Ergonomic design of control centres - Part 6: Environmental requirements for control centres (ISO 11064-6:2005)

ISO 11064-6 establishes environmental requirements for the ergonomic design, upgrading or refurbishment of control rooms, control suite and all other rooms such as offices, technical and auxiliary rooms. The following aspects are: - thermal environment, - air distribution principles, - lighting environment, - acoustical environment, - air composition, - vibrations.

Ergonomische Gestaltung von Leitzentralen - Teil 6: Umgebungsbezogene Anforderungen an Leitzentralen (ISO 11064-6:2005)

ISO 11064-6 legt die umgebungsbedingten Anforderungen an die ergonomische Gestaltung, Nachrüstung oder Erneuerung von Wartenräumen und weiteren Funktionsbereichen innerhalb der Gesamtwarte fest.
Folgende Aspekte sind berücksichtigt:
- thermische Umgebung (gemäßigte Regionen);
- Luftqualität;
- Lichtverhältnisse;
- akustische Verhältnisse;
- Vibrationen;
- Ästhetik und Raumgestaltung.
Der Einfluss elektromagnetischer Felder auf den Menschen ist noch nicht ausreichend erforscht; aus diesem Grund enthält ISO 11064-6 keine besonderen Anforderungen. Leitlinien hinsichtlich des Einflusses elektromagnetischer Felder auf die Bildqualität von optischen Anzeigen sind in ISO 9241-6 angegeben.
ISO 11064-6 steht in engem Zusammenhang mit ISO 11064-2 und ISO 11064-3, in denen die Auslegung von Wartenräumen beschrieben ist. Im Hinblick auf die Gestaltung von Geräteschnittstellen, die durch Umgebungsfaktoren beeinflusst werden, bezieht sie sich außerdem auf ISO 11064-5. Planer sollten außerdem die allgemeineren umgebungsbedingten Anforderungen berücksichtigen, die mit der Anwendung von Bildschirmgeräten nach EN ISO 9241, Ergonomische Anforderungen für Bürotätigkeiten mit Bildschirmgeräten, Teile 6 und 7, zusammenhängen.
Es werden alle Arten von Leitzentralen behandelt, einschließlich derjenigen für Prozessführung, Transport- und Versandsysteme sowie Notbetrieb. Obwohl diese Internationale Norm in erster Linie für ortsfeste Leitzentralen vorgesehen ist, können viele dieser Grundsätze auch auf ortsveränderliche Leitzentralen, wie etwa von Schiffen, Lokomotiven und Flugzeugen, anwendbar sein.

Conception ergonomique des centres de commande - Partie 6: Exigences relatives a l'environnement pour les centres de commande (ISO 11064-6:2005)

L'ISO 11064-6:2005 définit des exigences relatives à l'environnement pour la conception ergonomique, la modernisation ou la rénovation des salles de commande et des autres zones fonctionnelles des annexes à la salle de commande. Les aspects suivants sont traités: l'environnement thermique (régions tempérées); la qualité de l'air; l'environnement lumineux; l'environnement acoustique; les vibrations; l'esthétique et la conception intérieure. Elle est applicable à tous les types de centres de commandes, y compris ceux destinés à l'industrie de transformation, aux transports et aux systèmes de répartition ainsi qu'aux services d'urgence. Bien qu'elle ait été conçue à l'origine pour les centres de commande non mobiles, bon nombre des principes s'appliquent également aux centres mobiles tels que ceux présents à bord des navires, des locomotives et des aéronefs. Elle ne traite pas de l'influence des champs électromagnétiques.

Ergonomsko načrtovanje krmilnih centrov – 6. del: Zahteve za delovno okolje krmilnih centrov (ISO 11064-6:2005)

General Information

Status
Published
Publication Date
31-Oct-2005
Technical Committee
Current Stage
6060 - National Implementation/Publication (Adopted Project)
Start Date
01-Nov-2005
Due Date
01-Nov-2005
Completion Date
01-Nov-2005

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SLOVENSKI STANDARD
SIST EN ISO 11064-6:2005
01-november-2005
Ergonomsko načrtovanje krmilnih centrov – 6. del: Zahteve za delovno okolje
krmilnih centrov (ISO 11064-6:2005)

Ergonomic design of control centres - Part 6: Environmental requirements for control

centres (ISO 11064-6:2005)
Ergonomische Gestaltung von Leitzentralen - Teil 6: Umgebungsbezogene
Anforderungen an Leitzentralen (ISO 11064-6:2005)
Conception ergonomique des centres de commande - Partie 6: Exigences relatives a
l'environnement pour les centres de commande (ISO 11064-6:2005)
Ta slovenski standard je istoveten z: EN ISO 11064-6:2005
ICS:
13.180 Ergonomija Ergonomics
25.040.10 Večoperacijski stroji Machining centres
SIST EN ISO 11064-6:2005 en

2003-01.Slovenski inštitut za standardizacijo. Razmnoževanje celote ali delov tega standarda ni dovoljeno.

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SIST EN ISO 11064-6:2005
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SIST EN ISO 11064-6:2005
EUROPEAN STANDARD
EN ISO 11064-6
NORME EUROPÉENNE
EUROPÄISCHE NORM
July 2005
ICS 13.180
English Version
Ergonomic design of control centres - Part 6: Environmental
requirements for control centres (ISO 11064-6:2005)

Conception ergonomique des centres de commande - Ergonomische Gestaltung von Leitzentralen - Teil 6:

Partie 6: Exigences relatives à l'environnement pour les Umgebungsbezogene Anforderungen an Leitzentralen (ISO

centres de commande (ISO 11064-6:2005) 11064-6:2005)
This European Standard was approved by CEN on 9 May 2005.

CEN members are bound to comply with the CEN/CENELEC Internal Regulations which stipulate the conditions for giving this European

Standard the status of a national standard without any alteration. Up-to-date lists and bibliographical references concerning such national

standards may be obtained on application to the Central Secretariat or to any CEN member.

This European Standard exists in three official versions (English, French, German). A version in any other language made by translation

under the responsibility of a CEN member into its own language and notified to the Central Secretariat has the same status as the official

versions.

