Radiological protection -- Minimum criteria for electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy for retrospective dosimetry of ionizing radiation

The primary purpose of ISO 13304-1:2013 is to provide minimum acceptable criteria required to establish procedure of retrospective dosimetry by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and to report the results. The second purpose is to facilitate the comparison of measurements related to absorbed dose estimation obtained in different laboratories. ISO 13304-1:2013 covers the determination of absorbed dose in the measured material. It does not cover the calculation of dose to organs or to the body. It covers measurements in both biological and inanimate samples, and specifically: based on inanimate environmental materials, usually made at X-band microwave frequencies (8 GHz to 12 GHz); in vitro tooth enamel using concentrated enamel in a sample tube, usually employing X-band frequency, but higher frequencies are also being considered; in vivo tooth dosimetry, currently using L-band (1 GHz to 2 GHz), but higher frequencies are also being considered; in vitro nail dosimetry using nail clippings measured principally at X-band, but higher frequencies are also being considered; in vivo nail dosimetry with the measurements made at X-band on the intact finger or toe; in vitro measurements of bone, usually employing X-band frequency, but higher frequencies are also being considered. For the biological samples, the in vitro measurements are carried out in samples after their removal from the person and under laboratory conditions, whereas the measurements in vivo may take place under field conditions. NOTE The dose referred to in ISO 13304-1:2013 is the absorbed dose of ionizing radiation in the measured materials.

Radioprotection -- Critères minimaux pour la spectroscopie par résonance paramagnétique électronique (RPE) pour la dosimétrie rétrospective des rayonnements ionisants

Le but principal de l'ISO 13304-1:2013 est de fournir un ensemble de critčres minimaux acceptables requis pour établir une procédure de dosimétrie rétrospective par spectroscopie par résonance paramagnétique électronique et pour rendre compte des résultats. Le but secondaire de l'ISO 13304-1:2013 vise ŕ faciliter la comparaison entre laboratoire des mesurages et de l'estimation de la dose absorbée. L'ISO 13304-1:2013 couvre la détermination de la dose absorbée dans le matériau mesuré. Elle ne couvre pas le calcul de la dose délivrée aux organes ou ŕ l'organisme entier. Elle ne concerne que les mesurages effectuées sur des échantillons biologiques et des échantillons inertes, et plus particuličrement: a) les mesurages de matériaux environnementaux inertes, généralement réalisés des fréquences micro-ondes de la bande X (8 GHz ŕ 12 GHz); b) les mesurages in vitro de prélčvement d'émail dentaire, placé dans un tube porte-échantillon, et mesuré en général en bande X, mais l'utilisation de fréquences micro-ondes plus élevées peut ętre également considérée; c) les mesurages in vivo de dents, réalisés actuellement en bande L (1 GHz ŕ 2 GHz), mais des fréquences micro-ondes plus élevées sont également envisagées; d) les mesurages in vitro de prélčvements d'ongles effectués principalement dans la bande X, mais des fréquences micro-ondes plus élevées sont également ŕ l'étude; e) les mesurages in vivo des ongles, effectués en bande X sur les ongles des doigts ou des orteils; f) les mesurages in vitro de tissus osseux, réalisés en général en bande X mais l'utilisation de fréquences micro-ondes plus élevées est également étudiée. En ce qui concerne les échantillons biologiques, les mesurages in vitro sont effectués sur des échantillons prélevés sur la personne et dans des conditions de laboratoire, tandis que les systčmes de mesure in vivo, réalisés sur les individus peuvent ętre déplacés au plus prčs des victimes.

General Information

Status
Replaced
Publication Date
14-Jul-2013
Withdrawal Date
14-Jul-2013
Current Stage
9599 - Withdrawal of International Standard
Completion Date
15-Jul-2013
Ref Project

RELATIONS

Buy Standard

Standard
ISO 13304-1:2013 - Radiological protection -- Minimum criteria for electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy for retrospective dosimetry of ionizing radiation
English language
18 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview
Standard
ISO 13304-1:2013 - Radioprotection -- Criteres minimaux pour la spectroscopie par résonance paramagnétique électronique (RPE) pour la dosimétrie rétrospective des rayonnements ionisants
French language
20 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview

Standards Content (sample)

INTERNATIONAL ISO
STANDARD 13304-1
First edition
2013-07-01
Radiological protection — Minimum
criteria for electron paramagnetic
resonance (EPR) spectroscopy for
retrospective dosimetry of ionizing
radiation —
Part 1:
General principles
Radioprotection — Critères minimaux pour la spectroscopie par
résonance paramagnétique électronique (RPE) pour la dosimétrie
rétrospective des rayonnements ionisants —
Partie 1: Principes généraux
Reference number
ISO 13304-1:2013(E)
ISO 2013
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO 13304-1:2013(E)
COPYRIGHT PROTECTED DOCUMENT
© ISO 2013

All rights reserved. Unless otherwise specified, no part of this publication may be reproduced or utilized otherwise in any form

or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, or posting on the internet or an intranet, without prior

written permission. Permission can be requested from either ISO at the address below or ISO’s member body in the country of

the requester.
ISO copyright office
Case postale 56 • CH-1211 Geneva 20
Tel. + 41 22 749 01 11
Fax + 41 22 749 09 47
E-mail copyright@iso.org
Web www.iso.org
Published in Switzerland
ii © ISO 2013 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO 13304-1:2013(E)
Contents Page

Foreword ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................iv

Introduction ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................v

1 Scope ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 1

2 Terms and definitions ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3 Confidentiality and ethical considerations ............................................................................................................................... 2

4 Laboratory safety requirements .......................................................................................................................................................... 2

4.1 Magnetic field ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 2

4.2 Electromagnetic frequency .......................................................................................................................................................... 3

4.3 Biohazards from samples .............................................................................................................................................................. 3

5 Collection/selection and identification of samples ......................................................................................................... 3

6 Transportation and storage of samples ....................................................................................................................................... 3

7 Preparation of samples.................................................................................................................................................................................. 4

8 Apparatus ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 5

8.1 Principles of EPR spectroscopy ................................................................................................................................................ 5

8.2 Requirements for EPR spectrometers ................................................................................................................................ 5

