This document provides both general and specific ergonomic requirements and recommendations for accessible tactile/haptic interactive systems, including accessible tactile/haptic interactions. This document provides guidance for increasing the accessibility of interactive systems making use of tactile/haptic input/output modalities such as gestures, vibration, and force feedback. The guidance provided also supports alternative input modalities and the use of different output representations. This document provides guidance for tactile/haptic interactions that is applicable to a variety of interactive systems, including assistive technologies (AT).

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This document describes the method for selection of a language in information and communication (ICT) devices. This document is intended to apply to the user interface design of ICT devices which have a function for setting the appropriate language environment when an end-user wants to initiate its operation.

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This document specifies mechanisms to choose between the keyboard groups specified in the ISO/IEC 9995 series, national keyboards standards, or other keyboard definitions. These mechanisms primarily become useful when the stipulated marking on the key top can be dynamically displayed on the key top.

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This document specifies the methods to improve accessibility of the visual display on small consumer products in order to minimize inconveniences that a variety of users including people with disabilities and the elderly can experience while using those products. In particular, this document focusses on how to present information on small visual displays to make the product more accessible for older people and people with low vision or colour deficiency. The provision of different modalities or alternative ways of displaying information to make the product more accessible is not covered in this document. This document only covers accessibility with regard to visual presentation of information, not audio or tactile-based display methods. NOTE 1 Accessibility of a product can be enhanced by adopting alternative means to the visual presentation of the information, which is not covered in this document. For information about alternative forms of presentation, ISO/IEC Guide 71, ISO 9241‑112 and ISO 9241‑171 can be useful. NOTE 2 A comprehensive catalogue of accessibility needs and strategies for accommodation for all users (not only those with visual impairments) is out of scope for this document. Readers interested in this regard can refer to ISO/IEC 29138‑1. This document applies to various consumer products equipped with digital displays, in which the information about operation of the product is visually presented. The products are usually equipped with built-in display panels. The consumer products include those hand-held products that can be easily carried by the user or those that are not portable but equipped with small displays, though the size of the product or the display is not specified in this document. NOTE 3 This document focusses on the accessibility of small displays, regardless of the size of the consumer product. NOTE 4 Examples include, but are not limited to, electronic thermometers, digital cameras, air-conditioning systems, remote controllers. This document is not applicable to those products with high flexibility or adjustability in presenting information on the display. Some examples are web- or application-based displays of ICT devices such as smart phones, smart TVs, and tablet PCs. It is not applicable to touch-based displays that have both the functions of display and control. Some examples are touch interfaces of smart watches or digital cameras. Finally, accessibility issues relating to indicating lamps/lights used for simple alerts or alarm are covered in ISO 24550 and are not considered in this document. NOTE 5 There are many accessibility issues in the touch interface related to information presentation as well as control function and they need to be dealt with together. It is possible that some guidance of this document is not applicable to some products, such as oral or ear thermometers, which have extremely small in-built displays.

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This document provides an overview of recent research on readability of electrophoretic displays. It also provides information for evaluating readability of electrophoretic displays and defining the context of their use.

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This standard provides requirements and recommendations for human-centred design principles and activities throughout the life cycle of computer-based interactive systems. It is intended to be used by those managing design processes, and is concerned with ways in which both hardware and software components of interactive systems can enhance human-system interaction.This document provides an overview of human-centred design activities. It does not provide detailed coverage of the methods and techniques required for human-centred design, nor does it address health or safety aspects in detail. Although it addresses the planning and management of human-centred design, it does not address all aspects of project management. The information in this document is intended for use by those responsible for planning and managing projects that design and develop interactive systems. It therefore addresses technical human factors and ergonomics issues only to the extent necessary to allow such individuals to understand their relevance and importance in the design process as a whole. It also provides a framework for human factors and usability professionals involved in human-centred design. Detailed human factors/ergonomics, usability and accessibility issues are dealt with more fully in a number of standards including other parts of ISO 9241 (see Annex A) and ISO 6385, which sets out the broad principles of ergonomics. The requirements and recommendations in this document can benefit all parties involved in human-centred design and development. Annex B provides a checklist that can be used to support claims of conformance with this document.

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Within the general scope described in ISO/IEC 9995-1, this part of ISO/IEC 9995 specifies the alphanumeric section of a keyboard and the division of that section into zones; the arrangement, number, and location of the keys in the alphanumeric zone ZA0 of the alphanumeric section; and the layout and allocation of several control functions to the keys in the function zones of the alphanumeric section.

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Within the general scope described in ISO/IEC 9995-1, this part of ISO/IEC 9995 specifies symbols for functions found on any type of numeric, alphanumeric or composite keyboards. Each of these symbols is intended to be considered as universal and nonlanguage related equivalent of names for the function they represent. Names of functions and descriptions are given in English and French.