CEN members are the national standards bodies of Austria, Belgium, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France,

Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia,

Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and United Kingdom.
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COMITÉ EUROPÉEN DE NORMALISATION
EUROPÄISCHES KOMITEE FÜR NORMUNG
Management Centre: rue de Stassart, 36 B-1050 Brussels

© 2005 CEN All rights of exploitation in any form and by any means reserved Ref. No. EN ISO 11064-6:2005: E

worldwide for CEN national Members.
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SIST EN ISO 11064-6:2005
EN ISO 11064-6:2005 (E)
Foreword

This document (EN ISO 11064-6:2005) has been prepared by Technical Committee ISO/TC 159

"Ergonomics" in collaboration with Technical Committee CEN/TC 122 "Ergonomics", the

secretariat of which is held by DIN.

This European Standard shall be given the status of a national standard, either by publication of

an identical text or by endorsement, at the latest by January 2006, and conflicting national

standards shall be withdrawn at the latest by January 2006.

According to the CEN/CENELEC Internal Regulations, the national standards organizations of

the following countries are bound to implement this European Standard: Austria, Belgium,

Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary,

Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland,

Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and United Kingdom.
Endorsement notice

The text of ISO 11064-6:2005 has been approved by CEN as EN ISO 11064-6:2005 without any

modifications.
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SIST EN ISO 11064-6:2005
INTERNATIONAL ISO
STANDARD 11064-6
First edition
2005-07-01
Ergonomic design of control centres —
Part 6:
Environmental requirements for control
centres
Conception ergonomique des centres de commande —
Partie 6: Exigences relatives à l'environnement pour les centres de
commande
Reference number
ISO 11064-6:2005(E)
ISO 2005
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SIST EN ISO 11064-6:2005
ISO 11064-6:2005(E)
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© ISO 2005

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ii © ISO 2005 – All rights reserved
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SIST EN ISO 11064-6:2005
ISO 11064-6:2005(E)
Contents Page

Foreword............................................................................................................................................................ iv

Introduction ........................................................................................................................................................ v

1 Scope ..................................................................................................................................................... 1

2 Normative references ........................................................................................................................... 1

3 Terms and definitions........................................................................................................................... 2

4 General principles for environmental design .................................................................................... 5

5 Requirements and recommendations ................................................................................................7

5.1 Ergonomic aspects and thermal conditions...................................................................................... 7

5.2 Ergonomics and air quality.................................................................................................................. 8

5.3 Ergonomics and lighting...................................................................................................................... 9

5.4 Ergonomics and acoustics ................................................................................................................ 12

5.5 Ergonomics and vibration ................................................................................................................. 14

5.6 Ergonomics and interior design and aesthetics ............................................................................. 15

Annex A (informative) Recommendations for environmental design......................................................... 17

Bibliography ..................................................................................................................................................... 20

© ISO 2005 – All rights reserved iii
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SIST EN ISO 11064-6:2005
ISO 11064-6:2005(E)
Foreword

ISO (the International Organization for Standardization) is a worldwide federation of national standards bodies

(ISO member bodies). The work of preparing International Standards is normally carried out through ISO

technical committees. Each member body interested in a subject for which a technical committee has been

established has the right to be represented on that committee. International organizations, governmental and

non-governmental, in liaison with ISO, also take part in the work. ISO collaborates closely with the

International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) on all matters of electrotechnical standardization.

International Standards are drafted in accordance with the rules given in the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 2.

The main task of technical committees is to prepare International Standards. Draft International Standards

adopted by the technical committees are circulated to the member bodies for voting. Publication as an

International Standard requires approval by at least 75 % of the member bodies casting a vote.

Attention is drawn to the possibility that some of the elements of this document may be the subject of patent

rights. ISO shall not be held responsible for identifying any or all such patent rights.

ISO 11064-6 was prepared by Technical Committee ISO/TC 159, Ergonomics, Subcommittee SC 4,

Ergonomics of human-system interaction.

ISO 11064 consists of the following parts, under the general title Ergonomic design of control centres:

 Part 1: Principles for the design of control centres
 Part 2: Principles for the arrangement of control suites
 Part 3: Control room layout
 Part 4: Layout and dimensions of workstations
 Part 6: Environmental requirements for control centres
 Part 7: Principles for the evaluation of control centres
iv © ISO 2005 – All rights reserved
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SIST EN ISO 11064-6:2005
ISO 11064-6:2005(E)
Introduction

The environmental aspects associated with the design of man–machine systems need to be addressed, since

poor environments can seriously affect operator performance. In control rooms, these environmental factors

include lighting, humidity, temperature, vibration and noise. These factors also need to take account of shift

work, real-time operations under time pressure and the specialised equipment used in control rooms.

In this part of ISO 11064, environmental requirements are presented which optimize work conditions in such a

way that safety is ensured, health is not impaired and the efficiency of control room operators is promoted.

The degree of specificity of this standard does not extend to national and local requirements, which can vary

between countries and/or regions. In such cases, experts in the relevant areas (human factors and

ergonomics, lighting, acoustics, thermal environment, etc.) will need to be consulted. For specific values on

environmental variables, see Annex A and/or consult local and/or national standards for the relevant country

or region.
© ISO 2005 – All rights reserved v
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SIST EN ISO 11064-6:2005
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SIST EN ISO 11064-6:2005
INTERNATIONAL STANDARD ISO 11064-6:2005(E)
Ergonomic design of control centres —
Part 6:
Environmental requirements for control centres
1 Scope

This part of ISO 11064 gives environmental requirements as well as recommendations for the ergonomic

design, upgrading or refurbishment of control rooms and other functional areas within the control suite.

The following aspects are covered:
 thermal environment (temperate regions);
 air quality;
 lighting environment;
 acoustic environment;
 vibration;
 aesthetics and interior design.

It is applicable to all types of control centres, including those for the process industry, transport and

dispatching systems and emergency services. Although primarily intended for non-mobile control centres,

many of its principles are relevant to mobile centres such as those found on ships, locomotives and aircraft.

It does not cover the influence of electromagnetic fields. Guidance on the influence of electromagnetic fields

on the image quality of visual displays is given in ISO 9241-6.

