Guidance for assessing the validity of physical fire models for obtaining fire effluent toxicity data for fire hazard and risk assessment

ISO 16312-1:2016 provides technical criteria and guidance for evaluating physical fire models (i.e. laboratory combustion devices and operating protocols) used in effluent toxicity studies for obtaining data on the effluent from products and materials under fire conditions relevant to life safety.[9] Relevant analytical methods, calculation methods, bioassay procedures and prediction of the toxic effects of fire effluents can be referenced in ISO 19701, ISO 19702, ISO 19703, ISO 19706 and ISO 13344. Comparisons are detailed in ISO 29903. Prediction of the toxic effects of fire effluents can be referenced in ISO 13571 and ISO/TR 13571‑2.

Lignes directrices pour évaluer la validité des modèles de feu physiques pour l'obtention de données sur les effluents du feu en vue de l'évaluation des risques et dangers

L'ISO 16312-1 :2016 fournit un guide et des critčres techniques applicables ŕ l'évaluation des modčles physiques du feu (c'est-ŕ-dire les dispositifs de combustion et protocoles de fonctionnement en laboratoire) utilisés dans le cadre d'études sur la toxicité des effluents afin d'obtenir des données sur les effluents de produits et matériaux dans des conditions d'incendie touchant ŕ la sécurité des personnes[[9]]. Des méthodes d'analyse, méthodes de calcul, modes opératoires d'essais biologiques et prévisions des effets toxiques des effluents du feu pertinents peuvent ętre référencés dans l'ISO 19701, l'ISO 19702, l'ISO 19703, l'ISO 19706 et l'ISO 13344. Les comparaisons de ces données sont détaillées dans l'ISO 29903. Les prévisions des effets toxiques des effluents du feu peuvent ętre référencées dans l'ISO 13571 et l'ISO/TR 13571‑2.

General Information

Status
Published
Publication Date
13-Nov-2016
Current Stage
9020 - International Standard under periodical review
Start Date
15-Oct-2021
Ref Project

RELATIONS

Buy Standard

Standard
ISO 16312-1:2016 - Guidance for assessing the validity of physical fire models for obtaining fire effluent toxicity data for fire hazard and risk assessment
English language
11 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview
Standard
ISO 16312-1:2016 - Lignes directrices pour évaluer la validité des modeles de feu physiques pour l'obtention de données sur les effluents du feu en vue de l'évaluation des risques et dangers
French language
13 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview

Standards Content (sample)

INTERNATIONAL ISO
STANDARD 16312-1
Third edition
2016-11-15
Guidance for assessing the validity of
physical fire models for obtaining fire
effluent toxicity data for fire hazard
and risk assessment —
Part 1:
Criteria
Lignes directrices pour évaluer la validité des modèles de feu
physiques pour l’obtention de données sur les effluents du feu en vue
de l’évaluation des risques et dangers —
Partie 1: Critères
Reference number
ISO 16312-1:2016(E)
ISO 2016
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO 16312-1:2016(E)
COPYRIGHT PROTECTED DOCUMENT
© ISO 2016, Published in Switzerland

All rights reserved. Unless otherwise specified, no part of this publication may be reproduced or utilized otherwise in any form

or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, or posting on the internet or an intranet, without prior

written permission. Permission can be requested from either ISO at the address below or ISO’s member body in the country of

the requester.
ISO copyright office
Ch. de Blandonnet 8 • CP 401
CH-1214 Vernier, Geneva, Switzerland
Tel. +41 22 749 01 11
Fax +41 22 749 09 47
copyright@iso.org
www.iso.org
ii © ISO 2016 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO 16312-1:2016(E)
Contents Page

Foreword ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................iv

Introduction ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................v

1 Scope ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 1

2 Normative references ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3 Terms and definitions ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

4 General principles ............................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

4.1 Physical fire model............................................................................................................................................................................... 1

4.2 Model validity .......................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

4.3 Test specimens ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 2

4.4 Combustion conditions .................................................................................................................................................................... 2

4.5 Effluent characterization ................................................................................................................................................................ 2

5 Significance and use .......................................................................................................................................................................................... 2

6 The ideal fire effluent toxicity test method .............................................................................................................................. 3

6.1 Fire stages ................................................................................................................................................................................................... 3

6.2 Applicability .............................................................................................................................................................................................. 3

6.3 Apparatus independence ............................................................................................................................................................... 3

6.4 Operational efficiency ....................................................................................................................................................................... 3

6.5 Data generated ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 3

6.6 Accuracy ........................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4

6.7 Repeatability and reproducibility........................................................................................................................................... 4

7 Characteristics of fire stages .................................................................................................................................................................... 4

8 Characterization of physical fire models ..................................................................................................................................... 4

8.1 Thermal environment in the test specimen ................................................................................................................... 4

8.1.1 General...................................................................................................................................................................................... 4

8.1.2 Smouldering ......................................................................................................................................................................... 5

8.1.3 Pyrolysis .................................................................................................................................................................................. 5

8.1.4 Flaming ...................................................................... ............................................................................................................... 5

8.2 Oxygen availability............................................................................................................................................................................... 5

8.2.1 General...................................................................................................................................................................................... 5

8.2.2 Fuel/air equivalence ratio ....................................................................................................................................... 5

8.2.3 Combustion efficiency ................................................................................................................................................. 6

8.3 Test specimen ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 6

8.4 Yields of combustion products .................................................................................................................................................. 6

8.5 Analytical instrumentation........................................................................................................................................................... 6

8.6 Use of test animals ............................................................................................................................................................................... 6

9 Physical fire model accuracy .................................................................................................................................................................... 7

Annex A (informative) Characteristics affecting combustion product yields ............................................................9

Bibliography .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................11

© ISO 2016 – All rights reserved iii
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO 16312-1:2016(E)
Foreword

ISO (the International Organization for Standardization) is a worldwide federation of national standards

bodies (ISO member bodies). The work of preparing International Standards is normally carried out

through ISO technical committees. Each member body interested in a subject for which a technical

committee has been established has the right to be represented on that committee. International

organizations, governmental and non-governmental, in liaison with ISO, also take part in the work.