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This document provides guidance for the auditory presentation of information controlled by software, irrespective of the device. It includes specific properties such as the syntactic or semantic aspects of information, e.g. coding techniques, and gives provisions for the organization of information taking account of human perception and memory capabilities. This document does not address the hardware issues of the transmission and the production of auditory information. NOTE 1 Volume is dependent on hardware and thus cannot always be absolutely controlled by software. Environmental conditions can also affect the ability for sounds to be perceived, which can be beyond the ability of the software to take into account. This document does not apply to auditory alarms, warnings or other safety-related uses of auditory information. NOTE 2 Safety-related uses of auditory presentation of information are covered in various domain specific standards, such as ISO 7731:2003 which deals with auditory danger signals for public and work areas, and IEC 60601-1-8:2006 which provides very specific requirements for auditory alarms for medical devices. While this document applies to the presentation of all non-safety-related information, it does not include application domain specific guidance (e.g., audio instructions for consumer products). This document can be utilized throughout the design process (e.g. as specification and guidance for designers during design or as a basis for heuristic evaluation). Its provisions for the presentation of information depend on the auditory design approach, the task, the user, the environment and the single or multiple technologies that can be used for presenting the information. Consequently, this document cannot be applied without knowledge of the context of use. It is not intended to be used as a prescriptive set of rules to be applied in its entirety but rather assumes that the designer has proper information available concerning task and user requirements and understands the use of available technology. This document does not address visual or tactile/haptic presentation of information or modality shifting for the presentation of auditory information in other modalities. NOTE 3 ISO 9241-112 provides high-level ergonomic guidance that applies to all modalities.

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This document provides requirements and recommendations for human-centred design principles and activities throughout the life cycle of computer-based interactive systems. It is intended to be used by those managing design processes, and is concerned with ways in which both hardware and software components of interactive systems can enhance human?system interaction.
NOTE Computer-based interactive systems vary in scale and complexity. Examples include off-the-shelf (shrink-wrap) software products, custom office systems, process control systems, automated banking systems, Web sites and applications, and consumer products such as vending machines, mobile phones and digital television. Throughout this document, such systems are generally referred to as products, systems or services although, for simplicity, sometimes only one term is used.
This document provides an overview of human-centred design activities. It does not provide detailed coverage of the methods and techniques required for human-centred design, nor does it address health or safety aspects in detail. Although it addresses the planning and management of human-centred design, it does not address all aspects of project management.
The information in this document is intended for use by those responsible for planning and managing projects that design and develop interactive systems. It therefore addresses technical human factors and ergonomics issues only to the extent necessary to allow such individuals to understand their relevance and importance in the design process as a whole. It also provides a framework for human factors and usability professionals involved in human-centred design. Detailed human factors/ergonomics, usability and accessibility issues are dealt with more fully in a number of standards including other parts of ISO 9241 (see Annex A) and ISO 6385, which sets out the broad principles of ergonomics.
The requirements and recommendations in this document can benefit all parties involved in human-centred design and development. Annex B provides a checklist that can be used to support claims of conformance with this document.

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This document provides requirements and recommendations for human-centred design principles and activities throughout the life cycle of computer-based interactive systems. It is intended to be used by those managing design processes, and is concerned with ways in which both hardware and software components of interactive systems can enhance human?system interaction. NOTE Computer-based interactive systems vary in scale and complexity. Examples include off-the-shelf (shrink-wrap) software products, custom office systems, process control systems, automated banking systems, Web sites and applications, and consumer products such as vending machines, mobile phones and digital television. Throughout this document, such systems are generally referred to as products, systems or services although, for simplicity, sometimes only one term is used. This document provides an overview of human-centred design activities. It does not provide detailed coverage of the methods and techniques required for human-centred design, nor does it address health or safety aspects in detail. Although it addresses the planning and management of human-centred design, it does not address all aspects of project management. The information in this document is intended for use by those responsible for planning and managing projects that design and develop interactive systems. It therefore addresses technical human factors and ergonomics issues only to the extent necessary to allow such individuals to understand their relevance and importance in the design process as a whole. It also provides a framework for human factors and usability professionals involved in human-centred design. Detailed human factors/ergonomics, usability and accessibility issues are dealt with more fully in a number of standards including other parts of ISO 9241 (see Annex A) and ISO 6385, which sets out the broad principles of ergonomics. The requirements and recommendations in this document can benefit all parties involved in human-centred design and development. Annex B provides a checklist that can be used to support claims of conformance with this document.

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This document describes the processes and specifies the outcomes by which human-centred design (HCD) is carried out within organizations. Human-centred design aims to meet requirements for human-centred quality (see Annex E) throughout the life cycle of interactive systems. The processes are described from the viewpoint of those responsible for the analysis, design and evaluation of the human use of interactive systems. The process descriptions include the purpose, benefits, outcomes, typical activities and work products for each process, and are for use in the specification, implementation, assessment and improvement of the activities used for human-centred design and operation in any type of system life cycle. They can also provide the basis for professional development and certification.
The processes are associated with the domains of ergonomics/human factors, human?computer interaction, usability and user experience. This document does not include specific methods for human-centred design, nor does it describe processes for organizational redesign.
The scope of this document does not include other aspects of ergonomics, which include the design of organizations as well as systems for human use, and which extend beyond the domain of design; for example in the forensic analysis of the causes of accidents and in the generation of data and methods of measurement.
NOTE 1 ISO/TS 18152 is a related standard with a broader scope than this document. It includes the organizational processes for the identification and handling of issues related to both users and other stakeholders.
The intended application of this document is computer-based interactive systems. While the processes apply to interactive systems that deliver services, they do not cover the design of those services. The relevant aspects of the processes can also be applied to simple or non-computer?based interactive systems.
NOTE 2 Human-centred design concentrates on the human-centred aspects of design and not on other aspects of design such as mechanical construction, programming or the basic design of services.
The process descriptions in this document provide the basis for a rigorous assessment of an enterprise's capability to carry out human-centred processes in compliance with the ISO/IEC 33000 family of standards.
This document is intended for use by organizations that want to address and improve their treatment of human-centred design of either their internal systems or the products and services they provide, and the procurement of systems and parts of systems. The processes can be applied by small- and medium-sized enterprises as well as by large organizations.
Copyright release for the process descriptions
Users of this document may freely reproduce the process descriptions contained in Clause 9 as part of any process assessment model, or as part of any demonstration of compatibility with this document, so that it can be used for its intended purpose.