8.3 Requirements for the resonator ............................................................................................................................................... 5

8.4 Measurements of the background signals ....................................................................................................................... 6

8.5 Spectrometer stability and monitoring/control of environmental conditions ............................... 6

8.6 Baseline drift ............................................................................................................................................................................................. 6

9 Measurements of the samples ................................................................................................................................................................ 7

9.1 General principles ................................................................................................................................................................................ 7

9.2 Choice and optimization of the measurement parameters .............................................................................. 7

9.3 Sample positioning and loading ............................................................................................................................................... 9

9.4 Microwave bridge tuning ............................................................................................................................................................... 9

9.5 Use of standard samples as field markers and amplitude monitors ........................................................ 9

9.6 Monitoring reproducibility ........................................................................................................................................................10

9.7 Procedure to measure anisotropic samples ...............................................................................................................10

9.8 Coding of spectra and samples ...............................................................................................................................................10

10 Determination of the absorbed dose in the samples ...................................................................................................10

10.1 Determination of the radiation-induced signal intensity ................................................................................10

10.2 Conversion of the EPR signal into an estimate of absorbed dose ............................................................11

11 Measurement uncertainty .......................................................................................................................................................................11

12 Investigation of dose that has been questioned ................................................................................................................12

13 Quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) ............................................................................................................13

14 Minimum documentation requirements ..................................................................................................................................14

Bibliography .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................15

© ISO 2013 – All rights reserved iii
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO 13304-1:2013(E)
Foreword

ISO (the International Organization for Standardization) is a worldwide federation of national standards

bodies (ISO member bodies). The work of preparing International Standards is normally carried out

through ISO technical committees. Each member body interested in a subject for which a technical

committee has been established has the right to be represented on that committee. International

organizations, governmental and non-governmental, in liaison with ISO, also take part in the work.

ISO collaborates closely with the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) on all matters of

electrotechnical standardization.

The procedures used to develop this document and those intended for its further maintenance are

described in the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 1. In particular the different approval criteria needed for the

different types of ISO documents should be noted. This document was drafted in accordance with the

editorial rules of the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 2. www.iso.org/directives

Attention is drawn to the possibility that some of the elements of this document may be the subject of

patent rights. ISO shall not be held responsible for identifying any or all such patent rights. Details of

any patent rights identified during the development of the document will be in the Introduction and/or

on the ISO list of patent declarations received. www.iso.org/patents

Any trade name used in this document is information given for the convenience of users and does not

constitute an endorsement.

The committee responsible for this document is ISO/TC 85, Nuclear energy, nuclear technologies, and

radiological protection, Subcommittee SC 2, Radiological protection.

ISO 13304 consists of the following parts, under the general title Radiological protection — Minimum criteria

for electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy for retrospective dosimetry of ionizing radiation:

— Part 1: General principles
iv © ISO 2013 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
ISO 13304-1:2013(E)
Introduction

Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) has become an important approach for retrospective dosimetry

in any situation where dosimetric information is potentially incomplete or unknown for an individual.

It is now applied widely for retrospective evaluation of doses that were delivered at considerable times

in the past (e.g. EPR dosimetry is one of the methods of choice for retrospective evaluation of doses to

the involved populations from the atomic weapon exposures in Japan and after the Chernobyl accident)

and has received attention for use for triage after an incident in which large numbers of people have

potentially been exposed to clinically significant levels of radiation. Various materials may be analysed

by EPR to provide information on dose. Thus, EPR is a versatile tool for retrospective dosimetry,

pertinent as well for acute exposures (past or recent, whole or partial body) and prolonged exposures.

Doses estimated with EPR were mainly used to correlate the biological effect of ionizing radiation to

received dose, to validate other techniques or methodologies, to manage casualties, or for forensic

expertise for judicial authorities. It uses mainly biological tissues of the person as the dosimeter and

also can use materials from personal objects as well as those located in the immediate environment.

EPR dosimetry is based on the fundamental properties of ionizing radiation: the generation of unpaired

electron species (often but not exclusively free radicals) proportional to absorbed dose. The technique

of EPR specifically and sensitively detects the amount of unpaired electrons that have sufficient stability

to be observed after their generation; while the amount of the detectable unpaired electrons is usually

directly proportional to the amount that was generated, these species can react, and therefore, the

relationship between the intensity of the EPR signal and the radiation dose needs to be established for

each type of use. The most extensive use of the technique has been with calcified tissue, especially with

[15]

enamel from teeth. An IAEA technical report was published on the use for tooth enamel. To extend

the possibility of EPR retrospective dosimetry, new materials possibly suitable for EPR dosimetry are

regularly studied and associated protocols established. This International Standard is aimed to make

this technique more widely available, more easily applicable and useful for dosimetry. Specifically, this

International Standard proposes a methodological frame and recommendations to set up, validate, and

apply protocols from samples collection to dose reporting.
© ISO 2013 – All rights reserved v
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
INTERNATIONAL STANDARD ISO 13304-1:2013(E)
Radiological protection — Minimum criteria for electron
paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy for
retrospective dosimetry of ionizing radiation —
Part 1:
General principles
1 Scope

The primary purpose of this International Standard is to provide minimum acceptable criteria required

to establish procedure of retrospective dosimetry by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

and to report the results.

The second purpose is to facilitate the comparison of measurements related to absorbed dose estimation

obtained in different laboratories.

This International Standard covers the determination of absorbed dose in the measured material. It

does not cover the calculation of dose to organs or to the body. It covers measurements in both biological

and inanimate samples, and specifically:

a) based on inanimate environmental materials, usually made at X-band microwave frequencies

(8 GHz to 12 GHz);

b) in vitro tooth enamel using concentrated enamel in a sample tube, usually employing X-band

frequency, but higher frequencies are also being considered;

c) in vivo tooth dosimetry, currently using L-band (1 GHz to 2 GHz), but higher frequencies are also

being considered;

d) in vitro nail dosimetry using nail clippings measured principally at X-band, but higher frequencies

are also being considered;

e) in vivo nail dosimetry with the measurements made at X-band on the intact finger or toe;

f) in vitro measurements of bone, usually employing X-band frequency, but higher frequencies are also

being considered.