ISO collaborates closely with the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) on all matters of

electrotechnical standardization.

The procedures used to develop this document and those intended for its further maintenance are

described in the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 1. In particular the different approval criteria needed for the

different types of ISO documents should be noted. This document was drafted in accordance with the

editorial rules of the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 2 (see www.iso.org/directives).

Attention is drawn to the possibility that some of the elements of this document may be the subject of

patent rights. ISO shall not be held responsible for identifying any or all such patent rights. Details of

any patent rights identified during the development of the document will be in the Introduction and/or

on the ISO list of patent declarations received (see www.iso.org/patents).

Any trade name used in this document is information given for the convenience of users and does not

constitute an endorsement.

For an explanation on the meaning of ISO specific terms and expressions related to conformity assessment,

as well as information about ISO’s adherence to the World Trade Organization (WTO) principles in the

Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT) see the following URL: www.iso.org/iso/foreword.html.

The committee responsible for this document is ISO/TC 92, Fire safety, Subcommittee SC 3, Fire threat

to people and environment.

This third edition cancels and replaces the second edition (ISO 16312-1:2010), of which it constitutes a

minor revision with the normative references and bibliography having been updated.

A list of all parts in the ISO 16312-series can be found on the ISO website.
iv © ISO 2016 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
ISO 16312-1:2016(E)
Introduction

Providing the desired degree of life safety for an occupancy increasingly involves an explicit fire hazard

or risk assessment. This assessment includes such components as the following:
— information on the room/building properties;
— the nature of the occupancy;
— the nature of the occupants;
— the types of potential fires;
— the outcomes to be avoided, etc.

This type of determination also requires information on the potential for harm due to the effluent

produced in the fire. Because of the prohibitive cost of real-scale product testing under the wide range

of fire conditions, most estimates of the potential harm from the fire effluent depend on data generated

from a physical fire model, a reduced-scale test apparatus and procedure for its use.

The role of a physical fire model for generating accurate toxic effluent composition is to recreate the

essential features of the complex thermal and reactive chemical environment in full-scale fires. These

environments vary with the physical characteristics of the fire scenario and with time during the

course of the fire, and close representation of some phenomena occurring in full-scale fires can be

difficult or even not possible on a small-scale. The accuracy of the physical fire model, then, depends on

two features:

a) degree to which the combustion conditions in the bench-scale apparatus mirror those in the fire

stage being replicated;

b) degree to which the yields of the important combustion products obtained from burning of the

commercial product at full scale are replicated by the yields from burning specimens of the product

in the small-scale model. This measure is generally performed for a small set of products, and the

derived accuracy is then presumed to extend to other test subjects. At least one methodology for

[11]
effecting this comparison has been developed.

This document provides guidance for accuracy assessment with and without the use of laboratory

animals. Generally, accurate estimation of the toxic potency of the effluent can be obtained from

analysis of a small number of gases (the N-gas hypothesis), as described in ISO 13571. This is especially

true for product formulations similar to those for which the N-gas model has been confirmed. There are,

however, cases where unusual toxicants have been generated in bench-scale apparatus. Thus, for novel

commercial product formulations, confidence in the accuracy of the toxic potency measurement in the

bench-scale device can be improved by a confirming bioassay and correlation with real-scale fire tests.

© ISO 2016 – All rights reserved v
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
INTERNATIONAL STANDARD ISO 16312-1:2016(E)
Guidance for assessing the validity of physical fire models
for obtaining fire effluent toxicity data for fire hazard and
risk assessment —
Part 1:
Criteria
1 Scope

This document provides technical criteria and guidance for evaluating physical fire models (i.e.

laboratory combustion devices and operating protocols) used in effluent toxicity studies for obtaining

[9]

data on the effluent from products and materials under fire conditions relevant to life safety. Relevant

analytical methods, calculation methods, bioassay procedures and prediction of the toxic effects of fire

effluents can be referenced in ISO 19701, ISO 19702, ISO 19703, ISO 19706 and ISO 13344. Comparisons

are detailed in ISO 29903. Prediction of the toxic effects of fire effluents can be referenced in ISO 13571

and ISO/TR 13571-2.
2 Normative references

The following documents are referred to in the text in such a way that some or all of their content

constitutes requirements of this document. For dated references, only the edition cited applies. For

undated references, the latest edition of the referenced document (including any amendments) applies.

ISO 13571:2012, Life-threatening components of fire — Guidelines for the estimation of time to compromised

tenability in fires
3 Terms and definitions

For the purposes of this document, the terms and definitions given in ISO 13943 apply.

ISO and IEC maintain terminological databases for use in standardization at the following addresses:

— IEC Electropedia: available at http://www.electropedia.org/
— ISO Online browsing platform: available at http://www.iso.org/obp
4 General principles
4.1 Physical fire model

A physical fire model is characterized by the requirements placed on the form of the test specimen, the

operational combustion conditions and the capability of analysing the products of combustion.

4.2 Model validity

For use in providing data for effluent toxicity assessment, the validity of a physical fire model is

determined by the degree of accuracy with which it reproduces the yields of the principal toxic

components in real-scale fires.
© ISO 2016 – All rights reserved 1
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
ISO 16312-1:2016(E)
4.3 Test specimens

Fire safety engineering requires data on commercial products or product components. In a reduced-

scale test, the manner in which a specimen of the product is composed can affect the nature and yields

of the combustion products.
4.4 Combustion conditions

The yields of combustion products depend on such apparatus conditions as the fuel/air equivalence

ratio, whether the decomposition is flaming or non-flaming, the persistence of flaming of the sample, the

temperature of the specimen and the effluent produced, the stability of the decomposition conditions,

and the interaction of the apparatus with the decomposition process, with the effluent and the flames.