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This document describes the processes and specifies the outcomes by which human-centred design (HCD) is carried out within organizations. Human-centred design aims to meet requirements for human-centred quality (see Annex E) throughout the life cycle of interactive systems. The processes are described from the viewpoint of those responsible for the analysis, design and evaluation of the human use of interactive systems. The process descriptions include the purpose, benefits, outcomes, typical activities and work products for each process, and are for use in the specification, implementation, assessment and improvement of the activities used for human-centred design and operation in any type of system life cycle. They can also provide the basis for professional development and certification. The processes are associated with the domains of ergonomics/human factors, human?computer interaction, usability and user experience. This document does not include specific methods for human-centred design, nor does it describe processes for organizational redesign. The scope of this document does not include other aspects of ergonomics, which include the design of organizations as well as systems for human use, and which extend beyond the domain of design; for example in the forensic analysis of the causes of accidents and in the generation of data and methods of measurement. NOTE 1 ISO/TS 18152 is a related standard with a broader scope than this document. It includes the organizational processes for the identification and handling of issues related to both users and other stakeholders. The intended application of this document is computer-based interactive systems. While the processes apply to interactive systems that deliver services, they do not cover the design of those services. The relevant aspects of the processes can also be applied to simple or non-computer?based interactive systems. NOTE 2 Human-centred design concentrates on the human-centred aspects of design and not on other aspects of design such as mechanical construction, programming or the basic design of services. The process descriptions in this document provide the basis for a rigorous assessment of an enterprise's capability to carry out human-centred processes in compliance with the ISO/IEC 33000 family of standards. This document is intended for use by organizations that want to address and improve their treatment of human-centred design of either their internal systems or the products and services they provide, and the procurement of systems and parts of systems. The processes can be applied by small- and medium-sized enterprises as well as by large organizations. Copyright release for the process descriptions Users of this document may freely reproduce the process descriptions contained in Clause 9 as part of any process assessment model, or as part of any demonstration of compatibility with this document, so that it can be used for its intended purpose.

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This document specifies ergonomic principles which apply to the user requirements, design, and procurement of the physical equipment and environment, which contribute to the context of use of interactive systems. It provides requirements, recommendations and explanations related to these principles. In particular, the general principles and requirements specified in this document apply to the standards specifying functional design of furniture and equipment constituting the environment. The principles specified in this document utilize ergonomic knowledge (from the disciplines anthropometry, acoustics, vision, thermal environments, indoor air quality, mechanical vibrations, etc.) to design and evaluate environments that enhance usability (effectiveness, efficiency and satisfaction), accessibility, performance and well-being for organized and non-organized use of interactive systems. The intended users of this document include: — developers of systems, products and services; — public and corporate purchasers; — occupational health and safety professionals; — architects and interior designers; — human resource professionals; — usability/ergonomics/human factors professionals.

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This document establishes optical, geometrical and visual inspection methods for the assessment of a display in various contexts of use according to ISO 9241‑303.

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This document provides a framework for understanding the concept of usability and applying it
to situations where people use interactive systems, and other types of systems (including built
environments), and products (including industrial and consumer products) and services (including
technical and personal services).
NOTE In this document, the phrase “object of interest” refers to the system, product or service for which
usability is being considered (see 8.1).
This document:
— explains that usability is an outcome of use;
— defines key terms and concepts;
— identifies the fundamentals of usability; and
— explains the application of the concept of usability.
It does not describe specific processes or methods for taking account of usability in design development
or evaluation.
The intended users of this document include:
— usability/ergonomics/human factors professionals;
— designers and developers of systems, products and services;
— quality assurance personnel;
— public and corporate purchasers; and
— consumer organizations.
The most common applications of this document are in design and evaluation.

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This document establishes optical, geometrical and visual inspection methods for the assessment of a display in various contexts of use according to ISO 9241‑303.

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Within the general scope described in ISO/IEC 9995-1, this part of ISO/IEC 9995 defines the allocation on a
keyboard of a set of graphic characters which, when used in combination with an existing national version
keyboard layout or the complementary Latin group layout as defined in this part of ISO/IEC 9995, allows the
input of a minimum character repertoire as defined by collection 281 (MES-1) specified in ISO/IEC 10646 and
proposes extensions of this minimum repertoire.
This part of ISO/IEC 9995 is primarily intended for word-processing and text-processing applications.

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This document establishes optical, geometrical and visual inspection methods for the assessment of a display in various contexts of use according to ISO 9241‑303.

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ISO 9241-11:2018 provides a framework for understanding the concept of usability and applying it to situations where people use interactive systems, and other types of systems (including built environments), and products (including industrial and consumer products) and services (including technical and personal services).
NOTE In this document, the phrase "object of interest" refers to the system, product or service for which usability is being considered (see 8.1).
ISO 9241-11:2018:
- explains that usability is an outcome of use;
- defines key terms and concepts;
- identifies the fundamentals of usability; and
- explains the application of the concept of usability.
ISO 9241-11:2018 does not describe specific processes or methods for taking account of usability in design development or evaluation.
The intended users of this document include:
- usability/ergonomics/human factors professionals;
- designers and developers of systems, products and services;
- quality assurance personnel;
- public and corporate purchasers; and
- consumer organizations.
The most common applications of this document are in design and evaluation.