For the biological samples, the in vitro measurements are carried out in samples after their removal

from the person and under laboratory conditions, whereas the measurements in vivo may take place

under field conditions.

NOTE The dose referred to in this International Standard is the absorbed dose of ionizing radiation in the

measured materials.
2 Terms and definitions
For the purposes of this document, the following terms and definitions apply.
2.1
retrospective dosimetry (including early or emergency response)

dosimetry, usually at the level of the individual, carried out after an exposure using methods other than

the conventional radiation dosimeters
© ISO 2013 – All rights reserved 1
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
ISO 13304-1:2013(E)
2.2
electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)
electron spin resonance (ESR)

magnetic resonance technique which is similar to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) but based on the

net spin of unpaired electrons, such as free radicals and electron defects centers in matrices

Note 1 to entry: The terms EPR and ESR are essentially equivalent and are widely used. The term electron

magnetic resonance (EMR) also sometimes is used because it is analogous to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR).

2.3
radical/paramagnetic centre
species with unpaired electron(s)

Note 1 to entry: Paired electrons have the same quantum state except for opposite spins; unpaired electrons

do not have a “partner” with the opposite spin. When the unpaired spin is on a molecule, it is usually termed a

radical; when the unpaired electron is in a matrix, it often is termed a paramagnetic centre.

2.4
in vivo measurement

measurement carried out within the living system, such as measurements of paramagnetic centres in

teeth within the mouth
2.5
in vitro measurement
measurement carried out on materials outside the organism

Note 1 to entry: The term ex vivo also has been used in the literature for sample measured in vitro but irradiated

within the organism.
2.6
quality assurance

planned and systematic actions necessary to provide adequate confidence that a process, measurement,

or service satisfies given requirements for quality
2.7
quality control

planned and systematic actions intended to verify that systems and components conform with

predetermined requirements
3 Confidentiality and ethical considerations

All individual identifying information of persons who provided samples should not be attached to the

information on the samples and kept only in a secured place. The corresponding samples should be

identified by codes with indication only of parameters that are useful for scientific purposes and for

making decisions. Data linking the code to the person can be kept if they are done so in a secure manner,

with access limited to the persons in charge of the data.

Where appropriate, permission for obtaining and measuring the samples should be obtained under the

rules of the jurisdiction where the samples are obtained.
4 Laboratory safety requirements
4.1 Magnetic field

With conventional spectrometers, the magnetic field (for signals with g-factor near 2,0, typically 350 mT

for X-band and 1 200 mT for Q-band) is restricted to the region between the poles of the magnets, and

therefore, there is no associated biological hazard (can affect watches or credit cards if brought very

close to the gap).
2 © ISO 2013 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
ISO 13304-1:2013(E)

The open nature of some in vivo EPR spectrometers (for signals with g-factor near 2,0, 40 mT for L-band)

combined with large gaps between the poles has the potential to project the 0,5 mT line beyond the

confines of the room. This line needs to be determined and appropriate shielding placed for areas that

exceed this limit and that are accessed by the general public. The establishment of the 0,5 mT limit

is based on concerns about potential effects on pacemakers, which are the only significant source of

biohazards from the magnetic fields that are employed with EPR. The conventional limit is 0,5 mT

(which is very conservative) and surveys should be made to confirm that this field is not exceeded where

a person with a pacemaker could be positioned.

Effects of modulation fields on tissues or tooth restorations are not a significant hazard.

4.2 Electromagnetic frequency
4.2.1 in vitro measurement

The configurations used for in vitro measurements have no hazard for exposure of operators, as

the spectrometer usually fully constrains the microwave to the sample with no significant amount

distributed outside of the resonator.
4.2.2 in vivo measurement

Measurements in vivo have the potential hazard of local heating. The operative safety limit is that

established for NMR in terms of permissible rates of energy absorption. In practice, this is a potential

hazard only at high incident microwave power levels—typically > 1 W, which is at least a factor of 3

greater than that in existing instruments.
4.3 Biohazards from samples

Biological samples measured in vitro should be handled in conformance to the rules of the jurisdiction

for routine practice for handling biological samples.

Measurements of teeth in vivo should follow the routines practiced for ordinary dentistry in regard to

potential contamination from subjects to operators or other subjects.
5 Collection/selection and identification of samples

All samples should be collected in as uniform manner as possible and the circumstances of the collection

noted, although this may not always be able to be controlled by the measuring laboratory. If prior

coordination between the collecting and the measuring laboratories is possible, requirements about the

sample collection, selection (of donors, location, or materials) and storage (sample holder, integrity of

the sample and of the container, temperature, light, UV) should be given. If information about samples

is available, keep record of them (this information can be about the location of the sample, origin or

history of the sample, information about donor, etc.). All samples should have a unique identifying code

associated with them.
6 Transportation and storage of samples

If sample collection is made in a place other than the measuring laboratory, then samples should

be transported and stored under specified environmental conditions. These conditions should be

coordinated between the collecting and the measuring laboratories. Conditions of transportation and

storage of the sample may affect the integrity of the sample and also modify the quantity of paramagnetic

species or the nature of the paramagnetic species in the samples. Environmental parameters such

as light and other types of radiations (UV, X-rays, gamma), temperature, humidity, oxygen, sample

conditionings in water or disinfectant solution, for example, contamination (e.g. dust), may significantly

affect the nature and quantity of paramagnetic species in the samples. Therefore, specific attention

should be taken as to the conditions of transportation and storage to avoid or limit as much as possible

the influence of environmental parameters on the samples.
© ISO 2013 – All rights reserved 3
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO 13304-1:2013(E)

If possible, the influence of these parameters on the radiation-induced signal line shape and intensity

should be investigated to establish the optimum conditions for transportation or storage and to avoid

unnecessary precautions. When samples are known to be sensitive to one or several environmental

conditions or the influence of these parameters or samples is not known, it is highly recommended that

precautions are taken so as to avoid conditions that could affect the samples.

Transportation conditions, including dates, ways of transportation, and mode of control of transportation

conditions, should be recorded. Appropriate sample packaging should always be used to prevent sample

physical damage.