4.5 Effluent characterization

4.5.1 For the effluent from most common materials, the major acute toxic effects have been shown to

depend upon a small number of major asphyxiant gases and a somewhat wider range of inorganic and

organic irritants. In ISO 13571, a base set of combustion products has been identified for routine analysis.

Novel materials can evolve previously unidentified toxic products. Thus, a more detailed chemical

analysis can be needed in order to provide a full assessment of acute effects and to assess chronic or

environmental toxicants. A bioassay can provide guidance on the importance of toxicants not included in

the base set. ISO 19706 contains a fuller discussion of the utility of bioassays.

4.5.2 It is essential that the physical fire model enable accurate determinations of chemical effluent

composition.

4.5.3 It is desirable that the physical fire model accommodate a bioassay method.

5 Significance and use

5.1 Most computational models of fire hazard and risk require information regarding the potential of

fire effluent (gases, heat and smoke) to cause harm to people and to affect their ability to escape or to

seek refuge.

5.2 The quality of the data on fire effluent has a profound effect on the accuracy of the prediction of the

degree of life safety offered by an occupancy design.

5.3 Due to the large number of products to be included in fire safety assessments, the high cost of

performing real-scale tests of products, and the small number of large-scale test facilities, information on

effluent toxicity is most often obtained from physical fire models.

5.4 There are numerous physical fire models cited in national regulations. These apparatus vary

in design and operation, as well as in their degree of characterization. This document defines what

apparatus characteristics should define a physical fire model, identifies the data appropriate for assessing

the validity of a physical fire model and provides technical criteria for evaluating them with regard to the

accuracy of their data relevant to life safety.

5.5 This document does not address means for combining the effluent component yields to estimate

the effects on laboratory animals (see ISO 13344) or for extrapolating the test results to people (see

ISO 13571).
2 © ISO 2016 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
ISO 16312-1:2016(E)
6 The ideal fire effluent toxicity test method
6.1 Fire stages

6.1.1 The combustion and/or pyrolysis conditions in the combustor section of the apparatus reproduce

the conditions in one or more stages of actual fires, including incipient, growing and fully developed fires.

6.1.2 Specimens are burned under constant, pre-selected conditions of thermal insult and oxygen

availability (ventilation). The decomposition conditions and decomposition behaviour of the specimen

enable yields to be characterized for specific condition parameters.

6.1.3 For initial and progressive smouldering, the effects of specimen bulk and thermal properties are

considered.

6.1.4 For growth and early fire simulations, including oxidative pyrolysis and well ventilated flaming,

the in-use exposed surface of a material or product is exposed to the appropriate thermal insult.

6.1.5 For simulation of the developed stages of a fire, full burning of the test specimen is required.

6.2 Applicability

This method tests homogeneous materials (both solid and cellular) and commercial products (especially

layered, non-uniform specimens), both melting and non-melting, in relevant form and under simulated

fire scenarios. The nature and quantity of the decomposition products are representative of actual fire

scenarios.
6.3 Apparatus independence

The apparatus does not impose any significant influence on the results, i.e. the results reflect the

burning behaviour of the test specimen and not the apparatus effects. Flame quenching on surfaces

should not affect the nature of the effluent and the effluent should not be subject to ageing effects. The

combustion zone and effluent plume treatment are designed to ensure that these are achieved.

6.4 Operational efficiency
The test equipment is as simple as possible and capable of safe operation.
6.5 Data generated

6.5.1 The method produces direct measurements of the yields of toxic gases and smoke and/or

measurements of the mass concentration of gases and smoke over time, from which the yields may be

calculated. The gases include those expected to contribute to the toxic potency of fire effluent: CO , CO,

HCN, HCl, HBr, HF, NO, NO , SO , acrolein and formaldehyde.
2 2

NOTE The relative importance of the various gases can depend on the harmful effect being considered.

6.5.2 The method produces a measurement of the mass of the test specimen. Preferably, this is obtained

throughout the test to determine whether the yields of the combustion products are changing as the

combustion proceeds. A determination of the final mass allows for the calculation of average yields over

the duration of the test.
6.5.3 The physical fire model is compatible with the use of bioassay methods.
© ISO 2016 – All rights reserved 3
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO 16312-1:2016(E)
6.6 Accuracy

Sufficient test data and especially gas yield data from the physical fire model have been validated

against full scale and/or real scale fire scenarios. The fire stages for which agreement is achieved

and the degree of agreement are included in Annex A. The test conditions required to achieve that

agreement with the specified fire stages are given.
6.7 Repeatability and reproducibility

Repeatability and reproducibility of data and limits of accuracy have been established by inter-

laboratory trial and are incorporated as part of the standard method.
7 Characteristics of fire stages
7.1 The stages of fire are characterized in ISO 19706.

7.2 The environmental conditions that characterize the stages of both a fire and a physical fire model

are the following:
— ambient temperature;
— temperature at the combustion site (for non-radiation-controlled burning);
— heat flux to the fuel surface (for radiation-controlled burning);
— surface temperature of the test specimen;
— mass loss rate;
— oxygen concentration at the fuel surface and around the flame;

— availability of fresh oxygen to replenish that depleted by combustion (ventilation rate and mixing).

7.2.1 The last three of these parameters are captured in the fuel/air equivalence ratio.

7.2.2 Typical values of these parameters for the various fire stages are presented in ISO 19706:2011,

Table 1.

