Soil quality — Assessment of human exposure from ingestion of soil and soil material — Procedure for the estimation of the human bioaccessibility/bioavailability of metals in soil

This document deals with the assessment of human exposure from ingestion of soil and soil materials. It specifies a physiologically based test procedure for the estimation of the human bioaccessibility of metals from contaminated soil in connection with the evaluation of the exposure related to human oral uptake. The method is a sequential extraction using synthetic gastrointestinal fluids and can be used to estimate oral bioaccessibility. Soils or other geological materials, in sieved form, are extracted in an environment that simulates the basic physicochemical conditions of the human gastrointestinal tract. This document describes a method to simulate the release of metals from soil and soil materials after passage through three compartments of the human gastrointestinal tract (mouth, stomach and small intestine). It produces extracts that are representative of the concentration of potentially harmful elements in the human gastrointestinal tract for subsequent chemical characterization. NOTE 1 Bioaccessibility can be used to approximate oral bioavailability. NOTE 2 The test has been validated for arsenic, cadmium and lead in an interlaboratory trial. The method has been in vivo validated to assess the oral bioavailability of arsenic, cadmium and lead.

Qualité du sol — Évaluation de l'exposition humaine par ingestion de sol et de matériaux du sol — Mode opératoire pour l'estimation de la bioaccessibilité/biodisponibilité pour l'homme de métaux dans le sol

Le présent document traite de l'évaluation de l'exposition humaine par ingestion de sol et de matériaux du sol. Le présent document spécifie une procédure d'essai pertinente d'un point de vue physiologique pour l'estimation de la bioaccessibilité pour l'homme de métaux dans un sol contaminé, en liaison avec l'évaluation de l'exposition de l'homme par voie orale. Cette méthode est un essai de lixiviation séquentiel utilisant des sucs gastrointestinaux synthétiques; elle peut être utilisée pour estimer la bioaccessibilité orale. Les sols ou autres matériaux géologiques, sous forme tamisée, sont extraits dans un environnement qui simule les conditions physico-chimiques de base du tractus gastrointestinal humain. Le présent document décrit une méthode pour simuler la libération de métaux contenus dans un sol ou dans des matériaux de sol après le passage par les trois compartiments du tractus gastrointestinal humain (bouche, estomac et intestin grêle). La méthode d'essai produit des extraits qui sont représentatifs de la concentration d'éléments potentiellement dangereux dans le tractus gastrointestinal humain en vue d'une caractérisation chimique ultérieure. L'essai a été validé pour l'arsenic, le cadmium et le plomb dans le cadre d'un essai interlaboratoires international. NOTE 1 La bioaccessibilité peut être utilisée pour estimer de manière approximative la biodisponibilité de la substance étudiée. NOTE 2 La méthode a été validée pour l'arsenic, le cadmium et le plomb dans le cadre d'un essai interlaboratoires international. Elle a été validée in vivo pour évaluer la biodisponibilité de l'arsenic, du cadmium et du plomb.

General Information

Status
Published
Publication Date
08-Oct-2018
Current Stage
6060 - International Standard published
Start Date
09-Oct-2018
Completion Date
09-Oct-2018
Ref Project

RELATIONS

Buy Standard

Standard
ISO 17924:2018 - Soil quality -- Assessment of human exposure from ingestion of soil and soil material -- Procedure for the estimation of the human bioaccessibility/bioavailability of metals in soil
English language
21 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview
Standard
ISO 17924:2018:Version 24-apr-2020 - Soil quality -- Assessment of human exposure from ingestion of soil and soil material -- Procedure for the estimation of the human bioaccessibility/bioavailability of metals in soil
English language
21 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview
Standard
ISO 17924:2018 - Qualité du sol -- Évaluation de l'exposition humaine par ingestion de sol et de matériaux du sol -- Mode opératoire pour l'estimation de la bioaccessibilité/biodisponibilité pour l'homme de métaux dans le sol
French language
22 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview
Standard
ISO 17924:2018:Version 24-apr-2020 - Qualité du sol -- Évaluation de l'exposition humaine par ingestion de sol et de matériaux du sol -- Mode opératoire pour l'estimation de la bioaccessibilité/biodisponibilité pour l'homme de métaux dans le sol
French language
22 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview

Standards Content (sample)

INTERNATIONAL ISO
STANDARD 17924
First edition
2018-10
Corrected version
2021-09
Soil quality — Assessment of human
exposure from ingestion of soil
and soil material — Procedure
for the estimation of the human
bioaccessibility/bioavailability of
metals in soil
Qualité du sol — Évaluation de l'exposition humaine par ingestion de
sol et de matériaux du sol — Mode opératoire pour l'estimation de la
bioaccessibilité/biodisponibilité pour l'homme de métaux dans le sol
Reference number
ISO 17924:2018(E)
ISO 2018
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO 17924:2018(E)
COPYRIGHT PROTECTED DOCUMENT
© ISO 2018

All rights reserved. Unless otherwise specified, or required in the context of its implementation, no part of this publication may

be reproduced or utilized otherwise in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, or posting

on the internet or an intranet, without prior written permission. Permission can be requested from either ISO at the address

below or ISO’s member body in the country of the requester.
ISO copyright office
CP 401 • Ch. de Blandonnet 8
CH-1214 Vernier, Geneva
Phone: +41 22 749 01 11
Email: copyright@iso.org
Website: www.iso.org
Published in Switzerland
ii © ISO 2018 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO 17924:2018(E)
Contents Page

Foreword ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................iv

Introduction ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................vi

1 Scope ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 1

2 Normative references ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3 Terms and definitions ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

4 Bioaccessibility/Bioavailability as a concept in assessment of soils and sites with

respect to human exposure ....................................................................................................................................................................... 3

5 Description of the mechanisms of human contaminant uptake ......................................................................... 5

6 Description of metal binding mechanisms (speciation of metals) in soil.................................................7

7 Use and interpretation of in vitro tests for risk assessment ................................................................................... 8

8 Description of test method ........................................................................................................................................................................ 9

8.1 Test principle ............................................................................................................................................................................................ 9

8.2 Apparatus .................................................................................................................................................................................................... 9

8.3 Reagents.....................................................................................................................................................................................................10

8.4 Preparation of simulated fluids .............................................................................................................................................11

8.4.1 General...................................................................................................................................................................................11

8.4.2 Simulated saliva fluid (1 000 ml) ....................................................................................................................11

8.4.3 Simulated gastric fluid (1 000 ml) .................................................................................................................13

8.4.4 Simulated duodenal fluid (1 000 ml) ..........................................................................................................13

8.4.5 Simulated bile fluid (1 000 ml) .........................................................................................................................14

8.4.6 pH control of mixed fluids ....................................................................................................................................15

8.5 Sample pre-treatment ....................................................................................................................................................................15

8.5.1 General...................................................................................................................................................................................15

8.5.2 Preparation of test samples .................................................................................................................................15

8.5.3 Typical analysis protocol .......................................................................................................................................15

8.6 Sample preparation procedure ..............................................................................................................................................16

9 Data handling, quality control and presentation of results .................................................................................17

9.1 General ........................................................................................................................................................................................................17

9.2 Bioaccessibility calculation .......................................................................................................................................................18

Annex A (informative) Sample preparation procedure .................................................................................................................20

Bibliography .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................21

© ISO 2018 – All rights reserved iii
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO 17924:2018(E)
Foreword

ISO (the International Organization for Standardization) is a worldwide federation of national standards

bodies (ISO member bodies). The work of preparing International Standards is normally carried out

through ISO technical committees. Each member body interested in a subject for which a technical

committee has been established has the right to be represented on that committee. International

organizations, governmental and non-governmental, in liaison with ISO, also take part in the work.

ISO collaborates closely with the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) on all matters of

electrotechnical standardization.

The procedures used to develop this document and those intended for its further maintenance are

described in the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 1. In particular, the different approval criteria needed for the

different types of ISO documents should be noted. This document was drafted in accordance with the

editorial rules of the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 2 (see www .iso .org/ directives).

Attention is drawn to the possibility that some of the elements of this document may be the subject of

patent rights. ISO shall not be held responsible for identifying any or all such patent rights. Details of

any patent rights identified during the development of the document will be in the Introduction and/or

on the ISO list of patent declarations received (see www .iso .org/ patents).

Any trade name used in this document is information given for the convenience of users and does not

constitute an endorsement.

For an explanation of the voluntary nature of standards, the meaning of ISO specific terms and

expressions related to conformity assessment, as well as information about ISO's adherence to the

World Trade Organization (WTO) principles in the Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT) see www .iso .org/

iso/ foreword .html.

This document was prepared by Technical Committee ISO/TC 190, Soil quality, Subcommittee SC 7,

Impact assessment.

This first edition of ISO 17924 cancels and replaces ISO/TS 17924:2007, which has been technically

revised. The changes compared to the previous edition are as follows:

— 7.1 "General", 7.2 "Choosing an appropriate test", 7.3 "Description of applicable test methods" and

7.4 "Recommendations" have been deleted. 7.5 "Use and interpretation of in vitro tests for risk

assessment" has been retained and renumbered to Clause 7;
— Clause 8 "Description of test method" has been added;

— Clause 9 (formerly Clause 8) "Data handling, quality control and presentation of results" has been

completely revised;

— Annex A "Human bioaccessibility testing" has been replaced by Annex A "Sample preparation

procedure";
— the figures have been revised;
— the complete document has been editorially revised;
— the Scope has been adapted.

Any feedback or questions on this document should be directed to the user’s national standards body. A

complete listing of these bodies can be found at www .iso .org/ members .html.
This corrected version of ISO 17924:2018 incorporates the following corrections:

— in 8.3.12, the CAS number for magnesium chloride hexahydrate has been corrected to CAS-Nr 7786-

30-3;
iv © ISO 2018 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
ISO 17924:2018(E)

— in 8.4.1, third paragraph, the sentence "The solutions are made according to detailed instructions

given on the day before the extractions." has been deleted to avoid duplication of information given

in the second paragraph;

— in 8.4.4, Table 9, NaHCO , has been added with the following quantities: 5,607 g (Volume/mass made

up to 500 ml), 11 214 mg/l (Final concentration);
— in 8.4.5, Table 12, the mass of NaCl has been corrected to 5,230 g;
— in 8.4.5, Table 12, the mass of NaHCO has been corrected to 5,796 g;

— in 8.6.17, the text "the pH should be pH = 6,3 ± 0,5." has been deleted, as the BARGE method does not

stipulate a tolerance for the final pH.
© ISO 2018 – All rights reserved v
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
ISO 17924:2018(E)
Introduction

When assessing soils contaminated with, for example, potentially harmful elements (e.g. arsenic), soil

ingestion (especially by children) is often considered to be the most important exposure pathway.

This assessment is often carried out on the basis of total content of the potentially harmful elements

in question in the soil. However, several studies suggest that the availability of the potentially harmful

elements (e.g. arsenic) in gastrointestinal tract is dependent on the form of the potentially harmful

elements present and the site-specific soil chemistry. Test methods based on in vivo tests with, for

example, juvenile swine or mini pigs are time consuming and expensive and not very compatible

with the decision processes connected with the assessment and clean-up of contaminated sites. Test

methods have thus been developed and validated, which involve in vitro laboratory tests aimed at

simulating in vivo results. This will reduce the cost and practicalities related to the use of such testing

on contaminated land.

Due to the large expenditure necessary for both private landowners and public funds set aside for the

remediation of contaminated land, International Standards on the assessment of contaminated soil,

especially with regard to human health, are in great demand. International Standards in this complex

field will support a common scientific basis for the exchange of data, development of knowledge and

sound evaluation. The aim of this document is to describe the elements of such an in vitro test system

and give advice as to the appropriate combination and use of these elements in the specific situation.

The method is based on the Bioaccessibility Research Group of Europe, Unified Bioaccessibility Method

(BARGE UBM), which has been developed and agreed upon by the BARGE group.

In human health risk assessment, “bioavailability” is specifically used in reference to absorption into

systemic circulation, consistent with the toxicological use of the term. This encompasses bioaccessibility,

which again is a combined measure of the processes determining the interaction between the metal

associated with the soil and the liquid in the human digestion system. Bioavailability furthermore

includes the absorption of the contaminant through a physiological membrane and the metabolism in

the liver. The bioavailable fraction is thus the fraction left after release into the human digestive liquid,

transport across the intestinal epithelium and metabolism in the liver. Further description of these

processes is given in Clause 4.