Procedures to avoid X-ray exposure of the sample during airport controls should be implemented. The

dose at the X-ray hand luggage control is of the order of the microgray, so it can be considered negligible

for some applications. If not, when the sample is transported in hand luggage, then authorization for

X-ray exemption should be obtained in advance in order to avoid hindrance at the airport security

controls. X-ray dose to the hold luggage can be higher. For shipping, appropriate labelling (including a

note that the package contains radiation-sensitive dosimeters and, therefore, should not be irradiated)

should be used. When this is not possible, unirradiated identical control samples or dosimeters should

be placed in the package.

After the samples are received, they should be stored under stable conditions and the temperature and

humidity should be monitored and recorded. Exposure to light should always be avoided.

7 Preparation of samples

Sample preparation should be performed according to an established and explicit protocol.

For in vitro and ex vivo measurements, sample preparation is usually needed to accomplish several goals,

including: achieving a sample size that fits in the measurement tube; reducing anisotropy; ensuring

disinfection; eliminating paramagnetic impurities from the sample; drying the sample; and stabilizing

the EPR signals.

When required, preparation of the sample can be done by grinding, crushing, cutting, drilling, or

other mechanical treatments. During these operations, sample overheating should be avoided using

water irrigation or other cooling systems. Metal contamination of the sample can be avoided by using

hard alloy tools.

As needed, sterilization, cleaning, deproteination, and/or delipidation are performed using chemical

agents. Thermal treatment (annealing, freezing) can be used to accelerate or slow down recombination

of the radicals. Samples with significant amounts of moisture can be dried before the EPR measurements

to improve signal-to-noise ratio.

The setup of a protocol for sample preparation shall include the evaluation of the effect of the protocol

on the EPR signals (lineshape and intensity) on the dose estimation, including whether it can induce EPR

signals. When employing the additive dose method (see 10.2.1), it is very desirable to use protocols that

do not affect the radiation sensitivity.

The protocol should be described in details in documents, including: the duration of treatment, quality of

reagents, and the instrumentation used and its performance. All samples should be prepared following

the same protocol. Samples used for calibration have to be treated according to the same protocol as the

samples to be measured.

Any modification to the protocol should be noted and the influence of each modification evaluated (e.g.

power or frequency of ultrasonic bath, reagent quality).

All details of the procedures for each sample shall be recorded in a log of the history of the sample.

For measurements in vivo, there are no requirements for preparation of the samples. Depending on the site

that is measured, there may be a need to minimize moisture (especially when making measurements in vivo

in teeth) or to carry out some cleaning procedures (e.g. removing obvious particulate matter from nails).

Because of the limited ability to control environmental conditions fully when making measurements in

4 © ISO 2013 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
ISO 13304-1:2013(E)

vivo, it is highly desirable to always utilize a standard sample that is in place and with a known relationship

to the sample volume so that factors that affect the measurements (especially factors that affect the quality

factor of the resonator) can be detected and accounted for in the processing of the data.

8 Apparatus
8.1 Principles of EPR spectroscopy

EPR is a technique that specifically and sensitively detects unpaired electrons. It is based on the resonant

absorption of electromagnetic energy for transitions between electron spin states. A static magnetic

field is applied that induces net absorption from transitions between spin states if there is a vacant level

to which the spin can flip. In a magnetic field, the different spin states result in different energy levels,

with the difference in the energy being proportional to the magnetic field. A transition between these

two levels can be induced by an appropriate electromagnetic field.

Currently, continuous wave (CW) EPR spectroscopy is usually used for EPR dosimetry. In an EPR

CW spectrometer, the resonance frequency is applied to a resonant structure and absorption of the

electromagnetic waves by a sample in the resonator is detected. Typically, the resonant condition is

reached by continuously changing the main magnetic field, while a fixed frequency is applied to the

resonator. As a result, an EPR spectrum of absorption versus magnetic field intensity is obtained. Other

methods of EPR signal detection such as pulsed EPR, fast scan EPR spectroscopy, etc. are potentially

available, but to date, these have not been shown to be more effective for dosimetry application than

CW EPR. So, considerations on EPR dosimetry in this International Standard are restricted to CW EPR,

although most of the guidelines would be applicable to other types of EPR spectroscopy.

To improve the signal-to-noise ratio, modern EPR CW spectrometers employ high-frequency magnetic

field modulation in combination with phase-sensitive detection. As a result, the original spectral line

is produced not in the form of an absorption curve, but in the form of its first derivative. In modern

spectrometers, the EPR signal is recorded in digital form using a dedicated computer. In most

spectrometers, the computer also is used to control operation of the spectrometer, e.g. for setting

measurement parameters, tuning the resonator, acquiring the signal, saving the recorded spectrum to

disk, and preliminary spectra processing (such as digital filtering, baseline correction, etc.).

Depending on the magnetic field intensity and, respectively, the resonance frequency, the following

band frequencies are commonly used for EPR dosimetry.

— X-band usually is used for EPR in vitro dosimetry because of a good compromise between sensitivity,

sample size, and sensitivity to the presence of water.

— L-band is used mainly for in vivo tooth dosimetry because of the relatively low amount of non-

resonant absorption of the microwaves due to the presence of water in biological tissues. Q-band

is mainly used in research connected with investigation of spectroscopic properties of materials

suitable for EPR dosimetry and has potential for being utilized for in vitro dosimetry. An advantage

of Q-band is that only a small sample mass is required for measurements and spectral components

can be better resolved in comparison with lower frequencies. On the other hand, such spectrometers

are not widely available, often are more complex to use, and may have a lower signal-to-noise ratio.

8.2 Requirements for EPR spectrometers

As EPR dosimetry often deals with small sample masses and low intensity signals, the sensitivity and

stability of the instruments are critical. Sensitivity and stability may be optimized by proper choice of

instrumental factors (such as selection of resonator, its tuning, and minimization of the microphonic

effects) and selection of the measurement parameters.
8.3
...