7.3 The outcomes of the combustion process also form a basis for characterization of the fire stage:

— yields of a (toxicologically important) subset of the hundreds of combustion products;

— carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide ratio ([CO]/[CO ]);

— ratios of “telltale” second-order products of incomplete combustion, such as an aldehyde to carbon

dioxide.
8 Characterization of physical fire models
8.1 Thermal environment in the test specimen
8.1.1 General

The three-dimensional temperature profile around a product undergoing combustion determines both

the burning rate and the yields of the combustion products. The nature of this profile varies with the

fire type and the time at which one is observing the burning (see Annex A).
4 © ISO 2016 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
ISO 16312-1:2016(E)
8.1.2 Smouldering
This type of combustion, occurring only in porous materials, is characterized by

a) the direction in which the combustion front moves relative to the direction from which the air is

arriving, and
b) a peak fuel temperature.
8.1.3 Pyrolysis

Radiative pyrolysis is characterized by a radiant flux to the surface (kW/m ), a surface temperature

and the thermal inertia of the test specimen. Conductive and convective heating are characterized by a

surface temperature and the thermal inertia of the test specimen.
8.1.4 Flaming

Flaming combustion is characterized by any imposed radiant flux from the flames and from the

apparatus surfaces, the fuel surface temperature and the thermal inertia of the test specimen.

8.2 Oxygen availability
8.2.1 General

The oxygen percentage (generally expressed as a mole, mass, or volume fraction or percent) determines

the local and instantaneous burning rate of the product or material. There are multiple ways to

characterize the availability of oxygen for burning.
8.2.2 Fuel/air equivalence ratio

8.2.2.1 Global equivalence ratios are most often cited (although not always cited as such) for the

following reasons:

— the equivalence ratio is not usually uniform over the total combusting surface;

— the local values are not known;

— the instantaneous values vary during a test and there are rarely sufficient data to follow the changes.

Calculation methods are given in ISO 19703.

8.2.2.2 For a flow-through apparatus, the air flow is generally metered. The instantaneous mass loss

is obtained by weighing the sample during the test or estimated from measurement of the principal

carbonaceous by-products (mainly CO and CO) and knowledge of the chemical formula of the sample.

For determination of a global equivalence ratio, the total mass lost is determined by weighing the test

specimen before and after the test.

NOTE Since different products burn at different rates and since products have varying chemical formulae,

using the same air flow for all tests leads to global equivalence ratios that differ from product to product.

8.2.2.3 For a closed-cabinet apparatus, the instantaneous global equivalence ratio is determined from

the sample mass loss rate (or the cumulative concentrations of carbonaceous by-products) and the

oxygen concentration in the chamber.

Generally with these apparatus, there is a local decrease in oxygen concentration and the mixing of

the chamber gases during the test might not be sufficient to create a homogeneous atmosphere. Thus,

determination of the instantaneous equivalence ratio is not possible, and it is necessary to determine a

global equivalence ratio. The decreasing oxygen availability decreases the completeness of combustion

and the nature of the combustion off-gases. Thus, the production of toxic gases is weighted toward

© ISO 2016 – All rights reserved 5
---------------------- Page: 10 ----------------------
ISO 16312-1:2016(E)

the end of the test, and the length of the procedure affects the determination of toxic potency of the

effluent. This change in decomposition conditions during the test makes it difficult to determine yields

for a specified fire condition if the specimen mass is not monitored.

NOTE The long residence time of the combustion products during a test can lead to significant depositing of

combustion products on the chamber walls.
8.2.3 Combustion efficiency

8.2.3.1 Combustion efficiency should be measured continuously during a test since a change in its value

indicates a change in the combustion conditions. However, it is often reported as a global value, averaged

over the full burning time. As noted above, this can be misleading when considering toxicological

implications, since most of the impact results from that period(s) when the combustion efficiency is low.

The different measures (heat release efficiency, oxygen consumption efficiency, carbon dioxide formation

efficiency) can give different values. The formulae and examples are given in ISO 19703.

8.2.3.2 The combustion efficiency is affected if the flames impact surfaces within the test apparatus or

extend into a vitiated region.
8.3 Test specimen

8.3.1 The yields of effluent components from non-homogeneous materials are sensitive to the selection

of a portion of the finished product for testing. For the test output to be accurate, the tested specimen

shall be representative of the composition and conformation of the finished product. Loss of accuracy

is manifested to the extent that component materials are disproportionately sampled, new surfaces are

exposed, protective layers are perforated, etc.

8.3.2 For layered commercial products, the yields depend upon the layers exposed to decomposition in

the physical fire model. For early non-flaming or flaming stages, only the upper surface can be involved.

At intermediate and later stages, the whole composite can be involved. This shall be reflected in the test

conditions.
8.4 Yields of combustion products

8.4.1 The species of interest are toxic gases, soot particulates and total aerosols.

8.4.2 Yields shall be expressed as mass of a species formed per mass of test specimen lost. This enables

calculation of generation rates of effluent per mass of fuel studied and surface area of specimen studied.

8.4.3 The mass of a species formed is generally calculated from measurement of the concentration of

that species. Depending on whether the concentration is measured continuously or from a g

...

NORME ISO
INTERNATIONALE 16312-1
Troisième édition
2016-11-15
Lignes directrices pour évaluer la
validité des modèles de feu physiques
pour l’obtention de données sur les
effluents du feu en vue de l’évaluation
des risques et dangers —
Partie 1:
Critères
Guidance for assessing the validity of physical fire models for
obtaining fire effluent toxicity data for fire hazard and risk
assessment —
Part 1: Criteria
Numéro de référence
ISO 16312-1:2016(F)
ISO 2016
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO 16312-1:2016(F)
DOCUMENT PROTÉGÉ PAR COPYRIGHT
© ISO 2016, Publié en Suisse

Droits de reproduction réservés. Sauf indication contraire, aucune partie de cette publication ne peut être reproduite ni utilisée

sous quelque forme que ce soit et par aucun procédé, électronique ou mécanique, y compris la photocopie, l’affichage sur

l’internet ou sur un Intranet, sans autorisation écrite préalable. Les demandes d’autorisation peuvent être adressées à l’ISO à

l’adresse ci-après ou au comité membre de l’ISO dans le pays du demandeur.
ISO copyright office
Ch. de Blandonnet 8 • CP 401
CH-1214 Vernier, Geneva, Switzerland
Tel. +41 22 749 01 11
Fax +41 22 749 09 47
copyright@iso.org
www.iso.org
ii © ISO 2016 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO 16312-1:2016(F)
Sommaire Page