When considering bioavailability as the fraction of the chemical that is absorbed into systemic

circulation, two operational definitions are important: absolute and relative bioavailability. Absolute

bioavailability is the fraction of the applied dose that is absorbed and reaches the systemic circulation

(and can never be greater than 100 percent). Relative bioavailability represents a comparison of

absorption under two different sets of conditions, for example from a soil sample vs. food or another

matrix used in a toxicity study, and can be greater than or less than 1. This factor can be used in exposure

assessments for exposure by direct ingestion of soil, for instance if the absolute bioavailability of the

metal in the specific soil is suspected to differ significantly from the absolute bioavailability implicit in

the toxicity value/quality criteria used.
vi © ISO 2018 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
INTERNATIONAL STANDARD ISO 17924:2018(E)
Soil quality — Assessment of human exposure from
ingestion of soil and soil material — Procedure for the
estimation of the human bioaccessibility/bioavailability of
metals in soil
1 Scope

This document deals with the assessment of human exposure from ingestion of soil and soil materials.

It specifies a physiologically based test procedure for the estimation of the human bioaccessibility of

metals from contaminated soil in connection with the evaluation of the exposure related to human oral

uptake.

The method is a sequential extraction using synthetic gastrointestinal fluids and can be used to

estimate oral bioaccessibility. Soils or other geological materials, in sieved form, are extracted in an

environment that simulates the basic physicochemical conditions of the human gastrointestinal tract.

This document describes a method to simulate the release of metals from soil and soil materials after

passage through three compartments of the human gastrointestinal tract (mouth, stomach and small

intestine). It produces extracts that are representative of the concentration of potentially harmful

elements in the human gastrointestinal tract for subsequent chemical characterization.

NOTE 1 Bioaccessibility can be used to approximate oral bioavailability.

NOTE 2 The test has been validated for arsenic, cadmium and lead in an interlaboratory trial. The method has

been in vivo validated to assess the oral bioavailability of arsenic, cadmium and lead.

2 Normative references

The following documents are referred to in the text in such a way that some or all of their content

constitutes requirements of this document. For dated references, only the edition cited applies. For

undated references, the latest edition of the referenced document (including any amendments) applies.

ISO 11074, Soil quality — Vocabulary
3 Terms and definitions

For the purposes of this document, the terms and definitions given in ISO 11074 and the following apply.

ISO and IEC maintain terminological databases for use in standardization at the following addresses:

— ISO Online browsing platform: available at https:// www .iso .org/ obp
— IEC Electropedia: available at http:// www .electropedia .org/
3.1
absorption
process by which a body takes in substance and makes it a part of itself
3.2
bioaccessibility

fraction of a substance in soil or soil material that is liberated in (human) gastrointestinal juices and

thus available for absorption
© ISO 2018 – All rights reserved 1
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
ISO 17924:2018(E)
3.3
bioavailability

fraction of a substance present in ingested soil that reaches the systemic circulation (blood stream)

3.4
contaminant
substance or agent present in the soil as a result of human activity

Note 1 to entry: There is no assumption in this definition that harm results from the presence of the contaminant.

3.5
dermal contact
contact with (touching) the skin
3.6
exposure
dose of a chemical that reaches the human body
3.7
exposure pathway
route a substance takes from its source to a receptor
3.8
ingestion
act of taking substances, such as soil and soil material, into the body by mouth
3.9
in vitro bioaccessibility test
bioaccessibility test carried out outside a living organism
3.10
no observed adverse effect level
NOAEL
dose at which no adverse effect on a receptor can be observed
3.11
pica

eating habit where usually strange and unpalatable material such as soil material and stones are

consumed

Note 1 to entry: The term pica stems from the Latin name pica pica for the raven bird magpie which picks up

randomly any kind of material for nest construction.
3.12
provisional tolerable weekly intake
PTWI

provisional weekly tolerable amount of a substance which can be taken in by a human body during a

lifetime through the food chain without affecting human health
3.13
receptor
potentially exposed person
3.14
relative absorption fraction
RAF

ratio between the amount of a contaminant reaching systemic circulation when ingested with, for

example, soil and the same amount obtained when ingested in the toxicity experiment underlying the

criteria
2 © ISO 2018 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO 17924:2018(E)
3.15
species

different forms of a substance always arising with each other in a reaction equilibrium

3.16
tolerable daily intake value
TDI

daily tolerable amount of a substance which can be taken in by a human body during a lifetime through

the food chain without effecting human health
4 Bioaccessibility/Bioavailability as a concept in assessment of soils and sites
with respect to human exposure

The characterization of bioaccessibility/bioavailability is usually performed as a part of a risk and/or

exposure assessment.
Risk assessment comprises the following elements:
— hazard identification;
— dose-response assessment;
— exposure assessment;
— and based on the above: risk characterization.

An exposure assessment is the process wherein the intensity, frequency, and duration of human

exposure of a contaminant are estimated, and comprises:
— source identification and characterization;
— identification of exposure routes;
— identification of relevant receptors/target groups;
— and based on this: the actual exposure assessment.

For the assessment of possible effects on human health, an analysis of the exposure routes is a

prerequisite. Where receptors are not directly exposed to a contaminant, exposure assessment needs

to consider the various ways by which indirect exposure might occur and the significance of them.

Human exposure from soil contamination can occur through different media.
Directly from the soil, the following exposure routes exist:

— soil ingestion, both dietary and through adherence to hands and unwashed vegetables, etc.;

— dermal contact;
— ingestion of house dust that predominantly consists of soil material.
Airborne exposure comprises the following:
— inhalation and ingestion of fugitive dust;
— inhalation of elevated outdoor-concentrations;
— inhalation of vapours that have intruded into buildings.
Exposure through food chain comprises the following:
— consumption of plants including crops, wild plants and fungi;
© ISO 2018 – All rights reserved 3
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
ISO 17924:2018(E)
— consumption of animals and animal products, including wild animals;
— consumption of contaminated water.

Within this document, direct uptake of soil via ingestion and/or ingestion of fugitive dust is considered.

Oral ingestion is one of the most important exposure routes for humans to soil contaminants.

Quality criteria for soil (the maximum concentration limits for soil) are usually calculated on the basis

of a tolerable daily intake value (TDI) or a provisionally tolerable weekly intake (PTWI), that can be

derived from the no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) found in human data or experimental animal

data. For genotoxic carcinogens for which no lower threshold for increased risk for cancer is assumed,

the TDI value is set at a level that corresponds to a tolerable low (negligible) cancer risk level.

For determining the TDI, data on oral toxicity are primarily considered. These data often pertain

to animal experiments where the substance is administrated to the animals mixed in the feed or in

drinking water (the vehicle or transporter of the contaminant). The amount of contaminant needed to

produce adverse health effects in the animal is then recorded. As an alternative, epidemiological studies

relating observed human health effects to recorded exposures have been used. Most toxicological

studies report the total ingested amount and seldom indicate exact values for the bioavailability of the

substances administered.

When extrapolating from such experimental conditions to other conditions, e.g. to intake of

contaminated soil, this approach assumes that the uptake efficiency is equal for all scenarios, i.e. that

the absolute bioavailability of the contaminant is constant. The absolute oral bioavailability can be

defined as the fraction of an orally ingested contaminant that reaches systemic circulation, i.e. enters

the blood stream. The absolute oral bioavailability of a contaminant may range from close to 0 to almost

1 (i.e. 100 %) depending upon the physiochemical form of the contaminant. In this context, the use of

the concept of absolute, oral bioavailability rests upon the assumption that adverse health effects are

systemic and thus triggered by the contaminants reaching the blood stream, i.e. the internal exposure

as opposed to the external exposure measured directly as intake of a contaminated medium multiplied

by the concentration of the contaminant in the medium, see Figure 1.

The absolute bioavailability can be measured as the ratio between amounts in the blood of animals or

man after intravenous injection (100 % bioavailability) and after oral ingestion (uptake of bioavailable

fraction).
Figure 1 — Schematic presentation of oral uptake processes
4 © ISO 2018 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 10 ----------------------
ISO 17924:2018(E)

A more feasible approach is to measure the relative bioavailability or relative absorption fraction

(RAF), which is the ratio between the amount of a contaminant reaching systemic circulation when

ingested with, for example, soil and the same amount obtained when ingested in the toxicity experiment

underlying the criterion.

It should be noted that although most relative bioavailabilities are less than 1 and would result in an

increased acceptable levels, RAF values above 1 could be found that would result in a demand for a

decreased acceptable level.
5 Description of the mechanisms of human contaminant uptake

A series of compartments are involved in human bioavailability of ingested soil contaminants, as

described in Clause 4.

The overall pathway leads the food and soil with contaminants from the mechanical grinding in the

mouth through a series of chemical and microbiological processes to partial dissolution through the

entire gastrointestinal tract (bioaccessibility processes). The dissolved components are transported

through the membranes of the gastrointestinal epithelium (absorption) and into the blood stream.

During transport through the membranes, degradation can occur (metabolism). The blood passes

the liver before entering the systemic circulation, allowing for degradation or removal of unwanted

compounds in the liver (metabolism, first pass effect). Most of the dissolution processes are completed

before the material leaves the small intestine, and it is generally accepted that most of the uptake

takes place in the small intestine. To which extent uptake takes place in the stomach depends on the

compound. The environment in the compartments differs and accordingly impacts the bioaccessibility

process differently, see Table 1.

Table 1 — Functions and conditions in the compartments involved in bioaccessibility processes

Primary
Main added Residence Contaminant dissolution
Compartment digestion pH
“reagents” time function
functions
Mouth Grinding
Moisture
Seconds to Grinding enhances subsequent
6,5
Cleavage of
minutes dissolution
Amylase
starch
Gullet Transport None 6,5 Seconds None
Stomach Hydrochloric acid
Acid dissolves labile mineral
Cleavage of pro-
Proteases 1 - 5 8 min to 3 h oxides, sulphides and car-
teins and fats
bonates to release metals.
Lipases
Small intestine Organic matter is dissolved
Bicarbonate
Cleavage of
and bound contaminants
oligosaccha- Bile
released
rides, proteins,
Proteases
Cationic metals are solubilised
fats and other
4 - 7,5 2 h to 10 h
by complexation with bile
constituents Lipases
acids
Solubilization of Oligosaccharases
Some metals are precipitated
fats
Phosphatases
by the high pH or by phosphate

The pH in the stomach may vary from close to 1 under fasted conditions to as high as 5 after feeding.

Residence time (1/2-time for emptying) in the stomach varies similarly from 8 min to 15 min and

30 min to 3 h for fasted and average fed conditions, respectively. Furthermore, bile release varies as

well, with high releases under fed conditions. Finally, the pH in the stomach can be lower for small

children than for adults.

The gastrointestinal tract constitutes a complex ecosystem with aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms.

The density of microorganisms is less in the human stomach and in the upper part of the small intestine

but increases towards and in the large intestine. Anaerobic microorganisms dominate in human

© ISO 2018 – All rights reserved 5
---------------------- Page: 11 ----------------------
ISO 17924:2018(E)

faeces, whereas aerobic bacteria are found in high densities in the large intestine. Sulfate reducing

bacteria have been detected in the human large intestine while high concentrations of oxygen have

been detected throughout the gastrointestinal tract of pigs. Overall, dominating aerobic conditions and

microorganisms would be expected in the stomach, but with increasingly anaerobic conditions from

the small intestine to the large intestine.

Absorption requires that the contaminants are dissolved (free or bound to a dissolved carrier such as

bile), transported to the gastrointestinal wall and, if bound to a carrier, released at the surface of the

gastrointestinal membrane for absorption. The carrier mechanisms can be complexation of cationic

metals by bile acids. Bile acids, proteins and other complexing agents can enhance exposure for cationic

metals. Also, lipids and other soluble organic matter in the diet can add to the carrier effect of the bile.