NORME ISO
INTERNATIONALE 13304-1
Première édition
2013-07-01
Radioprotection — Critères minimaux
pour la spectroscopie par résonance
paramagnétique électronique (RPE)
pour la dosimétrie rétrospective des
rayonnements ionisants —
Partie 1:
Principes généraux
Radiological protection — Minimum criteria for electron
paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy for retrospective
dosimetry of ionizing radiation —
Part 1: General principles
Numéro de référence
ISO 13304-1:2013(F)
ISO 2013
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO 13304-1:2013(F)
DOCUMENT PROTÉGÉ PAR COPYRIGHT
© ISO 2013

Droits de reproduction réservés. Sauf indication contraire, aucune partie de cette publication ne peut être reproduite ni utilisée

sous quelque forme que ce soit et par aucun procédé, électronique ou mécanique, y compris la photocopie, l’affichage sur

l’internet ou sur un Intranet, sans autorisation écrite préalable. Les demandes d’autorisation peuvent être adressées à l’ISO à

l’adresse ci-après ou au comité membre de l’ISO dans le pays du demandeur.
ISO copyright office
Case postale 56 • CH-1211 Geneva 20
Tel. + 41 22 749 01 11
Fax + 41 22 749 09 47
E-mail copyright@iso.org
Web www.iso.org
Publié en Suisse
ii © ISO 2013 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO 13304-1:2013(F)
Sommaire Page

Avant-propos ..............................................................................................................................................................................................................................iv

Introduction ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................v

1 Domaine d’application ................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

2 Termes et définitions ....................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3 Confidentialité et considérations déontologiques ............................................................................................................ 2

4 Exigences de sécurité relatives aux laboratoires................................................................................................................ 3

4.1 Champ magnétique ............................................................................................................................................................................. 3

4.2 Fréquence électromagnétique ................................................................................................................................................... 3

4.3 Risques biologiques pour les échantillons ...................................................................................................................... 3

5 Prélèvement/choix et identification des échantillons .................................................................................................. 3

6 Transport et stockage des échantillons ........................................................................................................................................ 4

7 Préparation des échantillons .................................................................................................................................................................. 4

8 Appareillage .............................................................................................................................................................................................................. 5

8.1 Principes de la spectroscopie RPE ......................................................................................................................................... 5

8.2 Exigences relatives aux spectromètres RPE .................................................................................................................. 6

8.3 Exigences relatives au résonateur .......................................................................................................................................... 6

8.4 Mesurages des signaux non issus des échantillons ................................................................................................. 6

8.5 Stabilité du spectromètre et surveillance/contrôle des conditions environnementales ....... 7

8.6 Dérive de la ligne de base .............................................................................................................................................................. 7

9 Mesurages des échantillons ...................................................................................................................................................................... 8

9.1 Principes généraux .............................................................................................................................................................................. 8

9.2 Choix et optimisation des paramètres de mesure .................................................................................................... 8

9.3 Positionnement et chargement de l’échantillon .....................................................................................................10

9.4 Réglage du spectromètre.............................................................................................................................................................10

9.5 Utilisation d’échantillons de référence comme marqueurs de champ et

contrôleurs d’amplitude ..............................................................................................................................................................11

9.6 Reproductibilité du contrôle ....................................................................................................................................................11

9.7 Procédure de mesure des échantillons anisotropes ............................................................................................11

9.8 Codage des spectres et des échantillons ........................................................................................................................11

10 Détermination de la dose absorbée dans les échantillons ....................................................................................11

10.1 Détermination de l’intensité du signal radio-induit ............................................................................................11

10.2 Conversion du signal RPE en une estimation de dose absorbée ...............................................................12

11 Incertitude de mesure .................................................................................................................................................................................13

12 Examen d’une dose suspecte.................................................................................................................................................................13

13 Assurance qualité et contrôle de la qualité (AQ et CQ) ..............................................................................................14

14 Exigences minimales concernant la documentation ...................................................................................................16

Bibliographie ...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................17

© ISO 2013 – Tous droits réservés iii
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO 13304-1:2013(F)
Avant-propos

L’ISO (Organisation internationale de normalisation) est une fédération mondiale d’organismes

nationaux de normalisation (comités membres de l’ISO). L’élaboration des Normes internationales est

en général confiée aux comités techniques de l’ISO. Chaque comité membre intéressé par une étude

a le droit de faire partie du comité technique créé à cet effet. Les organisations internationales,

gouvernementales et non gouvernementales, en liaison avec l’ISO participent également aux travaux.

L’ISO collabore étroitement avec la Commission électrotechnique internationale (CEI) en ce qui concerne

la normalisation électrotechnique.

Les procédures utilisées pour élaborer le présent document et celles destinées à sa mise à jour sont

décrites dans les Directives ISO/CEI, Partie 1. Il convient, en particulier de prendre note des différents

critères d’approbation requis pour les différents types de documents ISO. Le présent document a été

rédigé conformément aux règles de rédaction données dans les Directives ISO/CEI, Partie 2, www.iso.

org/directives.

L’attention est appelée sur le fait que certains des éléments du présent document peuvent faire l’objet de

droits de propriété intellectuelle ou de droits analogues. L’ISO ne saurait être tenue pour responsable

de ne pas avoir identifié de tels droits de propriété et averti de leur existence. Les détails concernant les

références aux droits de propriété intellectuelle ou autres droits analogues identifiés lors de l’élaboration

du document sont indiqués dans l’Introduction et/ou sur la liste ISO des déclarations de brevets reçues,

www.iso.org/patents.

Les éventuelles appellations commerciales utilisées dans le présent document sont données pour

information à l’intention des utilisateurs et ne constituent pas une approbation ou une recommandation.

Le comité chargé de l’élaboration du présent document est l’ISO/TC 85, Énergie nucléaire, technologies

nucléaires et radioprotection, sous-comité SC 2, Radioprotection.

