Unchanged with respect to the current edition CLC/TS 50459-2:2015.
Scope of the revision:
- to update general principles for the presentation of ERTMS/ETCS/GSM-R information correlated with ERA_ERTMS_015560 v3.4.0:2016,
- to update ergonomic arrangements with EN 16186-1:2014, EN 16186-2:2017, EN 16186-3:2016
- to harmonize layout with existing and on supplier side well-established solutions and enhancement of touch-layout
- to update in accordance to the Results of the outcome of the Rascop DMI ad’hoc group

  • Technical specification
    99 pages
    English language
    sale 10% off
    e-Library read for
    1 day

This document is intended to be used alongside ISO/TR 12295, ISO 11226 and the ISO 11228 series in the agricultural sector. This document gives information on how existing standards can be used in a global sector such as agriculture where, albeit with different characteristics, biomechanical overload is a relevant aspect, WMSDs are common and specific preventive actions are needed. The proposed project aims to: 1)   define the user(s) and fields for its application (including non-experts in ergonomics); 2)   provide examples of procedures for hazard identification, risk estimation or evaluation and risk reduction in different agricultural settings, through: —   more synthetic procedural schemes (main test); —   more analytical explanations of the procedures, through mathematical models and application examples, also with the use of specific free simple tools, in: —  Annex A (pre-mapping with ERGOCHECK); —  Annex B (evaluation of Multitask risk of biomechanical overload on typical agricultural macro-cycles, considering upper limbs repetitive movements, manual lifting and carrying, pushing-pulling); —  Annex C (study of awkward postures with criteria derived from the actual standards and scientific literature as TACOS method).

  • Technical report
    133 pages
    English language
    sale 15% off
  • Draft
    145 pages
    English language
    sale 15% off

Unchanged with respect to the current edition CLC/TS 50459-1:2015.
Scope of the revision:
- to update general principles for the presentation of ERTMS/ETCS/GSM-R information correlated with ERA_ERTMS_015560 v3.4.0:2016,
- to update ergonomic arrangements with EN 16186-1:2014, EN 16186-2:2017, EN 16186-3:2016
- to update in accordance to the Results of the outcome of the Rascop DMI ad’hoc group

  • Technical specification
    22 pages
    English language
    sale 10% off
    e-Library read for
    1 day
  • Technical specification
    22 pages
    English language
    sale 10% off
    e-Library read for
    1 day

Unchanged with respect to the current edition CLC/TS 50459-3:2016.
Scope of the revision:
- to update general principles for the presentation of ERTMS/ETCS/GSM-R information correlated with ERA_ERTMS_015560 v3.4.0:2016,
- to update ergonomic arrangements with EN 16186-1:2014, EN 16186-2:2017, EN 16186-3:2016
- to revise pictures and layouts
- to update in accordance to the Results of the outcome of the Rascop DMI ad’hoc group

  • Technical specification
    59 pages
    English language
    sale 10% off
    e-Library read for
    1 day

This document provides ergonomics data for standard developers to use in applying
ISO/IEC Guide 71:2014 to address accessibility in standards. These data can also be used by ergonomists
and designers to support the development of more accessible products, systems, services, environments,
and facilities.
The ergonomics data include quantitative data and knowledge about basic human characteristics and
capabilities as well as context-specific and task-specific data, all being based on ergonomics research.
The data focused on the effects of ageing and/or consequences of various types of human sensory,
physical, and cognitive disabilities. It does not contain general ergonomics data that have no direct
relation to ageing or disabilities.
The data presented in this document are not exhaustive due to no available data for some aspects of
human characteristics and capabilities with regard to ageing and disabilities.

  • Technical report
    248 pages
    English language
    sale 10% off
    e-Library read for
    1 day

This document provides formal procedures and two, alternative, methods (users are advised to choose whichever of the two suits their individual requirements) for determining the priority of on-board messages presented to drivers of road vehicles by transport information and control systems (TICS) and other systems. It is applicable to the whole range of TICS in-vehicle messages, including traveller information, navigation, travel and traffic advisories, "yellow pages" information, warnings, systems status, emergency calling system information, and electronic toll/fee collection, as well as to messages from non-TICS sources such as telephone, warnings and telltales. Although applicable to systems that allow the free generation of messages, it neither provides guidance on how to use the messages deriving from its procedures nor is it applicable to mandatory or legally required messages.

  • Technical specification
    31 pages
    English language
    sale 15% off
  • Draft
    31 pages
    English language
    sale 15% off

This document provides a framework and consistent terminology for specifying user requirements. It specifies the common industry format (CIF) for a user requirement specification including the content elements and the format for stating those requirements.
NOTE 1 A user requirements specification is the formal documentation of a set of user requirements, which aids in the development and evaluation of usable interactive systems.
In this document, user requirements refers to:
a) user-system interaction requirements for achieving intended outcomes (including requirements for system outputs and their attributes);
b) use-related quality requirements that specify the quality criteria associated with the outcomes of users interacting with the interactive system and can be used as criteria for system acceptance.
NOTE 2 ISO/IEC 25030 introduces the concept of quality requirements. The use-related quality requirements in this document are a particular type of quality requirement.
The content elements of a user requirements specification are intended to be used as part of documentation resulting from the activities specified in ISO 9241-210, and from human centred design processes, such as those in ISO 9241-220.
This document is intended to be used by requirements engineers, business analysts, product managers, product owners, and people acquiring systems from third parties.
The CIF series of standards addresses usability-related information (as described in ISO 9241-11 and ISO/IEC TR 25060).
NOTE 3 In addition to usability, user requirements can include other perspectives, such as human-centred quality introduced in ISO 9241-220, and other quality perspectives presented in ISO/IEC 25010, ISO/IEC TS 25011, and ISO/IEC 25030.
NOTE 4 While this document was developed for interactive systems, the guidance can also be applied in other domains.
This document does not prescribe any kind of method, lifecycle or process. The content elements of a user requirements specification can be used in iterative development which includes the elaboration and evolution of requirements (e.g. as in agile development).