The simple dissolution/transport/absorption processes can be complicated by chemical kinetics

resulting from the sequential change in the chemical environment of the gastrointestinal tract, as well

as by soil and contaminant chemistry. As an example, lead found in soil as the common contaminant

anglesite (PbSO ) will dissolve in the stomach and will stay in solution here at the low pH and high

chloride concentration, see Figure 2. Entering the higher pH in the presence of dissolved phosphate in

the small intestine, the dissolved lead ions (Pb ) will precipitate very quickly as lead chlorophosphate

[chloropyromorphite, Pb (PO ) Cl]. The phosphate can originate from digested food or from the soil.

5 4 3

Phosphate minerals, such as hydroxyapatite, Ca (PO ) OH, will dissolve in the low pH of the stomach,

5 4 3

but dissolution will be slower and less complete at higher pH in the stomach (as occurring after food

ingestion). If stomach transit is fast (as occurring under fasting conditions), the hydroxyapatite may

not dissolve in the stomach and reach the small intestine where the neutral to slightly alkaline pH

will prevent further dissolution and thus also precipitation of released lead as lead chlorophosphate.

Conversely, just after transit from the stomach to the small intestine, the pH is still low and absorption

of lead can take
...

INTERNATIONAL ISO
STANDARD 17924
First edition
2018-10
Soil quality — Assessment of human
exposure from ingestion of soil
and soil material — Procedure
for the estimation of the human
bioaccessibility/bioavailability of
metals in soil
Qualité du sol — Évaluation de l'exposition humaine par ingestion de
sol et de matériaux du sol — Mode opératoire pour l'estimation de la
bioaccessibilité/biodisponibilité pour l'homme de métaux dans le sol
Reference number
ISO 17924:2018(E)
ISO 2018
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO 17924:2018(E)
COPYRIGHT PROTECTED DOCUMENT
© ISO 2018

All rights reserved. Unless otherwise specified, or required in the context of its implementation, no part of this publication may

be reproduced or utilized otherwise in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, or posting

on the internet or an intranet, without prior written permission. Permission can be requested from either ISO at the address

below or ISO’s member body in the country of the requester.
ISO copyright office
CP 401 • Ch. de Blandonnet 8
CH-1214 Vernier, Geneva
Phone: +41 22 749 01 11
Fax: +41 22 749 09 47
Email: copyright@iso.org
Website: www.iso.org
Published in Switzerland
ii © ISO 2018 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO 17924:2018(E)
Contents Page

Foreword ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................iv

Introduction ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................v

1 Scope ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 1

2 Normative references ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3 Terms and definitions ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

4 Bioaccessibility/Bioavailability as a concept in assessment of soils and sites with

respect to human exposure ....................................................................................................................................................................... 3

5 Description of the mechanisms of human contaminant uptake ......................................................................... 5

6 Description of metal binding mechanisms (speciation of metals) in soil.................................................7

7 Use and interpretation of in vitro tests for risk assessment ................................................................................... 8

8 Description of test method ........................................................................................................................................................................ 9

8.1 Test principle ............................................................................................................................................................................................ 9

8.2 Apparatus .................................................................................................................................................................................................... 9

8.3 Reagents.....................................................................................................................................................................................................10

8.4 Preparation of simulated fluids .............................................................................................................................................11

8.4.1 General...................................................................................................................................................................................11

8.4.2 Simulated saliva fluid (1 000 ml) ....................................................................................................................11

8.4.3 Simulated gastric fluid (1 000 ml) .................................................................................................................13

8.4.4 Simulated duodenal fluid (1 000 ml) ..........................................................................................................13

8.4.5 Simulated bile fluid (1 000 ml) .........................................................................................................................14

8.4.6 pH control of mixed fluids ....................................................................................................................................15

8.5 Sample pre-treatment ....................................................................................................................................................................15

8.5.1 General...................................................................................................................................................................................15

8.5.2 Preparation of test samples .................................................................................................................................15

8.5.3 Typical analysis protocol .......................................................................................................................................15

8.6 Sample preparation procedure ..............................................................................................................................................16

9 Data handling, quality control and presentation of results .................................................................................17

9.1 General ........................................................................................................................................................................................................17

9.2 Bioaccessibility calculation .......................................................................................................................................................18

Annex A (informative) Sample preparation procedure .................................................................................................................20

Bibliography .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................21

© ISO 2018 – All rights reserved iii
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO 17924:2018(E)
Foreword

ISO (the International Organization for Standardization) is a worldwide federation of national standards

bodies (ISO member bodies). The work of preparing International Standards is normally carried out

through ISO technical committees. Each member body interested in a subject for which a technical

committee has been established has the right to be represented on that committee. International

organizations, governmental and non-governmental, in liaison with ISO, also take part in the work.

ISO collaborates closely with the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) on all matters of

electrotechnical standardization.

The procedures used to develop this document and those intended for its further maintenance are

described in the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 1. In particular, the different approval criteria needed for the

different types of ISO documents should be noted. This document was drafted in accordance with the

editorial rules of the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 2 (see www .iso .org/directives).

Attention is drawn to the possibility that some of the elements of this document may be the subject of

patent rights. ISO shall not be held responsible for identifying any or all such patent rights. Details of

any patent rights identified during the development of the document will be in the Introduction and/or

on the ISO list of patent declarations received (see www .iso .org/patents).

Any trade name used in this document is information given for the convenience of users and does not

constitute an endorsement.

For an explanation of the voluntary nature of standards, the meaning of ISO specific terms and

expressions related to conformity assessment, as well as information about ISO's adherence to the

World Trade Organization (WTO) principles in the Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT) see www .iso

.org/iso/foreword .html.

This document was prepared by Technical Committee ISO/TC 190, Soil quality, Subcommittee SC 7,

Impact assessment.

This first edition of ISO 17924 cancels and replaces ISO/TS 17924:2007, which has been technically

revised. The changes compared to the previous edition are as follows:

— 7.1 "General", 7.2 "Choosing an appropriate test", 7.3 "Description of applicable test methods" and

7.4 "Recommendations" have been deleted. 7.5 "Use and interpretation of in vitro tests for risk

assessment" has been retained and renumbered to Clause 7;
— Clause 8 "Description of test method" has been added;

— Clause 9 (formerly Clause 8) "Data handling, quality control and presentation of results" has been

completely revised;

— Annex A "Human bioaccessibility testing" has been replaced by Annex A "Sample preparation

procedure";
— the figures have been revised;
— the complete document has been editorially revised;
— the Scope has been adapted.

Any feedback or questions on this document should be directed to the user’s national standards body. A

complete listing of these bodies can be found at www .iso .org/members .html.
iv © ISO 2018 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
ISO 17924:2018(E)
Introduction

When assessing soils contaminated with, for example, potentially harmful elements (e.g. arsenic), soil

ingestion (especially by children) is often considered to be the most important exposure pathway.

This assessment is often carried out on the basis of total content of the potentially harmful elements

in question in the soil. However, several studies suggest that the availability of the potentially harmful

elements (e.g. arsenic) in gastrointestinal tract is dependent on the form of the potentially harmful

elements present and the site-specific soil chemistry. Test methods based on in vivo tests with, for

example, juvenile swine or mini pigs are time consuming and expensive and not very compatible

with the decision processes connected with the assessment and clean-up of contaminated sites. Test

methods have thus been developed and validated, which involve in vitro laboratory tests aimed at

simulating in vivo results. This will reduce the cost and practicalities related to the use of such testing

on contaminated land.

Due to the large expenditure necessary for both private landowners and public funds set aside for the

remediation of contaminated land, International Standards on the assessment of contaminated soil,

especially with regard to human health, are in great demand. International Standards in this complex

field will support a common scientific basis for the exchange of data, development of knowledge and

sound evaluation. The aim of this document is to describe the elements of such an in vitro test system

and give advice as to the appropriate combination and use of these elements in the specific situation.

The method is based on the Bioaccessibility Research Group of Europe, Unified Bioaccessibility Method

(BARGE UBM), which has been developed and agreed upon by the BARGE group.

In human health risk assessment, “bioavailability” is specifically used in reference to absorption into

systemic circulation, consistent with the toxicological use of the term. This encompasses bioaccessibility,

which again is a combined measure of the processes determining the interaction between the metal

associated with the soil and the liquid in the human digestion system. Bioavailability furthermore

includes the absorption of the contaminant through a physiological membrane and the metabolism in

the liver. The bioavailable fraction is thus the fraction left after release into the human digestive liquid,

transport across the intestinal epithelium and metabolism in the liver. Further description of these

processes is given in Clause 4.

When considering bioavailability as the fraction of the chemical that is absorbed into systemic

circulation, two operational definitions are important: absolute and relative bioavailability. Absolute

bioavailability is the fraction of the applied dose that is absorbed and reaches the systemic circulation

(and can never be greater than 100 percent). Relative bioavailability represents a comparison of

absorption under two different sets of conditions, for example from a soil sample vs. food or another

matrix used in a toxicity study, and can be greater than or less than 1. This factor can be used in exposure

assessments for exposure by direct ingestion of soil, for instance if the absolute bioavailability of the

metal in the specific soil is suspected to differ significantly from the absolute bioavailability implicit in

the toxicity value/quality criteria used.
© ISO 2018 – All rights reserved v
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
INTERNATIONAL STANDARD ISO 17924:2018(E)
Soil quality — Assessment of human exposure from
ingestion of soil and soil material — Procedure for the
estimation of the human bioaccessibility/bioavailability of
metals in soil
1 Scope

This document deals with the assessment of human exposure from ingestion of soil and soil materials. It

specifies a physiologically based test procedure for the estimation of the human bioaccessibility of metals

from contaminated soil in connection with the evaluation of the exposure related to human oral uptake.

The method is a sequential extraction using synthetic gastrointestinal fluids and can be used to

estimate oral bioaccessibility. Soils or other geological materials, in sieved form, are extracted in an

environment that simulates the basic physicochemical conditions of the human gastrointestinal tract.

This document describes a method to simulate the release of metals from soil and soil materials after

passage through three compartments of the human gastrointestinal tract (mouth, stomach and small

intestine). It produces extracts that are representative of the concentration of potentially harmful

elements in the human gastrointestinal tract for subsequent chemical characterization.

NOTE 1 Bioaccessibility can be used to approximate oral bioavailability.

NOTE 2 The test has been validated for arsenic, cadmium and lead in an interlaboratory trial. The method has

been in vivo validated to assess the oral bioavailability of arsenic, cadmium and lead.

2 Normative references

The following documents are referred to in the text in such a way that some or all of their content

constitutes requirements of this document. For dated references, only the edition cited applies. For

undated references, the latest edition of the referenced document (including any amendments) applies.

ISO 11074, Soil quality — Vocabulary
3 Terms and definitions

For the purposes of this document, the terms and definitions given in ISO 11074 and the following apply.

ISO and IEC maintain terminological databases for use in standardization at the following addresses:

— ISO Online browsing platform: available at https: //www .iso .org/obp
— IEC Electropedia: available at http: //www .electropedia .org/
3.1
absorption
process by which a body takes in substance and makes it a part of itself
3.2
bioaccessibility

fraction of a substance in soil or soil material that is liberated in (human) gastrointestinal juices and

thus available for absorption
© ISO 2018 – All rights reserved 1
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
ISO 17924:2018(E)
3.3
bioavailability

fraction of a substance present in ingested soil that reaches the systemic circulation (blood stream)

3.4
contaminant
substance or agent present in the soil as a result of human activity

Note 1 to entry: There is no assumption in this definition that harm results from the presence of the contaminant.

3.5
dermal contact
contact with (touching) the skin
3.6
exposure
dose of a chemical that reaches the human body
3.7
exposure pathway
route a substance takes from its source to a receptor
3.8
ingestion
act of taking substances, such as soil and soil material, into the body by mouth
3.9
in vitro bioaccessibility test
bioaccessibility test carried out outside a living organism
3.10
no observed adverse effect level
NOAEL
dose at which no adverse effect on a receptor can be observed
3.11
pica

eating habit where usually strange and unpalatable material such as soil material and stones are

consumed

Note 1 to entry: The term pica stems from the Latin name pica pica for the raven bird magpie which picks up

randomly any kind of material for nest construction.
3.12
provisional tolerable weekly intake
PTWI

provisional weekly tolerable amount of a substance which can be taken in by a human body during a

lifetime through the food chain without affecting human health
3.13
receptor
potentially exposed person
3.14
relative absorption fraction
RAF

ratio between the amount of a contaminant reaching systemic circulation when ingested with, for

example, soil and the same amount obtained when ingested in the toxicity experiment underlying the

criteria
2 © ISO 2018 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
ISO 17924:2018(E)
3.15
species

different forms of a substance always arising with each other in a reaction equilibrium

3.16
tolerable daily intake value
TDI

daily tolerable amount of a substance which can be taken in by a human body during a lifetime through

the food chain without effecting human health
4 Bioaccessibility/Bioavailability as a concept in assessment of soils and sites
with respect to human exposure

The characterization of bioaccessibility/bioavailability is usually performed as a part of a risk and/or

exposure assessment.
Risk assessment comprises the following elements:
— hazard identification;
— dose-response assessment;
— exposure assessment;
— and based on the above: risk characterization.