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ISO 9241-11:2018 provides a framework for understanding the concept of usability and applying it to situations where people use interactive systems, and other types of systems (including built environments), and products (including industrial and consumer products) and services (including technical and personal services). NOTE In this document, the phrase "object of interest" refers to the system, product or service for which usability is being considered (see 8.1). ISO 9241-11:2018: - explains that usability is an outcome of use; - defines key terms and concepts; - identifies the fundamentals of usability; and - explains the application of the concept of usability. ISO 9241-11:2018 does not describe specific processes or methods for taking account of usability in design development or evaluation. The intended users of this document include: - usability/ergonomics/human factors professionals; - designers and developers of systems, products and services; - quality assurance personnel; - public and corporate purchasers; and - consumer organizations. The most common applications of this document are in design and evaluation.

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Selection or creation of the gestures to be used in a gesture interface is guided by this standard. It addresses the usability of gestures and provides information on the design of gestures, the process and relevant parameters. In addition, the standard provides guidance on how gestures should be documented. The standard is concerned with the gestures expressed by a human and is not concerned with the system response generated when users are performing these gestures.

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ISO 9241-125 provides requirements and recommendations for the visual presentation of information and specific properties such as the syntactic or semantic aspects of information, e.g. coding techniques. These requirements and recommendations can be utilised throughout the design process (e.g., as specification and guidance for designers during design or as a basis for heuristic evaluation).
This International Standard applies to all visual user interfaces controlled by software. Requirements or recommendations that do not apply to all types of visual interfaces clearly indicate any limitations to their applicability.
Presentation of information depends upon the visual design approach, the task, the user, the environment and the single or multiple technologies that might be used for presenting the information. Consequently, ISO 9241-125 cannot be applied without knowledge of the context of use, and it is not intended to be used as a prescriptive set of rules to be applied in its entirety. Rather, it assumes that the designer has proper information available concerning task and user requirements and understands the use of available technology.
Some of the requirements and recommendations in this International Standard are based on Latin-based language usage and might not apply, or might need to be modified, for use with a different language. In applying those requirements and recommendations that assume a specific language base (e.g., alphabetic ordering of coding information, items in a list), it is important that care is taken to follow the intent of the standard when translation is required to a different language.
ISO 9241-125 does not address auditory or tactile/ haptic presentation of information or modality shifting in order to present visual information in other modalities.

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ISO 9241-940:2017 - describes the types of methods that can be used for the evaluation of haptic devices and of systems that include haptic devices, - specifies a procedure for the evaluation of haptic interactions by a usability walkthrough or usability test (see Annex J), and - provides guidance on the types of methods that are appropriate for the evaluation of specific attributes of haptic systems, cross-referenced to the guidance in the relevant clauses of other International Standards (see Annexes A, B, C, D, E, F and G). It applies to the following types of interaction: - augmented reality - information overlaid on a real scene, e.g. vibrating belt indicating distance; - gesture control of a device or a virtual scenario; - unidirectional interaction such as a vibrating phone or a vibrating belt; - virtual environment - virtual space with which a user can interact with the aid of a haptic device. ISO 9241-940:2017 applies to the following types of devices: - gesture sensor, e.g. video that discerns 3D hand movements, touch screens that sense 2D touches; - kinaesthetic haptic device, e.g. desktop haptic interface; - tactile display, e.g. vibrating phone. ISO 9241-940:2017 is not applicable to standard input devices such as keyboards, mice or track balls. NOTE ISO 9241‑400 covers standard input devices, and ISO 9241‑411 applies to the evaluation of input devices such as keyboards and mice. ISO 9241-940:2017 can be used to identify the types of methods and measures for - establishing benchmarks, - establishing requirements for haptic interaction, - identifying problems with haptic interaction (formative evaluation), and - use of the criteria to establish whether a haptic system meets requirements (summative evaluation).

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This part of ISO 9241 provides ergonomic requirements for stereoscopic displays using glasses. These requirements are stated as performance specifications, aimed at ensuring effective and comfortable viewing conditions for users, and at reducing visual fatigue caused by stereoscopic images on stereoscopic display using glasses. Test methods and metrology, yielding conformance measurements and criteria, are provided for design evaluation.
This part of ISO 9241 is applicable to temporally or spatially interlaced type. These are implemented by flatpanel displays, projection displays, etc.
Stereoscopic displays using glasses can be applied to many contexts of use. However, this part focuses on business and home leisure applications (i.e., observing moving images, games, and so on). Only dark environments are specified in the current version of this part.

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ISO 9241-960:2017 gives guidance on the selection or creation of the gestures to be used in a gesture interface. It addresses the usability of gestures and provides information on their design, the design process and relevant parameters that are to be considered. In addition, it provides guidance on how gestures should be documented. This document is concerned with gestures expressed by a human and not with the system response generated when users are performing these gestures.
NOTE 1 Specific gestures are standardized within ISO/IEC 14754 and the ISO/IEC 30113 series.
NOTE 2 Input devices such as tablets or spatial gesture recognition devices can capture gestures in 2D or 3D. All human gestures are 3D.