  • Standard
    30 pages
    English language
    sale 10% off
    e-Library read for
    1 day

This document provides both general and specific ergonomic requirements and recommendations for accessible tactile/haptic interactive systems, including accessible tactile/haptic interactions. This document provides guidance for increasing the accessibility of interactive systems making use of tactile/haptic input/output modalities such as gestures, vibration, and force feedback. The guidance provided also supports alternative input modalities and the use of different output representations. This document provides guidance for tactile/haptic interactions that is applicable to a variety of interactive systems, including assistive technologies (AT).

  • Standard
    21 pages
    English language
    sale 15% off
  • Draft
    21 pages
    English language
    sale 15% off

This document describes principles for interaction between a user and a system that are formulated
in general terms (i.e. independent of situations of use, application, environment or technology). This
document provides a framework for applying those interaction principles and the general design
recommendations for interactive systems.
While this document is applicable to all types of interactive systems, it does not cover the specifics
of every application domain (e.g. safety critical systems, collaborative work, artificial intelligence
features).
It is intended for the following audiences:
— analysts of requirements (including market requirements, user requirements, and system
requirements);
— designers of user interface development tools and style guides to be used by user interface designers
and developers;
— designers of user interfaces who will apply the guidance during the design activities (either directly,
based on training, or by using tools and style guides which incorporate the guidance);
— developers who will apply the guidance during the development process;
— evaluators who are responsible for ensuring that products meet the general design recommendations
contained in this document;
— buyers who will reference this document in contracts during product procurement.
This document focuses on interaction principles related to the design of interactions between user and
interactive system. ISO 9241-112 provides further guidance on the presentation of information.
This document does not consider any other aspect of design such as marketing, aesthetics and corporate
identity.

  • Standard
    40 pages
    English language
    sale 10% off
    e-Library read for
    1 day

This document specifies considerations to be taken, as well as support and assistive products that can be used when organizing a physical meeting in which older persons and persons with disabilities can actively participate. Teleconferences and web conferences are important methods that can be used to include older persons and persons with disabilities in meetings.

  • Standard
    17 pages
    English language
    sale 15% off
  • Draft
    17 pages
    English language
    sale 15% off

This document describes the different parts of the ISO 11064 series. The overall content of each of the parts is presented, the most likely users of that part and the relevance of each part to different stages in the control room design process.

  • Technical report
    7 pages
    English language
    sale 15% off
  • Draft
    7 pages
    English language
    sale 15% off

ISO/CIE 8995-3:2018 specifies the lighting requirements which will contribute to the visual needs for safety and security within outdoor work places.

  • Standard
    12 pages
    English language
    sale 10% off
    e-Library read for
    1 day
  • Standard
    7 pages
    English language
    sale 15% off
  • Standard
    12 pages
    English language
    sale 10% off
    e-Library read for
    1 day

This document addresses: — physically embodied RIA systems, such as robots and autonomous vehicles with which users will physically interact; — systems embedded within the physical environment with which users do not consciously interact, but which collect data and/or modify the environment within which people live or work such as smart building and, mood-detection; — intelligent software tools and agents with which users actively interact through some form of user interface; — intelligent software agents which act without active user input to modify or tailor the systems to the user's behaviour, task or some other purpose, including providing context specific content/information, tailoring adverts to a user based on information about them, user interfaces that adapt to the cognitive or physiological state, "ambient intelligence"; — the effect on users resulting from the combined interaction of several RIA systems such as conflicting behaviours between the RIA systems under the same circumstances; — the complex system-of-systems and sociotechnical impacts of the use of RIA systems, particularly on society and government. This document is not an exploration of the philosophical, ethical or political issues surrounding robotics, artificial intelligence, machine learning, and intelligent machines or environments. For matters of ethics and political issues, see standards such as BS 8611 and IEC P7000. However, this document does identify where and why ethical issues need to be taken into account for a wide range of systems and contexts, and as such it provides information relevant to the broader debate regarding RIA systems. This document has a broader focus than much of the early work on autonomy that relates to the automation of control tasks and mechanization of repetitive physical or cognitive tasks, and centres on levels of automation. Although this document addresses a wide range of technology applications, and sector and stakeholder views on the issues, the treatment of each can be incomplete due to the diverse and increasingly varied applications of RIA systems.

  • Technical report
    51 pages
    English language
    sale 15% off
  • Draft
    51 pages
    English language
    sale 15% off

This document defines key terms and parameters applied in the analysis of driver visual behaviour focused on glance and glance-related measures. It provides guidelines and minimum requirements on equipment and procedures for analysing driver visual behaviour including assessment of TICS to: — plan evaluation trials; — specify (and install) data capture equipment; and — validate, analyse, interpret and report visual-behaviour metrics (standards of measurement). The parameters and definitions described below provide a common source of reference for driver visual behaviour data. It is applicable to on-road trials (e.g. field operational tests or naturalistic studies), and laboratory-based driving studies. The procedures described in this document can also apply to more general assessments of driver visual behaviour. Data collected and analysed according to this document will allow comparisons to be performed across different TICS applications and experimental scenarios.

  • Standard
    51 pages
    English language
    sale 15% off
  • Draft
    52 pages
    English language
    sale 15% off

This document is intended to provide guidance in the use of anthropometric data within the ISO 9241-500 series.

  • Technical report
    8 pages
    English language
    sale 15% off
  • Draft
    8 pages
    English language
    sale 15% off

This document describes principles for interaction between a user and a system that are formulated in general terms (i.e. independent of situations of use, application, environment or technology). This document provides a framework for applying those interaction principles and the general design recommendations for interactive systems. While this document is applicable to all types of interactive systems, it does not cover the specifics of every application domain (e.g. safety critical systems, collaborative work, artificial intelligence features). It is intended for the following audiences: — analysts of requirements (including market requirements, user requirements, and system requirements); — designers of user interface development tools and style guides to be used by user interface designers and developers; — designers of user interfaces who will apply the guidance during the design activities (either directly, based on training, or by using tools and style guides which incorporate the guidance); — developers who will apply the guidance during the development process; — evaluators who are responsible for ensuring that products meet the general design recommendations contained in this document; — buyers who will reference this document in contracts during product procurement. This document focuses on interaction principles related to the design of interactions between user and interactive system. ISO 9241-112 provides further guidance on the presentation of information. This document does not consider any other aspect of design such as marketing, aesthetics and corporate identity.