An exposure assessment is the process wherein the intensity, frequency, and duration of human

exposure of a contaminant are estimated, and comprises:
— source identification and characterization;
— identification of exposure routes;
— identification of relevant receptors/target groups;
— and based on this: the actual exposure assessment.

For the assessment of possible effects on human health, an analysis of the exposure routes is a

prerequisite. Where receptors are not directly exposed to a contaminant, exposure assessment needs

to consider the various ways by which indirect exposure might occur and the significance of them.

Human exposure from soil contamination can occur through different media.
Directly from the soil, the following exposure routes exist:

— soil ingestion, both dietary and through adherence to hands and unwashed vegetables, etc.;

— dermal contact;
— ingestion of house dust that predominantly consists of soil material.
Airborne exposure comprises the following:
— inhalation and ingestion of fugitive dust;
— inhalation of elevated outdoor-concentrations;
— inhalation of vapours that have intruded into buildings.
Exposure through food chain comprises the following:
— consumption of plants including crops, wild plants and fungi;
© ISO 2018 – All rights reserved 3
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO 17924:2018(E)
— consumption of animals and animal products, including wild animals;
— consumption of contaminated water.

Within this document, direct uptake of soil via ingestion and/or ingestion of fugitive dust is considered.

Oral ingestion is one of the most important exposure routes for humans to soil contaminants.

Quality criteria for soil (the maximum concentration limits for soil) are usually calculated on the basis

of a tolerable daily intake value (TDI) or a provisionally tolerable weekly intake (PTWI), that can be

derived from the no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) found in human data or experimental animal

data. For genotoxic carcinogens for which no lower threshold for increased risk for cancer is assumed,

the TDI value is set at a level that corresponds to a tolerable low (negligible) cancer risk level.

For determining the TDI, data on oral toxicity are primarily considered. These data often pertain

to animal experiments where the substance is administrated to the animals mixed in the feed or in

drinking water (the vehicle or transporter of the contaminant). The amount of contaminant needed to

produce adverse health effects in the animal is then recorded. As an alternative, epidemiological studies

relating observed human health effects to recorded exposures have been used. Most toxicological

studies report the total ingested amount and seldom indicate exact values for the bioavailability of the

substances administered.

When extrapolating from such experimental conditions to other conditions, e.g. to intake of

contaminated soil, this approach assumes that the uptake efficiency is equal for all scenarios, i.e. that

the absolute bioavailability of the contaminant is constant. The absolute oral bioavailability can be

defined as the fraction of an orally ingested contaminant that reaches systemic circulation, i.e. enters

the blood stream. The absolute oral bioavailability of a contaminant may range from close to 0 to almost

1 (i.e. 100 %) depending upon the physiochemical form of the contaminant. In this context, the use of

the concept of absolute, oral bioavailability rests upon the assumption that adverse health effects are

systemic and thus triggered by the contaminants reaching the blood stream, i.e. the internal exposure

as opposed to the external exposure measured directly as intake of a contaminated medium multiplied

by the concentration of the contaminant in the medium, see Figure 1.

The absolute bioavailability can be measured as the ratio between amounts in the blood of animals or

man after intravenous injection (100 % bioavailability) and after oral ingestion (uptake of bioavailable

fraction).
Figure 1 — Schematic presentation of oral uptake processes
4 © ISO 2018 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
ISO 17924:2018(E)

A more feasible approach is to measure the relative bioavailability or relative absorption fraction

(RAF), which is the ratio between the amount of a contaminant reaching systemic circulation when

ingested with, for example, soil and the same amount obtained when ingested in the toxicity experiment

underlying the criterion.

It should be noted that although most relative bioavailabilities are less than 1 and would result in an

increased acceptable levels, RAF values above 1 could be found that would result in a demand for a

decreased acceptable level.
5 Description of the mechanisms of human contaminant uptake

A series of compartments are involved in human bioavailability of ingested soil contaminants, as

described in Clause 4.

The overall pathway leads the food and soil with contaminants from the mechanical grinding in the

mouth through a series of chemical and microbiological processes to partial dissolution through the

entire gastrointestinal tract (bioaccessibility processes). The dissolved components are transported

through the membranes of the gastrointestinal epithelium (absorption) and into the blood stream.

During transport through the membranes, degradation can occur (metabolism). The blood passes

the liver before entering the systemic circulation, allowing for degradation or removal of unwanted

compounds in the liver (metabolism, first pass effect). Most of the dissolution processes are completed

before the material leaves the small intestine, and it is generally accepted that most of the uptake

takes place in the small intestine. To which extent uptake takes place in the stomach depends on the

compound. The environment in the compartments differs and accordingly impacts the bioaccessibility

process differently, see Table 1.

Table 1 — Functions and conditions in the compartments involved in bioaccessibility processes

Primary
Main added Residence Contaminant dissolution
Compartment digestion pH
“reagents” time function
functions
Mouth Grinding
Moisture
Seconds to Grinding enhances subsequent
6,5
Cleavage of
minutes dissolution
Amylase
starch
Gullet Transport None 6,5 Seconds None
Stomach Hydrochloric acid
Acid dissolves labile mineral
Cleavage of pro-
Proteases 1 - 5 8 min to 3 h oxides, sulphides and carbon-
teins and fats
ates to release metals.
Lipases
Small intestine Bicarbonate
Organic matter is dissolved
Cleavage of
and bound contaminants
oligosaccha- Bile
released
rides, proteins,
Proteases
fats and other
4 - 7,5 2 h to 10 h Cationic metals are solubilised
constituents
Lipases
by complexation with bile acids
Solubilization of Oligosaccharases
Some metals are precipitated
fats
by the high pH or by phosphate
Phosphatases

The pH in the stomach may vary from close to 1 under fasted conditions to as high as 5 after feeding.

Residence time (1/2-time for emptying) in the stomach varies similarly from 8 min to 15 min and

30 min to 3 h for fasted and average fed conditions, respectively. Furthermore, bile release varies as

well, with high releases under fed conditions. Finally, the pH in the stomach can be lower for small

children than for adults.

The gastrointestinal tract constitutes a complex ecosystem with aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms.

The density of microorganisms is less in the human stomach and in the upper part of the small intestine

but increases towards and in the large intestine. Anaerobic microorganisms dominate in human

faeces, whereas aerobic bacteria are found in high densities in the large intestine. Sulfate reducing

© ISO 2018 – All rights reserved 5
---------------------- Page: 10 ----------------------
ISO 17924:2018(E)

bacteria have been detected in the human large intestine while high concentrations of oxygen have

been detected throughout the gastrointestinal tract of pigs. Overall, dominating aerobic conditions and

microorganisms would be expected in the stomach, but with increasingly anaerobic conditions from

the small intestine to the large intestine.

Absorption requires that the contaminants are dissolved (free or bound to a dissolved carrier such as

bile), transported to the gastrointestinal wall and, if bound to a carrier, released at the surface of the

gastrointestinal membrane for absorption. The carrier mechanisms can be complexation of cationic

metals by bile acids. Bile acids, proteins and other complexing agents can enhance exposure for cationic

metals. Also, lipids and other soluble organic matter in the diet can add to the carrier effect of the bile.

The simple dissolution/transport/absorption processes can be complicated by chemical kinetics

resulting from the sequential change in the chemical environment of the gastrointestinal tract, as well

as by soil and contaminant chemistry. As an example, lead found in soil as the common contaminant

anglesite (PbSO ) will dissolve in the stomach and will stay in solution here at the low pH and high

chloride concentration, see Figure 2. Entering the higher pH in the presence of dissolved phosphate in

the small intestine, the dissolved lead ions (Pb ) will precipitate very quickly as lead chlorophosphate

[chloropyromorphite, Pb (PO ) Cl]. The phosphate can originate from digested food or from the soil.

5 4 3

Phosphate minerals, such as hydroxyapatite, Ca (PO ) OH, will dissolve in the low pH of the stomach,

5 4 3

but dissolution will be slower and less complete at higher pH in the stomach (as occurring after food

ingestion). If stomach transit is fast (as occurring under fasting conditions), the hydroxyapatite may

not dissolve in the stomach and reach the small intestine where the neutral to slightly alkaline pH

will prevent further dissolution and thus also precipitation of released lead as lead chlorophosphate.

Conversely, just after transit from the stomach to the small intestine, the pH is still low and absorption

of lead can take place driven by the high dissolved lead concentration possible in acidic pH. Overall, the

de facto dissolution of lead from soil will depend upon interacting conditions such as soil composition,

simultaneously ingested food and feeding conditions of the human. This also means that cultural

factors that affect the type of food typically consumed can have an influence on the actual uptake.

Figure 2 — Example of dissolution of a lead mineral (lead sulfate) in the stomach and

subsequent precipitation in the small intestine

The absorption of dissolved contaminants predominantly occurs through the epithelium of the stomach

and the small intestine (the intestinal epithelium) either through the cells (transcellular transport) or

between the cells (paracellular transport). The pathway between the cells is primarily taken by polar

or ionic contaminants (e.g. some metals).

Metals are absorbed by passive paracellular transport, by passive transcellular diffusion or by activ

...

NORME ISO
INTERNATIONALE 17924
Première édition
2018-10
Version corrigée
2021-09
Qualité du sol — Évaluation de
l'exposition humaine par ingestion
de sol et de matériaux du sol — Mode
opératoire pour l'estimation de la
bioaccessibilité/biodisponibilité pour
l'homme de métaux dans le sol
Soil quality — Assessment of human exposure from ingestion of
soil and soil material — Procedure for the estimation of the human
bioaccessibility/bioavailability of metals in soil
Numéro de référence
ISO 17924:2018(F)
ISO 2018
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO 17924:2018(F)
DOCUMENT PROTÉGÉ PAR COPYRIGHT
© ISO 2018

Tous droits réservés. Sauf prescription différente ou nécessité dans le contexte de sa mise en œuvre, aucune partie de cette

publication ne peut être reproduite ni utilisée sous quelque forme que ce soit et par aucun procédé, électronique ou mécanique,

y compris la photocopie, ou la diffusion sur l’internet ou sur un intranet, sans autorisation écrite préalable. Une autorisation peut

être demandée à l’ISO à l’adresse ci-après ou au comité membre de l’ISO dans le pays du demandeur.