Avant-propos ..............................................................................................................................................................................................................................iv

Introduction ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................v

1 Domaine d’application ................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

2 Références normatives ................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3 Termes et définitions ....................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

4 Principes généraux ............................................................................................................................................................................................ 1

4.1 Modèle physique du feu .................................................................................................................................................................. 1

4.2 Validité du modèle ............................................................................................................................................................................... 2

4.3 Éprouvettes ................................................................................................................................................................................................ 2

4.4 Conditions de combustion ............................................................................................................................................................ 2

4.5 Caractérisation des effluents ...................................................................................................................................................... 2

5 Portée et utilisation ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 2

6 Méthode idéale d’essai de toxicité des effluents du feu ............................................................................................... 3

6.1 Stades du feu ............................................................................................................................................................................................. 3

6.2 Applicabilité .............................................................................................................................................................................................. 3

6.3 Incidence de l’appareillage sur les résultats ................................................................................................................. 3

6.4 Efficience opérationnelle ............................................................................................................................................................... 3

6.5 Données produites ............................................................................................................................................................................... 3

6.6 Exactitude .................................................................................................................................................................................................... 4

6.7 Répétabilité et reproductibilité ................................................................................................................................................ 4

7 Caractéristiques des stades du feu .................................................................................................................................................... 4

8 Caractérisation des modèles physiques du feu .................................................................................................................... 5

8.1 Ambiances thermiques dans l’éprouvette ....................................................................................................................... 5

8.1.1 Généralités ............................................................................................................................................................................ 5

8.1.2 Feu couvant ........................................................................................................................................................................... 5

8.1.3 Pyrolyse ................................................................................................................................................................................... 5

8.1.4 Flammes .................................................................................................................................................................................. 5

8.2 Apport d’oxygène .................................................................................................................................................................................. 5

8.2.1 Généralités ............................................................................................................................................................................ 5

8.2.2 Rapport d’équivalence combustible/air ...................................................................................................... 5

8.2.3 Rendement de combustion ..................................................................................................................................... 6

8.3 Éprouvette ......... .......................................................................................................................................................................................... 6

8.4 Rendements des produits de combustion ....................................................................................................................... 7

8.5 Instrumentation analytique ......................................................................................................................................................... 7

8.6 Recours aux animaux d’expérience ....................................................................................................................................... 7

9 Exactitude du modèle physique du feu ......................................................................................................................................... 7

Annexe A (informative) Caractéristiques affectant les rendements des produits de combustion ...10

Bibliographie ...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................13

© ISO 2016 – Tous droits réservés iii
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO 16312-1:2016(F)
Avant-propos

L’ISO (Organisation internationale de normalisation) est une fédération mondiale d’organismes

nationaux de normalisation (comités membres de l’ISO). L’élaboration des Normes internationales est

en général confiée aux comités techniques de l’ISO. Chaque comité membre intéressé par une étude

a le droit de faire partie du comité technique créé à cet effet. Les organisations internationales,

gouvernementales et non gouvernementales, en liaison avec l’ISO participent également aux travaux.

L’ISO collabore étroitement avec la Commission électrotechnique internationale (IEC) en ce qui

concerne la normalisation électrotechnique.

Les procédures utilisées pour élaborer le présent document et celles destinées à sa mise à jour sont

décrites dans les Directives ISO/IEC, Partie 1. Il convient, en particulier de prendre note des différents

critères d’approbation requis pour les différents types de documents ISO. Le présent document a été

rédigé conformément aux règles de rédaction données dans les Directives ISO/IEC, Partie 2 (voir www.

iso.org/directives).

L’attention est appelée sur le fait que certains des éléments du présent document peuvent faire l’objet de

droits de propriété intellectuelle ou de droits analogues. L’ISO ne saurait être tenue pour responsable

de ne pas avoir identifié de tels droits de propriété et averti de leur existence. Les détails concernant

les références aux droits de propriété intellectuelle ou autres droits analogues identifiés lors de

l’élaboration du document sont indiqués dans l’Introduction et/ou dans la liste des déclarations de

brevets reçues par l’ISO (voir www.iso.org/brevets).

Les appellations commerciales éventuellement mentionnées dans le présent document sont données

pour information, par souci de commodité, à l’intention des utilisateurs et ne sauraient constituer un

engagement.

Pour une explication de la signification des termes et expressions spécifiques de l’ISO liés à

l’évaluation de la conformité, ou pour toute information au sujet de l’adhésion de l’ISO aux principes

de l’OMC concernant les obstacles techniques au commerce (OTC), voir le lien suivant: Avant-propos —

Informations supplémentaires.

Le comité chargé de l’élaboration du présent document est l’ISO/TC 92, Sécurité au feu, sous-comité

SC 3, Dangers pour les personnes et l’environnement dus au feu.

Cette troisième édition annule et remplace la deuxième édition (ISO 16312-1:2010), dont elle constitue

une révision mineure incluant une mise à jour des références normatives et de la Bibliographie.

Une liste de l’ensemble des parties de la série de normes ISO 16312 est disponible sur le site Web de l’ISO.

iv © ISO 2016 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
ISO 16312-1:2016(F)
Introduction

Assurer le niveau souhaité de sécurité des personnes dans le cadre d’une occupation implique de plus

en plus une évaluation explicite des dangers ou risques d’incendie. Cette évaluation comprend les

éléments suivants:

— des informations relatives aux caractéristiques de la ou des pièces/du ou des bâtiments;

— la nature de l’occupation;
— la nature des occupants;
— les types de feux latents;
— les conséquences à éviter, etc.