  • Standard
    32 pages
    English language
    sale 15% off
  • Standard
    32 pages
    English language
    sale 15% off
  • Standard
    34 pages
    French language
    sale 15% off

This document establishes the requirements and recommendations for image contents and electronic display systems to reduce visually induced motion sickness (VIMS), while viewing images on electronic displays. This document is applicable to electronic display systems, including flat panel displays, projectors with a screen, and virtual reality (VR) type of head mounted displays (HMDs), but not including HMDs that present electronic images on/with real-world scenes. NOTE 1 This document assumes the images are viewed under appropriate defined conditions. See Annex B for the appropriate viewing conditions. NOTE 2 This document is useful for the design, development, and supply of image contents, as well as electronic displays for reducing VIMS. NOTE 3 ISO 9241‑392[3] provides guidelines for stereoscopic 3D displays, of which the methods are also used in HMDs. NOTE 4 The International Telecommunication Union (ITU) generally sets the standards for broadcasting.

  • Standard
    25 pages
    English language
    sale 15% off

EN-ISO 24550 specifies design requirements and recommendations for indicator lights, mainly LED sourced, on consumer products for use by older people and people with visual disabilities. It does not consider the needs of persons who are blind. Indicator lights include those that inform users visually about the conditions, changes in functional status and settings, and malfunction of products. They convey information by light on/off, time-modulated intensity, blinking, colour, luminance level, and layout. This document addresses household and home appliances. It excludes electronic displays presenting characters and graphics, machinery, and appliances in special use for professional, technical, and industrial applications.

  • Standard
    16 pages
    English language
    sale 10% off
    e-Library read for
    1 day

EN-ISO 24551 specifies ergonomic requirements and recommendations for consumer product spoken instructions that are provided to guide users in the operation of a product and/or as a means of providing feedback to users about the status/state of a product. Such instructions can be used by persons with or without visual impairments, and are useful for users who have difficulty reading and/or cognitive impairments. The applicability of the requirements and recommendations described in this document does not depend on the language of the instructions or whether the instructions are provided via recorded human speech or synthesized speech from text. The requirements and recommendations in this document are applicable to conventional, stand-alone consumer products in general, whose function is limited by characteristics that prevent a user from attaching, installing or using assistive technology in order to use the product. They are not applicable to machines and equipment used for professional work. This document does not apply to products for which the instructional content and/or the means of presentation are specified in other standards (e.g. medical devices, fire alarms). It also does not provide recommendations or requirements for spoken instructions of Interactive Voice Response (IVR) systems or digital assistants on personal computers or similar devices

  • Standard
    16 pages
    English language
    sale 10% off
    e-Library read for
    1 day

This document gives the scientific summaries of visually induced motion sickness resulting from images presented visually on or by electronic display devices. Electronic displays include flat panel displays, electronic projections on a flat screen, and head-mounted displays. Different aspects of human-system interaction are covered in other parts of the ISO 9241 series (see Annex A).

  • Technical report
    82 pages
    English language
    sale 15% off

This document specifies the methods to improve accessibility of the visual display on small consumer products in order to minimize inconveniences that a variety of users including people with disabilities and the elderly can experience while using those products. In particular, this document focusses on how to present information on small visual displays to make the product more accessible for older people and people with low vision or colour deficiency. The provision of different modalities or alternative ways of displaying information to make the product more accessible is not covered in this document. This document only covers accessibility with regard to visual presentation of information, not audio or tactile-based display methods. NOTE 1 Accessibility of a product can be enhanced by adopting alternative means to the visual presentation of the information, which is not covered in this document. For information about alternative forms of presentation, ISO/IEC Guide 71, ISO 9241‑112 and ISO 9241‑171 can be useful. NOTE 2 A comprehensive catalogue of accessibility needs and strategies for accommodation for all users (not only those with visual impairments) is out of scope for this document. Readers interested in this regard can refer to ISO/IEC 29138‑1. This document applies to various consumer products equipped with digital displays, in which the information about operation of the product is visually presented. The products are usually equipped with built-in display panels. The consumer products include those hand-held products that can be easily carried by the user or those that are not portable but equipped with small displays, though the size of the product or the display is not specified in this document. NOTE 3 This document focusses on the accessibility of small displays, regardless of the size of the consumer product. NOTE 4 Examples include, but are not limited to, electronic thermometers, digital cameras, air-conditioning systems, remote controllers. This document is not applicable to those products with high flexibility or adjustability in presenting information on the display. Some examples are web- or application-based displays of ICT devices such as smart phones, smart TVs, and tablet PCs. It is not applicable to touch-based displays that have both the functions of display and control. Some examples are touch interfaces of smart watches or digital cameras. Finally, accessibility issues relating to indicating lamps/lights used for simple alerts or alarm are covered in ISO 24550 and are not considered in this document. NOTE 5 There are many accessibility issues in the touch interface related to information presentation as well as control function and they need to be dealt with together. It is possible that some guidance of this document is not applicable to some products, such as oral or ear thermometers, which have extremely small in-built displays.

  • Standard
    7 pages
    English language
    sale 15% off

This document defines design principles of accessibility for controls of consumer products, so that users from a population with the widest range of user needs, characteristics and capabilities are able to use controls to operate and control consumer products in the same manner and ease as users without disabilities. This document is applicable to all kinds and types of consumer products. This document is applicable to the controls for common main operations of consumer products such as initiation, termination, and cancellation of operation, as well as for specified functions necessary for more detailed operations and fine adjustment. This document does not deal with controls for some specialized devices intended only for specified user populations and tasks, e.g. assistive and medical devices. Each design consideration in this document is based on ergonomic principles that are necessary for making the controls of consumer products accessible to a wider range of users.