ISO copyright office
Case postale 401 • Ch. de Blandonnet 8
CH-1214 Vernier, Genève
Tél.: +41 22 749 01 11
E-mail: copyright@iso.org
Web: www.iso.org
Publié en Suisse
ii © ISO 2018 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO 17924:2018(F)
Sommaire Page

Avant-propos ..............................................................................................................................................................................................................................iv

Introduction ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................vi

1 Domaine d’application ................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

2 Références normatives ................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3 Termes et définitions ....................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

4 Le concept de bioaccessibilité/biodisponibilité pour les sites et sols pollués dans

les évaluations de risques sanitaires .............................................................................................................................................. 3

5 Description des mécanismes d’absorption des substances par l’être humain ...................................5

6 Description des mécanismes de liaison des métaux (spéciation des métaux) dans le sol .....8

7 Utilisation et interprétation des tests in vitro pour l’évaluation du risque ............................................9

8 Description de la méthode d’essai ..................................................................................................................................................10

8.1 Principe de l’essai ..............................................................................................................................................................................10

8.2 Appareillage............................................................................................................................................................................................10

8.3 Réactifs ........................................................................................................................................................................................................11

8.4 Préparation des liquides simulés .........................................................................................................................................12

8.4.1 Généralités .........................................................................................................................................................................12

8.4.2 Liquide salivaire simulé (1 000 ml) ..............................................................................................................13

8.4.3 Liquide gastrique simulé (1 000 ml) ...........................................................................................................13

8.4.4 Liquide duodénal simulé (1 000 ml) ...........................................................................................................14

8.4.5 Liquide biliaire simulé (1 000 ml) .................................................................................................................15

8.4.6 Contrôle du pH des liquides mélangés.......................................................................................................16

8.5 Prétraitement de l’échantillon ................................................................................................................................................16

8.5.1 Généralités .........................................................................................................................................................................16

8.5.2 Préparation des échantillons pour essai ..................................................................................................16

8.5.3 Protocole d’analyse typique ................................................................................................................................16

8.6 Mode opératoire de préparation des échantillons ................................................................................................17

9 Traitement des données, contrôle de la qualité et présentation des résultats ................................19

9.1 Généralités ...............................................................................................................................................................................................19

9.2 Calcul de la bioaccessibilité .......................................................................................................................................................19

Annexe A (informative) Mode opératoire de préparation des échantillons .............................................................21

Bibliographie ...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................22

© ISO 2018 – Tous droits réservés iii
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO 17924:2018(F)
Avant-propos

L’ISO (Organisation internationale de normalisation) est une fédération mondiale d’organismes

nationaux de normalisation (comités membres de l’ISO). L’élaboration des Normes internationales est

en général confiée aux comités techniques de l’ISO. Chaque comité membre intéressé par une étude

a le droit de faire partie du comité technique créé à cet effet. Les organisations internationales,

gouvernementales et non gouvernementales, en liaison avec l’ISO participent également aux travaux.

L’ISO collabore étroitement avec la Commission électrotechnique internationale (IEC) en ce qui

concerne la normalisation électrotechnique.

Les procédures utilisées pour élaborer le présent document et celles destinées à sa mise à jour sont

décrites dans les Directives ISO/IEC, Partie 1. Il convient, en particulier de prendre note des différents

critères d’approbation requis pour les différents types de documents ISO. Le présent document a été

rédigé conformément aux règles de rédaction données dans les Directives ISO/IEC, Partie 2 (voir www

.iso .org/ directives).

L’attention est attirée sur le fait que certains des éléments du présent document peuvent faire l’objet de

droits de propriété intellectuelle ou de droits analogues. L’ISO ne saurait être tenue pour responsable

de ne pas avoir identifié de tels droits de propriété et averti de leur existence. Les détails concernant

les références aux droits de propriété intellectuelle ou autres droits analogues identifiés lors de

l’élaboration du document sont indiqués dans l’Introduction et/ou dans la liste des déclarations de

brevets reçues par l’ISO (voir www .iso .org/ brevets).

Les appellations commerciales éventuellement mentionnées dans le présent document sont données

pour information, par souci de commodité, à l’intention des utilisateurs et ne sauraient constituer un

engagement.

Pour une explication de la nature volontaire des normes, la signification des termes et expressions

spécifiques de l’ISO liés à l’évaluation de la conformité, ou pour toute information au sujet de l’adhésion

de l’ISO aux principes de l’Organisation mondiale du commerce (OMC) concernant les obstacles

techniques au commerce (OTC), voir le lien suivant: www .iso .org/ iso/ fr/ avant -propos.

Le présent document a été élaboré par le comité technique ISO/TC 190, Qualité du sol, sous-comité SC 7,

Évaluation de l'impact.

Cette première édition de l’ISO 17924 annule et remplace l’ISO/TS 17924:2007, qui a fait l’objet d’une

révision technique. Les modifications par rapport à la précédente édition sont les suivantes:

— 7.1 «Généralités», 7.2 «Choix d’un essai approprié», 7.3 «Description des méthodes d’essai applicables»

et 7.4 «Recommandations» ont été supprimés. 7.5 «Utilisation et interprétation des essais in vitro

pour l’évaluation du risque» a été renuméroté en Article 7 et essais in vitro a été remplacé par tests

in vitro;
— l’Article 8 «Description de la méthode d’essai» a été ajouté;

— l’Article 9 (anciennement Article 8) «Traitement des données, contrôle de la qualité et présentation

des résultats» a été totalement révisé;

— l’Annexe A «Essais de bioaccessibilité humaine» a été remplacée par l’Annexe A «Mode opératoire de

préparation des échantillons»;
— les figures ont été révisées;
— le document complet a fait l’objet d’une révision éditoriale;
— le domaine d’application a été adapté.

Il convient que l’utilisateur adresse tout retour d’information ou toute question concernant le présent

document à l’organisme national de normalisation de son pays. Une liste exhaustive desdits organismes

se trouve à l’adresse www .iso .org/ fr/ members .html.
iv © ISO 2018 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
ISO 17924:2018(F)

La présente version corrigée de l'ISO 17924:2018 inclut les corrections suivantes:

— en 8.3.12, le n° CAS du chlorure de magnésium hexahydraté a été corrigé en n° CAS 7786-30-3;

— en 8.4.1, troisième alinéa, la phrase "Les solutions sont obtenues conformément aux instructions

détaillées fournies la veille des extractions." a été supprimée pour éviter la répétition de l'information

donnée dans le deuxième alinéa;

— en 8.4.4, Tableau 9, NaHCO , a été ajouté avec les quantités suivantes: 5,607 g (Volume/masse

complété à 500 ml), 11 214 mg/l (Concentration finale);
— en 8.4.5, Tableau 12, la masse de NaCl a été corrigée à 5,230 g;
— en 8.4.5, Tableau 12, la masse de NaHCO a été corrigée à 5,796 g;

— en 8.6.17, le texte "il convient que la valeur du pH soit égale à 6,3 ± 0,5." a été supprimé car la méthode

BARGE ne stipule pas de tolérance pour le pH final.
© ISO 2018 – Tous droits réservés v
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
ISO 17924:2018(F)
Introduction

Lors d’une évaluation de sols pollués par exemple par d’éléments potentiellement dangereux (e.g.

l’arsenic), l’ingestion de sol (notamment par des enfants) est souvent considérée comme la voie

d’exposition prépondérante. Cette évaluation est souvent fondée sur la concentration totale en d’éléments

potentiellement dangereux dans le sol. Toutefois, plusieurs études suggèrent que la disponibilité

d’éléments potentiellement dangereux (e.g. l’arsenic) dans le tractus gastrointestinal dépend de la forme

d’éléments potentiellement dangereux présents et des paramètres physico-chimiques du sol spécifique

du site. Des méthodes d’essai fondées sur des tests in vivo réalisés, par exemple, sur des porcs juvéniles

ou des porcs nains, sont onéreuses, demandent beaucoup de temps et ne sont pas compatibles avec les

processus décisionnels liés à l’évaluation et au traitement des sites pollués. Des méthodes d’essai ont

donc été élaborées et validées. Elles mettent en œuvre des essais de laboratoire in vitro (tests in vitro)

destinés à simuler des résultats in vivo. Ces méthodes d’essai permettront de réduire les coûts et les

opérations liés à la mise en œuvre d'essais in situ sur un terrain contaminé.

Compte tenu des dépenses importantes auxquelles les propriétaires de terrains privés et les

autorités publiques doivent faire face pour la réhabilitation d’un terrain contaminé, il existe une forte

demande pour des Normes internationales relatives à l’évaluation des sols pollués, notamment pour

ce qui concerne la santé humaine. Dans ce domaine complexe, les Normes internationales permettent

de constituer une base scientifique commune pour l’échange de données, le développement des

connaissances et l’évaluation robuste. Le but du présent document est de décrire les éléments de la mise

en œuvre d’un de ces tests in vitro et de proposer des conseils concernant la combinaison et l’utilisation

appropriées de ces éléments dans une situation donnée. La méthode est basée sur la Méthode de

bioaccessibilité unifiée du Groupe de recherche sur la bioaccessibilité en Europe (BARGE UBM), qui a

été élaborée et approuvée par le groupe BARGE.

Dans l’évaluation des risques pour la santé humaine, le terme «biodisponibilité» correspond

spécifiquement à l’absorption d’une substance dans la circulation générale, conformément à l’utilisation

toxicologique du terme. Cela tient compte de la «bioaccessibilité», paramètre correspondant à la

part de substances du sol capable de se dissoudre dans les liquides digestifs humains. En outre, la

biodisponibilité tient compte de l’absorption du contaminant à travers les membranes physiologiques

et la métabolisation par le foie. La fraction biodisponible correspond à la part restant après dissolution

dans les liquides digestifs, passage à travers les membranes épithéliales intestinales et métabolisation

par le foie. Ces processus sont décrits dans l’Article 4.

La biodisponibilité correspond à la fraction de la substance chimique absorbée dans la circulation

générale, aussi deux paramètres peuvent être définis: la biodisponibilité absolue et la biodisponibilité

relative. La biodisponibilité absolue est la part de la dose administrée qui est absorbée et qui atteint la

circulation générale (et qui ne peut jamais être supérieure à 100 %). La biodisponibilité relative permet

de comparer l’absorption d’une même substance dans deux matrices données via laquelle elle est

administrée: par exemple dans un échantillon de sol par rapport à une administration dans des aliments

ou dans une autre matrice utilisée lors d’étude de toxicité. Elle peut être supérieure ou inférieure à

1. Ce facteur peut être utilisé dans le cadre des évaluations de l’exposition pour une exposition par

ingestion non intentionnelle de sol, particulièrement s’il existe potentiellement, pour un métal donné,

une différence significative entre la biodisponibilité absolue sur le site étudié et celle établie lors d’une

étude de toxicité dans des conditions particulières.
vi © ISO 2018 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
NORME INTERNATIONALE ISO 17924:2018(F)
Qualité du sol — Évaluation de l'exposition humaine par
ingestion de sol et de matériaux du sol — Mode opératoire
pour l'estimation de la bioaccessibilité/biodisponibilité
pour l'homme de métaux dans le sol
1 Domaine d’application

Le présent document traite de l’évaluation de l’exposition humaine par ingestion de sol et de matériaux

du sol. Le présent document spécifie une procédure d’essai pertinente d’un point de vue physiologique

pour l’estimation de la bioaccessibilité pour l’homme de métaux dans un sol contaminé, en liaison avec

l’évaluation de l’exposition de l’homme par voie orale.

Cette méthode est un essai de lixiviation séquentiel utilisant des sucs gastrointestinaux synthétiques;

elle peut être utilisée pour estimer la bioaccessibilité orale. Les sols ou autres matériaux géologiques,

sous forme tamisée, sont extraits dans un environnement qui simule les conditions physico-chimiques

de base du tractus gastrointestinal humain.

Le présent document décrit une méthode pour simuler la libération de métaux contenus dans un sol

ou dans des matériaux de sol après le passage par les trois compartiments du tractus gastrointestinal

humain (bouche, estomac et intestin grêle). La méthode d’essai produit des extraits qui sont

représentatifs de la concentration d’éléments potentiellement dangereux dans le tractus gastrointestinal

humain en vue d’une caractérisation chimique ultérieure. L’essai a été validé pour l’arsenic, le cadmium

et le plomb dans le cadre d’un essai interlaboratoires international.

NOTE 1 La bioaccessibilité peut être utilisée pour estimer de manière approximative la biodisponibilité de la

substance étudiée.

NOTE 2 La méthode a été validée pour l’arsenic, le cadmium et le plomb dans le cadre d’un essai

interlaboratoires international. Elle a été validée in vivo pour évaluer la biodisponibilité de l’arsenic, du cadmium

et du plomb.
2 Références normatives

Les documents suivants cités dans le texte constituent, pour tout ou partie de leur contenu, des

exigences du présent document. Pour les références datées, seule l’édition citée s’applique. Pour les

références non datées, la dernière édition du document de référence s’applique (y compris les éventuels

amendements).
ISO 11074, Qualité du sol — Vocabulaire
3 Termes et définitions

Pour les besoins du présent document, les termes et définitions de l’ISO 11074 ainsi que les suivants,

s’appliquent.