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ISO 9241-125:2017 provides guidance for the visual presentation of information controlled by software, irrespective of the device. It includes specific properties such as the syntactic or semantic aspects of information, e.g. coding techniques, and gives provisions for the organization of information taking account of human perception and memory capabilities. Those of its provisions that do not apply to specific types of visual interfaces clearly indicate any limitations to their applicability. It does not address specific details of charts, graphs or information visualization.
ISO 9241-125:2017 can be utilized throughout the design process (e.g. as specification and guidance for designers during design or as a basis for heuristic evaluation). Its provisions for the presentation of information depend upon the visual design approach, the task, the user, the environment and the single or multiple technologies that might be used for presenting the information. Consequently, this document cannot be applied without knowledge of the context of use. It is not intended to be used as a prescriptive set of rules to be applied in its entirety but rather assumes that the designer has proper information available concerning task and user requirements and understands the use of available technology.
Some of the provisions of this document are based on Latin-based language usage and might not apply, or might need to be modified, for use with languages that use other alphabets. In applying those that assume a specific language base (e.g. alphabetic ordering of coding information, items in a list), it is important that care is taken to follow its intent of the standard when translation is required to a different language.
ISO 9241-125:2017 does not address auditory or tactile/haptic presentation of information or modality shifting for the presentation of visual information in other modalities.
NOTE ISO 9241‑112 provides high-level ergonomic guidance that applies to all modalities.

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ISO 9241-960:2017 gives guidance on the selection or creation of the gestures to be used in a gesture interface. It addresses the usability of gestures and provides information on their design, the design process and relevant parameters that are to be considered. In addition, it provides guidance on how gestures should be documented. This document is concerned with gestures expressed by a human and not with the system response generated when users are performing these gestures. NOTE 1 Specific gestures are standardized within ISO/IEC 14754 and the ISO/IEC 30113 series. NOTE 2 Input devices such as tablets or spatial gesture recognition devices can capture gestures in 2D or 3D. All human gestures are 3D.

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    24 pages
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    26 pages
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ISO 9241-125:2017 provides guidance for the visual presentation of information controlled by software, irrespective of the device. It includes specific properties such as the syntactic or semantic aspects of information, e.g. coding techniques, and gives provisions for the organization of information taking account of human perception and memory capabilities. Those of its provisions that do not apply to specific types of visual interfaces clearly indicate any limitations to their applicability. It does not address specific details of charts, graphs or information visualization. ISO 9241-125:2017 can be utilized throughout the design process (e.g. as specification and guidance for designers during design or as a basis for heuristic evaluation). Its provisions for the presentation of information depend upon the visual design approach, the task, the user, the environment and the single or multiple technologies that might be used for presenting the information. Consequently, this document cannot be applied without knowledge of the context of use. It is not intended to be used as a prescriptive set of rules to be applied in its entirety but rather assumes that the designer has proper information available concerning task and user requirements and understands the use of available technology. Some of the provisions of this document are based on Latin-based language usage and might not apply, or might need to be modified, for use with languages that use other alphabets. In applying those that assume a specific language base (e.g. alphabetic ordering of coding information, items in a list), it is important that care is taken to follow its intent of the standard when translation is required to a different language. ISO 9241-125:2017 does not address auditory or tactile/haptic presentation of information or modality shifting for the presentation of visual information in other modalities. NOTE ISO 9241‑112 provides high-level ergonomic guidance that applies to all modalities.

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ISO 9241-392:2015 establishes recommendations for reducing the potential visual discomfort and visual fatigue experienced during viewing of stereoscopic images under defined viewing conditions. Visual fatigue and discomfort might be produced by the stereoscopic optical stimulus of disparate images that were presented binocularly.
ISO 9241-392:2015 is also applicable to the final products of stereoscopic presentations which depend on stereoscopic image content and stereoscopic displays when viewed under appropriate defined conditions. Therefore, the recommendations are intended for people responsible for the design, development, and supply of stereoscopic image content as well as stereoscopic displays.
NOTE 1 See Annex B for appropriate viewing conditions.
The recommendations in this part of ISO 9241 are applicable to stereoscopic displays such as those with glasses and two-view autostereoscopic displays, stereoscopic head-mounted displays, and stereoscopic projectors. Moreover, they are applicable to stereoscopic image content intended to be presented on the above-mentioned stereoscopic displays and stereoscopic presentations that are realized by the combinations of these images and displays.
NOTE 2 Annex C presents numerical criteria as an informative reference.
NOTE 3 Other guidance might need to be established by referring to this part of ISO 9241 when requirements and recommendations specific to each type of stereoscopic image content or stereoscopic display become necessary.
NOTE 4 ITU generally sets the standards for broadcasting.
NOTE 5 ISO 9241‑303:2011, Annex E provides guidelines for virtual displays which are intended for stereoscopic head-mounted displays.

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This part of ISO 9241 provides ergonomic design principles for interactive systems related to the software controlled presentation of information by user interfaces in the three main modalities (visual, auditory, tactile/haptic) typically used in ICT. These principles apply to the perception and understanding of presented information. These principles are applicable in the analysis, design and evaluation of interactive systems. This part of ISO 9241 also provides recommendations corresponding to the principles. The recommendations for each of the principles are not exhaustive and are not necessarily independent from one another.
While this part of ISO 9241 is applicable to all types of interactive systems, it does not cover the specifics of particular application domains. This part of ISO 9241 also applies to outputs from interactive systems (such as printed documents e.g. invoices).
The guidance in this International Standard for presenting information is aimed at helping the user to accomplish tasks. This guidance is not aimed at the presentation of information for other reasons (e.g. corporate branding or advertising).
It is intended for the following types of users:
- user interface designers, who will apply the guidance during the development process;
- developers, who will apply the guidance during design and implementation of system functionality;
- evaluators, who are responsible for ensuring that products meet the recommendations;
- designers of user interface development tools and style guides to be used by user interface designers;
- buyers, who will reference this part of ISO 9241 during product procurement.