  • Technical specification
    8 pages
    English language
    sale 15% off

This document provides an overview of recent research on readability of electrophoretic displays. It also provides information for evaluating readability of electrophoretic displays and defining the context of their use.

  • Technical report
    36 pages
    English language
    sale 15% off

EN-ISO 10551 presents principles and examples of practical application for the construction of appropriate subjective scales for use in the assessment and evaluation of the physical environment. It does not standardize particular scales. It considers scales of perception, comfort, preference, acceptability, expression form and tolerance, and environmental components such as thermal, visual, air quality, acoustic and vibration. It does not consider other scales such as: - scales related to the effects of the environment on the ability to read displays or signs, on manual performance or on psychological conditions such as mood, etc.; - scales related to pain or scales related to stimuli that can lead to injury. This document does not present principles of surveys (see Note) or questionnaire design. However, the scales that are developed using this document can be incorporated into surveys or questionnaires.

  • Standard
    37 pages
    English language
    sale 10% off
    e-Library read for
    1 day

This standard provides requirements and recommendations for human-centred design principles and activities throughout the life cycle of computer-based interactive systems. It is intended to be used by those managing design processes, and is concerned with ways in which both hardware and software components of interactive systems can enhance human-system interaction.This document provides an overview of human-centred design activities. It does not provide detailed coverage of the methods and techniques required for human-centred design, nor does it address health or safety aspects in detail. Although it addresses the planning and management of human-centred design, it does not address all aspects of project management. The information in this document is intended for use by those responsible for planning and managing projects that design and develop interactive systems. It therefore addresses technical human factors and ergonomics issues only to the extent necessary to allow such individuals to understand their relevance and importance in the design process as a whole. It also provides a framework for human factors and usability professionals involved in human-centred design. Detailed human factors/ergonomics, usability and accessibility issues are dealt with more fully in a number of standards including other parts of ISO 9241 (see Annex A) and ISO 6385, which sets out the broad principles of ergonomics. The requirements and recommendations in this document can benefit all parties involved in human-centred design and development. Annex B provides a checklist that can be used to support claims of conformance with this document.

  • Standard
    42 pages
    English language
    sale 10% off
    e-Library read for
    1 day

This document provides guidance for the auditory presentation of information controlled by software, irrespective of the device. It includes specific properties such as the syntactic or semantic aspects of information, e.g. coding techniques, and gives provisions for the organization of information taking account of human perception and memory capabilities. This document does not address the hardware issues of the transmission and the production of auditory information. NOTE 1 Volume is dependent on hardware and thus cannot always be absolutely controlled by software. Environmental conditions can also affect the ability for sounds to be perceived, which can be beyond the ability of the software to take into account. This document does not apply to auditory alarms, warnings or other safety-related uses of auditory information. NOTE 2 Safety-related uses of auditory presentation of information are covered in various domain specific standards, such as ISO 7731:2003 which deals with auditory danger signals for public and work areas, and IEC 60601-1-8:2006 which provides very specific requirements for auditory alarms for medical devices. While this document applies to the presentation of all non-safety-related information, it does not include application domain specific guidance (e.g., audio instructions for consumer products). This document can be utilized throughout the design process (e.g. as specification and guidance for designers during design or as a basis for heuristic evaluation). Its provisions for the presentation of information depend on the auditory design approach, the task, the user, the environment and the single or multiple technologies that can be used for presenting the information. Consequently, this document cannot be applied without knowledge of the context of use. It is not intended to be used as a prescriptive set of rules to be applied in its entirety but rather assumes that the designer has proper information available concerning task and user requirements and understands the use of available technology. This document does not address visual or tactile/haptic presentation of information or modality shifting for the presentation of auditory information in other modalities. NOTE 3 ISO 9241-112 provides high-level ergonomic guidance that applies to all modalities.

  • Technical specification
    20 pages
    English language
    sale 15% off
  • Technical specification
    22 pages
    French language
    sale 15% off

This document specifies ergonomic requirements and recommendations for consumer product spoken instructions that are provided to guide users in the operation of a product and/or as a means of providing feedback to users about the status/state of a product. Such instructions can be used by persons with or without visual impairments, and are useful for users who have difficulty reading and/or cognitive impairments.
The applicability of the requirements and recommendations described in this document does not depend on the language of the instructions or whether the instructions are provided via recorded human speech or synthesized speech from text.
The requirements and recommendations in this document are applicable to conventional, stand-alone consumer products in general, whose function is limited by characteristics that prevent a user from attaching, installing or using assistive technology in order to use the product. They are not applicable to machines and equipment used for professional work.
This document does not apply to products for which the instructional content and/or the means of presentation are specified in other standards (e.g. medical devices, fire alarms). It also does not provide recommendations or requirements for spoken instructions of Interactive Voice Response (IVR) systems or digital assistants on personal computers or similar devices.
NOTE ISO 9241‑154 provides recommendations or requirements for IVR systems.
This document does not specify voice sounds of text-to-speech systems or narrative speech used in place of printed instruction manuals and independently from the product.

  • Standard
    16 pages
    English language
    sale 10% off
    e-Library read for
    1 day

This document specifies design requirements and recommendations for indicator lights, mainly LED sourced, on consumer products for use by older people and people with visual disabilities. It does not consider the needs of persons who are blind.
Indicator lights include those that inform users visually about the conditions, changes in functional status and settings, and malfunction of products. They convey information by light on/off, time-modulated intensity, blinking, colour, luminance level, and layout.
This document addresses household and home appliances. It excludes electronic displays presenting characters and graphics, machinery, and appliances in special use for professional, technical, and industrial applications.