L’ISO et l’IEC tiennent à jour des bases de données terminologiques destinées à être utilisées en

normalisation, consultables aux adresses suivantes:

— ISO Online browsing platform: disponible à l’adresse https:// www .iso .org/ obp;

— IEC Electropedia: disponible à l’adresse http:// www .electropedia .org/ .
© ISO 2018 – Tous droits réservés 1
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
ISO 17924:2018(F)
3.1
absorption

processus par lequel un corps assimile une substance pour en faire une partie intégrante de lui-même

3.2
bioaccessiblité

fraction d’une substance dans un sol ou un matériau du sol, libérée dans les sucs gastrointestinaux

(humains) et donc disponible pour absorption
3.3
biodisponibilité

fraction d’une substance présente dans un sol ingéré, qui atteint la circulation générale (circulation

sanguine)
3.4
contaminant
substance ou agent présent(e) dans le sol du fait de l’activité humaine

Note 1 à l'article: La présente définition ne présuppose pas l’existence d’un danger dû à la présence du

contaminant.
3.5
contact cutané
contact avec la peau
3.6
exposition
dose d’une substance chimique qui atteint le corps humain
3.7
voie d’exposition
chemin suivi par une substance entre une source et un récepteur
3.8
ingestion

acte consistant à introduire des substances, comme du sol et des matériaux du sol, dans le corps par la

bouche
3.9
test de bioaccessibilité in vitro
détermination de la bioaccessibilité réalisée hors d’un organisme vivant
3.10
dose sans effet indésirable observé
DSEIO
dose à laquelle aucun effet indésirable ne peut être observé sur un récepteur
3.11
pica

comportement alimentaire caractérisé par la consommation de substances généralement atypiques et

non comestibles, comme des matériaux du sol et des cailloux

Note 1 à l'article: Le terme «pica» est dérivé du nom latin pica pica désignant la Pie bavarde qui prélève au hasard

tous genres de matériaux pour la construction de son nid.
3.12
dose hebdomadaire tolérable provisoire
DHTP

quantité hebdomadaire tolérable provisoire d’une substance qui peut être absorbée par le corps humain

au cours de sa vie, via la chaîne alimentaire, sans affecter la santé humaine
2 © ISO 2018 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO 17924:2018(F)
3.13
récepteur
personne potentiellement exposée
3.14
fraction d’absorption relative
FAR

rapport entre la quantité d’un contaminant atteignant la circulation générale lorsqu’il est ingéré avec,

par exemple, du sol, et la même quantité obtenue lorsqu’il est ingéré lors de la détermination de la

toxicité pour établir les critères
3.15
espèces

différentes formes d’une substance toujours produites ensemble à l'équilibre réactionnel

3.16
dose journalière tolérable
DJT

quantité journalière tolérable d’une substance qui peut être absorbée par le corps humain au cours de

sa vie, via la chaîne alimentaire, sans affecter la santé humaine
4 Le concept de bioaccessibilité/biodisponibilité pour les sites et sols pollués
dans les évaluations de risques sanitaires

La caractérisation de la bioaccessibilité/biodisponibilité est habituellement réalisée en tant que partie

intégrante d’une évaluation de risque et/ou de l’exposition.
Une évaluation du risque comprend les éléments suivants:
— identification des dangers;
— évaluation de la relation dose-effet;
— évaluation de l’exposition;
— et, sur la base des éléments ci-dessus: caractérisation du risque.

Une évaluation de l’exposition est le processus au cours duquel l’intensité, la fréquence et la durée de

l’exposition humaine à une substance sont estimées. Ce processus comprend:
— l’identification et la caractérisation de la source;
— l’identification des voies d’exposition;
— l’identification des récepteurs/groupes cibles concernés;
— et, sur la base des éléments ci-dessus: l’évaluation de l’exposition.

S’agissant de l’évaluation des effets sur la santé humaine, l’analyse des voies d’exposition constitue un

prérequis. Lorsque des personnes (récepteurs) ne sont pas directement exposées à un contaminant,

il importe que l’évaluation du degré d’exposition tienne compte des divers moyens par lesquels une

exposition indirecte peut se produire, ainsi que de leur importance.

L’exposition humaine à la contamination du sol peut se faire par le biais de différents milieux.

Directement à partir du sol, par les voies d’exposition suivantes:

— l’ingestion de sol, par voie alimentaire et par adhérence aux mains et aux légumes non lavés, etc.;

— le contact cutané;

— l’ingestion de poussière à l’intérieur du domicile essentiellement composée de matériau de sol.

© ISO 2018 – Tous droits réservés 3
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
ISO 17924:2018(F)
L’exposition par l’air comprend:
— l’inhalation et l’ingestion de poussières diffuses;
— l’inhalation de substances gazeuses provenant de sources extérieures;
— l’inhalation de vapeurs introduites dans les bâtiments.
L’exposition par le biais de la chaîne alimentaire comprend:

— la consommation de végétaux, comprenant des produits agricoles végétaux, des plantes potagères,

des végétaux sauvages et des champignons;

— la consommation d’animaux et de produits d’origine animale, y compris des animaux sauvages;

— la consommation d’eau contaminée.

Le champ d’application du présent document couvre l’absorption directe de sol par ingestion et/

ou l’ingestion de poussières diffuses. L’ingestion orale constitue l’une des plus importantes voies

d’exposition des êtres humains aux contaminants du sol.

Les critères de qualité du sol (limites de concentration maximale pour le sol) sont habituellement

calculés sur la base d’une dose journalière tolérable (DJT) ou d’une dose hebdomadaire tolérable

provisoire (DHTP), qui peut être déduite à partir de la dose sans effet nocif observé (DSENO ou NOAEL

en anglais) déterminée à partir de données épidémiologiques ou de données expérimentales. En ce qui

concerne les cancérogènes génotoxiques pour lesquels aucun seuil d’effet n’est fixé, la DJT est fixée à un

niveau qui correspond à un niveau faible tolérable (négligeable) de risque de cancer.

La détermination de la DJT se fonde essentiellement sur les données relatives à la toxicité orale. Ces

données sont souvent élaborées à partir d’études expérimentales lors desquelles la substance est

administrée aux animaux via l’alimentation ou l’eau de boisson. La quantité de substance induisant des

effets sur la santé chez l’animal est ensuite déterminée. Des études épidémiologiques peuvent également

être utilisées pour déterminer les effets d’une exposition sur la santé humaine. La plupart des études

épidémiologiques sont basées sur la quantité totale ingérée et seules quelques-unes fournissent des

valeurs exactes sur la biodisponibilité des substances administrées.

Lors de l’extrapolation de ces conditions expérimentales à d’autres conditions (l’ingestion de sol

contaminé par exemple), il est supposé que l’absorption d’une substance donnée est la même pour tous les

scénarios, c’est-à-dire que la biodisponibilité absolue du contaminant est constante. La biodisponibilité

orale absolue d’une substance peut être définie comme la fraction de substance ingérée qui atteint la

circulation générale, c’est-à-dire qui pénètre dans la circulation sanguine. La biodisponibilité orale

absolue d’une substance peut être comprise entre 0 et 1 (c’est-à-dire 100 %), selon la forme physico-

chimique de la substance. Dans ce contexte, l’utilisation du concept de biodisponibilité orale absolue

repose sur l’hypothèse selon laquelle les effets de la substance sur la santé sont systémiques et donc

déclenchés lorsque la substance atteint la circulation sanguine. Ainsi le concept d’exposition interne est

mis en perspective avec celui d’exposition externe mesurée directement en tant que quantité de milieu

ingéré multipliée par la concentration de la substance dans ce milieu (voir Figure 1).

La biodisponibilité absolue peut être déterminée par le ratio entre la quantité de substance dans le sang

(animal ou humain) après injection en intraveineuse (biodisponibilité de 100 %) et celle après ingestion

orale (absorption de fraction biodisponible).
4 © ISO 2018 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 10 ----------------------
ISO 17924:2018(F)
Figure 1 — Représentation schématique des processus d’absorption orale

Une approche plus pratique consiste à mesurer la biodisponibilité relative ou fraction d’absorption

relative (FAR) qui représente le rapport entre la quantité d’une substance atteignant la circulation

générale lorsqu’il est ingéré, par exemple dans du sol, et la même quantité ingérée lors de la

détermination de la toxicité dont les paramètres sont fixés.

Il convient de noter que, bien que la plupart des biodisponibilités relatives soient inférieures à 1 et

qu’elles devraient aboutir à des niveaux acceptables plus élevés, des valeurs de FAR supérieures à 1 sont

possibles et induisent donc des risques plus importants.
5 Description des mécanismes d’absorption des substances par l’être humain

Plusieurs compartiments sont impliqués dans la biodisponibilité pour l’homme des contaminants du sol

ingérés, comme décrit à l’Article 4.

Les aliments et le sol contaminé sont d’abord soumis à un broyage mécanique au niveau de la

bouche, puis, par une série de processus chimiques et microbiologiques, ils subissent une dissolution

partielle à travers le tractus gastrointestinal (processus de bioaccessibilité). Les composants dissous

passent à travers les membranes de l’épithélium gastrointestinal (absorption) pour parvenir à la

circulation sanguine. Durant le passage à travers les membranes, une dégradation peut se produire

(métabolisation). Après absorption, le sang passe par le foie avant d’entrer dans la circulation générale.

Cette étape hépatique conduit à la dégradation ou l’élimination de composés indésirables dans le foie

(métabolisme, effet de premier passage). La plupart des processus de dissolution s’achèvent avant que le

matériau ne quitte l’intestin grêle, et il est généralement reconnu que la majeure partie de l’assimilation

se déroule dans l’intestin grêle. Une éventuelle assimilation de la substance au niveau stomacal dépend

de la nature du composé. L’environnement chimique de chaque compartiment digestif est différent et

influence le processus de bioaccessibilité (voir Tableau 1).
© ISO 2018 – Tous droits réservés 5
---------------------- Page: 11 ----------------------
ISO 17924:2018(F)

Tableau 1 — Fonctions et conditions dans les compartiments impliqués dans les processus de

bioaccessibilité
Fonctions Principaux
essentielles «réactifs» inter- Durée de Fonction de dissolution
Compartiment pH
de la diges- venant dans la séjour des contaminants
tion digestion
Bouche Broyage
Humidité
Secondes à Le broyage favorise la dissolu-
6,5
Dégradation
minutes tion ultérieure.
Amylase
de l’amidon
Œsophage Transport Aucun 6,5 Secondes Aucun
Estomac Acide chlorhy-
L’acide dissout les oxydes
Dégradation drique
minéraux labiles, des sulfures
des protéines 1 à 5 8 min à 3 h
Protéases et des carbonates pour libérer
et des graisses
des métaux.
Lipases
Intestin grêle La matière organique est dis-
Dégradation Bicarbonate
soute et les contaminants liés
des oligosac-
sont libérés.
Bile
charides, pro-
Les métaux cationiques sont
téines, graisses Protéases
4 à 7,5 2 h à 10 h solubilisés par complexation
et autres
Lipases
avec les acides biliaires.
constituants
Oligosaccharases
Certains métaux sont préci-
Solubilisation
pités par le pH élevé ou par le
des graisses Phosphatases
phosphate.
Le pH dans l’estomac peut varier entre 1 (à jeun) et 5 (apr
...

NORME ISO
INTERNATIONALE 17924
Première édition
2018-10
Qualité du sol — Évaluation de
l'exposition humaine par ingestion
de sol et de matériaux du sol — Mode
opératoire pour l'estimation de la
bioaccessibilité/biodisponibilité pour
l'homme de métaux dans le sol
Soil quality — Assessment of human exposure from ingestion of
soil and soil material — Procedure for the estimation of the human
bioaccessibility/bioavailability of metals in soil
Numéro de référence
ISO 17924:2018(F)
ISO 2018
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO 17924:2018(F)
DOCUMENT PROTÉGÉ PAR COPYRIGHT
© ISO 2018

Tous droits réservés. Sauf prescription différente ou nécessité dans le contexte de sa mise en œuvre, aucune partie de cette

publication ne peut être reproduite ni utilisée sous quelque forme que ce soit et par aucun procédé, électronique ou mécanique,

y compris la photocopie, ou la diffusion sur l’internet ou sur un intranet, sans autorisation écrite préalable. Une autorisation peut

être demandée à l’ISO à l’adresse ci-après ou au comité membre de l’ISO dans le pays du demandeur.

