l'organisateur de l'expérience.

4.6.2 Examiner les données pour les valeurs douteuses et aberrantes en utilisant le test de Grubbs, décrit au

paragraphe 7.3.4 de l'ISO 5725-2:1994.

Pour tester les valeurs douteuses et aberrantes dans les différences de cellules, appliquer le test de Grubbs aux

valeurs de chaque colonne du tableau 2 à tour de rôle.

Pour tester les valeurs douteuses et aberrantes dans les moyennes de cellules, appliquer le test de Grubbs aux

valeurs de chaque colonne du tableau 3 à tour de rôle.

L'interprétation de ces tests est exposée en détail au paragraphe 7.3.2 de l'ISO 5725-2:1994. Ils sont utilisés pour

identifier des résultats qui sont si incohérents avec le reste des données présentées dans l'expérience que leur

inclusion dans le calcul des écarts-types de répétabilité et de reproductibilité affecterait de façon substantielle les

valeurs de ces statistiques. Habituellement, les données révélées aberrantes sont exclues des calculs, et les

données révélées douteuses sont incluses, à moins qu'il n'y ait une bonne raison de procéder autrement. Si les

tests montrent qu'une valeur dans l'un des tableaux 2 ou 3 doit être exclue du calcul des écarts-types de répétabilité

et de reproductibilité, alors la valeur correspondante dans l'autre tableau doit être aussi exclue des calculs.

4.7 Report des résultats d'une expérience à niveau fractionné
4.7.1 Au paragraphe 7.7 de l'ISO 5725-2:1994, des conseils sont donnés sur
— le report au panel des résultats de l'analyse statistique;
— les décisions à prendre par le panel; et
— la préparation d'un rapport complet.

4.7.2 Des recommandations sur la forme à donner à une publication des écarts-types de répétabilité et de

reproductibilité d'une méthode de mesure normalisée sont données au paragraphe 7.1 de l'ISO 5725-1:1994.

---------------------- Page: 11 ----------------------
ISO 5725-5:1998(F) ISO
4.8 Exemple 1: Une expérience à niveau fractionné — Détermination de protéine

Le tableau 4 contient les données provenant d'une expérience [5] qui a impliqué la détermination de protéine

4.8.1
dans des fourrages par combus
...

Questions, Comments and Discussion

Ask us and Technical Secretary will try to provide an answer. You can facilitate discussion about the standard in here.