  • Standard
    16 pages
    English language
    sale 10% off
    e-Library read for
    1 day

ISO 24500:2010 specifies the auditory signals used as a means of feedback for operations or conditions of consumer products when used by a person with or without visual or auditory impairment. It is intended to be applied as appropriate to such products depending on the product type and its conditions of use.
It is applicable to auditory signals of a fixed frequency used in general applications (also called “beep sounds”), but not to variable frequency or melodic sounds.
It does not specify fire or gas leak alarm sounds or crime prevention alarm sounds (determined by other laws and regulations), electronic chimes, voice guides or other sounds particular to communication instruments such as telephones; nor is it applicable to auditory danger signals for public or work areas (covered in ISO 7731, ISO 8201, and ISO 11429).
It is not applicable to machines and equipment used for professional work; nor does it specify the sound pressure levels of auditory signals from the consumer products (for the determination of these levels, taking into consideration accessible design, see ISO 24501).

  • Standard
    14 pages
    English language
    sale 10% off
    e-Library read for
    1 day

This document provides human machine interface (HMI) design specifications for keyless ignition systems that use key code carrying device for passenger cars (including sport utility vehicles and light trucks) and commercial vehicles (including heavy trucks and buses), independent of vehicle propulsion system. HMI specifications for the electrical key functions include actuation in normal conditions, emergencies, low battery, and avoidance of inadvertent actuations, alerts and specific non-standard situations.

  • Standard
    11 pages
    English language
    sale 15% off

This document specifies ergonomic requirements and recommendations for consumer product spoken instructions that are provided to guide users in the operation of a product and/or as a means of providing feedback to users about the status/state of a product. Such instructions can be used by persons with or without visual impairments, and are useful for users who have difficulty reading and/or cognitive impairments. The applicability of the requirements and recommendations described in this document does not depend on the language of the instructions or whether the instructions are provided via recorded human speech or synthesized speech from text. The requirements and recommendations in this document are applicable to conventional, stand-alone consumer products in general, whose function is limited by characteristics that prevent a user from attaching, installing or using assistive technology in order to use the product. They are not applicable to machines and equipment used for professional work. This document does not apply to products for which the instructional content and/or the means of presentation are specified in other standards (e.g. medical devices, fire alarms). It also does not provide recommendations or requirements for spoken instructions of Interactive Voice Response (IVR) systems or digital assistants on personal computers or similar devices. NOTE ISO 9241‑154 provides recommendations or requirements for IVR systems. This document does not specify voice sounds of text-to-speech systems or narrative speech used in place of printed instruction manuals and independently from the product.

  • Standard
    8 pages
    English language
    sale 15% off
  • Standard
    8 pages
    French language
    sale 15% off

This document specifies design requirements and recommendations for indicator lights, mainly LED sourced, on consumer products for use by older people and people with visual disabilities. It does not consider the needs of persons who are blind. Indicator lights include those that inform users visually about the conditions, changes in functional status and settings, and malfunction of products. They convey information by light on/off, time-modulated intensity, blinking, colour, luminance level, and layout. This document addresses household and home appliances. It excludes electronic displays presenting characters and graphics, machinery, and appliances in special use for professional, technical, and industrial applications.

  • Standard
    8 pages
    English language
    sale 15% off
  • Standard
    8 pages
    French language
    sale 15% off

This document provides a method for estimating minimum legible font size for single characters, but not for words or sentences, in self-luminous or reflected mode, used in documents, products labels, signs, and displays for people at any age and in any viewing condition in which viewing distance, luminance and contrast are varied. This document applies designing and evaluating legibility of single characters for people at any age who have no pathological disorders in their eyes, but not for people with visual impairments such as low vision. The application is specifically directed to, but not limited to, the cases of printed materials where fixed font size is used. Applicability of the method to other languages is given in Annex F.

  • Standard
    37 pages
    English language
    sale 15% off

This International Standard specifies the processes by which human-centred design is achieved throughout the lifecycle of interactive systems (including products and services). It is also applicable to some noninteractive products, systems or environments intended for human use. These human-centred process (HCP) descriptions are for use in the specification, assessment and improvement of HCPs used in system development and operation. They can also provide the basis for professional development and certification.
The processes support achievement of the overall objective of human-centred design when using a system: usability, accessibility, freedom from risk related to or arising from human use, and user experience (referred to as value-in-use).
NOTE 1 Human-centred design aims to make interactive systems more usable with potential benefits including improved productivity, enhanced user well-being, avoidance of stress, increased accessibility and reduced risk of harm. Ergonomics shares these objectives but is used beyond the domain of design, for example in the forensic analysis of the causes of accidents and in the generation of data and methods of measurement.
The description of processes in this International Standard provides a basis for those planning and carrying out human-centred design activities within an organization, and in the execution of projects. In addition it can provide the basis for those who wish to improve the performance of human-centred design activities within their own organization or in an organization supplying systems or services.
The guidance in this International Standard is not applicable to an organizational re-design, although its application might identify the necessity for re-design.
NOTE 2 ISO 9241-2 and ISO TS 18152 address organizational design in more detail.
This International Standard does not prescribe specific methods. The processes described in ISO 9241-220, can be implemented using a range of methods (such as those described in ISO/TR 16982).
ISO 9241-210 specifies the approaches to human-centred design to be used by project managers, while this International Standard is intended to be used by those performing and supporting human-centred design. These processes can be implemented according to the needs of the specific project and/or organization.
This International Standard specifies the purposes, outcomes, activities and work products for each process. Cross references are made to other parts of the ISO 9241 series that address the design and/or evaluation of components of an interactive system or its environment (see normative Annex B).