This part of ISO 11064 is closely connected with ISO 11064-2 and ISO 11064-3, which describe the control

room layout. It also relates to the design of equipment interfaces, which are influenced by environmental

factors. It would be prudent for designers to also take account of the more general environmental

requirements associated with display screen equipment use presented in ISO 9241-6 and ISO 9241-7.

2 Normative references

The following referenced documents are indispensable for the application of this document. For dated

references, only the edition cited applies. For undated references, the latest edition of the referenced

document (including any amendments) applies.

ISO 7731, Ergonomics — Danger signals for public and work areas — Auditory danger signals

ISO 7779, Acoustics — Measurement of airborne noise emitted by information technology and

telecommunications equipment
ISO/CIE 8995, Lighting of indoor work places
© ISO 2005 – All rights reserved 1
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SIST EN ISO 11064-6:2005
ISO 11064-6:2005(E)

ISO 9241-6, Ergonomic requirements for office work with visual display terminals (VDTs) — Part 6: Guidance

on the work environment
ISO 13731, Ergonomics of the thermal environment — Vocabulary and symbols

IEC 60651, Sound level meters — Electromagnetic and electrostatic compatibility and test procedures

3 Terms and definitions
For the purposes of this document, the following terms and definitions apply.
3.1
A-weighted sound pressure level
sound level

logarithm to the base 10 of the ratio of a given sound pressure to the reference sound pressure of 20 µPa, the

sound pressure being obtained with a standard frequency weighting and with standard exponentially weighted

time-averaging

NOTE The sound level in decibels is twenty times the logarithm to the base ten of that ratio.

[IEC 60651]
3.2
air velocity

average of the effective velocity of the air, i.e. the magnitude of the velocity vector of the flow at the measuring

point considered, over an interval of time (measuring period), expressed in metres per second

3.3
brightness

attribute of a visual sensation associated with the amount of light emitted from a given area

NOTE 1 It is the subjective correlate of luminance.
NOTE 2 See ISO 8995.
3.4
contrast

〈subjective sense〉 subjective assessment of the difference in appearance of two parts of a field of view seen

simultaneously or successively

NOTE Hence: brightness contrast, colour contrast, simultaneous contrast, successive contrast.

3.5
contrast

〈objective sense〉 quantities usually defined as a luminance ratio (usually for successive contrasts L /L ) or, for

2 1
surfaces viewed simultaneously, by the equation
L − L
where
L is the dominant or background luminance
L is the object luminance
2 © ISO 2005 – All rights reserved
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SIST EN ISO 11064-6:2005
ISO 11064-6:2005(E)

NOTE 1 When the areas of different luminance are comparable in size and it is desirable to take an average, the

following formula can be used instead:
LL−
0,5 L + L
NOTE 2 See ISO 8995.
3.6
equivalent continuous A-weighted sound pressure level
Aeq,T
A-weighted sound pressure level, in decibels, given by the equation
1 1pt()
Α
L = 10 lg dt
Aeq,T
2
tt−
21

where t − t is the period T over which the average is taken started at t and ending at t

2 1 1 2
NOTE See ISO 7779.
3.7
glare

discomfort or impairment of vision experienced when parts of the visual field are excessively bright in relation

to the brightness of the general surroundings to which the eyes are adapted
NOTE See ISO 8995.
3.8
illuminance

density of the luminous flux (φ) incident at a point, expressed in lux (1 lx = 1lm/m )

NOTE 1 In practice, the average illuminance of a given surface is calculated by dividing the flux falling on it by the area

(A) of the illuminated surface:
E =
NOTE 2 See ISO 8995.
3.9
luminance

physical measurement of the stimulus which produces the sensation of brightness, in terms of the luminous

intensity in a given direction, ε, (usually towards the observer), per unit area, of an emitting, transmitting or

reflecting surface, expressed in candelas per square metre

NOTE 1 It is the luminous intensity of the light emitted or reflected in a given direction from an element of the surface,

divided by the area of the element projected in the same direction.

NOTE 2 The luminance L, in candelas per square metre, of a perfectly matt surface is given by:

ρ × E
L =
© ISO 2005 – All rights reserved 3
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SIST EN ISO 11064-6:2005
ISO 11064-6:2005(E)
where
E is the illuminance, in lux (lx);
ρ is the reflectance of the surface considered.
NOTE 3 See ISO 8995.
3.10
luminance balance

ratio between the luminances of the displayed image and its adjacent surround, or sequentially viewed

surfaces
[ISO 9241-6:1999, 3.13]
3.11
reflectance

ratio of the luminous flux reflected from a surface (φ ) to the luminous flux incident (φ ) on it

r 0

NOTE 1 The reflectance depends on the direction of the incident light, except for matt surfaces, and on its spectral

distribution.
NOTE 2 Reflectance ρ =
NOTE 3 See ISO 8995.
3.12
reflected glare
glare resulting from specular reflections from polished or glossy surfaces
NOTE See ISO 8995.
3.13
relative humidity

ratio (× 100) between the partial pressure of water vapour in the air and the water vapour saturation pressure

at the same temperature and the same total pressure
[ISO 13731:2001, 2.96]
3.14
reverberation

continuation of a sound in an enclosed space after the source has stopped, result of reflections from the

boundary surfaces of the room
[ISO 9241-6:1999, 3.21]
3.15
air temperature
dry-bulb temperature of the air surrounding the occupant
NOTE It is expressed in degrees Celsius (°C).
[ISO 13731:2001, 2.2]
4 © ISO 2005 – All rights reserved
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SIST EN ISO 11064-6:2005
ISO 11064-6:2005(E)
4 General principles for environmental design

The following nine general ergonomic principles shall be followed for good environmental design.

NOTE 1 It is important to recognise that design features related to one particular environmental principle can have an

impact on other principles.

Principle 1: Operator task demands and comfort shall be the primary focus when designing control centre

environments.

Principle 2: In order to optimize operator’s performance and comfort, levels of illumination as well as

temperature shall be adjustable in accordance with the operator’s needs.

Principle 3: Where conflicting demands exist between different environmental features (i.e. thermal conditions,

air quality, lighting, acoustics, vibration, and interior design and aesthetics), a balance shall be sought which

favours operational needs.