L’ISO 13304 comprend les parties suivantes, présentées sous le titre général Radioprotection — Critères

minimaux pour la spectroscopie par résonance paramagnétique électronique (RPE) pour la dosimétrie

rétrospective des rayonnements ionisants:
— Partie 1: Principes généraux
iv © ISO 2013 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
ISO 13304-1:2013(F)
Introduction

La résonance paramagnétique électronique (RPE) est une technique couramment utilisée en dosimétrie

rétrospective lorsque les informations dosimétriques concernant un individu sont potentiellement

incomplètes ou inconnues. Elle est largement utilisée pour l’évaluation rétrospective des doses délivrées

à des moments précis dans le passé (par exemple, la dosimétrie RPE est l’une des méthodes de choix pour

l’évaluation rétrospective des doses délivrées aux populations exposées à l’arme atomique au Japon et

aux personnes exposées suite à l’accident de Tchernobyl) et elle est également envisagée comme méthode

de tri de population lors d’accident impliquant un grand nombre de personnes potentiellement exposées

à des niveaux de rayonnement cliniquement significatifs. Divers types de matériaux peuvent être

analysés par la technique RPE pour estimer la dose absorbée dans ces matériaux. Ainsi, la spectroscopie

RPE est un outil polyvalent pour la dosimétrie rétrospective, qui est aussi bien mis en œuvre pour les

expositions aiguës (passées ou récentes, d’une partie ou de l’ensemble du corps) que pour les expositions

de longue durée. Les doses estimées avec la méthode RPE ont principalement ont été utilisées pour

établir une corrélation entre les effets biologiques des rayonnements ionisants et la dose reçue, pour

valider d’autres techniques ou méthodologies, pour la gestion des victimes d’accident d’irradiation ou

assurer l’expertise médico-légale dans le cadre de procédures judiciaires. Les tissus biologiques humains

sont les principaux matériaux utilisés pour la dosimétrie rétrospective par RPE mais des matériaux

provenant d’objets personnels ainsi que des objets situés dans l’environnement immédiat des personnes

exposées peuvent être également utilisés. Le principe de la dosimétrie RPE est basée sur les propriétés

fondamentales des rayonnements ionisants: la production d’espèces comportant des électrons non

appariés (souvent, mais non exclusivement, des radicaux libres) en quantité proportionnelle à la dose

absorbée. La spectroscopie RPE permet de détecter de manière spécifique et sensible les quantités

d’espèces comportant des électrons non appariés suffisamment stables pour pouvoir être observés

après leur création; bien que la quantité d’électrons non appariés détectés soit en général directement

proportionnelle à la quantité générée, ces espèces peuvent réagir, d’où la nécessité d’établir, pour chaque

type d’utilisation, la relation entre l’intensité du signal RPE et la dose de rayonnement. Cette technique a

été le plus souvent appliquée sur des tissus calcifiés, notamment l’émail dentaire. Un Rapport technique

de l’AIEA portant sur l’estimation des doses à partir de la mesure de l’émail dentaire a été publié en

[15]

2002. Pour étendre le champ d’application de la spectroscopie RPE dans le domaine de la dosimétrie

rétrospective, de nouveaux matériaux potentiellement utilisables sont régulièrement étudiés et des

protocoles associés établis. Le but de la présente norme est de faciliter la diffusion de cette technique,

de la rendre plus facilement applicable et plus utile pour la dosimétrie. Spécifiquement, la présente

Norme internationale propose un cadre méthodologique et des recommandations pour établir, valider

et appliquer des protocoles allant du prélèvement des échantillons jusqu’à la consignation des doses.

© ISO 2013 – Tous droits réservés v
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
NORME INTERNATIONALE ISO 13304-1:2013(F)
Radioprotection — Critères minimaux pour la spectroscopie
par résonance paramagnétique électronique (RPE) pour la
dosimétrie rétrospective des rayonnements ionisants —
Partie 1:
Principes généraux
1 Domaine d’application

Le but principal de la présente Norme internationale est de fournir un ensemble de critères minimaux

acceptables requis pour établir une procédure de dosimétrie rétrospective par spectroscopie par

résonance paramagnétique électronique et pour rendre compte des résultats.

Le but secondaire de la présente Norme internationale vise à faciliter la comparaison entre laboratoire

des mesurages et de l’estimation de la dose absorbée.

La présente Norme internationale couvre la détermination de la dose absorbée dans le matériau mesuré.

Elle ne couvre pas le calcul de la dose délivrée aux organes ou à l’organisme entier. Elle ne concerne

que les mesurages effectuées sur des échantillons biologiques et des échantillons inertes, et plus

particulièrement:

a) les mesurages de matériaux environnementaux inertes, généralement réalisés des fréquences

micro-ondes de la bande X (8 GHz à 12 GHz);

b) les mesurages in vitro de prélèvement d’émail dentaire, placé dans un tube porte-échantillon, et

mesuré en général en bande X, mais l’utilisation de fréquences micro-ondes plus élevées peut être

également considérée;

c) les mesurages in vivo de dents, réalisés actuellement en bande L (1 GHz à 2 GHz), mais des fréquences

micro-ondes plus élevées sont également envisagées;

d) les mesurages in vitro de prélèvements d’ongles effectués principalement dans la bande X, mais des

fréquences micro-ondes plus élevées sont également à l’étude;

e) les mesurages in vivo des ongles, effectués en bande X sur les ongles des doigts ou des orteils;

f) les mesurages in vitro de tissus osseux, réalisés en général en bande X mais l’utilisation de fréquences

micro-ondes plus élevées est également étudiée.

En ce qui concerne les échantillons biologiques, les mesurages in vitro sont effectués sur des échantillons

prélevés sur la personne et dans des conditions de laboratoire, tandis que les systèmes de mesure in

vivo, réalisés sur les individus peuvent être déplacés au plus près des victimes.

NOTE La dose mentionnée dans la présente Norme internationale, est la dose absorbée de rayonnement

ionisant dans les matériaux mesurés.
2 Termes et définitions

Pour les besoins du présent document, les termes et définitions suivants s’appliquent.