  • Standard
    100 pages
    English language
    sale 10% off
    e-Library read for
    1 day

This document provides requirements and recommendations for human-centred design principles and activities throughout the life cycle of computer-based interactive systems. It is intended to be used by those managing design processes, and is concerned with ways in which both hardware and software components of interactive systems can enhance human?system interaction.
NOTE Computer-based interactive systems vary in scale and complexity. Examples include off-the-shelf (shrink-wrap) software products, custom office systems, process control systems, automated banking systems, Web sites and applications, and consumer products such as vending machines, mobile phones and digital television. Throughout this document, such systems are generally referred to as products, systems or services although, for simplicity, sometimes only one term is used.
This document provides an overview of human-centred design activities. It does not provide detailed coverage of the methods and techniques required for human-centred design, nor does it address health or safety aspects in detail. Although it addresses the planning and management of human-centred design, it does not address all aspects of project management.
The information in this document is intended for use by those responsible for planning and managing projects that design and develop interactive systems. It therefore addresses technical human factors and ergonomics issues only to the extent necessary to allow such individuals to understand their relevance and importance in the design process as a whole. It also provides a framework for human factors and usability professionals involved in human-centred design. Detailed human factors/ergonomics, usability and accessibility issues are dealt with more fully in a number of standards including other parts of ISO 9241 (see Annex A) and ISO 6385, which sets out the broad principles of ergonomics.
The requirements and recommendations in this document can benefit all parties involved in human-centred design and development. Annex B provides a checklist that can be used to support claims of conformance with this document.

  • Standard
    42 pages
    English language
    sale 10% off
    e-Library read for
    1 day

This document presents principles and examples of practical application for the construction of appropriate subjective scales for use in the assessment and evaluation of the physical environment. It does not standardize particular scales.
It considers scales of perception, comfort, preference, acceptability, expression form and tolerance, and environmental components such as thermal, visual, air quality, acoustic and vibration.
It does not consider other scales such as:
— scales related to the effects of the environment on the ability to read displays or signs, on manual performance or on psychological conditions such as mood, etc.;
— scales related to pain or scales related to stimuli that can lead to injury.
This document does not present principles of surveys (see Note) or questionnaire design. However, the scales that are developed using this document can be incorporated into surveys or questionnaires.
NOTE Environmental surveys are described in ISO 28802. ISO 28802 includes scales that are complementary to, and based upon, the principles of scale construction that are described in this document.

  • Standard
    37 pages
    English language
    sale 10% off
    e-Library read for
    1 day

This document gives minimum safety, ergonomic, and performance requirements for Camera Monitor Systems to replace mandatory inside and outside rearview mirrors for road vehicles (e.g. classes I to IV as defined in UN Regulation No. 46). It addresses Camera Monitor Systems (CMS) that will be used in road vehicles to present the required outside information of a specific field of view inside the vehicle. These specifications are intended to be independent of different camera and display technologies unless otherwise stated explicitly. Advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS), such as parking aids, are not part of this document. NOTE 1 Mirror classes V and VI (as defined in UN Regulation No. 46) are not in scope of this document since the requirements are already defined in UN Regulation No. 46. NOTE 2 The definitions and requirements in this document are formulated with regard to a system structure, where one camera captures one legally prescribed field of view and one monitor displays one legally prescribed field of view. Of course, also other system structures (e.g. with one monitor displaying two legally prescribed fields of view) are within the scope of this document. For those systems, either the system supplier or the vehicle manufacturer has to prove that the resulting system fulfils the requirements given in Clause 6. NOTE 3 Whenever the phrases "field of view" or "field of vision" are used, then both have the same meaning and are to be used in parallel.

  • Standard
    149 pages
    English language
    sale 15% off

This document provides requirements and recommendations for human-centred design principles and activities throughout the life cycle of computer-based interactive systems. It is intended to be used by those managing design processes, and is concerned with ways in which both hardware and software components of interactive systems can enhance human?system interaction. NOTE Computer-based interactive systems vary in scale and complexity. Examples include off-the-shelf (shrink-wrap) software products, custom office systems, process control systems, automated banking systems, Web sites and applications, and consumer products such as vending machines, mobile phones and digital television. Throughout this document, such systems are generally referred to as products, systems or services although, for simplicity, sometimes only one term is used. This document provides an overview of human-centred design activities. It does not provide detailed coverage of the methods and techniques required for human-centred design, nor does it address health or safety aspects in detail. Although it addresses the planning and management of human-centred design, it does not address all aspects of project management. The information in this document is intended for use by those responsible for planning and managing projects that design and develop interactive systems. It therefore addresses technical human factors and ergonomics issues only to the extent necessary to allow such individuals to understand their relevance and importance in the design process as a whole. It also provides a framework for human factors and usability professionals involved in human-centred design. Detailed human factors/ergonomics, usability and accessibility issues are dealt with more fully in a number of standards including other parts of ISO 9241 (see Annex A) and ISO 6385, which sets out the broad principles of ergonomics. The requirements and recommendations in this document can benefit all parties involved in human-centred design and development. Annex B provides a checklist that can be used to support claims of conformance with this document.

  • Standard
    33 pages
    English language
    sale 15% off
  • Standard
    33 pages
    French language
    sale 15% off

This document presents principles and examples of practical application for the construction of appropriate subjective scales for use in the assessment and evaluation of the physical environment. It does not standardize particular scales. It considers scales of perception, comfort, preference, acceptability, expression form and tolerance, and environmental components such as thermal, visual, air quality, acoustic and vibration. It does not consider other scales such as: — scales related to the effects of the environment on the ability to read displays or signs, on manual performance or on psychological conditions such as mood, etc.; — scales related to pain or scales related to stimuli that can lead to injury. This document does not present principles of surveys (see Note) or questionnaire design. However, the scales that are developed using this document can be incorporated into surveys or questionnaires. NOTE Environmental surveys are described in ISO 28802. ISO 28802 includes scales that are complementary to, and based upon, the principles of scale construction that are described in this document.