NOTE 2 One way to achieve this would be to consult experts in human factors and ergonomics with the aim of

identifying optimal compromises between conflicting demands, e.g. to design a lighting system in which old and new

equipment work in parallel in upgraded control centres.

Principle 4: External factors providing operational information (e.g. security views, weather conditions) shall

be taken into account when designing the control centre.

Principle 5: Environmental factors work in combination and shall be taken into account in a holistic way,

i.e. the whole environmental entity needs to be taken into account, (e.g. interaction between air conditioning

systems generating noise and the acoustic environment).

Principle 6: Environmental design shall be used to mitigate the detrimental effects of shift work, e.g. raising

ambient air temperature in the early morning.

NOTE 3 A complementary approach would be to consider improved shift work schedules.

Principle 7: The design of environmental systems shall take account of future change (e.g. equipment,

workstation layouts, and work organisation).

NOTE 4 This can be done by designing for flexibility (location of lighting, ventilation ducts, etc.). Another possible

measure would be to reserve extra capacity in the environmental systems.

Principle 8: The quality of the working environment shall be an integral part of the overall design process for

control centres, as shown in Figure 1.

NOTE 5 The steps presented in Figure 1 are part of a wider process discussed in ISO 11064-1.

Principle 9: An iterative and multi-disciplinary design approach shall be taken in order to achieve an

appropriate balance between buildings, equipment and the control centre environment. This approach shall be

checked and evaluated as the design develops.

NOTE 6 This approach is necessary because most building and equipment design features have a potential impact on

the design of the control centre environment. For example, the heat dissipation of lighting equipment can affect an air

conditioning system.
© ISO 2005 – All rights reserved 5
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SIST EN ISO 11064-6:2005
ISO 11064-6:2005(E)
Figure 1 — Overall process for control room environmental design
6 © ISO 2005 – All rights reserved
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SIST EN ISO 11064-6:2005
ISO 11064-6:2005(E)
5 Requirements and recommendations
5.1 Ergonomics and thermal conditions

5.1.1 The design of an appropriate thermal environment needs to take account of such factors as building

design, operator activities and climatic factors. The following should be taken into account:

 the nature and range of operator activities (sitting or walking);

 the typical clothing to be worn by operators (including any special protective clothing);

 operator numbers and shift patterns;
 total heat dissipation generated by the equipment and lighting;
 the orientation of control room in respect of solar gain;
 the requirement, if any, of pressurized rooms;
 thermal transfer from external walls;
 the number of doors and windows;
 shielding properties of construction materials;
 the potential for shielding direct sunlight;
 the geographical location of the building.

5.1.2 Localised heat in control rooms due to thermal radiation or hot air should be avoided by suitable

control of the climatic conditions.

5.1.3 Heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems shall provide appropriate internal climatic

environmental conditions (i.e. air temperature, humidity and air velocity), whatever the external thermal

conditions.
NOTE 1 Suggested values are presented in Annex A.

NOTE 2 Control rooms in non-temperate parts of the world can necessitate different requirements due to the nature of

the ambient environment, for example in very hot climates.

5.1.4 Human operators shall be provided with appropriate equipment for controlling and monitoring the

temperature in cases where the HVAC systems do not provide suitable internal climatic environmental

conditions.
NOTE Suggested values are presented in Annex A.

5.1.5 When specifying the thermal values, the ranges presented in Annex A should be taken into account

for the following variables relating to temperate environments:
 air temperature (t );
 mean radiant temperature;
 air velocity (v);
 humidity.

NOTE The relationship between the thermal environment, air quality and acoustics is presented in Figure 2.

© ISO 2005 – All rights reserved 7
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SIST EN ISO 11064-6:2005
ISO 11064-6:2005(E)
5.2 Ergonomics and air quality

5.2.1 Airflows shall be controlled such that personnel do not suffer direct air draughts. In order to help

achieve this, the air velocity shall be checked.

NOTE The correct arrangement of airflows can involve careful location of air distribution inlets and outlets.

5.2.2 Extractor grilles should be located to avoid short-circuits between inlets and outlets and to encourage

even distribution of air throughout the room.

5.2.3 Air conditioning/air handling systems should be designed so as to avoid vibration and minimize noise

from the system.

5.2.4 The rate of air change (i.e. the relation between the capacity of the HVAC system and the physical

volume of the control centre) shall be adjusted in order to maintain good air quality.

NOTE Sources of information are presented in the Bibliography.

5.2.5 The ingress of dust and other particles from the ceiling and floor plenum to the HVAC system should

be avoided (physical location of HVAC inlets and outlets, room cleaning, etc.).

5.2.6 The location of ducts should take account of cleaning and maintenance requirements.

5.2.7 Rooms such as toilets, canteens, locker rooms and smoking rooms should be maintained at a lower

pressure from other areas in order to avoid any odour ingress.

5.2.8 Operators should be protected against air pollution through the air supply.

NOTE Sources of information concerning threshold limit values (TLV) are presented in the Bibliography.

5.2.9 Potential contamination by external sources of solid particles, e.g. sand, construction materials, plant

chemicals, should be controlled through the design of the air handling systems.

5.2.10 Where safety and security issues arise, the malicious introduction of materials into air distribution

systems should be taken into account.

5.2.11 Humidification plant, such as steam humidifiers, should be of a type designed to minimize the

proliferation of micro-organisms, including bacteria, that cause Legionnaire's disease and fungi.

5.2.12 The following protective measures should be taken into account when designing air provision systems

for control room environments:
 the selection of non-toxic construction material (especially in case of fire);

 the separation of operators' areas from equipment which might emit pollutants in the environment

(e.g. photocopiers/ozone, battery rooms);

 an appropriate air change rate which will reduce the concentration of the impurities;

 the presence of specific safety procedures and personal protective equipment in case of suspected

specific risk (chemical pollution for instance);

 the use of airtight control rooms in case of exceptionally dangerous and polluted working areas;

 the installation of gas detection systems;
 the installation of fire extinguishing systems using non-toxic products.

The factors relevant to the specification of an appropriate air quality are presented in Figure 2.