Ce type de détermination requiert également des informations sur le dommage potentiel dû aux

effluents produits au cours d’un feu. En raison du coût prohibitif des essais (au feu) de produits en

grandeur réelle dans des cas d’incendies très divers, la plupart des estimations de dommage potentiel

dû aux effluents du feu dépendent des données produites par un modèle physique du feu, un appareillage

d’essai à échelle réduite et le mode opératoire relatif à son utilisation.

Le rôle d’un modèle physique du feu générant la composition exacte des effluents toxiques consiste à

reproduire les caractéristiques essentielles de l’environnement chimique thermique et réactif complexe

au cours de feux à pleine échelle. Ces environnements varient en fonction des caractéristiques physiques

du scénario d’incendie et du temps pendant le déroulement de l’incendie; en outre, une représentation

fidèle de certains phénomènes se produisant au cours de feux à pleine échelle peut s’avérer difficile,

voire impossible, à petite échelle. L’exactitude du modèle physique du feu dépend donc de deux

caractéristiques:

a) dans quelle mesure les conditions de combustion dans l’appareillage à grande échelle correspondent

à celles du stade du feu reproduit;

b) le degré selon lequel les rendements des produits de combustion obtenus par combustion du produit

commercial à pleine échelle sont reproduits par les rendements des éprouvettes de combustion

du produit dans le modèle à petite échelle. Cette mesure étant généralement effectuée pour un

ensemble restreint de produits, l’exactitude qui en découle est donc supposée s’étendre à d’autres

[[11]]

sujets d’essai. Au moins une méthode effectuant cette comparaison a été développée.

Le présent document fournit un guide pour l’évaluation de l’exactitude avec ou sans recours à des

animaux de laboratoire. En règle générale, une estimation exacte du potentiel toxique des effluents

peut être obtenue par le biais d’une analyse d’un petit nombre de gaz (l’hypothèse fondée sur N gaz

ou N-gas hypothesis), décrite dans l’ISO 13571. Cela est particulièrement vrai pour les formulations

des produits similaires à celles pour lesquels le modèle de N gaz a été confirmé. Il existe toutefois des

cas où un appareillage à grande échelle a généré des toxiques peu courants. Par conséquent, pour les

nouvelles formulations de produits commerciaux, il est possible d’améliorer la fiabilité de la précision

des mesures du potentiel toxique dans le dispositif à grande échelle par le biais d’un essai biologique de

confirmation et la corrélation avec des essais au feu en grandeur réelle.
© ISO 2016 – Tous droits réservés v
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
NORME INTERNATIONALE ISO 16312-1:2016(F)
Lignes directrices pour évaluer la validité des modèles de
feu physiques pour l’obtention de données sur les effluents
du feu en vue de l’évaluation des risques et dangers —
Partie 1:
Critères
1 Domaine d’application

Le présent document fournit un guide et des critères techniques applicables à l’évaluation des

modèles physiques du feu (c’est-à-dire les dispositifs de combustion et protocoles de fonctionnement

en laboratoire) utilisés dans le cadre d’études sur la toxicité des effluents afin d’obtenir des données

sur les effluents de produits et matériaux dans des conditions d’incendie touchant à la sécurité des

[[9]]

personnes . Des méthodes d’analyse, méthodes de calcul, modes opératoires d’essais biologiques et

prévisions des effets toxiques des effluents du feu pertinents peuvent être référencés dans l’ISO 19701,

l’ISO 19702, l’ISO 19703, l’ISO 19706 et l’ISO 13344. Les comparaisons de ces données sont détaillées

dans l’ISO 29903. Les prévisions des effets toxiques des effluents du feu peuvent être référencées dans

l’ISO 13571 et l’ISO/TR 13571-2.
2 Références normatives

Les documents suivants cités dans le texte constituent, pour tout ou partie de leur contenu, des

exigences du présent document. Pour les références datées, seule l’édition citée s’applique. Pour les

références non datées, la dernière édition du document de référence s’applique (y compris les éventuels

amendements).

ISO 13571:2012, Composants dangereux du feu — Lignes directrices pour l’estimation du temps disponible

avant que les conditions de tenabilité ne soient compromises
3 Termes et définitions

Pour les besoins du présent document, les termes et définitions donnés dans l’ISO 13943 s’appliquent.

L’ISO et l’IEC tiennent à jour des bases de données terminologiques destinées à être utilisées en

normalisation, consultables aux adresses suivantes:
— IEC Electropedia: disponible à l’adresse http://www.electropedia.org/

— ISO Online browsing platform (ou Plateforme OBP): disponible à l’adresse http://www.iso.org/obp

4 Principes généraux
4.1 Modèle physique du feu

Un modèle physique du feu est caractérisé par les exigences imposées quant à la forme de l’éprouvette,

les conditions opérationnelles de combustion et la capacité d’analyser les produits de combustion.

© ISO 2016 – Tous droits réservés 1
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
ISO 16312-1:2016(F)
4.2 Validité du modèle

Dans le cadre de l’obtention des données destinées à l’évaluation de la toxicité des effluents, la validité

d’un modèle physique du feu est déterminé par le degré de précision avec lequel il reproduit les

rendements des principaux composants toxiques au cours de feux en grandeur réelle.