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ISO 9241-333:2017 specifies ergonomic requirements for stereoscopic displays using glasses designed to produce or facilitate binocular parallax. These requirements are stated as performance specifications, aimed at ensuring effective and comfortable viewing conditions for users, and at reducing visual fatigue caused by stereoscopic images on stereoscopic display using glasses. Test methods and metrology, yielding conformance measurements and criteria, are provided for design evaluation. See Annex B for measurement procedures.
ISO 9241-333:2017 is applicable to temporally or spatially interlaced types of display. These are implemented by flat-panel displays, projection displays, etc.
Stereoscopic displays using glasses can be applied to many contexts of use. However, this document focuses on business and home leisure applications (i.e. observing moving images, games, etc.). Only dark environments are specified in this document.
For technical explanation of display technologies, see Annex C.

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ISO 9241-333:2017 specifies ergonomic requirements for stereoscopic displays using glasses designed to produce or facilitate binocular parallax. These requirements are stated as performance specifications, aimed at ensuring effective and comfortable viewing conditions for users, and at reducing visual fatigue caused by stereoscopic images on stereoscopic display using glasses. Test methods and metrology, yielding conformance measurements and criteria, are provided for design evaluation. See Annex B for measurement procedures. ISO 9241-333:2017 is applicable to temporally or spatially interlaced types of display. These are implemented by flat-panel displays, projection displays, etc. Stereoscopic displays using glasses can be applied to many contexts of use. However, this document focuses on business and home leisure applications (i.e. observing moving images, games, etc.). Only dark environments are specified in this document. For technical explanation of display technologies, see Annex C.

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ISO 9241-112:2017 establishes ergonomic design principles for interactive systems related to the software-controlled presentation of information by user interfaces. It applies to the three main modalities (visual, auditory, tactile/haptic) typically used in information and communication technology. These principles apply to the perception and understanding of presented information. These principles are applicable in the analysis, design, and evaluation of interactive systems. This document also provides recommendations corresponding to the principles. The recommendations for each of the principles are not exhaustive and are not necessarily independent from one another.
While this document is applicable to all types of interactive systems, it does not cover the specifics of particular application domains. This document also applies to outputs from interactive systems (such as printed documents, e.g. invoices).
The guidance in this document for presenting information is aimed at helping the user to accomplish tasks. This guidance is not aimed at the presentation of information for other reasons (e.g. corporate branding or advertising).
It is intended for the following types of users:
- user interface designers, who will apply the guidance during the development process;
- developers, who will apply the guidance during design and implementation of system functionality;
- evaluators, who are responsible for ensuring that products meet the recommendations;
- designers of user interface development tools and style guides to be used by user interface designers;
- project managers, who are responsible for managing development processes;
- buyers, who will reference this document during product procurement.

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ISO 9241-112:2017 establishes ergonomic design principles for interactive systems related to the software-controlled presentation of information by user interfaces. It applies to the three main modalities (visual, auditory, tactile/haptic) typically used in information and communication technology. These principles apply to the perception and understanding of presented information. These principles are applicable in the analysis, design, and evaluation of interactive systems. This document also provides recommendations corresponding to the principles. The recommendations for each of the principles are not exhaustive and are not necessarily independent from one another. While this document is applicable to all types of interactive systems, it does not cover the specifics of particular application domains. This document also applies to outputs from interactive systems (such as printed documents, e.g. invoices). The guidance in this document for presenting information is aimed at helping the user to accomplish tasks. This guidance is not aimed at the presentation of information for other reasons (e.g. corporate branding or advertising). It is intended for the following types of users: - user interface designers, who will apply the guidance during the development process; - developers, who will apply the guidance during design and implementation of system functionality; - evaluators, who are responsible for ensuring that products meet the recommendations; - designers of user interface development tools and style guides to be used by user interface designers; - project managers, who are responsible for managing development processes; - buyers, who will reference this document during product procurement.

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ISO 9241-392:2015 establishes recommendations for reducing the potential visual discomfort and visual fatigue experienced during viewing of stereoscopic images under defined viewing conditions. Visual fatigue and discomfort might be produced by the stereoscopic optical stimulus of disparate images that were presented binocularly.
ISO 9241-392:2015 is also applicable to the final products of stereoscopic presentations which depend on stereoscopic image content and stereoscopic displays when viewed under appropriate defined conditions. Therefore, the recommendations are intended for people responsible for the design, development, and supply of stereoscopic image content as well as stereoscopic displays.
NOTE 1 See Annex B for appropriate viewing conditions.
The recommendations in this part of ISO 9241 are applicable to stereoscopic displays such as those with glasses and two-view autostereoscopic displays, stereoscopic head-mounted displays, and stereoscopic projectors. Moreover, they are applicable to stereoscopic image content intended to be presented on the above-mentioned stereoscopic displays and stereoscopic presentations that are realized by the combinations of these images and displays.
NOTE 2 Annex C presents numerical criteria as an informative reference.
NOTE 3 Other guidance might need to be established by referring to this part of ISO 9241 when requirements and recommendations specific to each type of stereoscopic image content or stereoscopic display become necessary.
NOTE 4 ITU generally sets the standards for broadcasting.
NOTE 5 ISO 9241‑303:2011, Annex E provides guidelines for virtual displays which are intended for stereoscopic head-mounted displays.