8 © ISO 2005 – All rights reserved
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SIST EN ISO 11064-6:2005
ISO 11064-6:2005(E)

Figure 2 — Main factors in design of thermal environments, air quality and acoustic parameters

5.3 Ergonomics and lighting
5.3.1 The design of lighting should

 provide flexibility for a range of different visual tasks (including, for example, paper-based as well as

electronic work) to be undertaken by a range of different operators of varying ages, etc.,

 optimize visual performance at the workplace,
 minimize degradation in human performance,
© ISO 2005 – All rights reserved 9
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SIST EN ISO 11064-6:2005
ISO 11064-6:2005(E)
 enhance safety,
 enhance legibility of information — from both active and passive displays,
 improve operator vigilance,
 enhance the comfort and the health of the operator,

 facilitate the reading of vertical and horizontal printed material at workstations, if required,

 facilitate the reading of wall maps or reference material,

 facilitate viewing of self-illuminated equipment such as CCTV (closed circuit television) monitors, VDTs,

warning indicators and status boards,
 facilitate the reading of illuminated displays on control consoles, and
 facilitate the reading of off-workstation displays.

5.3.2 Lighting arrangements should be appropriate to the visual demands of the tasks to be carried out in

the working environment and should take into account the demands of normal and emergency work as well as

the effects of artificial and natural light.

NOTE Local lighting at an operating position might be necessary where a significant part of an operator’s duty

involves the use of a large amount of self-illuminated equipment. This might necessitate the facility to be able to dim the

general lighting.

5.3.3 Operator-controlled task lighting shall not be a source of glare to other occupants in the room.

5.3.4 Operators should have some control of the local maintained illuminance associated with their

workstation.

5.3.5 Lighting schemes should avoid veiling reflections and reflected glare off screens.

5.3.6 Lighting systems should take into account future changes in equipment, workstation layouts,

operating procedures, and team working. Options for rearrangement of lighting should be examined.

5.3.7 The location of any windows, skylights and fixed luminaries should minimize the potential for

generating reflections and glare.
5.3.8 Natural references
...

SLOVENSKI STANDARD
SIST EN ISO 11064-6:2005
01-november-2005
(UJRQRPVNRQDþUWRYDQMHNUPLOQLKFHQWURY±GHO=DKWHYH]DGHORYQRRNROMH
NUPLOQLKFHQWURY ,62

Ergonomic design of control centres - Part 6: Environmental requirements for control

centres (ISO 11064-6:2005)
Ergonomische Gestaltung von Leitzentralen - Teil 6: Umgebungsbezogene
Anforderungen an Leitzentralen (ISO 11064-6:2005)
Conception ergonomique des centres de commande - Partie 6: Exigences relatives a
l'environnement pour les centres de commande (ISO 11064-6:2005)
Ta slovenski standard je istoveten z: EN ISO 11064-6:2005
ICS:
13.180 Ergonomija Ergonomics
25.040.10 9HþRSHUDFLMVNLVWURML Machining centres
SIST EN ISO 11064-6:2005 en

2003-01.Slovenski inštitut za standardizacijo. Razmnoževanje celote ali delov tega standarda ni dovoljeno.

---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
SIST EN ISO 11064-6:2005
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SIST EN ISO 11064-6:2005
EUROPEAN STANDARD
EN ISO 11064-6
NORME EUROPÉENNE
EUROPÄISCHE NORM
July 2005
ICS 13.180
English Version
Ergonomic design of control centres - Part 6: Environmental
requirements for control centres (ISO 11064-6:2005)

Conception ergonomique des centres de commande - Ergonomische Gestaltung von Leitzentralen - Teil 6:

Partie 6: Exigences relatives à l'environnement pour les Umgebungsbezogene Anforderungen an Leitzentralen (ISO

centres de commande (ISO 11064-6:2005) 11064-6:2005)
This European Standard was approved by CEN on 9 May 2005.

CEN members are bound to comply with the CEN/CENELEC Internal Regulations which stipulate the conditions for giving this European

Standard the status of a national standard without any alteration. Up-to-date lists and bibliographical references concerning such national

standards may be obtained on application to the Central Secretariat or to any CEN member.

This European Standard exists in three official versions (English, French, German). A version in any other language made by translation

under the responsibility of a CEN member into its own language and notified to the Central Secretariat has the same status as the official

versions.

CEN members are the national standards bodies of Austria, Belgium, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France,

Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia,

Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and United Kingdom.
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EUROPÄISCHES KOMITEE FÜR NORMUNG
Management Centre: rue de Stassart, 36 B-1050 Brussels

© 2005 CEN All rights of exploitation in any form and by any means reserved Ref. No. EN ISO 11064-6:2005: E

worldwide for CEN national Members.
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
SIST EN ISO 11064-6:2005
EN ISO 11064-6:2005 (E)
Foreword

This document (EN ISO 11064-6:2005) has been prepared by Technical Committee ISO/TC 159

"Ergonomics" in collaboration with Technical Committee CEN/TC 122 "Ergonomics", the

secretariat of which is held by DIN.

This European Standard shall be given the status of a national standard, either by publication of

an identical text or by endorsement, at the latest by January 2006, and conflicting national

standards shall be withdrawn at the latest by January 2006.

According to the CEN/CENELEC Internal Regulations, the national standards organizations of

the following countries are bound to implement this European Standard: Austria, Belgium,

Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary,

Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland,

Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and United Kingdom.
Endorsement notice

The text of ISO 11064-6:2005 has been approved by CEN as EN ISO 11064-6:2005 without any

modifications.
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SIST EN ISO 11064-6:2005
INTERNATIONAL ISO
STANDARD 11064-6
First edition
2005-07-01
Ergonomic design of control centres —
Part 6:
Environmental requirements for control
centres
Conception ergonomique des centres de commande —
Partie 6: Exigences relatives à l'environnement pour les centres de
commande
Reference number
ISO 11064-6:2005(E)
ISO 2005
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SIST EN ISO 11064-6:2005
ISO 11064-6:2005(E)
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Published in Switzerland
ii © ISO 2005 – All rights reserved
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SIST EN ISO 11064-6:2005
ISO 11064-6:2005(E)
Contents Page

Foreword............................................................................................................................................................ iv