ISO copyright office
Case postale 401 • Ch. de Blandonnet 8
CH-1214 Vernier, Genève
Tél.: +41 22 749 01 11
Fax: +41 22 749 09 47
E-mail: copyright@iso.org
Web: www.iso.org
Publié en Suisse
ii © ISO 2018 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO 17924:2018(F)
Sommaire Page

Avant-propos ..............................................................................................................................................................................................................................iv

Introduction ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................v

1 Domaine d’application ................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

2 Références normatives ................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3 Termes et définitions ....................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

4 Le concept de bioaccessibilité/biodisponibilité pour les sites et sols pollués dans

les évaluations de risques sanitaires .............................................................................................................................................. 3

5 Description des mécanismes d’absorption des substances par l’être humain ...................................5

6 Description des mécanismes de liaison des métaux (spéciation des métaux) dans le sol .....8

7 Utilisation et interprétation des tests in vitro pour l’évaluation du risque ............................................9

8 Description de la méthode d’essai ..................................................................................................................................................10

8.1 Principe de l’essai ..............................................................................................................................................................................10

8.2 Appareillage............................................................................................................................................................................................10

8.3 Réactifs ........................................................................................................................................................................................................11

8.4 Préparation des liquides simulés .........................................................................................................................................12

8.4.1 Généralités .........................................................................................................................................................................12

8.4.2 Liquide salivaire simulé (1 000 ml) ..............................................................................................................13

8.4.3 Liquide gastrique simulé (1 000 ml) ...........................................................................................................13

8.4.4 Liquide duodénal simulé (1 000 ml) ...........................................................................................................14

8.4.5 Liquide biliaire simulé (1 000 ml) .................................................................................................................15

8.4.6 Contrôle du pH des liquides mélangés.......................................................................................................16

8.5 Prétraitement de l’échantillon ................................................................................................................................................16

8.5.1 Généralités .........................................................................................................................................................................16

8.5.2 Préparation des échantillons pour essai ..................................................................................................16

8.5.3 Protocole d’analyse typique ................................................................................................................................16

8.6 Mode opératoire de préparation des échantillons ................................................................................................17

9 Traitement des données, contrôle de la qualité et présentation des résultats ................................19

9.1 Généralités ...............................................................................................................................................................................................19

9.2 Calcul de la bioaccessibilité .......................................................................................................................................................19

Annexe A (informative) Mode opératoire de préparation des échantillons .............................................................21

Bibliographie ...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................22

© ISO 2018 – Tous droits réservés iii
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO 17924:2018(F)
Avant-propos

L’ISO (Organisation internationale de normalisation) est une fédération mondiale d’organismes

nationaux de normalisation (comités membres de l’ISO). L’élaboration des Normes internationales est

en général confiée aux comités techniques de l’ISO. Chaque comité membre intéressé par une étude

a le droit de faire partie du comité technique créé à cet effet. Les organisations internationales,

gouvernementales et non gouvernementales, en liaison avec l’ISO participent également aux travaux.

L’ISO collabore étroitement avec la Commission électrotechnique internationale (IEC) en ce qui

concerne la normalisation électrotechnique.

Les procédures utilisées pour élaborer le présent document et celles destinées à sa mise à jour sont

décrites dans les Directives ISO/IEC, Partie 1. Il convient, en particulier de prendre note des différents

critères d’approbation requis pour les différents types de documents ISO. Le présent document a été

rédigé conformément aux règles de rédaction données dans les Directives ISO/IEC, Partie 2 (voir www

.iso .org/directives).

L’attention est attirée sur le fait que certains des éléments du présent document peuvent faire l’objet de

droits de propriété intellectuelle ou de droits analogues. L’ISO ne saurait être tenue pour responsable

de ne pas avoir identifié de tels droits de propriété et averti de leur existence. Les détails concernant

les références aux droits de propriété intellectuelle ou autres droits analogues identifiés lors de

l’élaboration du document sont indiqués dans l’Introduction et/ou dans la liste des déclarations de

brevets reçues par l’ISO (voir www .iso .org/brevets).

Les appellations commerciales éventuellement mentionnées dans le présent document sont données

pour information, par souci de commodité, à l’intention des utilisateurs et ne sauraient constituer un

engagement.

Pour une explication de la nature volontaire des normes, la signification des termes et expressions

spécifiques de l’ISO liés à l’évaluation de la conformité, ou pour toute information au sujet de l’adhésion

de l’ISO aux principes de l’Organisation mondiale du commerce (OMC) concernant les obstacles

techniques au commerce (OTC), voir le lien suivant: www .iso .org/iso/fr/avant -propos.

Le présent document a été élaboré par le comité technique ISO/TC 190, Qualité du sol, sous-comité SC 7,

Évaluation de l'impact.

Cette première édition de l’ISO 17924 annule et remplace l’ISO/TS 17924:2007, qui a fait l’objet d’une

révision technique. Les modifications par rapport à la précédente édition sont les suivantes:

— 7.1 «Généralités», 7.2 «Choix d’un essai approprié», 7.3 «Description des méthodes d’essai applicables»

et 7.4 «Recommandations» ont été supprimés. 7.5 «Utilisation et interprétation des essais in vitro

pour l’évaluation du risque» a été renuméroté en Article 7 et essais in vitro a été remplacé par tests

in vitro;
— l’Article 8 «Description de la méthode d’essai» a été ajouté;

— l’Article 9 (anciennement Article 8) «Traitement des données, contrôle de la qualité et présentation

des résultats» a été totalement révisé;

— l’Annexe A «Essais de bioaccessibilité humaine» a été remplacée par l’Annexe A «Mode opératoire de

préparation des échantillons»;
— les figures ont été révisées;
— le document complet a fait l’objet d’une révision éditoriale;
— le domaine d’application a été adapté.

Il convient que l’utilisateur adresse tout retour d’information ou toute question concernant le présent

document à l’organisme national de normalisation de son pays. Une liste exhaustive desdits organismes

se trouve à l’adresse www .iso .org/fr/members .html.
iv © ISO 2018 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
ISO 17924:2018(F)
Introduction

Lors d’une évaluation de sols pollués par exemple par d’éléments potentiellement dangereux (e.g.

l’arsenic), l’ingestion de sol (notamment par des enfants) est souvent considérée comme la voie

d’exposition prépondérante. Cette évaluation est souvent fondée sur la concentration totale en d’éléments

potentiellement dangereux dans le sol. Toutefois, plusieurs études suggèrent que la disponibilité

d’éléments potentiellement dangereux (e.g. l’arsenic) dans le tractus gastrointestinal dépend de la forme

d’éléments potentiellement dangereux présents et des paramètres physico-chimiques du sol spécifique

du site. Des méthodes d’essai fondées sur des tests in vivo réalisés, par exemple, sur des porcs juvéniles

ou des porcs nains, sont onéreuses, demandent beaucoup de temps et ne sont pas compatibles avec les

processus décisionnels liés à l’évaluation et au traitement des sites pollués. Des méthodes d’essai ont

donc été élaborées et validées. Elles mettent en œuvre des essais de laboratoire in vitro (tests in vitro)

destinés à simuler des résultats in vivo. Ces méthodes d’essai permettront de réduire les coûts et les

opérations liés à la mise en œuvre d'essais in situ sur un terrain contaminé.

Compte tenu des dépenses importantes auxquelles les propriétaires de terrains privés et les

autorités publiques doivent faire face pour la réhabilitation d’un terrain contaminé, il existe une forte

demande pour des Normes internationales relatives à l’évaluation des sols pollués, notamment pour

ce qui concerne la santé humaine. Dans ce domaine complexe, les Normes internationales permettent

de constituer une base scientifique commune pour l’échange de données, le développement des

connaissances et l’évaluation robuste. Le but du présent document est de décrire les éléments de la mise

en œuvre d’un de ces tests in vitro et de proposer des conseils concernant la combinaison et l’utilisation

appropriées de ces éléments dans une situation donnée. La méthode est basée sur la Méthode de

bioaccessibilité unifiée du Groupe de recherche sur la bioaccessibilité en Europe (BARGE UBM), qui a

été élaborée et approuvée par le groupe BARGE.

Dans l’évaluation des risques pour la santé humaine, le terme «biodisponibilité» correspond

spécifiquement à l’absorption d’une substance dans la circulation générale, conformément à l’utilisation

toxicologique du terme. Cela tient compte de la «bioaccessibilité», paramètre correspondant à la

part de substances du sol capable de se dissoudre dans les liquides digestifs humains. En outre, la

biodisponibilité tient compte de l’absorption du contaminant à travers les membranes physiologiques

et la métabolisation par le foie. La fraction biodisponible correspond à la part restant après dissolution

dans les liquides digestifs, passage à travers les membranes épithéliales intestinales et métabolisation

par le foie. Ces processus sont décrits dans l’Article 4.

La biodisponibilité correspond à la fraction de la substance chimique absorbée dans la circulation

générale, aussi deux paramètres peuvent être définis: la biodisponibilité absolue et la biodisponibilité

relative. La biodisponibilité absolue est la part de la dose administrée qui est absorbée et qui atteint la

circulation générale (et qui ne peut jamais être supérieure à 100 %). La biodisponibilité relative permet

de comparer l’absorption d’une même substance dans deux matrices données via laquelle elle est

administrée: par exemple dans un échantillon de sol par rapport à une administration dans des aliments

ou dans une autre matrice utilisée lors d’étude de toxicité. Elle peut être supérieure ou inférieure à

1. Ce facteur peut être utilisé dans le cadre des évaluations de l’exposition pour une exposition par

ingestion non intentionnelle de sol, particulièrement s’il existe potentiellement, pour un métal donné,

une différence significative entre la biodisponibilité absolue sur le site étudié et celle établie lors d’une

étude de toxicité dans des conditions particulières.
© ISO 2018 – Tous droits réservés v
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
NORME INTERNATIONALE ISO 17924:2018(F)
Qualité du sol — Évaluation de l'exposition humaine par
ingestion de sol et de matériaux du sol — Mode opératoire
pour l'estimation de la bioaccessibilité/biodisponibilité
pour l'homme de métaux dans le sol
1 Domaine d’application

Le présent document traite de l’évaluation de l’exposition humaine par ingestion de sol et de matériaux

du sol. Le présent document spécifie une procédure d’essai pertinente d’un point de vue physiologique

pour l’estimation de la bioaccessibilité pour l’homme de métaux dans un sol contaminé, en liaison avec

l’évaluation de l’exposition de l’homme par voie orale.

Cette méthode est un essai de lixiviation séquentiel utilisant des sucs gastrointestinaux synthétiques;

elle peut être utilisée pour estimer la bioaccessibilité orale. Les sols ou autres matériaux géologiques,

sous forme tamisée, sont extraits dans un environnement qui simule les conditions physico-chimiques

de base du tractus gastrointestinal humain.

Le présent document décrit une méthode pour simuler la libération de métaux contenus dans un sol

ou dans des matériaux de sol après le passage par les trois compartiments du tractus gastrointestinal

humain (bouche, estomac et intestin grêle). La méthode d’essai produit des extraits qui sont

représentatifs de la concentration d’éléments potentiellement dangereux dans le tractus gastrointestinal

humain en vue d’une caractérisation chimique ultérieure. L’essai a été validé pour l’arsenic, le cadmium

et le plomb dans le cadre d’un essai interlaboratoires international.

NOTE 1 La bioaccessibilité peut être utilisée pour estimer de manière approximative la biodisponibilité de la

substance étudiée.

NOTE 2 La méthode a été validée pour l’arsenic, le cadmium et le plomb dans le cadre d’un essai

interlaboratoires international. Elle a été validée in vivo pour évaluer la biodisponibilité de l’arsenic, du cadmium

et du plomb.
2 Références normatives

Les documents suivants cités dans le texte constituent, pour tout ou partie de leur contenu, des

exigences du présent document. Pour les références datées, seule l’édition citée s’applique. Pour les

références non datées, la dernière édition du document de référence s’applique (y compris les éventuels

amendements).
ISO 11074, Qualité du sol — Vocabulaire
3 Termes et définitions

Pour les besoins du présent document, les termes et définitions de l’ISO 11074 ainsi que les suivants,

s’appliquent.