  • Standard
    28 pages
    English language
    sale 15% off
  • Standard
    29 pages
    French language
    sale 15% off

This document provides a framework and consistent terminology for specifying user requirements. It specifies the common industry format (CIF) for a user requirement specification including the content elements and the format for stating those requirements. NOTE 1 A user requirements specification is the formal documentation of a set of user requirements, which aids in the development and evaluation of usable interactive systems. In this document, user requirements refers to: a) user-system interaction requirements for achieving intended outcomes (including requirements for system outputs and their attributes); b) use-related quality requirements that specify the quality criteria associated with the outcomes of users interacting with the interactive system and can be used as criteria for system acceptance. NOTE 2 ISO/IEC 25030 introduces the concept of quality requirements. The use-related quality requirements in this document are a particular type of quality requirement. The content elements of a user requirements specification are intended to be used as part of documentation resulting from the activities specified in ISO 9241-210, and from human centred design processes, such as those in ISO 9241-220. This document is intended to be used by requirements engineers, business analysts, product managers, product owners, and people acquiring systems from third parties. The CIF series of standards addresses usability-related information (as described in ISO 9241-11 and ISO/IEC TR 25060). NOTE 3 In addition to usability, user requirements can include other perspectives, such as human-centred quality introduced in ISO 9241-220, and other quality perspectives presented in ISO/IEC 25010, ISO/IEC TS 25011, and ISO/IEC 25030. NOTE 4 While this document was developed for interactive systems, the guidance can also be applied in other domains. This document does not prescribe any kind of method, lifecycle or process. The content elements of a user requirements specification can be used in iterative development which includes the elaboration and evolution of requirements (e.g. as in agile development).

  • Standard
    20 pages
    English language
    sale 15% off
  • Standard
    21 pages
    French language
    sale 15% off

This document describes the processes and specifies the outcomes by which human-centred design (HCD) is carried out within organizations. Human-centred design aims to meet requirements for human-centred quality (see Annex E) throughout the life cycle of interactive systems. The processes are described from the viewpoint of those responsible for the analysis, design and evaluation of the human use of interactive systems. The process descriptions include the purpose, benefits, outcomes, typical activities and work products for each process, and are for use in the specification, implementation, assessment and improvement of the activities used for human-centred design and operation in any type of system life cycle. They can also provide the basis for professional development and certification.
The processes are associated with the domains of ergonomics/human factors, human?computer interaction, usability and user experience. This document does not include specific methods for human-centred design, nor does it describe processes for organizational redesign.
The scope of this document does not include other aspects of ergonomics, which include the design of organizations as well as systems for human use, and which extend beyond the domain of design; for example in the forensic analysis of the causes of accidents and in the generation of data and methods of measurement.
NOTE 1 ISO/TS 18152 is a related standard with a broader scope than this document. It includes the organizational processes for the identification and handling of issues related to both users and other stakeholders.
The intended application of this document is computer-based interactive systems. While the processes apply to interactive systems that deliver services, they do not cover the design of those services. The relevant aspects of the processes can also be applied to simple or non-computer?based interactive systems.
NOTE 2 Human-centred design concentrates on the human-centred aspects of design and not on other aspects of design such as mechanical construction, programming or the basic design of services.
The process descriptions in this document provide the basis for a rigorous assessment of an enterprise's capability to carry out human-centred processes in compliance with the ISO/IEC 33000 family of standards.
This document is intended for use by organizations that want to address and improve their treatment of human-centred design of either their internal systems or the products and services they provide, and the procurement of systems and parts of systems. The processes can be applied by small- and medium-sized enterprises as well as by large organizations.
Copyright release for the process descriptions
Users of this document may freely reproduce the process descriptions contained in Clause 9 as part of any process assessment model, or as part of any demonstration of compatibility with this document, so that it can be used for its intended purpose.

  • Standard
    100 pages
    English language
    sale 10% off
    e-Library read for
    1 day

This document addresses protocols for the use of 3-D surface-scanning systems in the acquisition of
human body shape data and measurements defined in ISO 7250-1 that can be extracted from 3-D scans.
While mainly concerned with whole-body scanners, it is also applicable to body-segment scanners
(head scanners, hand scanners, foot scanners).
It does not apply to instruments that measure the location and/or motion of individual landmarks.
The intended audience is those who use 3-D scanners to create 1-D anthropometric databases and the
users of 1-D anthropometric data from 3-D scanners. Although not necessarily aimed at the designers
and manufacturers of those systems, scanner designers and manufacturers can find it useful in meeting
the needs of clients who build and use 1‑D anthropometric databases.

  • Standard
    27 pages
    English language
    sale 10% off
    e-Library read for
    1 day

This document provides procedures that can be used as a secondary task in a dual task setting to determine whether that evaluation setting is standardized and valid for purposes of assessing driver attentional demand due to the use of an in-vehicle system. This document does not define calibration procedures for other evaluation activities that a laboratory might undertake. This document provides guidance on selecting a calibration task given a specific primary task. The primary tasks of interest include those that would be used in the evaluation of attentional demand. Such primary tasks are defined in other documents. The description of a calibration task includes its application, experimental setup, data collection, and procedures for analysis of results. The purpose of this document is not to define a reference criterion as to whether a given secondary task is suitable for use while driving. Although specific settings of parameters of a calibration task might be used to realize such a predefined pass/fail criterion, this document does not provide such a criterion for a given level of attentional demand.

  • Technical specification
    24 pages
    English language
    sale 15% off

This document is intended to be used within organizations that embrace and intend to implement the principles of human centredness outlined in ISO 27500.
This document is intended to provide requirements and recommendations on the human factors and ergonomics approach to achieving a successful and sustainable human-centred organization. It outlines managers' responsibilities ranging from organizational strategy to development of procedures and processes enabling human centredness, and the implementation of those procedures and processes.
This document provides requirements and recommendations for managers and the actions to be taken in order for an organization to achieve human centredness.
This document can be used:
a) by managers to understand and improve human-centred aspects of their activities;
b) by managers to identify how their staff can improve human-centred aspects of their activities;
c) to provide a basis for training managers how to be human-centred;
d) to provide a basis for organizations to evaluate the performance of managers.
It is not a management systems standard. Nor is it intended to prevent the development of standards that are more specific or more demanding.