Introduction ........................................................................................................................................................ v

1 Scope ..................................................................................................................................................... 1

2 Normative references ........................................................................................................................... 1

3 Terms and definitions........................................................................................................................... 2

4 General principles for environmental design .................................................................................... 5

5 Requirements and recommendations ................................................................................................7

5.1 Ergonomic aspects and thermal conditions...................................................................................... 7

5.2 Ergonomics and air quality.................................................................................................................. 8

5.3 Ergonomics and lighting...................................................................................................................... 9

5.4 Ergonomics and acoustics ................................................................................................................ 12

5.5 Ergonomics and vibration ................................................................................................................. 14

5.6 Ergonomics and interior design and aesthetics ............................................................................. 15

Annex A (informative) Recommendations for environmental design......................................................... 17

Bibliography ..................................................................................................................................................... 20

© ISO 2005 – All rights reserved iii
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SIST EN ISO 11064-6:2005
ISO 11064-6:2005(E)
Foreword

ISO (the International Organization for Standardization) is a worldwide federation of national standards bodies

(ISO member bodies). The work of preparing International Standards is normally carried out through ISO

technical committees. Each member body interested in a subject for which a technical committee has been

established has the right to be represented on that committee. International organizations, governmental and

non-governmental, in liaison with ISO, also take part in the work. ISO collaborates closely with the

International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) on all matters of electrotechnical standardization.

International Standards are drafted in accordance with the rules given in the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 2.

The main task of technical committees is to prepare International Standards. Draft International Standards

adopted by the technical committees are circulated to the member bodies for voting. Publication as an

International Standard requires approval by at least 75 % of the member bodies casting a vote.

Attention is drawn to the possibility that some of the elements of this document may be the subject of patent

rights. ISO shall not be held responsible for identifying any or all such patent rights.

ISO 11064-6 was prepared by Technical Committee ISO/TC 159, Ergonomics, Subcommittee SC 4,

Ergonomics of human-system interaction.

ISO 11064 consists of the following parts, under the general title Ergonomic design of control centres:

 Part 1: Principles for the design of control centres
 Part 2: Principles for the arrangement of control suites
 Part 3: Control room layout
 Part 4: Layout and dimensions of workstations
 Part 6: Environmental requirements for control centres
 Part 7: Principles for the evaluation of control centres
iv © ISO 2005 – All rights reserved
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SIST EN ISO 11064-6:2005
ISO 11064-6:2005(E)
Introduction

The environmental aspects associated with the design of man–machine systems need to be addressed, since

poor environments can seriously affect operator performance. In control rooms, these environmental factors

include lighting, humidity, temperature, vibration and noise. These factors also need to take account of shift

work, real-time operations under time pressure and the specialised equipment used in control rooms.

In this part of ISO 11064, environmental requirements are presented which optimize work conditions in such a

way that safety is ensured, health is not impaired and the efficiency of control room operators is promoted.

The degree of specificity of this standard does not extend to national and local requirements, which can vary

between countries and/or regions. In such cases, experts in the relevant areas (human factors and

ergonomics, lighting, acoustics, thermal environment, etc.) will need to be consulted. For specific values on

environmental variables, see Annex A and/or consult local and/or national standards for the relevant country

or region.
© ISO 2005 – All rights reserved v
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SIST EN ISO 11064-6:2005
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SIST EN ISO 11064-6:2005
INTERNATIONAL STANDARD ISO 11064-6:2005(E)
Ergonomic design of control centres —
Part 6:
Environmental requirements for control centres
1 Scope

This part of ISO 11064 gives environmental requirements as well as recommendations for the ergonomic

design, upgrading or refurbishment of control rooms and other functional areas within the control suite.

The following aspects are covered:
 thermal environment (temperate regions);
 air quality;
 lighting environment;
 acoustic environment;
 vibration;
 aesthetics and interior design.

It is applicable to all types of control centres, including those for the process industry, transport and

dispatching systems and emergency services. Although primarily intended for non-mobile control centres,

many of its principles are relevant to mobile centres such as those found on ships, locomotives and aircraft.

It does not cover the influence of electromagnetic fields. Guidance on the influence of electromagnetic fields

on the image quality of visual displays is given in ISO 9241-6.

This part of ISO 11064 is closely connected with ISO 11064-2 and ISO 11064-3, which describe the control

room layout. It also relates to the design of equipment interfaces, which are influenced by environmental

factors. It would be prudent for designers to also take account of the more general environmental

requirements associated with display screen equipment use presented in ISO 9241-6 and ISO 9241-7.

2 Normative references

The following referenced documents are indispensable for the application of this document. For dated

references, only the edition cited applies. For undated references, the latest edition of the referenced

document (including any amendments) applies.

ISO 7731, Ergonomics — Danger signals for public and work areas — Auditory danger signals

ISO 7779, Acoustics — Measurement of airborne noise emitted by information technology and

telecommunications equipment
ISO/CIE 8995, Lighting of indoor work places
© ISO 2005 – All rights reserved 1
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SIST EN ISO 11064-6:2005
ISO 11064-6:2005(E)

ISO 9241-6, Ergonomic requirements for office work with visual display terminals (VDTs) — Part 6: Guidance

on the work environment
ISO 13731, Ergonomics of the thermal environment — Vocabulary and symbols

IEC 60651, Sound level meters — Electromagnetic and electrostatic compatibility and test procedures

3 Terms and definitions
For the purposes of this document, the following terms and definitions apply.
3.1
A-weighted sound pressure level
sound level

logarithm to the base 10 of the ratio of a given sound pressure to the reference sound pressure of 20 µPa, the

sound pressure being obtained with a standard frequency weighting and with standard exponentially weighted

time-averaging

NOTE The sound level in decibels is twenty times the logarithm to the base ten of that ratio.

[IEC 60651]
3.2
air velocity

average of the effective velocity of the air, i.e. the magnitude of the velocity vector of the flow at the measuring

point considered, over an interval of time (measuring period), expressed in metres per second

3.3
brightness

attribute of a visual sensation associated with the amount of light emitted from a given area

NOTE 1 It is the subjective correlate of luminance.
NOTE 2 See ISO 8995.
3.4
contrast

〈subjective sense〉 subjective assessment of the difference in appearance of two parts of a field of view seen

simultaneously or successively

NOTE Hence: brightness contrast, colour contrast, simultaneous contrast, successive contrast.