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This part of ISO 9241 gives recommendations for tactile and haptic hardware and software interactions. It provides guidance on the design and evaluation of hardware, software, and combinations of hardware and software interactions, including
-   the design/use of tactile/haptic inputs, outputs, and/or combinations of inputs and outputs, with general guidance on their design/use as well as on designing/using combinations of tactile and haptic interactions for use in combination with other modalities or as the exclusive mode of interaction,
-   the tactile/haptic encoding of information, including textual data, graphical data and controls,
-   the design of tactile/haptic objects,
-   the layout of tactile/haptic space, and
-   interaction techniques.
It does not provide recommendations specific to Braille, but can apply to interactions that make use of Braille.
The recommendations given in this part of ISO 9241 are applicable to at least the controls of a virtual workspace, but they can also be applied to an entire virtual environment — consistent, in as far as possible, with the simulation requirements.

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Within the general scope described in ISO/IEC 9995-1, ISO 9995-9:2016 defines the allocation on a keyboard of a set of graphic characters which, when used in combination with an existing national version keyboard layout, allows the input of a minimum character repertoire as defined herein. This repertoire is intended to address all characters needed to write all contemporary languages using the Latin script, together with standardized Latin transliterations of some major languages using other scripts. It also contains all symbols and punctuation marks contained in ISO 8859-1, together with some selected other ones commonly used in typography and office use. It also addresses characters of some other scripts (Greek, Cyrillic, Armenian, Georgian, Hebrew) to the same extent (in the case of Cyrillic, leaving out some minority languages of the Russian Federation which have only a few hundred speakers left). It provides means to include other scripts (e.g. Arabic, Devanagari) in future versions of ISO 9995-9:2016 (e.g. by amendments). Furthermore, it addresses the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA). ISO 9995-9:2016 is primarily intended for word-processing and text-processing applications, to be used with full-sized keyboards as well as with miniature keyboards found on mobile devices ("smartphones" or handheld computers), especially ones which have only keys for the 26 basic Latin letters but no dedicated keys for digits.

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This part of ISO 9241 gives recommendations for tactile and haptic hardware and software interactions. It provides guidance on the design and evaluation of hardware, software, and combinations of hardware and software interactions, including
-   the design/use of tactile/haptic inputs, outputs, and/or combinations of inputs and outputs, with general guidance on their design/use as well as on designing/using combinations of tactile and haptic interactions for use in combination with other modalities or as the exclusive mode of interaction,
-   the tactile/haptic encoding of information, including textual data, graphical data and controls,
-   the design of tactile/haptic objects,
-   the layout of tactile/haptic space, and
-   interaction techniques.
It does not provide recommendations specific to Braille, but can apply to interactions that make use of Braille.
The recommendations given in this part of ISO 9241 are applicable to at least the controls of a virtual workspace, but they can also be applied to an entire virtual environment — consistent, in as far as possible, with the simulation requirements.

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This part of ISO 9241 describes visual user-interface elements and provides requirements and recommendations on when and how to use them. This part of ISO 9241 is concerned with software components of interactive systems to make human-system interaction usable as far as the basic interaction aspects are concerned.
This part of ISO 9241 provides a comprehensive list of generic visual user-interface elements, regardless of a specific dialogue technique, input method, visualization, and platform or implementation technology. It also addresses derivates, compositions (assemblies) and states of user interface elements. It gives requirements and recommendations on selection, usage and dependencies of user interface elements and their application. It is applicable regardless of a fixed, portable or mobile interactive system.
It does not provide detailed coverage of the methods and techniques required for design of user-interface elements. This standard does not address implementation and interaction details for specific input methods or technologies. It does not cover decorative user interface elements that are intended to address solely aesthetic (hedonic) qualities in the user interface eg. background images.
The information in this part of ISO 9241 is intended for use by those responsible for designing and evaluating user interfaces, but also for planning and managing platform specific aspects of user interface screen design.
It also provides guidance for human factors/ergonomics and usability professionals involved in human-centred design. It addresses technical issues only to the extent necessary to allow users of this international standard to understand the relevance and importance of a consistent interface element usage and selection in the design process as a whole.
Annex C provides a checklist that can be used to support claims of conformance to this standard.

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ISO 9241-161:2016 describes visual user-interface elements presented by software and provides requirements and recommendations on when and how to use them. This part of ISO 9241 is concerned with software components of interactive systems to make human-system interaction usable as far as the basic interaction aspects are concerned.
ISO 9241-161:2016 provides a comprehensive list of generic visual user-interface elements, regardless of a specific input method, visualization, and platform or implementation technology. The guidance given in this part of ISO 9241 is intended to be used in conjunction with ISO 9241 guidance on dialogue techniques. It recognizes that additional elements can evolve. It also addresses derivates, compositions (assemblies) and states of user-interface elements. It gives requirements and recommendations on selection, usage and dependencies of user-interface elements and their application. It is applicable regardless of a fixed, portable or mobile interactive system.
It does not provide detailed coverage of the methods and techniques required for design of user-interface elements. This part of ISO 9241 does not address implementation (e.g. graphical design of elements) and interaction details for specific input methods or technologies. It does not cover decorative user-interface elements that are intended to address solely aesthetic (hedonic) qualities in the user interface, e.g. background images.
The information in this part of ISO 9241 is intended for use by those responsible for the selection and implementation of visual user-interface elements in interactive systems and for evaluating user interfaces. It is intended for use by those planning and managing platform specific aspects of user interface screen design. It also provides guidance for human factors/ergonomics and usability professionals involved in human-centred design. It addresses technical issues only to the extent necessary to allow users of this part of ISO 9241 to understand the relevance and importance of a consistent interface element usage and selection in the design process as a whole.
Annex A provides a guide to selection of different visual user interface elements depending of their appropriate application.