L’ISO et l’IEC tiennent à jour des bases de données terminologiques destinées à être utilisées en

normalisation, consultables aux adresses suivantes:

— ISO Online browsing platform: disponible à l’adresse https: //www .iso .org/obp;

— IEC Electropedia: disponible à l’adresse http: //www .electropedia .org/.
© ISO 2018 – Tous droits réservés 1
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
ISO 17924:2018(F)
3.1
absorption

processus par lequel un corps assimile une substance pour en faire une partie intégrante de lui-même

3.2
bioaccessiblité

fraction d’une substance dans un sol ou un matériau du sol, libérée dans les sucs gastrointestinaux

(humains) et donc disponible pour absorption
3.3
biodisponibilité

fraction d’une substance présente dans un sol ingéré, qui atteint la circulation générale (circulation

sanguine)
3.4
contaminant
substance ou agent présent(e) dans le sol du fait de l’activité humaine

Note 1 à l'article: La présente définition ne présuppose pas l’existence d’un danger dû à la présence du

contaminant.
3.5
contact cutané
contact avec la peau
3.6
exposition
dose d’une substance chimique qui atteint le corps humain
3.7
voie d’exposition
chemin suivi par une substance entre une source et un récepteur
3.8
ingestion

acte consistant à introduire des substances, comme du sol et des matériaux du sol, dans le corps par

la bouche
3.9
test de bioaccessibilité in vitro
détermination de la bioaccessibilité réalisée hors d’un organisme vivant
3.10
dose sans effet indésirable observé
DSEIO
dose à laquelle aucun effet indésirable ne peut être observé sur un récepteur
3.11
pica

comportement alimentaire caractérisé par la consommation de substances généralement atypiques et

non comestibles, comme des matériaux du sol et des cailloux

Note 1 à l'article: Le terme «pica» est dérivé du nom latin pica pica désignant la Pie bavarde qui prélève au hasard

tous genres de matériaux pour la construction de son nid.
3.12
dose hebdomadaire tolérable provisoire
DHTP

quantité hebdomadaire tolérable provisoire d’une substance qui peut être absorbée par le corps humain

au cours de sa vie, via la chaîne alimentaire, sans affecter la santé humaine
2 © ISO 2018 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
ISO 17924:2018(F)
3.13
récepteur
personne potentiellement exposée
3.14
fraction d’absorption relative
FAR

rapport entre la quantité d’un contaminant atteignant la circulation générale lorsqu’il est ingéré avec,

par exemple, du sol, et la même quantité obtenue lorsqu’il est ingéré lors de la détermination de la

toxicité pour établir les critères
3.15
espèces

différentes formes d’une substance toujours produites ensemble à l'équilibre réactionnel

3.16
dose journalière tolérable
DJT

quantité journalière tolérable d’une substance qui peut être absorbée par le corps humain au cours de

sa vie, via la chaîne alimentaire, sans affecter la santé humaine
4 Le concept de bioaccessibilité/biodisponibilité pour les sites et sols pollués
dans les évaluations de risques sanitaires

La caractérisation de la bioaccessibilité/biodisponibilité est habituellement réalisée en tant que partie

intégrante d’une évaluation de risque et/ou de l’exposition.
Une évaluation du risque comprend les éléments suivants:
— identification des dangers;
— évaluation de la relation dose-effet;
— évaluation de l’exposition;
— et, sur la base des éléments ci-dessus: caractérisation du risque.

Une évaluation de l’exposition est le processus au cours duquel l’intensité, la fréquence et la durée de

l’exposition humaine à une substance sont estimées. Ce processus comprend:
— l’identification et la caractérisation de la source;
— l’identification des voies d’exposition;
— l’identification des récepteurs/groupes cibles concernés;
— et, sur la base des éléments ci-dessus: l’évaluation de l’exposition.

S’agissant de l’évaluation des effets sur la santé humaine, l’analyse des voies d’exposition constitue un

prérequis. Lorsque des personnes (récepteurs) ne sont pas directement exposées à un contaminant,

il importe que l’évaluation du degré d’exposition tienne compte des divers moyens par lesquels une

exposition indirecte peut se produire, ainsi que de leur importance.

L’exposition humaine à la contamination du sol peut se faire par le biais de différents milieux.

Directement à partir du sol, par les voies d’exposition suivantes:

— l’ingestion de sol, par voie alimentaire et par adhérence aux mains et aux légumes non lavés, etc.;

— le contact cutané;

— l’ingestion de poussière à l’intérieur du domicile essentiellement composée de matériau de sol.

© ISO 2018 – Tous droits réservés 3
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO 17924:2018(F)
L’exposition par l’air comprend:
— l’inhalation et l’ingestion de poussières diffuses;
— l’inhalation de substances gazeuses provenant de sources extérieures;
— l’inhalation de vapeurs introduites dans les bâtiments.
L’exposition par le biais de la chaîne alimentaire comprend:

— la consommation de végétaux, comprenant des produits agricoles végétaux, des plantes potagères,

des végétaux sauvages et des champignons;

— la consommation d’animaux et de produits d’origine animale, y compris des animaux sauvages;

— la consommation d’eau contaminée.

Le champ d’application du présent document couvre l’absorption directe de sol par ingestion et/

ou l’ingestion de poussières diffuses. L’ingestion orale constitue l’une des plus importantes voies

d’exposition des êtres humains aux contaminants du sol.

Les critères de qualité du sol (limites de concentration maximale pour le sol) sont habituellement

calculés sur la base d’une dose journalière tolérable (DJT) ou d’une dose hebdomadaire tolérable

provisoire (DHTP), qui peut être déduite à partir de la dose sans effet nocif observé (DSENO ou NOAEL

en anglais) déterminée à partir de données épidémiologiques ou de données expérimentales. En ce qui

concerne les cancérogènes génotoxiques pour lesquels aucun seuil d’effet n’est fixé, la DJT est fixée à un

niveau qui correspond à un niveau faible tolérable (négligeable) de risque de cancer.

La détermination de la DJT se fonde essentiellement sur les données relatives à la toxicité orale. Ces

données sont souvent élaborées à partir d’études expérimentales lors desquelles la substance est

administrée aux animaux via l’alimentation ou l’eau de boisson. La quantité de substance induisant des

effets sur la santé chez l’animal est ensuite déterminée. Des études épidémiologiques peuvent également

être utilisées pour déterminer les effets d’une exposition sur la santé humaine. La plupart des études

épidémiologiques sont basées sur la quantité totale ingérée et seules quelques-unes fournissent des

valeurs exactes sur la biodisponibilité des substances administrées.

Lors de l’extrapolation de ces conditions expérimentales à d’autres conditions (l’ingestion de sol

contaminé par exemple), il est supposé que l’absorption d’une substance donnée est la même pour tous les

scénarios, c’est-à-dire que la biodisponibilité absolue du contaminant est constante. La biodisponibilité

orale absolue d’une substance peut être définie comme la fraction de substance ingérée qui atteint la

circulation générale, c’est-à-dire qui pénètre dans la circulation sanguine. La biodisponibilité orale

absolue d’une substance peut être comprise entre 0 et 1 (c’est-à-dire 100 %), selon la forme physico-

chimique de la substance. Dans ce contexte, l’utilisation du concept de biodisponibilité orale absolue

repose sur l’hypothèse selon laquelle les effets de la substance sur la santé sont systémiques et donc

déclenchés lorsque la substance atteint la circulation sanguine. Ainsi le concept d’exposition interne est

mis en perspective avec celui d’exposition externe mesurée directement en tant que quantité de milieu

ingéré multipliée par la concentration de la substance dans ce milieu (voir Figure 1).

La biodisponibilité absolue peut être déterminée par le ratio entre la quantité de substance dans le sang

(animal ou humain) après injection en intraveineuse (biodisponibilité de 100 %) et celle après ingestion

orale (absorption de fraction biodisponible).
4 © ISO 2018 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
ISO 17924:2018(F)
Figure 1 — Représentation schématique des processus d’absorption orale

Une approche plus pratique consiste à mesurer la biodisponibilité relative ou fraction d’absorption

relative (FAR) qui représente le rapport entre la quantité d’une substance atteignant la circulation

générale lorsqu’il est ingéré, par exemple dans du sol, et la même quantité ingérée lors de la

détermination de la toxicité dont les paramètres sont fixés.

Il convient de noter que, bien que la plupart des biodisponibilités relatives soient inférieures à 1 et

qu’elles devraient aboutir à des niveaux acceptables plus élevés, des valeurs de FAR supérieures à 1 sont

possibles et induisent donc des risques plus importants.
5 Description des mécanismes d’absorption des substances par l’être humain

Plusieurs compartiments sont impliqués dans la biodisponibilité pour l’homme des contaminants du sol

ingérés, comme décrit à l’Article 4.

Les aliments et le sol contaminé sont d’abord soumis à un broyage mécanique au niveau de la

bouche, puis, par une série de processus chimiques et microbiologiques, ils subissent une dissolution

partielle à travers le tractus gastrointestinal (processus de bioaccessibilité). Les composants dissous

passent à travers les membranes de l’épithélium gastrointestinal (absorption) pour parvenir à la

circulation sanguine. Durant le passage à travers les membranes, une dégradation peut se produire

(métabolisation). Après absorption, le sang passe par le foie avant d’entrer dans la circulation générale.

Cette étape hépatique conduit à la dégradation ou l’élimination de composés indésirables dans le foie

(métabolisme, effet de premier passage). La plupart des processus de dissolution s’achèvent avant que le

matériau ne quitte l’intestin grêle, et il est généralement reconnu que la majeure partie de l’assimilation

se déroule dans l’intestin grêle. Une éventuelle assimilation de la substance au niveau stomacal dépend

de la nature du composé. L’environnement chimique de chaque compartiment digestif est différent et

influence le processus de bioaccessibilité (voir Tableau 1).
© ISO 2018 – Tous droits réservés 5
---------------------- Page: 10 ----------------------
ISO 17924:2018(F)

Tableau 1 — Fonctions et conditions dans les compartiments impliqués dans les processus de

bioaccessibilité
Principaux
Fonctions
«réactifs» inter- Durée de Fonction de dissolution
Compartiment essentielles pH
venant dans la séjour des contaminants
de la digestion
digestion
Bouche Broyage
Humidité
Secondes à Le broyage favorise la dissolu-
6,5
Dégradation
minutes tion ultérieure.
Amylase
de l’amidon
Œsophage Transport Aucun 6,5 Secondes Aucun
Estomac Acide chlorhy-
L’acide dissout les oxydes
Dégradation drique
minéraux labiles, des sulfures
des protéines 1 à 5 8 min à 3 h
Protéases et des carbonates pour libérer
et des graisses
des métaux.
Lipases
Intestin grêle La matière organique est dis-
Dégradation Bicarbonate
soute et les contaminants liés
des oligosac-
sont libérés.
Bile
charides, pro-
Les métaux cationiques sont
téines, graisses Protéases
4 à 7,5 2 h à 10 h solubilisés par complexation
et autres
Lipases
avec les acides biliaires.
constituants
Oligosaccharases
Certains métaux sont préci-
Solubilisation
pités par le pH élevé ou par le
des graisses Phosphatases
phosphate.

Le pH dans l’estomac peut varier entre 1 (à jeun) et 5 (après alimentation). De la même manière, le

temps de demi-vidange stomacale) varie de 8 min à 15 min et de 30 min à 3 h, respectivement, dans des

conditions de jeûne et d’alimentation moyenne. Par ailleurs, la libération de bile varie également, des

quantités importantes étant libérées dans des conditions d’alimentation. Enfin, le pH dans l’estomac

peut être plus faible chez les jeunes enfants que chez les adultes.

Le tractus gastrointestinal constitue un écosystème complexe avec des microorganismes aérobies et

anaérobies. Chez l’homme, la densité des microorganismes est moindre dans l’estomac et dans la partie

supérieure de l’intestin grêle, mais elle va en augmentant jusqu’au gros intestin. Les microorganismes

anaérobies dominent dans les fèces humaines, tandis que les bactéries aérobies se trouvent en grande

densité plus haut dans le gros intestin. La présence de bactéries sulfato-réductrices a été détectée dans

le gros intestin de l’être humain, tandis que des concentrations éle
...

Questions, Comments and Discussion

Ask us and Technical Secretary will try to provide an answer. You can facilitate discussion about the standard in here.