3.5
contrast

〈objective sense〉 quantities usually defined as a luminance ratio (usually for successive contrasts L /L ) or, for

2 1
surfaces viewed simultaneously, by the equation
L − L
where
L is the dominant or background luminance
L is the object luminance
2 © ISO 2005 – All rights reserved
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SIST EN ISO 11064-6:2005
ISO 11064-6:2005(E)

NOTE 1 When the areas of different luminance are comparable in size and it is desirable to take an average, the

following formula can be used instead:
LL−
0,5 L + L
NOTE 2 See ISO 8995.
3.6
equivalent continuous A-weighted sound pressure level
Aeq,T
A-weighted sound pressure level, in decibels, given by the equation
1 1pt()
Α
L = 10 lg dt
Aeq,T
2
tt−
21

where t − t is the period T over which the average is taken started at t and ending at t

2 1 1 2
NOTE See ISO 7779.
3.7
glare

discomfort or impairment of vision experienced when parts of the visual field are excessively bright in relation

to the brightness of the general surroundings to which the eyes are adapted
NOTE See ISO 8995.
3.8
illuminance

density of the luminous flux (φ) incident at a point, expressed in lux (1 lx = 1lm/m )

NOTE 1 In practice, the average illuminance of a given surface is calculated by dividing the flux falling on it by the area

(A) of the illuminated surface:
E =
NOTE 2 See ISO 8995.
3.9
luminance

physical measurement of the stimulus which produces the sensation of brightness, in terms of the luminous

intensity in a given direction, ε, (usually towards the observer), per unit area, of an emitting, transmitting or

reflecting surface, expressed in candelas per square metre

NOTE 1 It is the luminous intensity of the light emitted or reflected in a given direction from an element of the surface,

divided by the area of the element projected in the same direction.

NOTE 2 The luminance L, in candelas per square metre, of a perfectly matt surface is given by:

ρ × E
L =
© ISO 2005 – All rights reserved 3
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SIST EN ISO 11064-6:2005
ISO 11064-6:2005(E)
where
E is the illuminance, in lux (lx);
ρ is the reflectance of the surface considered.
NOTE 3 See ISO 8995.
3.10
luminance balance

ratio between the luminances of the displayed image and its adjacent surround, or sequentially viewed

surfaces
[ISO 9241-6:1999, 3.13]
3.11
reflectance

ratio of the luminous flux reflected from a surface (φ ) to the luminous flux incident (φ ) on it

r 0

NOTE 1 The reflectance depends on the direction of the incident light, except for matt surfaces, and on its spectral

distribution.
NOTE 2 Reflectance ρ =
NOTE 3 See ISO 8995.
3.12
reflected glare
glare resulting from specular reflections from polished or glossy surfaces
NOTE See ISO 8995.
3.13
relative humidity

ratio (× 100) between the partial pressure of water vapour in the air and the water vapour saturation pressure

at the same temperature and the same total pressure
[ISO 13731:2001, 2.96]
3.14
reverberation

continuation of a sound in an enclosed space after the source has stopped, result of reflections from the

boundary surfaces of the room
[ISO 9241-6:1999, 3.21]
3.15
air temperature
dry-bulb temperature of the air surrounding the occupant
NOTE It is expressed in degrees Celsius (°C).
[ISO 13731:2001, 2.2]
4 © ISO 2005 – All rights reserved
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SIST EN ISO 11064-6:2005
ISO 11064-6:2005(E)
4 General principles for environmental design

The following nine general ergonomic principles shall be followed for good environmental design.

NOTE 1 It is important to recognise that design features related to one particular environmental principle can have an

impact on other principles.

Principle 1: Operator task demands and comfort shall be the primary focus when designing control centre

environments.

Principle 2: In order to optimize operator’s performance and comfort, levels of illumination as well as

temperature shall be adjustable in accordance with the operator’s needs.

Principle 3: Where conflicting demands exist between different environmental features (i.e. thermal conditions,

air quality, lighting, acoustics, vibration, and interior design and aesthetics), a balance shall be sought which

favours operational needs.

NOTE 2 One way to achieve this would be to consult experts in human factors and ergonomics with the aim of

identifying optimal compromises between conflicting demands, e.g. to design a lighting system in which old and new

equipment work in parallel in upgraded control centres.

Principle 4: External factors providing operational information (e.g. security views, weather conditions) shall

be taken into account when designing the control centre.

Principle 5: Environmental factors work in combination and shall be taken into account in a holistic way,

i.e. the whole environmental entity needs to be taken into account, (e.g. interaction between air conditioning

systems generating noise and the acoustic environment).

Principle 6: Environmental design shall be used to mitigate the detrimental effects of shift work, e.g. raising

ambient air temperature in the early morning.

NOTE 3 A complementary approach would be to consider improved shift work schedules.

Principle 7: The design of environmental systems shall take account of future change (e.g. equipment,

workstation layouts, and work organisation).

NOTE 4 This can be done by designing for flexibility (location of lighting, ventilation ducts, etc.). Another possible

measure would be to reserve extra capacity in the environmental systems.

Principle 8: The quality of the working environment shall be an integral part of the overall design process for

control centres, as shown in Figure 1.

NOTE 5 The steps presented in Figure 1 are part of a wider process discussed in ISO 11064-1.

Principle 9: An iterative and multi-disciplinary design approach shall be taken in order to achieve an

appropriate balance between buildings, equipment and the control centre environment. This approach shall be

checked and evaluated as the design develops.