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ISO 9241-391:2016 provides requirements and recommendations for reducing photosensitive seizures (PSS), while viewing images on electronic displays.
The requirements and recommendations in this part of ISO 9241 are designed to be applied to image contents. By image contents, reference is made to the images independent of the device or environment in which they are displayed.
The requirements and recommendations in this part of ISO 9241 are for the protection of the vulnerable individuals in the viewing population who are photosensitive and who are therefore liable to seizures triggered by flashing lights and regular patterns, including certain repetitive images.
NOTE 1 ITU considers the image safety issues in relation to broadcasting. Some of these are described in ITU-R BT.1702.[2]
NOTE 2 There are some related recommendations in ISO/IEC 40500:2012, W3C Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0, for web contents accessibility.
NOTE 3 Photosensitive seizures and photosensitive epilepsy, that is, chronic conditions characterized by those repeated seizures are medical conditions. Clinical aspects of photosensitivity appear in Annex C. Visually induced seizures are equivalent to PSS.

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ISO 9241-161:2016 describes visual user-interface elements presented by software and provides requirements and recommendations on when and how to use them. This part of ISO 9241 is concerned with software components of interactive systems to make human-system interaction usable as far as the basic interaction aspects are concerned. ISO 9241-161:2016 provides a comprehensive list of generic visual user-interface elements, regardless of a specific input method, visualization, and platform or implementation technology. The guidance given in this part of ISO 9241 is intended to be used in conjunction with ISO 9241 guidance on dialogue techniques. It recognizes that additional elements can evolve. It also addresses derivates, compositions (assemblies) and states of user-interface elements. It gives requirements and recommendations on selection, usage and dependencies of user-interface elements and their application. It is applicable regardless of a fixed, portable or mobile interactive system. It does not provide detailed coverage of the methods and techniques required for design of user-interface elements. This part of ISO 9241 does not address implementation (e.g. graphical design of elements) and interaction details for specific input methods or technologies. It does not cover decorative user-interface elements that are intended to address solely aesthetic (hedonic) qualities in the user interface, e.g. background images. The information in this part of ISO 9241 is intended for use by those responsible for the selection and implementation of visual user-interface elements in interactive systems and for evaluating user interfaces. It is intended for use by those planning and managing platform specific aspects of user interface screen design. It also provides guidance for human factors/ergonomics and usability professionals involved in human-centred design. It addresses technical issues only to the extent necessary to allow users of this part of ISO 9241 to understand the relevance and importance of a consistent interface element usage and selection in the design process as a whole. Annex A provides a guide to selection of different visual user interface elements depending of their appropriate application.

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ISO 9241-391:2016 provides requirements and recommendations for reducing photosensitive seizures (PSS), while viewing images on electronic displays. The requirements and recommendations in this part of ISO 9241 are designed to be applied to image contents. By image contents, reference is made to the images independent of the device or environment in which they are displayed. The requirements and recommendations in this part of ISO 9241 are for the protection of the vulnerable individuals in the viewing population who are photosensitive and who are therefore liable to seizures triggered by flashing lights and regular patterns, including certain repetitive images. NOTE 1 ITU considers the image safety issues in relation to broadcasting. Some of these are described in ITU-R BT.1702.[2] NOTE 2 There are some related recommendations in ISO/IEC 40500:2012, W3C Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0, for web contents accessibility. NOTE 3 Photosensitive seizures and photosensitive epilepsy, that is, chronic conditions characterized by those repeated seizures are medical conditions. Clinical aspects of photosensitivity appear in Annex C. Visually induced seizures are equivalent to PSS.

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ISO/IEC TR 13066-2:2016 specifies services provided in the Microsoft Windows platform to enable assistive technologies (AT) to interact with other software. One goal of this part of ISO/IEC 13066 is to define a set of application programming interfaces (APIs) for allowing software applications to enable accessible technologies on the Microsoft Windows platform. Another goal of this part of ISO/IEC 13066 is to facilitate extensibility and interoperability by enabling implementations by multiple vendors on multiple platforms. ISO/IEC TR 13066-2:2016 is applicable to the broad range of ergonomics and how ergonomics apply to human interaction with software systems.

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ISO/IEC TR 15440:2016 (TR) covers the following: - different input requirements catering for national and international practices and support of cultural and linguistic diversity; - recognition of requirements regarding comfort of use (for any user, including children, elderly and disabled people) and improved user productivity related to inputting data; - enhancements of keyboards and related input devices and methods required for new emerging phenomena such as Internet, multimedia, virtual reality; - virtual input requirements; - labelling issues (soft [LCD] and hard, permanent and temporary labels), function symbols and icons. ISO/IEC TR 15440:2016 does not cover implications of biometric input (fingerprint-based, iris-pattern-based, face-shape-based, etc.) devices for access and security. ISO/IEC TR 15440:2016 is aimed at both the users and manufacturers and intends to present the user requirements regarding keyboards and associated devices and methods, at the time of publication of this technical report.

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This part of ISO 9241 gives guidelines for organic light-emitting diode (OLED) displays.

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This part of ISO 9241 provides a summary of existing knowledge on ergonomics requirements for pixel
defects in electronic displays at the time of its publication. It also gives guidance on the specification of pixel
defects, visibility thresholds and aesthetic requirements for pixel defects. It does not itself give requirements
related to pixel defects, but it is envisaged that its information could be used in the revision of other parts in
the ISO 9241 series.

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This part of ISO 9241 gives guidelines for surface-conduction electron-emitter displays (SED).

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