4.3 Éprouvettes

L’ingénierie de la sécurité incendie requiert l’obtention de données sur les produits ou composants de

produits commerciaux. Dans un essai à échelle réduite, le mode de composition d’une éprouvette peut

affecter la nature et les rendements des produits de combustion.
4.4 Conditions de combustion

Les rendements des produits de combustion dépendent des conditions d’appareillage telles que le

rapport d’équivalence combustible/air, la décomposition avec flammes ou sans flammes, la persistance

de flamme de l’échantillon, la température de l’éprouvette et les effluents produits, la stabilité des

conditions de décomposition et l’interaction de l’appareillage avec le processus de décomposition, avec

les effluents et avec les flammes.
4.5 Caractérisation des effluents

4.5.1 Concernant les effluents des matériaux les plus courants, il s’est avéré que les principaux effets

toxiques aigus dépendent d’un nombre limité de gaz asphyxiants majeurs et d’une gamme légèrement

plus importante d’irritants inorganiques et organiques. L’ISO 13571 a identifié un ensemble de base

de produits de combustion à des fins d’analyse de routine. Des matériaux nouveaux, auparavant non

identifiés comme tels, peuvent devenir des produits toxiques. Par conséquent, une analyse chimique

plus approfondie peut s’avérer nécessaire pour évaluer les effets aigus de façon exhaustive, ainsi que

les toxiques chroniques ou produits écotoxiques. Un essai biologique peut fournir des indications sur

l’importance des toxiques ne figurant pas dans l’ensemble de base. L’ISO 19706 comporte une analyse

plus approfondie de l’utilité des essais biologiques.

4.5.2 Il est essentiel que le modèle physique du feu permette de déterminer avec précision la

composition des effluents chimiques.

4.5.3 Il est souhaitable que le modèle physique du feu prenne en compte une méthode d’analyse

biologique.
5 Portée et utilisation

5.1 La plupart des modélisations informatiques des dangers et risques d’incendie ont besoin

d’informations concernant le dommage potentiel causé par les effluents du feu (gaz, chaleur et fumée)

sur les personnes, ainsi que l’incidence sur leur capacité à s’échapper ou à se réfugier.

5.2 La qualité des données sur les effluents du feu a une incidence considérable sur l’exactitude de la

prévision du degré de sécurité des personnes que la conception d’une occupation peut offrir.

5.3 En raison du nombre important de produits à intégrer dans les évaluations de sécurité incendie,

du coût élevé induit par la réalisation d’essais de produits en grandeur réelle et du nombre limité

d’installations d’essais à grande échelle, les informations sur la toxicité des effluents sont le plus souvent

obtenues par les modèles physiques du feu.

5.4 Un nombre conséquent de modèles physiques du feu sont cités dans les réglementations nationales.

Ces appareillages diffèrent en termes de conception, de fonctionnement et de degré de caractérisation.

Le présent document détermine les caractéristiques d’appareillages recommandées dans la définition

2 © ISO 2016 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
ISO 16312-1:2016(F)

d’un modèle physique du feu, identifie les données appropriées à l’évaluation de la validité d’un modèle

physique du feu et fournit les critères techniques nécessaires à leur évaluation quant à l’exactitude de

leurs données en matière de sécurité des personnes.

5.5 Le présent document ne traite pas des moyens permettant de combiner les rendements des

composants d’effluents en vue d’en estimer les effets sur les animaux de laboratoire (voir l’ISO 13344) ni

de transposer les résultats des essais obtenus (sur l’animal) à l’homme (voir l’ISO 13571).

6 Méthode idéale d’essai de toxicité des effluents du feu
6.1 Stades du feu

6.1.1 Les conditions de combustion et/ou de pyrolyse dans la chambre de combustion de l’appareillage

reproduisent les conditions présentes dans un ou plusieurs stade(s) d’incendies réels, notamment le

stade naissant, le stade de croissance du feu et le stade de feu complètement développé.

6.1.2 Les éprouvettes sont brûlées dans des conditions constantes préétablies d’agression thermique

et de disponibilité de l’oxygène (ventilation). Les conditions de décomposition et le comportement de

décomposition de l’éprouvette permettent aux rendements d’être caractérisés en vue de paramètres de

conditions spécifiques.

6.1.3 Pour un feu couvant initial et progressif, les effets des propriétés générales et thermiques de

l’éprouvette sont pris en compte.

6.1.4 Pour des simulations de croissance du feu et de feu naissant, y compris la pyrolyse oxydante

et la formation de flammes bien ventilées, la surface d’utilisation exposée d’un matériau ou produit est

exposée à l’agression thermique appropriée.

6.1.5 Concernant la simulation des stades avancés d’un feu, il est nécessaire de procéder à la

combustion complète de l’éprouvette.
6.2 Applicabilité

Cette méthode soumet à essai des matériaux homogènes (à la fois solides et alvéolaires) et des produits

commerciaux (notamment des éprouvettes stratifiées non uniformes), en fusion et non fusibles, sous

une forme adéquate et dans des scénarios d’incendie simulé. La nature et la quantité des produits de

décomposition sont représentatives des scénarios d’incendie réel.
6.3 Incidence de l’appareillage sur les résultats

L’appareillage n’exerce aucune influence significative sur les résultats, c’est-à-dire que les résultats

reflètent le comportement de combustion de l’éprouvette et non les effets de l’appareillage. Il convient

que l’extinction de flammes sur les surfaces n’affecte pas la nature des effluents et il convient que les

effluents ne soient pas soumis aux effets du vieillissement. La zone de combustion et le traitement de

panache des effluents sont destinés à assurer le respect de ces recommandations.
6.4 Efficience opérationnelle

Le matériel d’essai est aussi simple que possible et capable de fonctionner en toute sécurité.

6.5 Données produites

6.5.1 La méthode permet d’obtenir des mesures directes des rendements de gaz et fumée toxiques

et/ou des mesures de concentration massique de gaz et de fumée dans le temps, à partir desquelles les

© ISO 2016 – Tous droits réservés 3
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO 16312-1:2016(F)

rendements peuvent être calculés. Les gaz comprennent les gaz censés contribuer au potentiel toxique

des effluents du feu: CO , CO, HCN, HCl, HBr, HF, NO, NO , SO , acroléine et formaldéhyde.

2 2 2

NOTE La relative importance des différents gaz peut dépendre de l’effet nocif considéré.