© ISO 2013 – Tous droits réservés 1
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
ISO 13304-1:2013(F)
2.1
dosimétrie rétrospective (inclus les situations d’urgence)

dosimétrie, effectuée après une exposition aux rayonnements ionisants en utilisant des méthodes et

des matériaux autres que les méthodes classiques de surveillance dosimétrique pour estimer une dose

reçue par un individu
2.2
RPE (résonance paramagnétique électronique)
RSE (résonance de spin électronique)

technique de résonance magnétique qui est similaire à la résonance magnétique nucléaire (RMN), mais

fondée sur la résonance des spin électroniques non appariés, tel que par exemple ceux présents dans les

radicaux libres ou ceux liés à une vacance ou une substitution d’atomes dans un réseau cristallin

Note 1 à l’article: Le terme de RPE est maintenant le plus communément utilisé. Le terme RSE est de moins en

moins employé. Le terme résonance magnétique électronique (RME), plus récent, est parfois employé car il est

analogue au terme RMN (résonance magnétique nucléaire).
2.3
centre paramagnétique
espèce contenant un (des) électron(s) non apparié(s)

Note 1 à l’article: Les électrons appariés ont le même état quantique, mais des spins orientés de manière opposée;

les électrons non appariés n’ont pas de «partenaire» avec un spin électronique opposé. Lorsque le spin non apparié

se trouve sur une molécule, il est habituellement désigné par «radical»; lorsque l’électron non apparié se trouve

dans une matrice, il est souvent désigné par «défaut paramagnétique».
2.4
mesurage in vivo

mesurage réalisé sur un système vivant comme, par exemple, des mesurages de centres paramagnétiques

présents dans l’émail dentaire mesurés directement dans la cavité buccale
2.5
mesurage in vitro
mesurage de prélèvements biologiques réalisé à l’extérieur de l’organisme

Note 1 à l’article: Le terme ex vivo a également été utilisé dans la littérature pour des échantillons prélevés et

analysés in vitro, mais irradiés à l’intérieur de l’organisme.
2.6
assurance qualité

toutes les actions planifiées et systématiques nécessaires pour attester qu’un processus, un mesurage

ou un service satisfait aux exigences de qualité
2.7
contrôle de la qualité

actions planifiées et systématiques destinées à vérifier que les systèmes et les composants sont

conformes aux exigences prédéterminées
3 Confidentialité et considérations déontologiques

Aucune information permettant d’identifier un donneur d’échantillons ne doit être jointe aux

informations figurant sur les échantillons. Ces informations doivent être sécurisées. Il convient

d’identifier les échantillons correspondants par des codes avec seulement une indication des paramètres

ayant un intérêt scientifique et être utile pour mener l’analyse. La conservation des données reliant le

code à l’identité de la personne est autorisée à condition qu’elle soit sécurisée, avec un accès limité aux

personnes en charge des données.

Le cas échéant, il convient que la permission pour l’acquisition et le mesurage des échantillons soit

obtenue conformément à la législation du lieu d’obtention des échantillons.
2 © ISO 2013 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
ISO 13304-1:2013(F)
4 Exigences de sécurité relatives aux laboratoires
4.1 Champ magnétique

Avec les spectromètres conventionnels, le champ magnétique (pour les signaux avec un facteur g proche

de 2,0, typiquement 350 mT en bande X, et 1 200 mT en bande Q) est confiné dans l’espace entre les

pôles des aimants, l’entrefer, il n’y a donc a priori aucun risque biologique associé lors de l’utilisation

(Toutefois, les montres ou les cartes à lecture magnétique sont endommagées lorsque placées dans et à

proximité de l’entrefer).

L’absence de confinement du champ magnétique de certains spectromètres RPE in vivo (pour les

signaux avec un facteur g proche de 2,0, 40 mT en bande L) associée aux espacements importants entre

les pôles peut potentiellement induire des champs supérieurs à la limite admise de 0,5 mT au-delà du

périmètre du local du spectromètre. Il convient de s’assurer que cette limite n’est pas dépassée pour

les zones accessibles au grand public et en cas de dépassement un blindage approprié doit être installé.

L’établissement de la limite à 0,5 mT est fondé sur les effets potentiels sur les pacemakers qui sont

l’unique source significative de risques engendrés par les champs magnétiques utilisés avec la RPE. La

limite conventionnelle est fixée à 0,5 mT (qui est une valeur très conservative) et il convient que des

contrôles soient effectués pour confirmer que cette limite n’est pas dépassée si une personne équipée

d’un pacemaker est susceptible de se trouver à proximité.

Pour les mesurages in vivo, les effets des champs magnétiques sur les tissus ou des restaurations

dentaires ne constituent pas un risque significatif.
4.2 Fréquence électromagnétique
4.2.1 Mesurage in vitro

Les configurations utilisées pour les mesurages in vitro ne présentent pas de risque connu concernant

l’exposition des opérateurs puisque les micro-ondes sont concentrées sur l’échantillon sans qu’une

quantité notable ne soit émise à l’extérieur du résonateur.
4.2.2 Mesurage in vivo

Les mesurages in vivo présentent le risque potentiel d’un échauffement local. La limite de sécurité fonctionnelle

est celle établie pour la RMN concernant les taux admissibles d’absorption d’énergie. Dans la pratique, il n’y a

de risque potentiel qu’à des niveaux élevés de puissance hyperfréquence incidente — habituellement > 1 W,

ce qui représente au moins un facteur trois fois supérieur à celui des instruments existants.

4.3 Risques biologiques pour les échantillons

Il convient que les échantillons d’origine biologique mesurés in vitro soient traités conformément aux

règles normalement applicables pour la manipulation des échantillons biologiques.

Il convient que les mesurages effectués sur des dents in vivo soient conformes aux règles normalement

applicables chez les professionnels en dentaire eu égard à la contamination potentielle des opérateurs

ou autres personnes par les sujets examinés.
5 Prélèvement/choix et identification des échantillons

Il convient que les échantillons soient prélevés d’une manière aussi uniforme que possible et que les

conditions de prélèvement soient consignées, bien que le laboratoire de mesure ne soit pas toujours en

mesure de le contrôler. Si une coordination préalable est possible entre les laboratoires en charge des

prélèvements et ceux réalisant les mesurages, il convient que les exigences concernant les prélèvements,

les règles de sélection (des donneurs, du lieu ou des matériaux) et la conservation (porte-échantillon,

intégrité de l’échantillon et du récipient, température, lumière, rayonnement ultraviolet) soient

spécifiées. Si des informations concernant les échantillons sont disponibles, il convient de les conserver

© ISO 2013 – Tous droits réservés 3
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO 13304-1:2013(F)