NOTE 6 This approach is necessary because most building and equipment design features have a potential impact on

the design of the control centre environment. For example, the heat dissipation of lighting equipment can affect an air

conditioning system.
© ISO 2005 – All rights reserved 5
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SIST EN ISO 11064-6:2005
ISO 11064-6:2005(E)
Figure 1 — Overall process for control room environmental design
6 © ISO 2005 – All rights reserved
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SIST EN ISO 11064-6:2005
ISO 11064-6:2005(E)
5 Requirements and recommendations
5.1 Ergonomics and thermal conditions

5.1.1 The design of an appropriate thermal environment needs to take account of such factors as building

design, operator activities and climatic factors. The following should be taken into account:

 the nature and range of operator activities (sitting or walking);

 the typical clothing to be worn by operators (including any special protective clothing);

 operator numbers and shift patterns;
 total heat dissipation generated by the equipment and lighting;
 the orientation of control room in respect of solar gain;
 the requirement, if any, of pressurized rooms;
 thermal transfer from external walls;
 the number of doors and windows;
 shielding properties of construction materials;
 the potential for shielding direct sunlight;
 the geographical location of the building.

5.1.2 Localised heat in control rooms due to thermal radiation or hot air should be avoided by suitable

control of the climatic conditions.

5.1.3 Heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems shall provide appropriate internal climatic

environmental conditions (i.e. air temperature, humidity and air velocity), whatever the external thermal

conditions.
NOTE 1 Suggested values are presented in Annex A.

NOTE 2 Control rooms in non-temperate parts of the world can necessitate different requirements due to the nature of

the ambient environment, for example in very hot climates.

5.1.4 Human operators shall be provided with appropriate equipment for controlling and monitoring the

temperature in cases where the HVAC systems do not provide suitable internal climatic environmental

conditions.
NOTE Suggested values are presented in Annex A.

5.1.5 When specifying the thermal values, the ranges presented in Annex A should be taken into account

for the following variables relating to temperate environments:
 air temperature (t );
 mean radiant temperature;
 air velocity (v);
 humidity.

NOTE The relationship between the thermal environment, air quality and acoustics is presented in Figure 2.

© ISO 2005 – All rights reserved 7
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SIST EN ISO 11064-6:2005
ISO 11064-6:2005(E)
5.2 Ergonomics and air quality

5.2.1 Airflows shall be controlled such that personnel do not suffer direct air draughts. In order to help

achieve this, the air velocity shall be checked.

NOTE The correct arrangement of airflows can involve careful location of air distribution inlets and outlets.

5.2.2 Extractor grilles should be located to avoid short-circuits between inlets and outlets and to encourage

even distribution of air throughout the room.

5.2.3 Air conditioning/air handling systems should be designed so as to avoid vibration and minimize noise

from the system.

5.2.4 The rate of air change (i.e. the relation between the capacity of the HVAC system and the physical

volume of the control centre) shall be adjusted in order to maintain good air quality.

NOTE Sources of information are presented in the Bibliography.

5.2.5 The ingress of dust and other particles from the ceiling and floor plenum to the HVAC system should

be avoided (physical location of HVAC inlets and outlets, room cleaning, etc.).

5.2.6 The location of ducts should take account of cleaning and maintenance requirements.

5.2.7 Rooms such as toilets, canteens, locker rooms and smoking rooms should be maintained at a lower

pressure from other areas in order to avoid any odour ingress.

5.2.8 Operators should be protected against air pollution through the air supply.

NOTE Sources of information concerning threshold limit values (TLV) are presented in the Bibliography.

5.2.9 Potential contamination by external sources of solid particles, e.g. sand, construction materials, plant

chemicals, should be controlled through the design of the air handling systems.

5.2.10 Where safety and security issues arise, the malicious introduction of materials into air distribution

systems should be taken into account.

5.2.11 Humidification plant, such as steam humidifiers, should be of a type designed to minimize the

proliferation of micro-organisms, including bacteria, that cause Legionnaire's disease and fungi.

5.2.12 The following protective measures should be taken into account when designing air provision systems

for control room environments:
 the selection of non-toxic construction material (especially in case of fire);

 the separation of operators' areas from equipment which might emit pollutants in the environment

(e.g. photocopiers/ozone, battery rooms);

 an appropriate air change rate which will reduce the concentration of the impurities;

 the presence of specific safety procedures and personal protective equipment in case of suspected

specific risk (chemical pollution for instance);

 the use of airtight control rooms in case of exceptionally dangerous and polluted working areas;

 the installation of gas detection systems;
 the installation of fire extinguishing systems using non-toxic products.

The factors relevant to the specification of an appropriate air quality are presented in Figure 2.

8 © ISO 2005 – All rights reserved
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SIST EN ISO 11064-6:2005
ISO 11064-6:2005(E)

Figure 2 — Main factors in design of thermal environments, air quality and acoustic parameters

5.3 Ergonomics and lighting
5.3.1 The design of lighting should

 provide flexibility for a range of different visual tasks (including, for example, paper-based as well as

electronic work) to be undertaken by a range of different operators of varying ages, etc.,

 optimize visual performance at the workplace,
 minimize degradation in human performance,
© ISO 2005 – All rights reserved 9
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SIST EN ISO 11064-6:2005
ISO 11064-6:2005(E)
 enhance safety,
 enhance legibility of information — from both active and passive displays,
 improve operator vigilance,
 enhance the comfort and the health of the operator,

 facilitate the reading of vertical and horizontal printed material at workstations, if required,

 facilitate the reading of wall maps or reference material,

 facilitate viewing of self-illuminated equipment such as CCTV (closed circuit television) monitors, VDTs,

warning indicators and status boards,
 facilitate the reading of illuminated displays on control consoles, and
 facilitate the reading of off-workstation displays.

5.3.2 Lighting arrangements should be appropriate to the visual demands of the tasks to be carried out in

the working environment and should take into account the demands of normal and emergency work as well as

the effects of artificial and natural light.

NOTE Local lighting at an operating position might be necessary where a significant part of an operator’s duty

involves the use of a large amount of self-illuminated equipment. This might necessitate the facility to be able to dim the

general lighting.

5.3.3 Operator-controlled task lighting shall not be a source of glare to other occupants in the room.

5.3.4 Operators should have some control of the local maintained illuminance associated with their

workstation.

5.3.5 Lighting schemes should avoid veiling reflections and reflected glare off screens.

5.3.6 Lighting systems should take into account future changes in equipment, workstation layouts,

operating procedures, and team working. Options for rearrangement of lighting should be examined.

5.3.7 The location of any windows, skylights and fixed luminaries should minimize the potential for

generating reflections
...

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