6.5.2 Cette méthode permet d’obtenir une mesure de la masse de l’éprouvette. Cette mesure est

obtenue de préférence tout au long de l’essai afin de déterminer si les rendements des produits de

combustion varient au fur et à mesure que la combustion se poursuit. La détermination de la masse

finale permet de calculer les rendements moyens pendant la durée de l’essai.

6.5.3 Le modèle physique du feu peut être utilisé avec les méthodes d’essais biologiques.

6.6 Exactitude

Une quantité suffisante de données d’essais et notamment de données de rendements en gaz issues

du modèle physique du feu ont été validées par rapport aux scénarios d’incendie à pleine échelle et/ou

en grandeur réelle. Les stades du feu pour lesquels la concordance est atteinte ainsi que le degré de

concordance figurent dans l’Annexe A. Les conditions d’essai requises pour obtenir cette concordance

avec les stades du feu spécifiés sont données.
6.7 Répétabilité et reproductibilité

La répétabilité et la reproductibilité des données et des limites d’exactitude ont été établies par l’essai

interlaboratoires et sont intégrées dans le cadre de la méthode normalisée.
7 Caractéristiques des stades du feu
7.1 Les stades du feu sont caractérisés dans l’ISO 19706.

7.2 Les conditions environnementales qui caractérisent les stades à la fois du feu et d’un modèle

physique du feu sont les suivantes:
— température ambiante;

— température sur le site de combustion (pour combustion par radiation non contrôlée);

— flux thermique vers la surface d’un produit combustible (pour combustion par radiation contrôlée);

— température de surface de l’éprouvette;
— vitesse de perte de masse;

— concentration en oxygène à la surface d’un produit combustible et autour des flammes;

— apport d’oxygène renouvelé pour compenser le manque d’oxygène dû à la combustion (débit de

renouvellement d’air et mélange d’air).

7.2.1 Les trois derniers paramètres mentionnés ci-dessus sont détectés selon le rapport d’équivalence

combustible/air.

7.2.2 Les valeurs types de ces paramètres pour les différents stades du feu sont présentées dans

l’ISO 19706:2011, Tableau 1.

7.3 Les résultats du processus de combustion servent également de base à la caractérisation du

stade du feu:
4 © ISO 2016 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
ISO 16312-1:2016(F)

— rendements d’un sous-ensemble (important d’un point de vue toxicologique) de centaines de

produits de combustion;
— rapport entre monoxyde de carbone et dioxyde de carbone ([CO]/[CO ]);

— rapports entre produits «témoins» de second ordre à la combustion incomplète, tels qu’entre un

aldéhyde et le dioxyde de carbone.
8 Caractérisation des modèles physiques du feu
8.1 Ambiances thermiques dans l’éprouvette
8.1.1 Généralités

Le profil tridimensionnel de température autour d’un produit soumis à la combustion détermine à la

fois la vitesse de propagation de flammes et les rendements des produits de combustion. La nature de

ce profil varie selon le type de feu et l’heure précise à laquelle l’observateur assiste à la combustion

(voir l’Annexe A).
8.1.2 Feu couvant

Ce type de combustion, qui se produit seulement dans des matériaux poreux, est caractérisé par:

a) la direction dans laquelle le front de combustion se déplace par rapport à la direction de l’arrivée

d’air; et
b) une température du combustible maximale.
8.1.3 Pyrolyse

La pyrolyse radiative est caractérisée par un flux énergétique vers la surface (kW/m ), une température

de surface et l’inertie thermique de l’éprouvette. L’échauffement par conduction et l’échauffement par

convection sont caractérisés par une température de surface et l’inertie thermique de l’éprouvette.

8.1.4 Flammes

La combustion avec flammes est caractérisée par tout flux énergétique imposé émanant des flammes

et des surfaces de l’appareillage, la température de surface du combustible et l’inertie thermique de

l’éprouvette.
8.2 Apport d’oxygène
8.2.1 Généralités

Le pourcentage d’oxygène (généralement exprimé en mole, masse, fraction volumique ou pourcentage)

détermine la vitesse de propagation de flammes locale et instantanée du produit ou matériau. Il existe

plusieurs façons de caractériser l’apport d’oxygène concernant la propagation de flammes.

8.2.2 Rapport d’équivalence combustible/air

8.2.2.1 Les rapports d’équivalence globaux sont le plus souvent cités (bien que pas toujours cités

comme tels) pour les raisons suivantes:

— le rapport d’équivalence n’est généralement pas uniforme sur la totalité de la surface de combustion;

— les valeurs locales ne sont pas connues;
© ISO 2016 – Tous droits réservés 5
---------------------- Page: 10 ----------------------
ISO 16312-1:2016(F)

— les valeurs instantanées varient au cours d’un essai et il existe peu de données suffisantes permettant

de suivre leur variation.
Les méthodes de calculs sont données dans l’ISO 19703.

8.2.2.2 Pour un appareillage avec renouvellement continu, le flux d’air est généralement analysé. La

perte de masse instantanée est obtenue en pesant l’échantillon au cours de l’essai ou est estimée à partir

des mesures des principaux sous-produits carbonés (principalement CO et CO) et grâce à la maîtrise de

la formule chimique de l’échantillon. Pour la détermination d’un rapport d’équivalence global, la masse

totale perdue est déterminée en pesant l’éprouvette avant et après l’essai.

NOTE Étant donné que différents produits brûlent à des vitesses différentes et qu’ils ont des formules

chimiques variables, l’utilisation d’un flux d’air identique pour tous les essais aboutit à des rapports d’équivalence

globaux qui diffèrent d’un produit à un autre.

8.2.2.3 Pour un appareillage en enceinte fermée, le rapport d’équivalence global est déterminé d’après

la vitesse de perte de masse de l’échantillon (ou les conc
...

Questions, Comments and Discussion

Ask us and Technical Secretary will try to provide an answer. You can facilitate discussion about the standard in here.