(il peut s’agir d’informations concernant l’emplacement, l’origine ou l’historique de l’échantillon, ou

d’informations concernant le donneur, etc.). Il convient qu’un code d’identification unique soit associé à

chacun des échantillons.
6 Transport et stockage des échantillons

Si le prélèvement des échantillons a lieu dans un endroit autre que le laboratoire de mesure, alors, il

convient que ces échantillons soient transportés et conservés dans des conditions environnementales

spécifiées. Il convient que ces conditions soient convenues entre les laboratoires en charge du prélèvement

et ceux en charge du mesurage. Les conditions de transport et de conservation de l’échantillon peuvent

altérer l’intégrité de l’échantillon et modifier la quantité ou la nature des espèces paramagnétiques dans

les échantillons. Les paramètres environnementaux, tels que la lumière et autres types de rayonnements

(UV, rayons X, gamma, etc.), la température, l’humidité, la teneur en oxygène, le conditionnement des

échantillons dans l’eau ou dans une solution désinfectante par exemple, ou encore la contamination

(par exemple poussière), peuvent altérer considérablement la nature et la quantité des espèces

paramagnétiques dans les échantillons. En conséquence, il convient de prêter une attention particulière

aux conditions de transport et de conservation afin d’éviter ou de limiter autant que possible l’influence

des paramètres environnementaux sur les échantillons.

Si possible, il convient d’étudier l’influence de ces paramètres sur la forme et l’intensité de la raie du signal

induit par les rayonnements ionisants afin de déterminer les conditions optimales pour le transport ou

la conservation et d’éviter les précautions inutiles. Si les échantillons sont réputés sensibles à une ou

plusieurs conditions environnementales, ou si l’influence de ces paramètres sur les échantillons n’est

pas connue, il est vivement recommandé que des précautions soient prises pour éviter les conditions

susceptibles d’affecter les échantillons.

Il convient que les conditions de transport, y compris les dates, les moyens de transport et le mode de

contrôle des conditions de transport soient consignées. Il convient que des emballages pour échantillons

soient toujours utilisés afin de protéger les échantillons contre toute détérioration physique.

Il convient que des procédures soient mises en œuvre pour éviter l’exposition des échantillons aux

rayons X lors des contrôles aux aéroports. La dose, au niveau du contrôle par rayons X des bagages à main,

étant de l’ordre du microgray, elle peut être considérée comme négligeable pour certaines applications.

Sinon, lorsque l’échantillon est transporté dans un bagage à main, il convient d’obtenir par avance une

autorisation dispensant le bagage du contrôle par rayons X afin d’éviter les soucis lors des contrôles de

sécurité dans les aéroports. Le bagage porté peut être soumis à une dose plus élevée de rayons X. Pour

l’expédition, il convient d’utiliser un étiquetage approprié (comprenant une note indiquant que le colis

contient des dosimètres sensibles aux rayonnements et qu’il convient de ne pas l’irradier). Si cela n’est

pas possible, il convient de placer des échantillons ou des dosimètres témoins identiques non irradiés

dans le colis.

Une fois les échantillons réceptionnés, il convient de les conserver dans des conditions stables et de

surveiller et de consigner la température et l’humidité. Il convient de toujours éviter l’exposition des

échantillons à la lumière.
7 Préparation des échantillons

Il convient que la préparation des échantillons soit effectuée selon un protocole établi et explicite.

Pour les mesurages in vitro et ex vivo, la préparation des échantillons est habituellement requise pour

atteindre plusieurs objectifs, parmi lesquels: l’obtention d’une taille d’échantillon adaptée au tube de

mesure, la réduction de l’anisotropie, la désinfection, l’élimination des impuretés paramagnétiques

contenues dans l’échantillon, le séchage de l’échantillon et la stabilisation des signaux RPE.

Si nécessaire, la préparation de l’échantillon peut être effectuée par broyage, concassage, découpage,

perçage ou autres traitements mécaniques. Durant ces opérations, il convient d’éviter de surchauffer

l’échantillon en utilisant un dispositif d’aspersion d’eau ou d’autres systèmes de refroidissement. La

contamination de l’échantillon par des métaux peut être évitée en utilisant des outils en alliages durs.

4 © ISO 2013 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
ISO 13304-1:2013(F)

Selon les besoins, la stérilisation, le nettoyage, la déprotéinisation et/ou le dégraissage sont effectués

à l’aide d’agents chimiques. Il est possible de procéder à un traitement thermique (recuit, congélation)

pour accélérer ou ralentir la recombinaison des radicaux. Les échantillons présentant des taux

d’humidité élevés peuvent être séchés avant d’être soumis aux mesurages RPE afin d’améliorer le

rapport signal/bruit.

La mise en place d’un protocole de préparation des échantillons doit inclure l’évaluation de l’effet du

protocole sur les signaux RPE (forme de raie et intensité) et sur l’estimation de la dose, y compris

un possible effet induit sur les signaux RPE. Lors de l’utilisation de laméthode des doses additives

(voir 10.2.1), il est vivement recommandé d’utiliser des protocoles qui n’affectent pas la sensibilité aux

rayonnements.

Il convient que le protocole soit décrit en détail dans les documents et qu’il indique les éléments suivants:

la durée de traitement, la qualité des réactifs ainsi que l’instrumentation utilisée et ses performances.

Il convient que tous les échantillons soient préparés selon le même protocole. Les échantillons utilisés

pour l’étalonnage doivent être traités selon le même protocole que les échantillons à mesurer.

Il convient que toute modification du protocole soit consignée et que l’influence de chaque modification

soit évaluée (par exemple puissance ou fréquence du bain à ultrasons, qualité des réactifs).

Tous les détails des procédures relatives à chaque échantillon doivent être enregistrés dans un registre

répertoriant l’historique de l’échantillon.

Pour les mesurages in vivo, il n’existe aucune exigence concernant la préparation des échantillons. Selon

le site mesuré, il est possible qu’il soit nécessaire de réduire le taux d’humidité (notamment lors de

mesurages effectués in vivo sur des dents) ou p
...

Questions, Comments and Discussion

Ask us and Technical Secretary will try to provide an answer. You can facilitate discussion about the standard in here.