  • Standard
    36 pages
    English language
    sale 10% off
    e-Library read for
    1 day

This document describes the processes and specifies the outcomes by which human-centred design (HCD) is carried out within organizations. Human-centred design aims to meet requirements for human-centred quality (see Annex E) throughout the life cycle of interactive systems. The processes are described from the viewpoint of those responsible for the analysis, design and evaluation of the human use of interactive systems. The process descriptions include the purpose, benefits, outcomes, typical activities and work products for each process, and are for use in the specification, implementation, assessment and improvement of the activities used for human-centred design and operation in any type of system life cycle. They can also provide the basis for professional development and certification. The processes are associated with the domains of ergonomics/human factors, human?computer interaction, usability and user experience. This document does not include specific methods for human-centred design, nor does it describe processes for organizational redesign. The scope of this document does not include other aspects of ergonomics, which include the design of organizations as well as systems for human use, and which extend beyond the domain of design; for example in the forensic analysis of the causes of accidents and in the generation of data and methods of measurement. NOTE 1 ISO/TS 18152 is a related standard with a broader scope than this document. It includes the organizational processes for the identification and handling of issues related to both users and other stakeholders. The intended application of this document is computer-based interactive systems. While the processes apply to interactive systems that deliver services, they do not cover the design of those services. The relevant aspects of the processes can also be applied to simple or non-computer?based interactive systems. NOTE 2 Human-centred design concentrates on the human-centred aspects of design and not on other aspects of design such as mechanical construction, programming or the basic design of services. The process descriptions in this document provide the basis for a rigorous assessment of an enterprise's capability to carry out human-centred processes in compliance with the ISO/IEC 33000 family of standards. This document is intended for use by organizations that want to address and improve their treatment of human-centred design of either their internal systems or the products and services they provide, and the procurement of systems and parts of systems. The processes can be applied by small- and medium-sized enterprises as well as by large organizations. Copyright release for the process descriptions Users of this document may freely reproduce the process descriptions contained in Clause 9 as part of any process assessment model, or as part of any demonstration of compatibility with this document, so that it can be used for its intended purpose.

  • Standard
    90 pages
    English language
    sale 15% off
  • Standard
    99 pages
    French language
    sale 15% off

This document specifies requirements that enable an organization to design, develop and provide products, goods and services so that they can be accessed, understood and used by the widest range of users, including persons with disabilities.
This document specifies requirements and recommendations that enables an organization to extend their range of users by identifying diverse needs, characteristics, capabilities, and preferences, by directly or indirectly involving users, and by using knowledge about accessibility in its procedures and processes.
This document specifies requirements that can enable an organization to meet applicable statutory and regulatory requirements as related to the accessibility of its products, goods and services.
The requirements set out in this document are generic and are intended to be applicable to all relevant parts of all organisations, regardless of type, size or products, goods and services provided.
This document promotes accessibility following a Design for All approach in mainstream products goods and services and interoperability of these with assistive technologies.
This document does not provide technical design specifications and does not imply uniformity in design or functionality of products, goods and services.

  • Standard
    53 pages
    English language
    sale 10% off
    e-Library read for
    1 day

This document provides design guidelines and requirements for tactile symbols and characters used for information and marking for people who need non-visual or non-auditory information. It is applicable to products, facilities and equipment in housing and transportation, services and packaging, where tactile symbols and characters may be used. This document specifies the physical characteristics of tactile symbols and characters for ease of legibility by touch taking into account human abilities of tactile sense and their aging effect. It does not specify semantic characteristics of tactile symbols and characters. This document is applicable to tactile symbols and characters of convex-type touched by fingers. It is not applicable to specifically coded tactile symbols or characters such as those of Braille, nor to those with vibratory or temporal changes.

  • Standard
    13 pages
    English language
    sale 15% off
  • Standard
    14 pages
    French language
    sale 15% off

This document is intended to be used within organizations that embrace and intend to implement the principles of human centredness outlined in ISO 27500. This document is intended to provide requirements and recommendations on the human factors and ergonomics approach to achieving a successful and sustainable human-centred organization. It outlines managers' responsibilities ranging from organizational strategy to development of procedures and processes enabling human centredness, and the implementation of those procedures and processes. This document provides requirements and recommendations for managers and the actions to be taken in order for an organization to achieve human centredness. This document can be used: a) by managers to understand and improve human-centred aspects of their activities; b) by managers to identify how their staff can improve human-centred aspects of their activities; c) to provide a basis for training managers how to be human-centred; d) to provide a basis for organizations to evaluate the performance of managers. It is not a management systems standard. Nor is it intended to prevent the development of standards that are more specific or more demanding.

  • Standard
    28 pages
    English language
    sale 15% off
  • Standard
    30 pages
    French language
    sale 15% off

This document addresses protocols for the use of 3-D surface-scanning systems in the acquisition of human body shape data and measurements defined in ISO 7250-1 that can be extracted from 3-D scans.
While mainly concerned with whole-body scanners, it is also applicable to body-segment scanners (head scanners, hand scanners, foot scanners).
It does not apply to instruments that measure the location and/or motion of individual landmarks.
The intended audience is those who use 3-D scanners to create 1-D anthropometric databases and the users of 1-D anthropometric data from 3-D scanners. Although not necessarily aimed at the designers and manufacturers of those systems, scanner designers and manufacturers can find it useful in meeting the needs of clients who build and use 1‑D anthropometric databases.

  • Standard
    27 pages
    English language
    sale 10% off
    e-Library read for
    1 day

This document specifies ergonomic principles which apply to the user requirements, design, and procurement of the physical equipment and environment, which contribute to the context of use of interactive systems. It provides requirements, recommendations and explanations related to these principles. In particular, the general principles and requirements specified in this document apply to the standards specifying functional design of furniture and equipment constituting the environment. The principles specified in this document utilize ergonomic knowledge (from the disciplines anthropometry, acoustics, vision, thermal environments, indoor air quality, mechanical vibrations, etc.) to design and evaluate environments that enhance usability (effectiveness, efficiency and satisfaction), accessibility, performance and well-being for organized and non-organized use of interactive systems. The intended users of this document include: — developers of systems, products and services; — public and corporate purchasers; — occupational health and safety professionals; — architects and interior designers; — human resource professionals; — usability/ergonomics/human factors professionals.

  • Standard
    7 pages
    English language
    sale 15% off
  • Standard
    7 pages
    French language
    sale 15% off